LA Times Crossword 1 May 22, Sunday

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Constructed by: Patti Varol
Edited by: Patti Varol

Today’s Theme: Work Clothes

Themed answers are common phrases reinterpreted as WORK CLOTHES worn by a professional cited in the clue:

  • 25A What the housekeeper wore to work? : DUST JACKET
  • 27A What the actor wore to work? : MOVIE SHORTS
  • 47A What the messenger wore to work? : BICYCLE PUMPS
  • 68A What the truffle hunter wore to work? : MUSHROOM CAP
  • 91A What the NASA scientist wore to work? : ASTEROID BELT
  • 111A What the scholar wore to work? : SMARTY-PANTS
  • 114A What the groundskeeper wore to work? : GARDEN HOSE
  • 36D What the conductor wore to work? : RAILROAD TIE
  • 46D What the soda jerk wore to work? : COUNTER SUIT

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 15m 18s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 Deposed Iranian ruler : SHAH

The last Shah of Iran was Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, who was overthrown in the revolution led by Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this resentment precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

14 __ Scotia : NOVA

The Canadian province of Nova Scotia (NS) lies on the east coast of the country and is a peninsula surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean. The area was settled by Scots starting in 1621, and Nova Scotia is Latin for “New Scotland”.

19 Cuarón film nominated for 10 Oscars : ROMA

“Roma” is a 2018 drama film on which Mexican film director served as writer, co-producer, cinematographer, co-editor as well as director. It is a semi-autobiographical piece inspired by Cuarón’s early life in Mexico City’s Colonia Roma neighborhood.”Roma” won several Oscars, including Best Cinematography and Best Director for Cuarón himself.

Film director Alfonso Cuarón has been at the helm of some real blockbusters, including 2004’s “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” and 2013’s “Gravity”. When he won the Academy Award for Best Directing for the latter film, Cuarón became the first Mexican director to be so honored.

22 “Young Sheldon” star Armitage : IAIN

“Young Sheldon” is a spinoff prequel to the hit sitcom “The Big Bang Theory” that follows the life of a 9-year-old Sheldon Cooper. The title character is played by child actor Iain Armitage. Jim Parsons, who plays Sheldon on “The Big Bang Theory”, is the narrator for the spinoff, and is also an executive producer. In another link between the shows, young Sheldon’s Mom is played by actress Zoe Perry. Perry is the real-life daughter of Laurie Metcalf, who plays “old” Sheldon’s mom in the original series.

23 No-frills type : ARIAL

We tend to use the terms typeface and font interchangeably. Technically, a typeface and font are not the same thing. A complete set of characters with a common design is referred to as a typeface (common examples being Helvetica and Arial). That typeface consists of a whole collection of fonts, all varying in weight and size. One set of Helvetica fonts, for example, might be Helvetica 14 point or Helvetica 16 point, i.e. a specific size. Another set might be Helvetica bold, or Helvetica italic. The difference between fonts and typefaces mattered a great deal when printers had collections of individual letters to make up blocks of text. Thankfully, we don’t have to worry about that these days.

24 Debit slip : CHIT

A chit is a note or a short letter. The term “chit” tends to be used these days in the sense of an amount owed (as in a poker game). The word used to be “chitty”, which is now obsolete but was closer to the original Hindi term. I feel a tad obsolete myself, because when we are at school we would be excused from class if we had a “chitty”.

25 What the housekeeper wore to work? : DUST JACKET

You can usually read an author’s bio on a book’s dust jacket.

32 Body image, briefly : TAT

The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”. Tattoos are sometimes referred to as “ink”.

38 Wraparound dress : SARI

The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that it is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

40 Hyland of “Modern Family” : SARAH

Actress Sarah Hyland is from Manhattan, and is best known for playing Haley Dunphy, the eldest child of the Dunphy family in the hit sitcom “Modern Family”. She played her first acting role when she was just five years old, portraying Howard Stern’s daughter in the 1997 film “Private Parts”. On the personal side of her life, Hyland had to receive a kidney transplant in 2012, with her father being the donor.

