LA Times Crossword 9 Oct 22, Sunday

Advertisement

Constructed by: Katie Hale
Edited by: Patti Varol

Today’s Theme: Say It Again

Themed answers each include two homophones side by side:

  • 23A Love letters between Andre Agassi and Steffi Graf? : TENNIS PROS’ PROSE
  • 32A Hot food served extra cold? : CHILLY CHILI PEPPERS
  • 50A Cast members who may sing “Under the Sea” at sea? : DISNEY CRUISE CREWS
  • 67A Musical composition to meditate to? : INNER PEACE PIECE
  • 86A Ransack the Grand Ole Opry? : STEAL STEEL GUITARS
  • 102A Money made by one with a Messiah complex? : FALSE PROPHET PROFIT
  • 117A Excited cry when Alabama pulled even in the big game? : CRIMSON TIDE TIED!

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 17m 49s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • TOPMOST (top-mast!!!)
  • NGAIO (Ngaia)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Milk option : SKIM

The fatty component of milk is known as butterfat (sometimes “milkfat”). To be labeled whole milk, the butterfat content must be at least 3.25%. Low-fat milk is defined as milk containing 0.5-2% fat, with levels of 1% and 2% commonly found on grocery store shelves. Skim milk must contain less than 0.5% fat, and typically contains 0.1%.

5 Organs with the smallest bones in the body : EARS

The middle ear is the portion of the ear immediately behind the eardrum. The middle ear contains three small bones called the ossicles, the three smallest bones in the human body. The ossicles’ job is to transmit sound from the outer ear to the inner ear. The shape of the bones gives rise to their names: the hammer (malleus), anvil (incus) and stirrup (stapes).

19 __ Domini : ANNO

The Latin word for year is “annus”. We often see it used in Latin phrases, but usually with a different spelling. In “anno Domini”, the “anno” is the ablative case of “annus” as the phrase means “in the year of the Lord”. Another example is “per annum”, in which “annum” is the accusative case as the literal translation of the phrase is “during the year”.

20 Grad : ALUM

An alumnus (plural “alumni”) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural “alumnae”). The term comes into English from Latin, in which an alumnus is a foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or alumnus.

21 Old-timey truth : SOOTH

A soothsayer is someone who claims to have the ability to predict the future. The term “soothsayer” comes from “sooth”, an archaic word for “truth”. So a soothsayer was supposedly one who told the “truth” (about the future).

22 “You win!” : UNCLE!

To say uncle is to submit or yield. This peculiarly American use of “uncle” dates back to the early 1900s, but nobody seems to know how “uncle!” came to mean “stop!”

23 Love letters between Andre Agassi and Steffi Graf? : TENNIS PROS’ PROSE

Retired tennis professional Andre Agassi has been married to fellow player Steffi Graf since 2001. Agassi wrote an autobiography called “Open”, published in 2009. An amazing revelation in the book is that Agassi’s famous head of hair was actually a wig for much of his playing career. Can you imagine how hard it must have been to play tennis at his level with a rug stuck on?

Steffi Graf is a former World No. 1 professional tennis player from Germany. Graf won 22 Grand Slam singles titles, which was more than any other man or woman until Serena Williams came along. Graf is married to another former World No. 1, namely Andre Agassi.

26 Word repeated in a Culture Club song : KARMA

Karma is a religious concept with its basis in Indian faiths. Karma embraces the notion of cause and effect. Good deeds have good consequences at some later point in one’s life, one’s future life, or one’s afterlife. And, bad deeds have bad consequences.

Culture Club is an English pop band that was founded by the lead vocalist Boy George. The group decided on the name “Culture Club” in recognition the varied background of the four band members: representing the gay, black, white, English, Irish and Jewish communities. The band’s most successful releases are “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me”, I’ll Tumble 4 Ya”, and “Karma Chameleon”.

27 Halvah flavor : SESAME

Halvah (also “halva, halwa”) is a sweet confection. It is common across Asia and best known in North America as part of Jewish cuisine.

28 Letters before a handle : AKA

Also known as (aka)Also known as (aka)

29 Type of lift : T-BAR

A T-bar is a ski lift on which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of a T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There’s also a J-bar, which is a similar device but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

32 Hot food served extra cold? : CHILLY CHILI PEPPERS

Chili peppers originated in Bolivia, and were first grown as a crop in Mexico. The spelling of the word “chili” can lead to some confusion. “Chili” is the most common spelling in North America, although the spelling “chile” is usual in Mexico and some parts of the US and Canada. The spelling in Britain and Ireland that I grew up with is “”chilli”.

