LA Times Crossword 4 May 22, Wednesday

Advertisement

Constructed by: Ed Sessa
Edited by: Patti Varol

Today’s Theme (according to Bill): Jekyll and Hyde

Themed answers are common phrases interpreted as things Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde might say to each other:

  • 20A Dr. Jekyll, to Mr. Hyde : YOU ARE ON MY MIND
  • 25A Dr. Jekyll, to Mr. Hyde : I’M BESIDE MYSELF
  • 42A Dr. Jekyll, to Mr. Hyde : I WANT TO BE ALONE
  • 48A Mr. Hyde, to Dr. Jekyll : IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 6m 01s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 Deer dad : STAG

A male deer is usually called a buck, and a female is a doe. However, the male red deer is usually referred to as a stag. The males of even larger species of deer are often called bulls, and the females called cows. In older English, male deer of over 5 years were called harts, and females of over 3 years were called hinds. The young of small species are known as fawns, and of larger species are called calves. All very confusing …

14 Rumble in the jungle : ROAR

Strictly speaking, the terms “rainforest” and “jungle” are related, but different. A healthy rainforest has a thick canopy of leaves so that the ground below is relatively clear of vegetation due to a lack of sunlight. When the canopy thins, the increase in sunlight promotes growth of tangled vegetation at ground level producing the habitat that we refer to as “jungle”.

16 Roker of ”The Jeffersons” : ROXIE

Actress Roxie Roker was best known for playing Helen Willis on the sitcom “The Jeffersons”. She was the mother of singer-songwriter Lenny Kravitz.

The very popular sitcom called “The Jeffersons” ran from 1975 until it came to an abrupt end in 1985. CBS canceled the show without even allowing a series finale that “wrapped things up”. In fact, lead actor Sherman Hemsley learned of the show’s cancellation in the newspaper.

17 Blue-Emu target : ACHE

Blu-Emu is a line of topical pain relievers that was introduced in 2002. As suggested by the name, Blue-Emu products include emu oil as an ingredient. Emu oil is extracted from the fat of emu carcases that are processed for meat.

18 “Never Have I __”: Netflix series created by Mindy Kaling and Lang Fisher : EVER

“Never Have I Ever” is a comedy-drama series that premiered in 2020. The show was co-created by actress and comedian Mindy Kaling, and is based on her experiences growing up in the Boston area (although the series is set in the San Fernando Valley). Star of “Never Have I Ever” is Canadian actress Maitreyi Ramakrishnan.

20 Dr. Jekyll, to Mr. Hyde : YOU ARE ON MY MIND
25 Dr. Jekyll, to Mr. Hyde : I’M BESIDE MYSELF
42 Dr. Jekyll, to Mr. Hyde : I WANT TO BE ALONE
48 Mr. Hyde, to Dr. Jekyll : IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME

Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” was published in 1886. There are many tales surrounding the writing of the story, including that the author wrote the basic tale in just three to six days, and spent a few weeks simply refining it. Allegedly, Stevenson’s use of cocaine stimulated his creative juices during those few days of writing.

23 Ruminate (over) : MULL

Ruminants are animals that “chew the cud”. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely, exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work. We also use the verb “to ruminate” in a figurative sense, to mean “to muse, ponder, chew over”.

24 One close to home? : UMP

Back in the 15th century, “an umpire” was referred to as “a noumpere”, which was misheard and hence causing the dropping of the initial letter N. The term “noumpere” came from Old French “nonper” meaning “not even, odd number”. The idea was that the original umpire was a third person called on to arbitrate between two, providing that “odd number” needed to decide the dispute.

32 Mitchell who won a Tony Award for “Hadestown” : ANAIS

Anaïs Mitchell is a Vermonet-based singer-songwriter. One of Mitchell’s more famous works is a 2010 concept album titled “Hadestown” that is based on the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. She adapted the album into a stage musical that opened Off-Broadway in 2016 as “Hadestown: The Myth. The Musical”.

34 Robert McCloskey’s “Blueberries for __” : SAL

“Blueberries for Sal” is a children’s storybook by Robert McCloskey that was published in 1948. It won the Caldecott Medal in 1949, recognizing “Blueberries for Sal” as the most distinguished picture for children released in the preceding year.

35 Slimy pest : SLUG

Snails and slugs are referred to collectively as gastropods. There are many, many species of gastropods, found both on land and in the sea. Gastropods with shells are generally described as snails, and those species without shells are referred to as slugs.