“Modern Family” is a marvelous television show shown on ABC since 2009. The show’s format is that of a “mockumentary”, with the cast often addressing the camera directly. In that respect “Modern Family” resembles two other excellent shows: “The Office” and “Parks and Recreation”, both of which might also be described as “mockumentaries”.

41 Bumbling one : SAD SACK

The slang phrase “sad sack” is used for a person who bungles things, someone who is pathetically inept. The phrase was coined in the twenties but gained popularity during WWII when it was used by a cartoon character in the US Armed Forces magazine “Yank”. The term is probably a shortened form of the much ruder phrase “sad sack of ****”.

44 “Abbott Elementary” TV network : ABC

“Abbott Elementary” is a sitcom in the mockumentary genre. The show was created by and stars Quinta Brunson as a cup-half-full second-grade teacher in a Philadelphia public school. The premise of “Abbott Elementary” is that a film crew is making a documentary about the lives of teachers working in underfunded schools.

47 What the messenger wore to work? : BICYCLE PUMPS

A pump is a woman’s shoe that doesn’t have a strap. Such shoes are probably called “pumps” because of the sound they make while walking in them.

50 Country name on some euro coins : EIRE

Euro coins are issued by all the participating European states. The reverse side is a common design used by all countries, whereas the obverse is a design specific to each nation. For example, the one euro coin issued by Malta features the Maltese Cross. That Maltese euro is legal tender right across the eurozone. The Irish euro features a harp.

53 Hotmail alternative : AOL

Hotmail was introduced in 1996 and was one of the world’s first webmail services. Webmail is an email service in which the emails are stored remotely on a server, rather than on a user’s own computer. Hotmail was acquired by Microsoft in 1997, and was replaced by Outlook.com in 2013.

54 Writer Zora __ Hurston : NEALE

Zora Neale Hurston was an American author who was most famous for her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God”.

56 Schlep : LUG

Our word “schlep” (sometimes “schlepp”) means “carry, drag”. “Schlep” comes from Yiddish, with “shlepen” having the same meaning.

59 Mennen product : AFTA

Afta is a brand of shaving products in the Mennen range, which is owned by Colgate-Palmolive.

61 Outlying communities : EXURBS

An extension to the term “suburb”, an exurb is an area beyond the suburbs at the very outskirts of a city. The term “exurbia” is often used to denote an area inhabited by more wealthy people.

63 Indian royalty : RANIS

A ranee (also “rani”) is an Indian queen or princess, and the female equivalent of a raja.

67 Routing abbr. : ATTN

Attention (attn.)

68 What the truffle hunter wore to work? : MUSHROOM CAP

Truffles are rooted out by pigs, or by specially trained dogs. The reason why pigs, especially sows, are so attracted to truffles is that there is a chemical compound found within the truffle that is very similar to androstenol, a sex pheromone found in the saliva of boars.

74 “Shaun of the Dead” director Wright : EDGAR

Edgar Wright is a film director from England who frequently collaborates with actor/comedians Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. Wright co-wrote the very successful “Three Flavours Cornetto” trilogy with Pegg, and was at the helm for the filming of all three movies.

80 Hazmat monitor : OSHA

Dangerous goods are commonly referred to as hazardous materials, or HAZMAT. People working with dangerous goods might wear a HAZMAT suit.

84 E-file org. : IRS

E-file: that’s certainly what I do with my tax return …

85 Tree surgeon’s transplant : GRAFT

Tree surgeons are also known as “arborists”. Such professionals focus on the health of individual trees, whereas foresters manage whole forests.

87 Orch. work : SYM

Symphony (sym.)

89 Art Spiegelman graphic novel : MAUS

“Maus” is a graphic novel published in 1991, although it appeared in serial form from 1980 to 1991. Written and drawn by cartoonist Art Spiegelman, “Maus” became the first graphic novel to win a Pulitzer, doing so in 1992.