37 City east of Pittsburgh : ALTOONA

Altoona is in central Pennsylvania, and is home to the Ivyside Park Campus of Pennsylvania State University. Altoona is also home to Lakemont Park and Leap-The-Dips, the world’s oldest operating wooden roller coaster. Altoona was founded in 1849 by the Pennsylvania Railroad as the site of a large maintenance facility. Railroad enthusiasts flock to Altoona to stand at the center of Horseshoe Curve, a tightly curved section of track that allows trains to achieve the elevation necessary to cross the Allegheny Ridge. That section of track lends its name to the city’s minor league baseball team, the Altoona Curve.

40 Force on Earth : ONE G

The force of gravity (g-force) that we all feel is referred to as “one G”. As gravity is an accelerating force, acceleration is measured relative to that force of gravity. So, if we are sitting in a vehicle that accelerates at 3G, then we are experiencing a force that is three times that which we feel from the gravitational pull of the earth. Zero G is weightlessness that is experienced when in space, and outside the influence of the earth’s gravity.

42 Vientiane language : LAO

Vientiane is the capital city of Laos, and is situated on the Mekong River. The city was originally called the “city of sandalwood” by Buddhist monks, naming it after the valued trees that grew in the area. The French took the Pali words for “city of sandalwood” and rewrote it as the French-sounding “Vientiane”.

43 Chemical relative : ISOMER

In the world of chemistry, isomers are two compounds with the same chemical formula (i.e. the same atomic constituents), but with a slightly different arrangement of the atoms relative to each other. The differing arrangement of atoms often leads to different chemical properties.

47 Lawmaking bodies : SENATES

Our word “senate” comes from the Latin name for such a body, namely “senatus”. In turn, “senatus” is derived from “senex” meaning “old man”, reflecting the original Roman Senate’s makeup as a council of “elders”.

50 Cast members who may sing “Under the Sea” at sea? : DISNEY CRUISE CREWS

“Under the Sea” is an Oscar-winning song from the 1989 Disney animated film “The Little Mermaid”. It is performed by the crab character named Sebastian.

56 “__ been thinking … ” : I’VE

Me too …

57 “Wreck-It Ralph” setting : ARCADE

“Wreck-It Ralph” is a 2012 animated movie from Disney. The title character is an arcade game villain who dreams of losing his bad guy image and becoming a hero.

60 Supermodel with a Global Chic collection on HSN : IMAN

Iman Mohamed Abdulmajid is a supermodel from Somalia who goes simply by the name “Iman” these days. “Iman” is an Arabic word for “faith”. She is a smart cookie. She has a degree in political science and is fluent in five languages: Somali, Arabic, Italian, French and English. Iman was married to English rock star David Bowie from 1992 until his death in 2016.

63 Like Roy Haylock as Bianca Del Rio : IN DRAG

“Bianca Del Rio” is the stage name of drag queen and comedian Roy Haylock. Del Rio won the sixth season of the reality competition “RuPaul’s Drag Race”.

66 Change : AMEND

The verb “to amend” means “to change for the better, put right, alter by adding”. The related verb “to emend” is used more rarely, and mainly in reference to the editing of professional writing. Both terms are derived from the Latin “emendare” meaning “to remove fault”.

74 Miley Cyrus’s “Party in __” : THE USA

“Party in the USA” is a 2009 song released by Miley Cyrus. It was co-written by Jessi J, with the intention that she would record it herself. She decided that the end product wasn’t “edgy” enough for her, and so passed it onto Cyrus. The Cyrus version made it to number-two in the charts, and Jessie J eventually recorded a cover version.

75 Fuel rating : OCTANE

The difference between a premium and regular gasoline is its octane rating. The octane rating is a measure of the resistance of the gasoline to auto-ignition i.e. its resistance to ignition just by virtue of being compressed in the cylinder. This auto-ignition is undesirable as multiple-cylinder engines are designed so that ignition within each cylinder takes place precisely when the plug sparks, and not before. If ignition occurs before the spark is created, the resulting phenomenon is called “knocking”. We sometimes use the adjective “high-octane” to mean “intense, dynamic, high-powered”

80 Nutrition fig. : RDA

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

85 Convent resident : NUN

A convent is a community devoted to religious life, and especially a community of nuns. The term “convent” ultimately comes from the Latin “com” (with, together) and “venire” (to come).