36 Piddling : DINKY

Here’s a word that has practically the opposite meaning back in Ireland, where I come from. In the US, something that is dinky is insignificant. In Ireland something dinky is neat and dainty.

47 Short holiday? : XMAS

The abbreviation “Xmas” that is used for “Christmas” comes from the Greek letter chi (X), which is the first letter of the Greek word for “Christ” (“Χριστός”).

56 Boaters and bowlers : HATS

A boater is a straw hat often associated with boating, hence the name.

I think that a bowler hat is usually called a derby here in the US. The bowler was first produced in 1849 in London by hatmakers Thomas and William Bowler, hence the name. The alternative name of “derby” comes from the tradition of wearing bowler hats at the Derby horse race (a major race held annually in England).

57 Denny’s rival : IHOP

The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn’t do too well in marketing tests.

Denny’s was the first restaurant I ate at on my initial visit to the US many moons ago. I thought I was in heaven. I’ve changed my opinion a little since then! Denny’s is famous for being “always open” (almost), something that blew my mind as a visitor from Ireland back in 1980. Denny’s was founded in 1953 in Lakewood, California, and originally went by the name “Denny’s Donuts”. The enduring Grand Slam breakfast has been on the menu since 1977.

59 Shallowest Great Lake : ERIE

Lake Erie is the fourth-largest of the five Great Lakes by area (Lake Ontario is the smallest). The lake takes its name from the Erie tribe of Native Americans that used to live along its southern shore. Erie is the smallest of the Great Lakes by volume and the shallowest, something for which nearby residents must be quite grateful. Being relatively shallow, much of Erie freezes over part way through most winters putting an end to most of the lake-effect snow that falls in the snow belt extending from the lake’s edge.

61 Sock away : HOARD

We’ve been “socking away” money, i.e. saving money, since the early 1940s. The etymology of “sock away” is related to the idea of hiding cash in one’s sock.

62 Like audiobooks, once : ON CD

The compact disc (CD) was developed jointly by Philips and Sony as a medium for storing and playing sound recordings. When the first commercial CD was introduced back in 1982, a CD’s storage capacity was far greater than the amount of data that could be stored on the hard drive of personal computers available at that time.

63 Device that helps a team pull together : YOKE

A yoke is a wooden beam used between a pair of animals so that they are forced to work together.

Down

2 “Un Poco __”: song from “Coco” : LOCO

“Coco” is a 2017 Pixar movie about a 12-year-old boy named Miguel who ends up in the land of the dead by accident. There, he seeks out the help of the great-great-grandfather to get back to his family in the land of the living.

3 Diamond Head’s island : OAHU

Diamond Head on the Hawaiian island of Oahu was given its name by British sailors in the 1800s. These sailors found calcite crystals in the rock surrounding the volcanic tuff cone and mistook the crystals for diamonds.

5 Girds (oneself) : STEELS

The phrase “gird your loins” dates back to ancient Rome. The expression describes the action of lifting “one’s skirts” and tying them between the legs to allow more freedom of movement before going into battle. Nowadays, “gird your loins” (or sometimes just “gird yourself”) is a metaphor for “prepare yourself for the worst”.

6 Copenhagen’s __ Gardens : TIVOLI

The Tivoli Gardens is a long-established amusement park in Copenhagen that opened for business in 1843. That makes it the second oldest amusement park on the planet. The Danes must like to be amused, as the oldest park is Dyrehavsbakken, also in Denmark.

Copenhagen is the largest city and the capital of Denmark. I haven’t had the privilege of visiting Copenhagen, but I hear it is a wonderful metropolis with a marvelous quality of life. The city is also very environmentally friendly, with over a third of its population commuting to work by bicycle.

7 Revival meeting cry : AMEN!

A revival meeting is a service in the Christian tradition that is held to provide inspiration to church members, or to gain converts.

9 Beyoncé’s 28 : GRAMMYS

Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny’s Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2002, after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical “Dreamgirls”. Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as “Queen Bey”, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”. Her fan base goes by the name “Beyhive”.

11 Nerve impulse carrier : AXON

A nerve cell is more correctly called a neuron. The branched projections that receive electrochemical signals from other neurons are known as dendrites. The long nerve fiber that conducts signals away from the neuron is known as the axon. A neuron that has no definite axon is referred to as “apolar” or “nonpolar”. In apolar neurons the nerve impulses radiate in all directions.