91 What the NASA scientist wore to work? : ASTEROID BELT

The vast majority of asteroids in the Solar System are found in the main asteroid belt, which is located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Four large asteroids (Ceres, Vesta, Pallas and Hygeia) make up about half the mass of the asteroid belt and are 400-950 km in diameter. The total mass of the belt is just 4% of the mass of our Moon. The larger asteroids are also known as “planetoids”.

96 Snobbery : ELITISM

Back in the 1780s, a snob was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word “snob” was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn’t a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

99 Michelle of “Crazy Rich Asians” : YEOH

Michelle Yeoh is an actress from Malaysia who appeared in several Hong Kong action films in which she did her own stunts and martial arts scenes. Her most famous action performance was in the 2000 movie “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, although I best know her for playing opposite Pierce Brosnan in the Bond film “Tomorrow Never Dies”.

“Crazy Rich Asians” is a 2018 romcom based on a 2013 novel of the same name by Kevin Kwan. The film garnered a lot of attention and accolades, not only for the quality of the script and performances. It was the first major Hollywood movie to feature a principal cast of Asian descent since 1993’s “The Joy Luck Club”.

101 A/C units : BTUS

In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured using the British Thermal Unit (BTU). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water’s temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

Air conditioning (A/C)

104 Tuning pin on a cello : PEG

A cello has four tuning pegs in a pegbox, one for each string.

105 Rae who has won five Black Reel Awards : ISSA

Issa Rae is a Stanford University graduate who created a YouTube web series called “The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl”. Rae also plays the title role in the series, a young lady named “J”. “Awkward Black Girl” was adapted into an HBO comedy-drama called “Insecure”, in which Issa Rae stars.

The Black Reel Awards have been presented annually since 2000 to recognize excellence of African Americans and the African diaspora in the film industry. The awards ceremony is hosted by the Foundation for the Augmentation of African-Americans in Film (FAAAF).

109 Football Hall of Famer Jones : DEACON

Deacon Jones was an NFL player who played defensive end. He was known for sacking the quarterback and coined, or at least popularized, the term “sack” in such a context. Off the field, Jones was quite the singer. He had a backing band called Nightshift, which evolved into the group War that is still active today. Jones got to sing onstage with Ray Charles, and also performed on the Merv Griffin Show. Steely Dan recorded the 1976 song Deacon Blues, which was inspired by Deacon Jones.

114 What the groundskeeper wore to work? : GARDEN HOSE

The word “hose” meaning “covering for the leg” has the same roots as the contemporary German word “Hose” meaning “trousers, pants”.

118 Cleveland’s lake : ERIE

Cleveland, Ohio was named after the man who led the team that surveyed the area prior to the founding of the city. General Moses Cleaveland did his work in 1796 and then left Ohio, never to return again.

120 Diaper cream ingredient : ALOE

“Diaper” is another word that I had to learn when I moved to America. What are called “diapers” over here, we call “nappies” back in Ireland. The term “diaper” is actually the original term that was used in England for the garment, where “diaper” referred to the cloth that was used. The term “diaper” was brought to the New World where it stuck. Back in Britain, “diaper” was displaced by the word “nappy”, a diminutive of “napkin”.

122 Deep-dish chain, familiarly : UNO’S

The chain of pizza parlors known today as Uno Chicago Grill used to be called Pizzeria Uno, or just “Uno’s”. Apparently, Uno’s created the world’s first deep-dish pizza.

123 Shampoo brand with an Essentials line : SUAVE

Suave is a line of personal care products from Unilever. The original Suave product was a hair tonic that was introduced in 1937.

126 Fortified wine from the Douro Valley : PORT

Portugal’s city of Oporto (“Porto” in Portuguese) gave its name to port wine in the late 1600s. Oporto was the seaport through which most of the region’s fortified red wine was exported.

The Douro Valley is a wine region in Portugal that is perhaps most associated with the production of port. The region is located on the Douro River, upstream from the city of Porto.