86 Ransack the Grand Ole Opry? : STEAL STEEL GUITARS

The Grand Ole Opry started out as a radio show in 1925 originally called the WSM “Barn Dance”. In 1927, the “Barn Dance” radio show was broadcast in a slot after an NBC production called “Musical Appreciation Hour”, a collection of classical works including Grand Opera. In a December show, the host of “Barn Dance” announced, “For the past hour, we have been listening to music taken largely from Grand Opera. From now on we will present the ‘Grand Ole Opry'”. That name was used for the radio show from then on.

93 Saudi __ : ARABIA

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is the largest Arab country in the Middle East and is the world’s largest oil producer, home to the world’s largest oil reserves. The Saudi dynasty started in central Arabia in 1744 when the secular leader Muhammad ibn Saud joined forces with the Islamic scholar and Imam, Muhammad ibn Abd-al-Wahhab. At the time, Saud was a ruler of a town near Riyadh and he was determined to bring “true” Islam to the Arabian peninsula. Since 1744 the fortunes of the Saudi family have risen and fallen, but it is that same family who rules what we know today as Saudi Arabia.

94 Apple platform : IOS

“iOS” is what Apple now calls their mobile operating system. It was previously known as iPhone OS.

95 With 79-Across, drink with tapioca pearls : BOBA …
79 See 95-Across : … TEA

Bubble tea, sometimes called “boba tea”, is a tea-based drink from Taiwan. The “bubbles” are chewy tapioca balls that are usually added to the drink.

96 Running wear? : HOSE

A snag is a pull or a tear in a fabric. A snag, particularly in stockings, might lead to a run. And on the other side of the Atlantic, a “run” is called a “ladder”.

108 MLB family name : ALOU

Felipe Alou is a former professional baseball player and manager. Alou managed the Montreal Expos from 1992 to 2001, and the San Francisco Giants from 2003 to 2006. Alou was born and raised in the Dominican Republic and came to the US to play for the Giants in 1955. Felipe’s brothers Matty and Jesús followed him to the US, and into Major League baseball.

109 Wine from Douro : PORT

The Douro Valley is a wine region in Portugal that is perhaps most associated with the production of port. The region is located on the Douro River, upstream from the city of Porto.

110 Rio maker : KIA

South Korean automaker Kia has been making the subcompact model called the Rio since 2000.

117 Excited cry when Alabama pulled even in the big game? : CRIMSON TIDE TIED!

The athletic teams of the University of Alabama (“Bama”) are nicknamed the Crimson Tide, which is a reference to the team colors of crimson and white.

122 __ butter : COCOA

Cocoa butter is extracted from the cacao bean and is used to make chocolate, among other things.

123 Weymouth of Talking Heads : TINA

Tina Weymouth is one of the founding members of the group called Talking Heads. Talking Heads was a New Wave band from New York City, formed in 1974 and active until 1991. Weymouth married Talking Heads co-founder Chris Franz in 1977.

124 Nick at __ : NITE

“Nick at Nite” is the name given to the late-night programming aired on the Nickelodeon channel space. Nick at Nite started broadcasting in 1985 and was conceived as television’s first “oldies” television network.

126 Director Welles : ORSON

Orson Welles is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for directing and narrating 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

127 “The Addams Family” adjective : OOKY

In the television sitcom “The Addams Family”, the family had a frequent visitor named Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. He was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

They’re creepy and they’re kooky,
Mysterious and spooky,
They’re altogether ooky,
The Addams Family.

Down

1 H.S. exams : SATS

Today, the standardized test for admission to colleges is known as the SAT Reasoning Test, but it used to be called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, which led to the abbreviation “SAT”.

2 Meniscus location : KNEE

We usually think of the meniscus as the curved upper surface of a liquid in a container, but a meniscus can also be a crescent-shaped body. In terms of anatomy, menisci are crescent-shaped pieces of cartilage present in joints such as the knee and wrist.