26 Word in Hawaiian volcano names : MAUNA

“Mauna” is a Hawaiian word meaning “mountain”, as in “Mauna Loa” and “Mauna Kea”.

27 Brightest star in Cygnus : DENEB

Deneb is the brightest star in the constellation Cygnus, the Swan. The name “Deneb” comes from the Arabic word “dhaneb” meaning “tail”, as it lies at the tail of the swan.

Cygnus is a constellation in the northern sky, with its name being Latin for “Swan”. Four stars define the main features of the “swan”, namely Albireo (the tip of the beak), Delta and Epsilon Cygnis (the wings) and Deneb (the tail). Deneb is one of the brightest stars in the night sky and is also part of the Northern Cross, which lies within the constellation of Cygnus.

28 Yellowstone grazers : ELK

The elk (also “wapiti”) is one of the largest species of deer in the world, with only the moose being bigger. Early European settlers were familiar with the smaller red deer back in their homelands, so when they saw the “huge” wapiti they assumed it was a moose, and incorrectly gave it the European name for a moose, namely “elk”. The more correct name for the beast is “wapiti”, which means “white rump” in Shawnee. It’s all very confusing …

Yellowstone was the first National Park to be established in the world when it was designated as such by President Grant in 1872. What a great tradition it started! The American National Parks are truly a treasure …

29 Complete, as a PDF contract : E-SIGN

Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications and platforms, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

30 Lash of old Westerns : LARUE

Alfred LaRue was an actor who appeared in a series of eleven western movies in the forties and fifties, playing the character Marshal Lash LaRue. He was very adept with the bullwhip, and so earned the nickname “Lash”. Years after his onscreen career ended, LaRue was the guy who trained Harrison Ford how to use a bullwhip for his role in the “Indiana Jones” series of films.

31 Get out of Dodge : FLEE

The phrase “get out of Dodge”, meaning “scram, flee”, is a reference to Dodge City, Kansas. The phrase became a cliché on TV westerns (mainly “Gunsmoke”, I think) and was then popularized by teenagers in the sixties and seventies.

32 Italian wine region : ASTI

Asti is in the Piedmont region of northwestern Italy. It is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine. Moscato d’Asti is produced from the same grape (Moscato Bianco). Moscato is a much sweeter wine with a lower alcohol content, and is usually served as a dessert wine.

36 “Same here” : DITTO

The word “ditto” was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So, “ditto” is another wonderful import from that lovely land …

41 Jai __ : ALAI

Jai alai is a game that derives from Basque pelota, and is known as “cesta-punta” in the Basque language. The name “jai alai” translates from the original Basque as “merry festival”.

44 Rare and wonderful : EXOTIC

The word “exotic” means “belonging to another country”, and is derived from the Greek “exo-” meaning “outside”. Exotica are things that are excitingly strange, often from foreign parts.

48 “Othello” villain : IAGO

Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare’s “Othello”. He is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. Iago hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello’s wife.

49 Supermodel Banks who coined the word “smize” : TYRA

To smize is to smile with the eyes. The term “smize” was coined by host Tyra Banks in 2009 on the reality show “America’s Next Top Model”.

50 Rossi of “Sons of Anarchy” : THEO

Actor Theo Rossi is perhaps best known for playing Juice Ortiz on the TV show “Sons of Anarchy”.

“Sons of Anarchy” is a popular FX crime series about an outlaw motorcycle club in California’s Central Valley. Apparently, it is the most successful FX show ever.

53 Ork native : MORK

“Mork & Mindy” is a sitcom that originally aired from 1978 to 1982. The title characters were played by Robin Williams and Pam Dawber. Mork is an alien from the planet Ork who reports back to his superior called Orson. Orson is played by voice actor Ralph James. Ralph James was also known for providing the voice of Mr. Turtle in famous Tootsie Pop commercials in the seventies. Nanu nanu!