Down

2 Early Judean king : HEROD

Herod the Great was a vassal king in the first century BCE who ruled Judea under Roman supremacy. According to the Christian Bible, It was Herod the Great who ordered the Massacre of the Innocents, the execution of all young, male children in Bethlehem at the time of the birth of Jesus of Nazareth. When Herod the Great died circa 4 BCE, Rome divided his kingdom between his three sons and one daughter. The son named Herod Antipas became ruler of Galilee and Perea. It is Herod Antipas who is cited as “King Herod” in the Bible, and who played a key role in the executions of John the Baptist and Jesus of Nazareth.

3 “__ Kitteridge”: Pulitzer winner by Elizabeth Strout : OLIVE

“Olive Kitteridge” is a 2008 novel by Elizabeth Strout. It takes the form of 13 interrelated short stories that provide a portrait of the title character. Strout wrote a sequel “Olive, Again” that takes the same form, a collection of 13 short stories. The original work was adapted into a 2014 miniseries starring Frances McDormand as Kitteridge.

9 Kim who narrates “How I Met Your Father” : CATTRALL

Kim Cattrall is a Canadian-English actress best known for playing Samantha Jones on HBO’s “Sex and the City”. My favorite film in which Cattrall features is the excellent 2010 film “The Ghost Writer”, in which she does a great job playing an Englishwoman.

“How I Met Your Father” is a spinoff sitcom to the very successful show “How I Met Your Mother”. The spinoff stars Hilary Duff as a photographer named Sophie who is a hopeless romantic looking for her soulmate. Kim Cattrall is the show’s narrator, playing a future Sophie who is telling her son how she met his father.

11 Work with a real estate agent, say : HOUSE-HUNT

The terms “realty” and “real estate” actually date back to the late 1600s. Back then, the terms meant “real possessions, things owned that are tangible and real”.

12 Photographer Adams : ANSEL

As an avid amateur photographer, I have been a big fan of the work of Ansel Adams for many years and must have read all of his books. Adams was famous for clarity and depth in his black and white images. Central to his technique was the use of the zone system, his own invention. The zone system is a way of controlling exposure in an image, particularly when there is a high contrast in the subject. Although the technique was developed primarily for black & white film, it can even apply to digital color images. In the digital world, the main technique is to expose an image for the highlights, and one or more images for the shadows. These images can then be combined digitally giving a final photograph with a full and satisfying range of exposures.

13 Posh spot for a weekend getaway : HOTEL SPA

No one really knows the etymology of the word “posh”. The popular myth that “posh” is actually an acronym standing for “port out, starboard home” is completely untrue, and is a story that can actually be traced back to the 1968 movie “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang”. The myth is that wealthy British passengers traveling to and from India would book cabins on the port side for the outward journey and the starboard side for the home journey. This trick was supposedly designed to keep their cabins out of the direct sunlight.

14 Classic salade : NICOISE

A Niçoise salad is known as a “salade niçoise” in its native France, where it was named for the city of Nice in the south of the country. The original contains no cooked vegetables, but here in North America there are almost always included some boiled potatoes.

15 State tree of Iowa : OAK

The oak is the state tree of several US states:

  • Oak tree: Iowa
  • Northern red oak: New Jersey
  • White oak: Connecticut, Illinois and Maryland
  • Live oak: Georgia

17 Tiny tunneler : ANT

Anthills are actually underground nests. The ants in the colony excavate below ground, resulting in a pile of sand or soil above ground.

21 Lou Grant’s TV station : WJM

The character Lou Grant originated on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. Grant was Mary Richards’ boss at WJM-TV in Minneapolis, and was played by Ed Asner. As Lou Grant, Asner was the only actor ever to win a comedy and drama Emmy for playing the same character.