4 European microstate led by Prince Albert II : MONACO

Albert II became the sovereign prince of Monaco in 2005 upon the death of his father Rainier III (and wife of actress Grace Kelly). The prince is quite the athlete. He is a judo black belt and competed in the bobsleigh events in five Winter Olympics.

6 Chamonix backdrop : ALP

Chamonix-Mont-Blanc is on the eastern border of France, in the Alps. Famously it was the site of the 1924 Winter Olympics, the first ever Winter Games.

8 Great __ Mountains : SMOKY

The Great Smoky Mountains are a subrange of the Appalachians and are located in North Carolina and Tennessee. The “Smokies” lie almost entirely within the bounds of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which is the most-visited national park in the whole country. The name “Smoky” is a reference to the natural fog often seen hanging over the range. The fog is actually a vapor made up of volatile organic compounds released by the vegetation covering the peaks.

9 Snake also known as Naja haje : ASP

The Egyptian cobra (Naja haje) is also known as the asp. That said, the term “asp” can apply to several species of snake, including the Egyptian cobra. Legend has it that Cleopatra committed suicide by enticing an asp to bite her. If that’s true, then that asp was probably an Egyptian cobra.

11 Play the recorder, perhaps : TOOTLE

The recorder is a woodwind instrument with a whistle mouthpiece. I have to admit to a negative impression of the recorder, as it’s the instrument that so many kids have to learn on the other side of the Atlantic. I’ve heard way too many school recitals featuring banks of recorders …The recorder is a woodwind instrument with a whistle mouthpiece. I have to admit to a negative impression of the recorder, as it’s the instrument that so many kids have to learn on the other side of the Atlantic. I’ve heard way too many school recitals featuring banks of recorders …

14 Puffin kin : AUK

Auks are penguin-like sea birds that live in colder northern waters including the Arctic. Like penguins, auks are great swimmers, but unlike penguins, auks can fly.

Puffins are seabirds found in the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans. They feed primarily by diving into the water to catch fish, and are known for their ability to swim underwater using a “flying” technique.

15 Podded plant : SNAP PEA

Sugar peas are also known as snap peas. These peas are eaten before the seeds mature, and the whole pod is consumed.

17 Composer Bernstein : ELMER

Film composer Elmer Bernstein was not related to the famous classical composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein, although the two were friends.

18 Tropical hardwoods : TEAKS

Teak is a hardwood tree in the mint family that is commonly found in monsoon forests of Asia. Teak’s tight grain and high oil content make it very suitable for constructing outdoor furniture, where weather resistance is valued. For the same reason, teak is the wood of choice for wooden decks on boats.

24 “If u ask me” : IMHO

In my humble opinion (IMHO)

25 __ fly : SAC

That would be a sac(rifice) fly, in baseball.

33 Secular : LAIC

Anything described as laic (or “laical, lay”) is related to the laity, those members of the church who are not clergy. The term “laic” ultimately comes from the Greek “laikos” meaning “of the people”.

35 Memo header : IN RE

The term “in re” is Latin, and is derived from “in” (in) and “res” (thing, matter). “In re” literally means “in the matter”, and is used to mean “in regard to” or “in the matter of”.

37 “M*A*S*H” star : ALDA

Hawkeye Pierce is the lead character in the “M*A*S*H” novel, movie and TV series. Hawkeye was originally portrayed by Donald Sutherland in the film, and then by Alan Alda in the television show. Pierce is the only character appearing in all 250 episodes of the groundbreaking TV series.

39 “Vissi d’arte” opera : TOSCA

“Vissi d’arte” is an aria from Puccini’s “Tosca” that is sung by the title character Floria Tosca. The title translates from Italian as “I lived for art”.

44 Sign for a packed house : SRO

Standing room only (SRO)

46 Surroundings : MILIEU

We use the French term “milieu” (plural “milieux”) to mean “environment, surroundings”. In French, “milieu” is the word for “middle”.

47 “Groo the Wanderer” cartoonist Aragonés : SERGIO

Sergio Aragonés is a Spanish-Mexican cartoonist who is best known for his contributions to “Mad” magazine. One of Aragonés’ creations is the regular section in the magazine titled “A Mad Look At …” He also created the comic book “Groo the Wanderer”.

