LA Times Crossword 16 Jul 22, Saturday

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Constructed by: Malaika Handa
Edited by: Patti Varol

Today’s Theme: None

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 14m 44s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 “4X2=8” rapper from Korea : PSY

“4×2=8” is a 2017 studio album released by South Korean singer and rapper Psy. The title is somewhat cryptic, and needs explaining. In Korean, “4” is “sa” and “2” is “i”. Together, 4 and 2 give “sai”, which is “Psy” written in the Korean alphabet Hangul. The number “8” is a reference to this being Psy’s eighth album.

13 Got credit, in a way? : OPENED A TAB

When we run a “tab” at a bar, we are running a “tabulation”, a listing of what we owe. Such a use of “tab” is American slang that originated in the 1880s.

16 Simple cocktail : GIN AND TONIC

The original tonic water was a fairly strong solution of the drug quinine dissolved in carbonated water. It was used in tropical areas in South Asia and Africa where malaria is rampant. The quinine has a prophylactic effect against the disease, and was formulated as “tonic water” so that it could be easily distributed. In British colonial India, the colonial types got into the habit of mixing gin with the tonic water to make it more palatable by hiding the bitter taste of quinine. Nowadays, the level of quinine in tonic water has dropped, and sugar has been added.

18 Agcy. whose logo is an eagle holding a scale : IRS

The IRS symbol is often referred to as the IRS Eagle. It comprises three elements:

  • The IRS Eagle itself (representing the United States)
  • The scales of justice (symbolizing fairness and honesty)
  • An olive branch (symbolizing peace and conciliation)

The IRS logo comprises the IRS symbol, with the letters “IRS” underneath.

19 Freelancer’s info : SPECS

The term “free lance” was coined by Sir Walter Scott in his 1820 novel “Ivanhoe”, when he used it to describe a medieval mercenary warrior. Forty years later, a “freelancer” was a journalist who did work for more than one publication without a long-term commitment.

20 Event that might be called “morp” : GAY PROM

Situations can arise when high school students feel the need to hold an “anti-prom” as an alternative celebration. Some anti-proms are staged as a form of protest, whereas others are held to perhaps provide a more personal get-together, or perhaps a cheaper event. Anti-prom is sometimes referred to as “morp”, which is “prom” spelled backwards.

22 Two dry gallons : PECK

A peck is a dry measure equal to a quarter of a bushel. The term can be used figuratively to mean a considerable quantity in general, as in the phrase “a peck of trouble”.

23 “__ Mañanitas”: Mexican birthday song : LAS

“Las Mañanitas” is a traditional birthday song that is very popular in Mexico, as well as some parts of the US. The song’s title translates from Spanish as “The Little Mornings”.

26 Artisan at Kells : SCRIBE

The Book of Kells is an illuminated Gospel book that dates back to about 800 AD, and was created by scribes in one or more Columban monasteries in Britain and/or Ireland. The manuscript gets its common name from the Irish Abbey of Kells, where it resided for centuries. The Book of Kells was presented to Trinity College in 1661, and it can be seen there in the school’s library to this day.

27 De Armas of “No Time to Die” : ANA

Ana de Armas is an actress from Cuba. Having attended the National Theater School of Cuba, she moved to Spain at the age of 18. Thre, she made a name for herself in a Spanish TV series called “El Internado”. De Armas moved to Los Angeles in 2014, after which her performance opposite Ryan Gosling in 2017’s “Blade Runner 2049” earned her critical acclaim.

2021’s “No Time to Die” is the 25th in the “James Bond” series of films. It stars Daniel Craig as the MI6 agent in his last appearance in the role. Bond’s adversary in “No Time to Die” is Lyutsifer Safin, played by Rami Malek. The theme song was performed by Billie Eilish.