34 Choose, in Duck, Duck, Goose : TAP

“Duck, Duck, Goose” is a kid’s game, and not one that I’ve heard of outside of crosswords to be honest …

36 What the conductor wore to work? : RAILROAD TIE

The rectangular supports under rails in railroad tracks are known as railroad ties or crossties here in North America. Over on the other side of the Atlantic, we call them railway sleepers.

44 Ghana’s capital : ACCRA

Accra sits on Ghana’s coast and is a major seaport as well as the country’s capital city. The name “Accra” comes from a local word “Nkran” meaning “ants”, a name chosen because of the large number of anthills found in the area when the city was founded.

46 What the soda jerk wore to work? : COUNTER SUIT

In the halcyon days of yore, a soda jerk was usually a young person whose main job was to serve ice cream sodas in a drugstore. The server would “jerk” the handle on the soda fountain to dispense the soda water, giving the job its distinctive name.

49 __ culpa : MEA

Many Roman Catholics are very familiar with the Latin phrase “mea culpa” meaning “my fault”, as it is used in the Latin Mass. The additional term “mea maxima culpa” translates as “my most grievous fault”.

52 Gay dating app : GRINDR

Grindr is a social networking app aimed at gay and bisexual men. Subscribers locate potential partners using the geolocation capabilities of smartphones. A user in a particular location can view a grid showing pictures of fellow subscribers arranged by proximity.

55 Interoffice no. : EXT

Extension (ext.)

59 Hi or bye on Lanai : ALOHA

The Hawaiian word “aloha” has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently, “aloha” has come to mean “hello” and “goodbye”, but only since the mid-1800s.

Lanai is the sixth largest of the Hawaiian Islands. Lanai was first spotted by Europeans just a few days after Captain Cook was killed on the Big Island of Hawaii in 1779. In 1922, the Hawaiian Pineapple Company bought the whole island of Lanai and turned most of it into the world’s largest pineapple plantation. Since then, Lanai has been known as “The Pineapple Island”. Today, 98% of the island is owned by Larry Ellison, the CEO of Oracle, and 2% is owned by the State of Hawaii.

60 Arctic chunk : FLOE

An ice floe is a sheet of ice that has separated from an ice field and is floating freely on the surface of the ocean.

65 Many a rock formation in Bryce Canyon : ARCH

Bryce Canyon National Park is truly a beautiful part of America. The strange thing is that Bryce isn’t a canyon at all, but rather is a natural amphitheater created by erosion of sedimentary rocks that are part of the Paunsaugunt Plateau.

66 Susan or Collin of country music : RAYE

Susan Raye is a country music singer from Eugene, Oregon. Her most successful recording was the 1971 song “L.A. International Airport”, which was a crossover hit that climbed the pop charts all around the world.

Collin Raye is the stage name of country music singer Floyd Wray. Wray also used the stage name Bubba Wray, while a band member of the Wrays in the eighties.

68 Multicolored fabric : MADRAS

Madras is a lightweight fabric with a plaid design that is often used for summer clothing. The pattern is sometimes referred to as “Madrasi checks”. The textile takes its name from Madras, the former name of the city of Chennai in India.

69 Literary alter ego : MR HYDE

Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” was published in 1886. There are many tales surrounding the writing of the story, including that the author wrote the basic tale in just three to six days, and spent a few weeks simply refining it. Allegedly, Stevenson’s use of cocaine stimulated his creative juices during those few days of writing.

70 Roomba target : CRUMB

The Roomba vacuum cleaner is a cool-looking device that navigates its way around a room by itself, picking up dirt as it goes. Like I said, it’s cool-looking but I am not sure how effective it is …

72 German camera : LEICA

Leica is a German optics company that is famous for production of lenses and cameras. The 1913 Leica was the first practical camera that could use 35mm film, a size chosen because it was already the standard for film used in motion pictures.

75 Play date? : GIG

Musicians use “gig” to describe a job, a performance. The term originated in the early 1900s in the world of jazz. The derivative phrase “gig economy” applies to a relatively recent phenomenon where workers find themselves jumping from temporary job to temporary job, from gig to gig.