48 __ Rachel Wood of “Westworld” : EVAN

Actress Evan Rachel Wood’s most famous role to date is playing one of the leads in the 2003 movie “Thirteen”. Wood’s private life draws a lot of attention, especially as she was romantically linked for some time with the “outrageous” musician Marilyn Manson.

“Westworld” is an HBO series that is based on a 1973 movie of the same name, which was written and directed by novelist Michael Crichton. Westworld is a high-tech theme park populated by androids that interact with the guests.

51 Forces that act on water? : NAVIES

A navy is a group of ships, and often the whole complement of seagoing resources of a nation. The term “navy” comes from the Latin “navis” meaning “ship”.

53 “The Walking Dead” actor Steven : YEUN

Steven Yeun is a South Korean-born American actor who is perhaps best known for playing Glenn Rhee in the TV show “The Walking Dead”. He also starred in the 2020 film “Minari” in a performance that earned him a Best Actor Oscar nomination, making him the first Asian-American to be so honored.

54 Pineapple center : CORE

The original use of the word “pineapple” was to describe what we now call a pine cone, the reproductive organ of a conifer tree. The term “pineapple” was then used by Europeans when they first encountered the tropical fruit, because it looked like a large pine cone.

55 “You __ what you sow” : REAP

The commonly quoted line “As ye sow, so shall ye reap” is not actually a direct quote from the Bible, although the sentiment is expressed there at least twice. In the Book of Job is the line “They that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same”. In the Epistle of Paul to the Galatians is the line “Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap”.

62 Small sofa : SETTEE

“Settee” is another word for “couch”. The term comes from the Old English “setl”, which was a long bench with a high back and arms.

64 “Illmatic” rapper : NAS

Rapper Nas used to go by an earlier stage name “Nasty Nas”, and before that by his real name “Nasir bin Olu Dara Jones”. Nas released his first album “Illmatic” in 1994, and inventively titled his fifth studio album “Stillmatic”, released in 2001.

65 Takoma Park, Md., region : DC AREA

Takoma Park is a city in Maryland that is a suburb of Washington, DC. In 2013, Takoma Park became the first city in the US to reduce the voting age to 16 (for municipal elections).

68 Seehorn of “Better Call Saul” : RHEA

Rhea Seehorn is an actress best known for playing lawyer Kim Wexler in the TV crime drama “Better Call Saul”.

70 Beige hue : ECRU

The color ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

71 Fashion designer Vera : WANG

Vera Wang’s first choice for a career was figure skating. Although she is a very capable skater, Wang failed to make the 1968 US Olympics team. She switched to the world of fashion, and is now famous for her designs of wedding dresses … and also costumes for figure skaters.

72 Together, musically : A DUE

“A due” is a musical term meaning “together” that translates literally from Italian as “by two”.

76 Mystery writer Marsh : NGAIO

Dame Ngaio Marsh was a crime writer from New Zealand. Marsh is known as one of the four original “Queens of Crime”, namely: Dorothy L. Sayers, Margery Allingham, Agatha Christie, and Marsh. All her novels feature her hero, a British CID detective named Roderick Alleyn.

77 Irish capital : EUROS

Euro coins are issued by all the participating European states. The reverse side is a common design used by all countries, whereas the obverse is a design specific to each nation. For example, the one euro coin issued by Malta features the Maltese Cross. That Maltese euro is legal tender right across the eurozone. The Irish euro features a harp.

81 Interior Secretary Haaland : DEB

Deb Haaland became US Secretary of the Interior in 2021, making her the first Native-American Cabinet secretary. However, she was not the first Native American to serve in the Cabinet. That honor went to Charles Curtis, US Vice President under Herbert Hoover.

82 Mahershala of “Green Book” : ALI

Mahershala Ali is an actor and sometime rapper. Among the more memorable roles Ali has had are lobbyist Remy Danton in TV’s “House of Cards”, and Colonel Boggs in “The Hunger Games” series of movies. He also won Best Supporting Actor Oscars for playing Juan in the 2016 drama “Moonlight”, and Dr. Don Shirley in 2018’s “Green Book”.