28 Semisolid dessert : JELL-O

If you like Jell-O, then you might want to stop by LeRoy, New York where you can visit the only Jell-O museum in the world. While at the museum, you can walk along the Jell-O Brick Road …

30 Flax fabric : LINEN

The textile known as linen is made from flax fibers. The name “linen” probably comes from “linum”, which is Latin for both “flax” and “textile made from flax”.

31 Fast tracks? : PUMP-UP SONGS

Pump-up songs are used to “pump up”, to create excitement and enthusiasm.

33 Element of 1990s fashion : HAMMER PANTS

Hammer pants are baggy pants that taper at the ankles. They are designed to facilitate hip-hop dancing, and are named for rap performer MC Hammer.

34 Sticks in windows : BARBER POLES

Barbers originally offered a wide range of services, including surgery. Back in the Middle Ages, one of the primary services offered was bloodletting. The red and white sign outside a barber’s place of business represented bloody bandages wrapped around a pole. Henry VIII restricted barbers to just haircutting … and dentistry. Our term “barber” comes to us via Anglo-French from the Latin “barba” meaning “beard”.

35 Stand in a painting class : EASEL

The word “easel” comes from an old Dutch word meaning “donkey”, would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

37 Handheld or holding hands, for short : PDA

Personal digital assistant (PDA)

Public display of affection (PDA)

42 __ Moines : DES

The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French “Riviere des Moines” meaning “River of the Monks”. It looks like there isn’t any “monkish” connection to the city’s name per se. “Des Moines” was just the name given by French traders who corrupted “Moingona”, the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

44 Many a Mugler garment : CATSUIT

The Mugler fashion house was launched in the seventies by French designer Thierry Mugler. One of Thierry Mugler’s most famous designs was the black dress worn by Demi Moore in the 1993 film “Indecent Proposal”.

47 Reddit Q&A : AMA

Reddit.com is a networking and news website that started up in 2005. It is essentially a bulletin board system with posts that are voted up and down by users, which determines the ranking of posts. The name “Reddit” is a play on “read it”, as in “I read it on Reddit”. One popular feature of the Reddit site is an online forum that is similar to a press conference. Known as an AMA (for “ask me anything”), participants have included the likes of President Barack Obama, Madonna, Bill Gates, Stephen Colbert and Gordon Ramsay. President Obama’s AMA was so popular that the high level of traffic brought down many parts of the Reddit site.

48 Celebration where many are out on the streets? : PRIDE PARADE

The first gay pride parades were held all on the same weekend in 1970, in New York City, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Back in the 1950s, to come “out of the closet” was to admit to being an alcoholic. By the seventies, the phrase mainly referred to gay people shrugging off secrecy about their sexual orientation.

54 Class for some immigrants: Abbr. : ESL

English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

Down

2 Camp nurse’s item : EPIPEN

EpiPen is a brand of epinephrine auto-injector. An EpiPen delivers a measured dose of epinephrine, which is a common treatment for an extreme allergic reaction.

3 Great Hill People : SENECA

The Seneca Native-American nation was a member of the Six Nations or Iroquois League, along with the Iroquois, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Tuscarora peoples. Historically, the Seneca lived south of Lake Ontario. The name “Seneca” translates as “Great Hill People”.

6 Tally : ADD

Back in the mid-1600s, a tally was a stick marked with notches that tracked how much one owed or paid. The term “tally” came from the Latin “talea” meaning “stick, rod”. The act of “scoring” the stick with notches gave rise to our word “score” for the number in a tally.

7 Pilates roll : MAT

Pilates is a physical exercise system developed by, and named for, Joseph Pilates. Pilates introduced his system of exercises in 1883 in Germany.

8 Employee’s perk: Abbr. : PTO

Paid time off (PTO)

11 Flashers in a club : STROBES

A strobe light is a device that produces regular flashes, like the light on top of a police car. The term derives from the Greek “strobos” meaning “twisting, whirling”.