54 Olympic sword : EPEE

There are three fencing events in the modern Olympics, with each distinguished by the weapon used:

  • Foil
  • Épée
  • Sabre

55 “Oh, cry me a river” : WAH

The idiom “cry me a river” is often used sarcastically in response to someone telling a “sob story”, someone seeking sympathy. The phrase was coined by songwriter Arthur Hamiliton in 1953 when he used it as the title for a 1953 song that he wrote for Ella Fitzgerald and the movie “Pete Kelly’s Blues”. The song was dropped from the movie, but Julie London had a big hit with “Cry Me a River”, after she sang it in the 1956 film “The Girl Can’t Help It”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Trudge : PLOD
5 Deer dad : STAG
9 Vexes, with “at” : GNAWS …
14 Rumble in the jungle : ROAR
15 Hourglass figure? : TIME
16 Roker of ”The Jeffersons” : ROXIE
17 Blue-Emu target : ACHE
18 “Never Have I __”: Netflix series created by Mindy Kaling and Lang Fisher : EVER
19 Make amends : ATONE
20 Dr. Jekyll, to Mr. Hyde : YOU ARE ON MY MIND
23 Ruminate (over) : MULL
24 One close to home? : UMP
25 Dr. Jekyll, to Mr. Hyde : I’M BESIDE MYSELF
32 Mitchell who won a Tony Award for “Hadestown” : ANAIS
33 Tall shade trees : ELMS
34 Robert McCloskey’s “Blueberries for __” : SAL
35 Slimy pest : SLUG
36 Piddling : DINKY
38 Passion : FIRE
39 Sun shade? : TAN
40 Locale : SITE
41 Make one’s case : ARGUE
42 Dr. Jekyll, to Mr. Hyde : I WANT TO BE ALONE
46 No longer cool : OUT
47 Short holiday? : XMAS
48 Mr. Hyde, to Dr. Jekyll : IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME
55 Means of entry : WAY IN
56 Boaters and bowlers : HATS
57 Denny’s rival : IHOP
58 Say yes : AGREE
59 Shallowest Great Lake : ERIE
60 Folk stories : LORE
61 Sock away : HOARD
62 Like audiobooks, once : ON CD
63 Device that helps a team pull together : YOKE

Down

1 Thank the goddesses, e.g. : PRAY
2 “Un Poco __”: song from “Coco” : LOCO
3 Diamond Head’s island : OAHU
4 Aim high : DREAM BIG
5 Girds (oneself) : STEELS
6 Copenhagen’s __ Gardens : TIVOLI
7 Revival meeting cry : AMEN!
8 Microbe : GERM
9 Beyoncé’s 28 : GRAMMYS
10 Policy that typically includes higher menu prices : NO TIPS
11 Nerve impulse carrier : AXON
12 Sailboat’s need : WIND
13 “That’s how it’s done” : SEE?
21 Feels remorse about : RUES
22 “Delish!” : YUMMY!
25 Kin by marriage : IN-LAW
26 Word in Hawaiian volcano names : MAUNA
27 Brightest star in Cygnus : DENEB
28 Yellowstone grazers : ELK
29 Complete, as a PDF contract : E-SIGN
30 Lash of old Westerns : LARUE
31 Get out of Dodge : FLEE
32 Italian wine region : ASTI
36 “Same here” : DITTO
37 “How was __ know?” : I TO
38 With no warmth : FROSTILY
40 In a daze : STUNNED
41 Jai __ : ALAI
43 More of a busybody : NOSIER
44 Rare and wonderful : EXOTIC
45 Brought a smile to : AMUSED
48 “Othello” villain : IAGO
49 Supermodel Banks who coined the word “smize” : TYRA
50 Rossi of “Sons of Anarchy” : THEO
51 Knitting need : YARN
52 “Buzz off!” : SHOO!
53 Ork native : MORK
54 Olympic sword : EPEE
55 “Oh, cry me a river” : WAH

12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 4 May 22, Wednesday”

  1. 10:42 – no errors, lookups, or revisions.

    New items: ROXIE Riker, ANAIS Mitchell (although I’d heard of Hadestown), THEO Rossi.

    Funny theme.

  2. 6:26 1 error
    Missed TIVILI->TIVOLI, as YOUAREINMY MIND seemed just as reasonable as YOUAREONMYMIND.

    Theme brought a smile. We are AMUSED.

  3. For once, a clever theme that was actually fun to solve and helpful to solve the other clues. All of the quotes are made up, of course, but the answers kind-a just fell into place.

  4. Mostly easy Wednesday for me; took 10:28 with no peeks or errors. Didn’t know ANAIS or SAL but got them easily with crosses. I knew who ROXIE was, even if I didn’t recognize her right away – great show. Amusing theme, even if I didn’t really use it directly…great story.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.