77 Poem section : CANTO

“Canto” is the Latin word for “singer”. In some religious traditions, a “cantor” is the person assigned to lead the singing of ecclesiastical music.

79 G-U-M rival : ORAL-B

The Oral-B toothbrush was introduced to the world in 1950, designed by a California periodontist. The first “model” was the Oral-B 60, a name given to reflect the 60 tufts in the brush. In 1969, the Oral-B was the first toothbrush to get to the moon as it was the toothbrush of choice for the crew of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.

80 Frequently found in a sonnet? : OFT

A sonnet is a short poem with varying rhyming schemes but always with 14 lines. The sonnet form has been around at least since the 13th century. The Shakespearean sonnet, for example, is composed of three quatrains (4 lines) and a final couplet (2 lines).

81 Scottish writer who created 69-Down : STEVENSON
(69D Literary alter ego : MR HYDE)

Robert Louis Stevenson (RLS) was a Scottish author. He was most famous for his novels “Treasure Island”, “Kidnapped” and “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”.

88 Melancholy poem : ELEGY

Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, which he completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:

  • Celestial fire
  • Far from the Madding Crowd
  • Kindred spirit

Melancholy is a dejection, depression of spirits. Melancholia was one of the body’s four basic substances of medieval science, the so-called four humors. All diseases were caused by these four substances getting out of balance. The four humors were:

  • Black bile (melancholia)
  • Yellow bile (cholera)
  • Phlegm (phlegma)
  • Blood (sanguis)

93 Smelter input : ORES

Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and, a greenhouse gas).

94 Chart-reading exam : EYE TEST

The commonly used eye chart (that starts with the letters “E FP TOZ LPED”) is called a Snellen chart. The test is named after its developer Herman Snellen, who introduced it way back in 1862.

100 Short break : HIATUS

A hiatus is a break or opening in a material object, or an interruption in time. “Hiatus” is Latin for “opening”.

106 Weasel : SNEAK

To weasel out of something is to back away from a prior commitment. The association of weasels with the concept of not being trusted might have arisen from the behavior in which a weasel sucks out the contents of an egg while leaving the shell virtually intact.

107 Ward (off) : STAVE

The word “stave” was originally the plural of “staff”, a word describing a wooden rod. To “stave off” originated with the concept of holding off with a staff. In the world of barrel-making, a stave is a narrow strip of wood that forms part of a barrel’s side.

110 Mandela’s org. : ANC

The African National Congress (ANC) started out as the South African Native National Congress in 1912 with the goal of improving the lot of black South Africans. After years of turmoil, the ANC came to power in the first open election in 1964.

As a young man, Nelson Mandela led the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC). Mandela was eventually arrested and admitted to charges of sabotage and was sentenced to life in prison in 1964. He remained behind bars for 27 years, mainly in the infamous prison on Robben Island. As the years progressed, Mandela became a symbol of the fight against apartheid. He was released in 1990, and immediately declared his commitment to peace and reconciliation with South Africa’s white minority population. Mandela was elected president of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) in 1994, an office that he held until 1999. Nelson Mandela passed away on December 5, 2013.

112 River of Pisa : ARNO

The Arno is the principal river in the Tuscany region of Italy, and passes through the cities of Florence and Pisa. Famously the Arno flooded in 1966, the worst flood in the region for centuries. There were numerous deaths and extensive destruction of priceless art treasures, particularly in Florence.

114 “Wonder Woman” star Gadot : GAL

Gal Gadot is an actress and former Miss Israel. She played Gisele Yashar in the “Fast & Furious” film franchise, and then began portraying Wonder Woman in superhero movies.

115 __ carte : A LA

On a restaurant menu, items that are “à la carte” are priced and ordered separately. A menu marked “table d’hôte” (also called “prix fixe”) is a fixed-price menu with limited choice. “Table d’hôte” translates from French as “table of the host”.