12 Sycophants : YES-MEN

A sycophant is a selfish person, and one who flatters. The term comes from the Greek “sykophantes” which originally meant “one who shows the fig”. This phrase described a vulgar gesture made with the thumb and two fingers.

14 __-variance tradeoff : BIAS

“Bias-variance” is a term used in statistics. I don’t understand it …

17 Brooklyn MiLB team : CYCLONES

The Brooklyn Cyclones are a minor league team affiliated with the New York Mets. In 2000, a “name-the-team” contest resulted in the adoption of “Cyclones”. The name was chosen in honor of a famous roller coaster in the Astroland amusement park on Coney Island, which is close to where the Cyclones play.

Minor League Baseball (MiLB)

24 Herb honored with a National Medal of Arts in 2013 : ALPERT

Herb Alpert still plays the trumpet today, but he is also a talented painter and sculptor. His works are seen regularly in exhibitions all around the world.

31 Paired symbols, for short : PARENS

Parentheses (parens.)

34 Nation in the Lucayan Archipelago : BAHAMAS

The Bahamas is a group of islands in the Atlantic Ocean lying in the same island chain as Cuba and Hispaniola. The Bahamas was a British colony for many years but became independent in 1973, although it retains membership in the British Commonwealth.

The Lucayan (also “Bahama”) Archipelago is part of the West Indies, and is located in the western North Atlantic Ocean. There are two territories in the archipelago, namely the Bahamas and the British Overseas Territory of the Turks and Caicos Islands.

37 Latke ingredient : POTATO

A latke is a delicious potato pancake (I’m Irish, so anything made with potatoes is delicious, to be fair).

38 “Dexter’s Laboratory” older sister : DEE DEE

“Dexter’s Laboratory” is an animated TV show about a boy-genius who has a secret laboratory hidden in his bedroom. The boy’s name is Dexter, and his older sister is Dee Dee. Dee Dee is always ruining Dexter’s experiments by mistake. The series premiered in 1996.

39 One of three snake species native to Britain : ADDERS

The adder, a snake in the viper family, is the only venomous snake found on the island of Great Britain. Adders are also found in Norway and Sweden, north of the Arctic Circle.

41 Assistant who can control HomeKit accessories : SIRI

Amazon, Google and Apple all provide users with software frameworks that manage various smart devices around the home. Amazon’s product is Alexa, Google’s is Home, and Apple’s is HomeKit.

45 Sturdy tan work boots, slangily : TIMS

The Timberland Company was founded in 1957 by Nathan Swartz, a shoemaker from Boston. The business’s first successful product was the waterproof boot called the Timberland. It was so successful that the company adopted Timberland for its name.

49 Auerbach of the Black Keys : DAN

The Black Keys are a rock band, a duo from Akron, Ohio. Dan Auerbach on guitar, along with Patrick Carney on drums, formed the Black Keys in 2001.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Devices that may shed some light on a situation : DESK LAMPS
10 “4X2=8” rapper from Korea : PSY
13 Got credit, in a way? : OPENED A TAB
15 Consumed : ATE
16 Simple cocktail : GIN AND TONIC
18 Agcy. whose logo is an eagle holding a scale : IRS
19 Freelancer’s info : SPECS
20 Event that might be called “morp” : GAY PROM
22 Two dry gallons : PECK
23 “__ Mañanitas”: Mexican birthday song : LAS
26 Artisan at Kells : SCRIBE
27 De Armas of “No Time to Die” : ANA
28 Semisolid dessert : JELL-O
30 Flax fabric : LINEN
31 Fast tracks? : PUMP-UP SONGS
33 Element of 1990s fashion : HAMMER PANTS
34 Sticks in windows : BARBER POLES
35 Stand in a painting class : EASEL
36 Tries out : TESTS
37 Handheld or holding hands, for short : PDA
40 Performs brilliantly : SHINES
42 __ Moines : DES
43 Did some digging : HOED
44 Many a Mugler garment : CATSUIT
46 In the stars : FATED
47 Reddit Q&A : AMA
48 Celebration where many are out on the streets? : PRIDE PARADE
52 Bestie : PAL
53 Cry of horrible realization? : I’M A MONSTER!
54 Class for some immigrants: Abbr. : ESL
55 Cool footwear : SNOWSHOES