“Green Book” is a 2018 comedy-drama film that is based on the true story of a 1962 tour of the Deep South by Florida-born classical and jazz pianist Don Shirley. Shirley, an African American, hires Italian-American bouncer Frank “Tony Lip” Vallelonga as his driver and bodyguard. I haven’t seen this one, but I hear that audiences and critics loved it …

86 Drink brand with a lizard logo : SOBE

The brand name “SoBe” can be found on teas, juices and bottled waters. “SoBe” is an abbreviation for “South Beach”, the neighborhood in Miami Beach, Florida.

87 Maria von __ : TRAPP

“The Sound of Music” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical that was made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on “The Story of the Trapp Family Singers”, a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war. One family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives in the same town in which I used to live in California.

88 Window part : SASH

A movable (up-and-down) window frame is called a sash, from the French word for a frame “châssis”. The term is also applied to that part of a door or window into which windows are set.

90 Persian in Mexico, e.g. : GATO

The Persian is that long-haired cat with a squashed muzzle. The breed takes its name from its place of origin, namely Persia (Iran).

96 “Get Out” genre : HORROR

“Get Out” is a 2017 horror film written and directed by Jordan Peele. I don’t do horror, but I do hear that this one is well made …

97 Fiber __ : OPTICS

Optical fibers are lengths of glass or plastic that are slightly thicker than a human hair. They are usually bundled into cables, and then used for transmission of data signals. Optical transmission has advantages over electrical transmission, especially in terms of interference and loss of signal strength.

101 Ital. peak : MT ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcanoes in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts. It is sometimes referred to as “Mongibello” in Italian, and as “Mungibeddu” (sometimes “Muncibeddu”) in Sicilian. The English name “Etna” comes from the Greek “aitho” meaning “I eat”.

102 Screwball comedy : FARCE

A farce is a comedy play that features an exaggerated and improbable storyline, with lots of physical humor. I love a good farce …

103 Hilo hello : ALOHA

Hilo is the largest settlement on the Big Island of Hawaii, and has a population of over 43,000 (that’s not very many!). I love the Big Island …

104 Celebrity chef DiSpirito : ROCCO

Rocco DiSpirito is a celebrity chef from New York City. He was a contestant on “Dancing with the Stars” in 2008, and did quite well in the competition.

105 MMA call : TKO

Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport in which competitors use a variety of techniques from a variety of traditional combat sports and martial arts.

106 Piebald horse : PINTO

A pinto is a horse with patchy markings of white mixed with another color. “Pinto” means “painted” in American Spanish.

112 “Wonder Woman 1984” actress Kristen :

Kristen Wiig is a comic actress who appears on “Saturday Night Live”. She also made an appearance on the first season of Spike TV’s quirky “The Joe Schmo Show”, playing “Dr. Pat”. More recently, she co-wrote and starred in the 2011 hit film “Bridesmaids”, and co-starred in the 2016 reboot of “Ghostbusters”.

“Wonder Woman 1984” is a 2020 film in which Gal Gadot plays Wonder Woman. As the title suggests, the action is set during the Cold War. The protagonist is the supervillain Cheetah, portrayed by Kristen Wiig.

113 French noodle : TETE

“Noodle” and “bean” are slang terms for the head.

116 Sofa bed site : DEN

The first patent for a folding bed (later “hide-a-bed”) was issued way back in 1899.