116 Mets color commentator Darling : RON

Ron Darling is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. Darling retired from the game in 1995, and started working as a color commentator for TBS in 2007.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Kills time in an airport terminal, say : SHOPS
6 “Be there in __” : A SEC
10 Deposed Iranian ruler : SHAH
14 __ Scotia : NOVA
18 “Who’s there?” : HELLO?
19 Cuarón film nominated for 10 Oscars : ROMA
20 As yet : TO NOW
22 “Young Sheldon” star Armitage : IAIN
23 No-frills type : ARIAL
24 Debit slip : CHIT
25 What the housekeeper wore to work? : DUST JACKET
27 What the actor wore to work? : MOVIE SHORTS
30 Look that way : SEEM TO
31 Genesis locale : EDEN
32 Body image, briefly : TAT
33 Pass on, in a way : RETELL
35 Runs : AIRS
38 Wraparound dress : SARI
40 Hyland of “Modern Family” : SARAH
41 Bumbling one : SAD SACK
44 “Abbott Elementary” TV network : ABC
47 What the messenger wore to work? : BICYCLE PUMPS
50 Country name on some euro coins : EIRE
51 Jam : CLOG UP
53 Hotmail alternative : AOL
54 Writer Zora __ Hurston : NEALE
56 Schlep : LUG
57 Romance : COURT
58 Backing : PRO
59 Mennen product : AFTA
61 Outlying communities : EXURBS
63 Indian royalty : RANIS
64 Available if needed : ON CALL
66 Back in : RETRO
67 Routing abbr. : ATTN
68 What the truffle hunter wore to work? : MUSHROOM CAP
71 Big do : GALA
74 “Shaun of the Dead” director Wright : EDGAR
76 Pie choice : CHERRY
77 Relinquishes : CEDES
78 Quite steamy : TORRID
80 Hazmat monitor : OSHA
82 Color nuance : HUE
83 Naysayers : ANTIS
84 E-file org. : IRS
85 Tree surgeon’s transplant : GRAFT
87 Orch. work : SYM
88 Tempt : ENTICE
89 Art Spiegelman graphic novel : MAUS
91 What the NASA scientist wore to work? : ASTEROID BELT
95 Pack it in : EAT
96 Snobbery : ELITISM
98 Brink : VERGE
99 Michelle of “Crazy Rich Asians” : YEOH
101 A/C units : BTUS
102 Jagged : UNEVEN
104 Tuning pin on a cello : PEG
105 Rae who has won five Black Reel Awards : ISSA
109 Football Hall of Famer Jones : DEACON
111 What the scholar wore to work? : SMARTY-PANTS
114 What the groundskeeper wore to work? : GARDEN HOSE
118 Cleveland’s lake : ERIE
119 Rarely ordered meat? : STEAK
120 Diaper cream ingredient : ALOE
121 Church law : CANON
122 Deep-dish chain, familiarly : UNO’S
123 Shampoo brand with an Essentials line : SUAVE
124 Touch down : LAND
125 Dispatch : SEND
126 Fortified wine from the Douro Valley : PORT
127 Expressed disdain : TSKED