Down

1 Place for some nail trims : DOG SPA
2 Camp nurse’s item : EPIPEN
3 Great Hill People : SENECA
4 Flair : KNACK
5 __ flare : LENS
6 Tally : ADD
7 Pilates roll : MAT
8 Employee’s perk: Abbr. : PTO
9 Provided backup, in a way : SANG
10 Twosomes : PAIRINGS
11 Flashers in a club : STROBES
12 Sycophants : YES-MEN
14 __-variance tradeoff : BIAS
17 Brooklyn MiLB team : CYCLONES
21 Stripes, florals, etc. : PRINTS
23 “I got this!” : LEMME!
24 Herb honored with a National Medal of Arts in 2013 : ALPERT
25 Sucked hard : SLURPED
28 Cancel one’s order? : JUMBLE UP
29 Go against : OPPOSE
31 Paired symbols, for short : PARENS
32 Seasons, as pasta water : SALTS
33 Wants for nothing : HAS IT ALL
34 Nation in the Lucayan Archipelago : BAHAMAS
35 __ room : ESCAPE
37 Latke ingredient : POTATO
38 “Dexter’s Laboratory” older sister : DEE DEE
39 One of three snake species native to Britain : ADDERS
41 Assistant who can control HomeKit accessories : SIRI
43 Cruel : HARSH
45 Sturdy tan work boots, slangily : TIMS
46 Album buyers, presumably : FANS
49 Auerbach of the Black Keys : DAN
50 Prefix with “pop” or “rock” : EMO-
51 Hard-hitting sound : POW!

29 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 16 Jul 22, Saturday”

  1. Took almost an hour for me. Top left section was hold up. Couldn’t get a foothold. BIAS and GAYPROM strangled me for awhile. Then I started over at the top left. PETSPA CATSPA DAYSPA then DOGSPA, then GIN AND TONIC jumped out at me.

    I got 28D JUMBLEUP but I don’t get it.

    Never heard of TIMS.

    Didn’t really enjoy this one. Felt like I was making up cute words that matched the cutesy clues???

    1. If you mess up an orderly arrangement you may be said to jumble it up.

      Subtle clue, but not unreasonable.

  2. LAT: About 50 minutes with unbelievably (for me in this puzzle) no errors. I didn’t know so many clues and took so many guesses. When I finished, I was still unsure of my answers, relying on Bill’s explanations. Many of the clues were too cute and too remote.

  3. Re 34A: Around here, at least, barber poles are not displayed in windows, but rather are affixed to the shops externally. And we do draw distinctions between sticks and poles.

    Re 53A: Huh? Eh? Whence?

    Re 55A clue: shouldn’t there be a question mark?

    Re 31A: Around here, the only pump-up song we have is ‘Okie from Muskogee,’ and
    I’m proud…

  4. Once again the constructor/editor playing fast and loose with language, which is surprising since words are their stock in trade. For example, 26A “Artisan at Kells” SCRIBE. A scribe was never considered to be an artisan, i.e. a person who made sellable objects by hand but whose work never rose to the level of those things made by an artist. Basket weavers, potters, glass blowers, in other words. True, scribes also made things by hand — at Kells they were books — but these were made in service to some employer. So in essence they provided a service and this is reflected in the professions they evolved into: typists, bookkeepers ans lawyers.

    Secondly, 34A “Sticks in windows” BARBERPOLES. I may be betraying a northeast USA bias but barber poles always seemed to be pretty hefty cylinders. “Sticks” usually suggest a certain thinness — a stick of gum vs a wad of gum.