119 __ Francisco : SAN

The California city of San Francisco takes its name from the Presidio of San Francisco and the nearby Mission San Francisco de Asís that were founded in 1776 by Spanish colonists.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Milk option : SKIM
5 Organs with the smallest bones in the body : EARS
9 Escapade : ANTIC
14 Good point : ASSET
19 __ Domini : ANNO
20 Grad : ALUM
21 Old-timey truth : SOOTH
22 “You win!” : UNCLE!
23 Love letters between Andre Agassi and Steffi Graf? : TENNIS PROS’ PROSE
26 Word repeated in a Culture Club song : KARMA
27 Halvah flavor : SESAME
28 Letters before a handle : AKA
29 Type of lift : T-BAR
31 Glance : PEEK
32 Hot food served extra cold? : CHILLY CHILI PEPPERS
37 City east of Pittsburgh : ALTOONA
40 Force on Earth : ONE G
41 Spotted : SEEN
42 Vientiane language : LAO
43 Chemical relative : ISOMER
47 Lawmaking bodies : SENATES
50 Cast members who may sing “Under the Sea” at sea? : DISNEY CRUISE CREWS
56 “__ been thinking … ” : I’VE
57 “Wreck-It Ralph” setting : ARCADE
58 Museum hanging : OIL
59 Not ‘neath : O’ER
60 Supermodel with a Global Chic collection on HSN : IMAN
61 “We need help!” : SAVE US!
63 Like Roy Haylock as Bianca Del Rio : IN DRAG
66 Change : AMEND
67 Musical composition to meditate to? : INNER PEACE PIECE
71 Walks in the shallows : WADES
74 Miley Cyrus’s “Party in __” : THE USA
75 Fuel rating : OCTANE
78 Flaps : ADOS
79 See 95-Across : … TEA
80 Nutrition fig. : RDA
83 Check out, in a way : RING UP
85 Convent resident : NUN
86 Ransack the Grand Ole Opry? : STEAL STEEL GUITARS
91 Grow resentful : GET SORE
93 Saudi __ : ARABIA
94 Apple platform : IOS
95 With 79-Across, drink with tapioca pearls : BOBA …
96 Running wear? : HOSE
98 Highest : TOPMOST
102 Money made by one with a Messiah complex? : FALSE PROPHET PROFIT
108 MLB family name : ALOU
109 Wine from Douro : PORT
110 Rio maker : KIA
111 Reached by plane : FLEW TO
115 Moved to a better fishing spot, maybe : ROWED
117 Excited cry when Alabama pulled even in the big game? : CRIMSON TIDE TIED!
121 Sound from a steeple : CHIME
122 __ butter : COCOA
123 Weymouth of Talking Heads : TINA
124 Nick at __ : NITE
125 All gone : EATEN
126 Director Welles : ORSON
127 “The Addams Family” adjective : OOKY
128 Grows old : AGES

Down

1 H.S. exams : SATS
2 Meniscus location : KNEE
3 Country lodgings : INNS
4 European microstate led by Prince Albert II : MONACO
5 Enter with caution : EASE IN
6 Chamonix backdrop : ALP
7 Sub-suburban : RURAL
8 Great __ Mountains : SMOKY
9 Snake also known as Naja haje : ASP
10 Neither’s partner : NOR
11 Play the recorder, perhaps : TOOTLE
12 “Brace yourself for heavy news” : IT’S BIG
13 Inexpensive : CHEAP
14 Puffin kin : AUK
15 Podded plant : SNAP PEA
16 Hours reduced by unplugging : SCREEN TIME
17 Composer Bernstein : ELMER
18 Tropical hardwoods : TEAKS
24 “If u ask me” : IMHO
25 __ fly : SAC
30 Hem over, say : RESEW
33 Secular : LAIC
34 Breaks up a plot, say : HOES
35 Memo header : IN RE
36 Hutches : PENS
37 “M*A*S*H” star : ALDA
38 Hideouts : LAIRS
39 “Vissi d’arte” opera : TOSCA
44 Sign for a packed house : SRO
45 French affirmative : OUI
46 Surroundings : MILIEU
47 “Groo the Wanderer” cartoonist Aragonés : SERGIO
48 __ Rachel Wood of “Westworld” : EVAN
49 Text command : SEND
51 Forces that act on water? : NAVIES
52 Perfect places : EDENS
53 “The Walking Dead” actor Steven : YEUN
54 Pineapple center : CORE
55 “You __ what you sow” : REAP
60 “Let me clarify … ” : I MEANT …
62 Small sofa : SETTEE
64 “Illmatic” rapper : NAS
65 Takoma Park, Md., region : DC AREA
66 When “Vissi d’arte” is sung in 39-Down : ACT II
68 Seehorn of “Better Call Saul” : RHEA
69 Sound from a steeple : PEAL
70 Beige hue : ECRU
71 Fashion designer Vera : WANG
72 Together, musically : A DUE
73 “This is your only chance” : DON’T BLOW IT
76 Mystery writer Marsh : NGAIO
77 Irish capital : EUROS
81 Interior Secretary Haaland : DEB
82 Mahershala of “Green Book” : ALI
84 “Wanna know a secret?” : PSST!
86 Drink brand with a lizard logo : SOBE
87 Maria von __ : TRAPP
88 Window part : SASH
89 Shady one? : TREE
90 Persian in Mexico, e.g. : GATO
92 “Get over it” : SO SUE ME
96 “Get Out” genre : HORROR
97 Fiber __ : OPTICS
99 Ineffective period : OFF DAY
100 Stack : PILE
101 Ital. peak : MT ETNA
102 Screwball comedy : FARCE
103 Hilo hello : ALOHA
104 Celebrity chef DiSpirito : ROCCO
105 MMA call : TKO
106 Piebald horse : PINTO
107 1:1, for one : RATIO
112 “Wonder Woman 1984” actress Kristen : WIIG
113 French noodle : TETE
114 Words of appreciation : ODES
116 Sofa bed site : DEN
118 Stock quote? : MOO!
119 __ Francisco : SAN
120 Tats : INK