Down

1 Embarrassment : SHAME
2 Early Judean king : HEROD
3 “__ Kitteridge”: Pulitzer winner by Elizabeth Strout : OLIVE
4 Grasslands : PLAINS
5 Lone : SOLE
6 Really, really old-school : ARCHAIC
7 “You’re not looking __ yourself!” : SO HOT
8 Mideast title : EMIR
9 Kim who narrates “How I Met Your Father” : CATTRALL
10 Avg. : STD
11 Work with a real estate agent, say : HOUSE-HUNT
12 Photographer Adams : ANSEL
13 Posh spot for a weekend getaway : HOTEL SPA
14 Classic salade : NICOISE
15 State tree of Iowa : OAK
16 Try (for) : VIE
17 Tiny tunneler : ANT
21 Lou Grant’s TV station : WJM
26 Somewhat : A TAD
28 Narrow piece : STRIP
29 Sun-cracked : SERE
34 Choose, in Duck, Duck, Goose : TAP
36 What the conductor wore to work? : RAILROAD TIE
37 Clean vigorously : SCRUB
39 Borders on : ABUTS
40 “Shift over a bit, will ya” : SCOOCH
42 Out : ASLEEP
43 Brewery array : KEGS
44 Ghana’s capital : ACCRA
45 Swell up : BLOAT
46 What the soda jerk wore to work? : COUNTER SUIT
48 Rambling accounts : YARNS
49 __ culpa : MEA
52 Gay dating app : GRINDR
55 Interoffice no. : EXT
58 Rain hard : POUR
59 Hi or bye on Lanai : ALOHA
60 Arctic chunk : FLOE
62 Top-priority : URGENT
65 Many a rock formation in Bryce Canyon : ARCH
66 Susan or Collin of country music : RAYE
68 Multicolored fabric : MADRAS
69 Literary alter ego : MR HYDE
70 Roomba target : CRUMB
72 German camera : LEICA
73 Plus : ASSET
75 Play date? : GIG
77 Poem section : CANTO
78 “Pencils down” : TIME
79 G-U-M rival : ORAL-B
80 Frequently found in a sonnet? : OFT
81 Scottish writer who created 69-Down : STEVENSON
86 To an equal degree : AS MUCH AS
87 “Sounds awesome!” : SIGN ME UP!
88 Melancholy poem : ELEGY
90 Star-__ : STUDDED
92 Crank (up) : REV
93 Smelter input : ORES
94 Chart-reading exam : EYE TEST
97 “Ohhhhh” : I SEE
100 Short break : HIATUS
103 “… said __ ever” : NO ONE
104 Earlier : PRIOR
106 Weasel : SNEAK
107 Ward (off) : STAVE
108 Did something appealing? : ASKED
110 Mandela’s org. : ANC
112 River of Pisa : ARNO
113 “Hey, c’mere!” : PSST!
114 “Wonder Woman” star Gadot : GAL
115 __ carte : A LA
116 Mets color commentator Darling : RON
117 Conclusion : END

11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 1 May 22, Sunday”

  1. 15:43, no errors. Definitely a blast from the past.

    And finally got that Saturday Newsday done, no errors in 3 hours (or should I be ashamed of that?). An interesting exercise of literally knowing nothing in the grid and still eventually grinding out something.

    1. Newsday: 2:15:20, no errors. Absurdly difficult. Surprised to get it done at all. Nothing to be ashamed of, no matter how long you spent on it.

  2. 23:09

    Cute theme.

    Lots of changes and fixes, but the one that stymied me was the Duck, Duck, Goose choice. OPT didn’t work. Then crosses gave me SAP. Sure, why not? But it turned out to be TAP and RESELL became RETELL and the banner flew.

  3. 23 minutes 2 seconds, and no errors, but needed Check Grid on 6 fills to correct typos.

    I guess Patti went to prove the old adage, “If you want something done right, do it yourself”.

    She was mostly successful in her endeavor. Grokking the theme actually helped in solving further down the grid. I did like the sometimes-ironic fill, “Said NOONE ever…”; and hope we won’t be saying that in this space as much as we did with Rich Norris.

  4. One error….the same one Pam made; had resell instead of retell.
    Plus several name lookups. Enjoyed the theme, though…especially
    “countersuit “,,,

  5. 35:28 – no errors or lookups. Revisions were: ANCIENT>ARCHAIC, SOBAD>SOHOT, PET>TAT, TAG>TAP, PELT>POUR.

    New items: SARAH Hyland, “Abbott Elementary,” Zora NEALE Hurston, EDGAR Wright, OLIVE Kitteridge, RON Darling.

    Nice theme.

  6. No errors. Quick run.. late posting…
    Too busy to keep up..

    Oddest entry of my entries: MAUS

    when I looked it up, sounds like a must read for me. Didn’t realize it was German for Mouse.

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