    Like everyone here I appreciate a tough Saturday puzzle, but I object to sloppy clues chosen it seems only for their brevity.

  5. 30:30, 4 lookups for CYCLONES, SENECA, ALPERT, LAS (mañanitas)

    I made the mistake of getting cute and thinking TUS Mañanitas would be a good title for a birthday song. The first of many mistakes.

    By the time I had all the squares filled in, PUTPUPSONGS crossing LETME made as much sense as anything else I had entered. Check grid showed it’s PUMPUPSONGS crossing LEMME.

    Difficult.

  6. Somehow I finished this puzzle without final error. I thought for the longest time this would be a massive DNF. But I kept pecking away at it and finally the Let Me got fixed to Lemme and I was done. I’ll now rest on my tattered laurels and bask in the glow of my desk lamp…

  7. 16:57, 2 Naticks (and I was lucky to get that with all the gibberish in this). Agreed with the others, absolutely horrid puzzle that should have never seen the light of day. (Sadly the New York Times is solid competition in this regard.)

    And on the other topic of the last two days, I got into this game relatively late, but I have to notice I derive a lot more enjoyment with the older puzzles than I do these modern “Dumb and Dumber” puzzles (I’m sure we’ll hit “Dumberer” soon enough). I’ll even notice when I do / redo ones from the era I was new to these that they’re of better quality than the ones turned out these days. A lot of the specific reasons have already been listed by others, so I won’t reiterate.

    But bad. Just bad.

  8. TIL “PUMP-UP SONGS” and “HAMMER PANTS”. YIL “TIL” (from a user’s comment). But I still have more to learn … 😜.

  9. Another DNF…Patti Varol must be a female David Steinberg…these puzzles really suck as of late👎👎
    Stay safe😀

    1. Hi Ken B. You posted what I was thinking when I saw Joel’s comment, so I’m going to post in support of your message. We have enough hate in this world, more than enough! I guess I hoped that Bill would remove the post.

  10. Difficult for me with some goofy clues and answers but it was fun. The kind of puzzle that makes me think about quitting and taking the L but feels great to complete and earn the W.

  11. Wow a real slog and considered giving up
    a couple of times but I actually finished
    with just one big mistake on pump up songs.
    I have a feeling the scribes of the puzzles
    are getting younger while we’re getting
    older. Although it felt good to get through
    most of the puzzle, I didn’t really enjoy it.

  12. Yeah … 15:31 and there wasn’t a chance in hell I was going to finish this one. I even got some of the Pride references, but the middle of the grid was just one natick after the other.

  13. Annoyances not previously mentioned.

    51d emo is emo to me, I’ve never seen it used as a prefix w either pop nor rock.
    Pop, rock, music, genre & style might be used to provide clue for EMO

    45d TIMS isn’t really proper for Timberlakes…Timb’s came up to distinguish them from Tim’s which is a cowboy boot brand, also short for Canadian Tim Hortons chain.

  14. Way too tough for me today; took 1:00:27 with tons of “check-grids” in the NW, N. I managed to get a reasonable time of about 20 minutes for the bottom half, middle and NE, but ran into a wall and complete boredom in the NW. I had ANA, sum and MAT. After a dozen “check-grids” I changed sum to ADD and slowly, very slowly, got one letter after another, until I finally got to a very unsatisfying finish.

    @Joel – GFY

  15. Jumbled Up has to be the worst crossword entry ever…been doing these successfully for 20 years…NYT…LAT..WSJ…been finishing saturday and friday puzzles regularly and i did finish this one but Cancel one’s order for Jumbled Up?…ridiculous.

  16. I agree with ALL of the DNF people. The clues were cutesy and their answers were obscure. I smiled when I finally comments section and saw how long it took for Bill (and others) to complete the darn thing. Tough puzzles are fine, but unfair clues and far-out answers are not fun. Saturday is a day to relax and enjoy.

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