22 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 9 Oct 22, Sunday”

  1. Messed up 65D. Thought it was ACADIA. didn’t know 63A and came up with IN A RAG. I was torn on 80A, thought it was RDA but didn’t work with 65D, so left it with DDA. So, . How many errors is that? 2, 3 ?? Not sure.

    Otherwise, long slog. Less than an hour.

    A lot of odd clues and odd answers. The theme was ok.

  2. Perhaps the natick of all naticks:
    This puzzles North East Corner have EVERY word a proper noun, except for two.

    9A – Birthplace of Apollo – DELOS
    16A – Popular social-planning website – EVITE
    19A – Stiller and ____ – MEARA

    9D – Reduce in rank – DEMOTE (only “good” clue)
    10D – Civil rights leader Medger – EVERS
    11D – Novelist O’Flaherty – LIAM
    12D – Other, in Oaxaca – OTRA
    13D – Bean or Combs – SEAN

    SIX out of the SEVEN clues were proper nouns. It’s a shame, as the rest of the puzzle was pretty good and entertaining, although the 3 Longs were also proper names …

    https://www.arkadium.com/games/sunday-crossword-pennydell/

    1. This is pretty much par for the course for Penny Dell. For where I live, all I can get if I want a crossword book easily is newspaper bound books that them and Kappa put out. Otherwise, I have to order out and grossly overpay if I want a book of well constructed crosswords.

      Basically, as a constructor you got to be careful and not just look for what fills, especially if you’re looking for something good for the solver. Generally put, this puzzle started out with a bad theme (“Overappelations”), added a lot more proper nouns and weird words and the grid ended up with a ton of Natick crossings and pretty much an abject disaster.

      Lot of market out there for crosswords. Just not a lot of places where you can get good, polished, enjoyable crosswords. Those are rare from any outlet.

      For those that really are curious, 12:26, a whole TON of guessing, and got out with 2 Natick errors.

  3. The Green Book is not a comedy. While there are some light moments, the movie focuses on the prejudice and hostility faced by a black classical musician on a tour of the Deep South in the early 60’s. The movie won the Oscar for Best Picture in 2019.

    1. Hi Patsy. I’d call it one of those hybrid deals – a Dramedy. Some drama. Some comedy. And maybe a BioDramedy as some of the life story of Dr. Shirley was shown along with the actual historical truth behind the actual Green Book which was used by people of color as they made their way across the United States by car or bus. I found the movie entertaining and informative and even disturbing to think this was the reality in our country not all that long ago.

    2. My bad, Patsy. I haven’t seen the film yet, and so misinterpreted what I read online. I changed the genre to comedy-drama, as suggested by Tony Michaels in another comment. Thanks for pointing out the error.

  4. 23 minutes even, and no errors. A few too many proper names (grouped together for maximum annoyance value), but for grids of this size, I suppose a few are to be expected.

  5. No final error. I will pronounce the solving of this puzzle “a slow slog of a wet dog” and leave it at that.

  6. 25:13 – no errors or lookups. False starts: MAY>SAC, ADAGE>SOOTH, KAA>ASP, ITSBAD>ITSBIG, PEER>PEEK, DRE>NAS.

    Had a few new answers and clue references.

    Figuring out the theme early on helped to solve some of them early, the first ones being DISNEY and CRIMSON. In general, getting one of the homonyms made the second one easy to figure out.

  7. Well, since I failed yesterday I decided to do today’s puzzle; took 33:45 with no peeks or errors. Pretty tricky in some places, but with crosses and good guessing I managed to finish with no major problems. Finally got the theme on the third theme clue which helped fill in a few gaps. Mused over …GUITARS and NGAIO for a bit before I got the banner.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *