LA Times Crossword Answers 21 Jun 15, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Quicklink
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: C.C. Burnikel
THEME: Honoring Our Veterans … each of today’s themed answers comprises two words, with the initials GI:

101D. Legislation signed 6/22/1944 by FDR … and, initially, what the nine longest across answers in this puzzle comprise GI BILL

23A. High-end bar? GOLD INGOT
25A. IRS Schedule C, line 7 GROSS INCOME
39A. Search feature that shows results as you type GOOGLE INSTANT
50A. “Massaging” Dr. Scholl’s product GEL INSOLES
67A. Broad appeal GENERAL INTEREST
87A. Popular Aegean vacation spots GREEK ISLES
97A. Teacher of the Year awardee, say GOOD INFLUENCE
116A. Exodus prohibition GRAVEN IMAGE
119A. “That could work!” GREAT IDEA!

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Queens swingers METS
The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

5. Like New York’s Waldorf Astoria DECO
Art deco is the name given to a style of design and architecture of the 1920s that actually had its roots in Belgium and then spread throughout Europe before arriving in North America. Celebrated examples of art deco architecture are the magnificent Chrysler Building in New York City completed in 1930, and the GE Building that sits in the middle of Rockefeller Center also in New York City, with the address of “30 Rock”.

The Waldorf=Astoria hotel (note the double hyphen) is named for the famous Astor family of New York that was so successful in business. The first Astors to arrive in the US immigrated from Walldorf in Germany. Two members of the family eventually built hotels in the city, one called the Waldorf (opened in 1893) and the other the Astoria (opened in 1897), with the pair operating next door to each other in competition. The hotels were eventually joined into one, creating the world’s largest hotel of the day. The original Waldorf=Astoria was demolished (the Empire State Building occupies that space now). The current hotel is an Art Deco landmark in the city, opened in 1931.

9. Ball queen BELLE
A “beau” is the boyfriend of a “belle”, a young lady. “Beau” and “belle” are the masculine and feminine forms of the French word for “handsome, beautiful”.

19. “The African Queen” co-screenwriter AGEE
James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

21. “The sharpest-sighted Spirit of all in Heaven,” in “Paradise Lost” URIEL
Uriel is one of the archangels in the Jewish and Christian traditions.

“Paradise Lost” is an epic poem written by Englishman John Milton. It is indeed an epic work, published originally in ten volumes with over ten thousand lines of verse. The “paradise” that is “lost” is the Garden of Eden, from which Adam and Eve were expelled by God in the “Fall of Man”.

22. Jazzy Jones NORAH
The beguiling Norah Jones is the daughter of famous sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar, and is one of my favorite singers. If you haven’t heard Jones sing her song “Come Away with Me”, you just haven’t lived …

25. IRS Schedule C, line 7 GROSS INCOME
The attachments to a Form 1040 income tax return are known as “schedules”. Schedule C lists the income and expenses related to self-employment.

27. Religion of most Malaysians ISLAM
About 60% of the population of Malaysia practice Islam as a religion, about 20% are practicing Buddhists, and about 10% are Christians.

28. Shower sponge LOOFA
The loofah (also loofa, lufah and luffa, all Arabic words) is a vine, with fruit that’s very popular in Asia and Africa. If the fruit is allowed to mature, it can be processed to remove everything but the more rigid xylem structure (remember your high school botany class?) leaving a soft, sponge-like mass that is used as a skin polisher.

30. Telecom unit NSEC
“Nanosecond” is more correctly abbreviated to “ns”, and really is a tiny amount of time: one billionth of a second.

34. Annual theater award OBIE
The Obies are the “Off-Broadway Theater Awards”. The Obies are presented annually and the recipients are chosen by “The Village Voice” newspaper.

39. Search feature that shows results as you type GOOGLE INSTANT
Google Instant is a feature in the Google search engine that suggests results in the search box while the user is still typing. The feature was introduced in 2010.

48. 21-Across, in Le Havre ANGE
In French, an angel (ange) is a messenger from God (de Dieu).

Le Havre is a city on the mouth of the river Seine on the northwest coast of France. The city’s name translates as “the haven”.

50. “Massaging” Dr. Scholl’s product GEL INSOLES
William Scholl worked part time as a cobbler and then in a shoe retailer in Chicago. Noting that many people had similar foot problems he went to night school and qualified as a podiatrist in 1904. Soon after he started his own company making footcare products, giving us the brand name Dr. Scholl’s.

56. Clark Kent’s father, in 1950s TV EBEN
Jor-El was a scientist on the planet Krypton who was married to Lara. Jor-El and Lara had an infant son named Kal-El who they were able to launch into space towards Earth just before Krypton was destroyed. Kal-El was to become Superman. When Kal-El landed on Earth his spacecraft was found by Eben and Sarah Kent, a married couple living on a farm in Iowa. Eben and Sarah adopted Kal-El and raised him as their son Clark.

57. Arthur of “Maude” BEA
Actress Bea Arthur’s most famous roles were on television, as the lead in the “All in the Family” spin-off “Maude” and as Dorothy Zbornak in “The Golden Girls”. Arthur also won a Tony for playing Vera Charles on stage in the original cast of “Mame” in 1966, two years after she played Yente the matchmaker in the original cast of “Fiddler on the Roof”.

58. Takes by force WRESTS
The verb “to wrest” can mean to obtain by violent twisting and pulling. The word “wrest” derives from the Middle English “wresten” meaning “to twist”. Our word “wrestling” has the same etymology.

64. Talk pioneer PAAR
Jack Paar was most famous as the host of “The Tonight Show”, from 1957 to 1962. When he died in 2004, “Time” magazine wrote that Paar was “the fellow who split talk show history into two eras: Before Paar and Below Paar”. Very complimentary …

65. Time __ WARNER
Time Warner is the third-largest TV and film media company in the world, after Disney and Comcast. Today’s conglomerate came about in 1990 with the merger of Time with Warner Communications. Time is a large magazine publisher, notably of “Time” magazine. Warner Communications was an entertainment company, the parent of Warner Bros. Pictures and Warner Music Group.

71. Eastern temple PAGODA
Pagodas are tiered (“storied”) towers found in various parts of Asia, usually built for religious purposes.

75. Bungler SAD SACK
The slang phrase “sad sack” is used for a person who bungles things, someone who is pathetically inept. The phrase was coined in the twenties but gained popularity during WWII when it was used by a cartoon character in the US Armed Forces magazine “Yank”. The term is probably a shortened form of the much ruder phrase “sad sack of ****”.

78. Tiger’s ex ELIN
Elin Nordegren is the ex-wife of Tiger Woods. Nordegren is a native of Sweden, and it was back in Sweden that she was hired as a nanny by the wife of golfer Jesper Parnevik. The job brought her to the US where she became a popular attraction on the professional golfing circuit. Apparently there was a long line of single golfers who wanted to be introduced to her, with Tiger Woods asking for an introduction for a year before he finally got to go out with her. The pair were married in 2004. Tiger and Elin have two children together: Sam Alexis born in 2007, and Charlie Axel born in 2009.

82. Rescue pro EMT
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

85. Historian seen in “I, Claudius” LIVY
Titus Livius (aka Livy) was a Roman historian who lived from 59 BC to AD 17. Livy wrote the definitive history of Rome at that time.

“I, Claudius” is a 1934 novel penned by Robert Graves, written in the form of an autobiography of Emperor Claudius of Rome. Graves wrote a sequel in 1935 called “Claudius the God”. Both books were adapted by the BBC into a fabulous television series that went by the name of the first book “I, Claudius”.

86. League, e.g. UNIT
A “league” is a unit of distance that dates back to the Middle Ages. No longer used, it was originally defined as the distance that a person could walk in an hour. In the English-speaking world, a league was equal to three miles on land, or three nautical miles at sea.

87. Popular Aegean vacation spots GREEK ISLES
The Aegean Sea is that part of the Mediterranean that lies between Greece and Turkey. Within the Aegean Sea are found the Aegean Islands, a group that includes Crete and Rhodes.

90. Vacation time in Versailles ETE
In French, one might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil).

Versailles is a city located just 10 miles from the center of Paris. It is famous of course as home to the magnificent Palace of Versailles. The palace started out as a hunting lodge built in the village of Versailles in 1624, built for Louis XIII. Louis XIII extended the lodge into a full-blown château, but it was Louis XIV who expanded it into one of the largest palaces on the planet. Louis XIV moved the royal court from Paris to Versailles starting in 1678.

91. Pusher’s nemesis NARC
“Narc” is a slang term for a law enforcement officer who tracks down criminals associated with illegal drugs.

95. __ es Salaam DAR
Dar es Salaam is the largest city in Tanzania, and sits right on the east coast of Africa. The city’s name is usually translated from Arabic as “Haven of Peace”.

104. Roger, for one RABBIT
“Who Framed Roger Rabbit” was released in 1988, a clever film featuring cartoon characters that interact directly with human beings. The film is based on a novel written by Gary K. Wolf, called “Who Censored Roger Rabbit?” There is a prequel floating around that has never been produced, and it’s called “Who Discovered Roger Rabbit”.

106. Maestro Klemperer OTTO
Otto Klemperer was a conductor and composer from Germany. Klemperer was a friend of the noted composer Gustav Mahler and assisted Mahler in the first production of his “Symphony of a Thousand”, one of the largest scale choral works in the repertoire. Otto’s son was Werner Klemperer, the actor who played Colonel Klink on the TV show “Hogan’s Heroes”.

108. Milky stone OPAL
An opal is often described as having a milky iridescence, known as “opalescence”.

113. Let’s Move! campaign launcher Michelle OBAMA
Michelle Obama nee Robinson grew up on the South Side of Chicago and is sister to Craig Robinson, the coach of men’s basketball at Oregon State University. After graduating from Harvard Law School, Michelle Robinson worked as an associate at the Chicago office of the Sidley Austin law firm. Barack Obama joined the firm as a summer associate and Michelle Robinson was assigned to mentor him, and as they say, one thing led to another …

116. Exodus prohibition GRAVEN IMAGE
In the Christian tradition the second commandment prohibits the worship of “any graven image”. Usually this means that graven images can be created, but not worshipped.

The Book of Exodus is the second book in the Bible, and deals with Moses leading the Hebrews out of Egypt. The name “exodus” comes from the Greek “exodos” meaning “departure”.

122. Colorful swimmer TETRA
The neon tetra is a freshwater fish, native to parts of South America. The tetra is a very popular aquarium fish and millions are imported into the US every year. Almost all of the imported tetras are farm-raised in Asia and very few come from their native continent.

126. Hook’s look SNEER
Captain Hook is the bad guy in “Peter Pan”, the famous play by J. M. Barrie. Hook is Peter Pan’s sworn enemy, as Pan cut off Hook’s hand causing it to be replaced by a “hook”. It is implied in the play that Hook attended Eton College, just outside London. Hook’s last words are “Floreat Etona”, which is Eton College’s motto.

128. Ancient strings LYRE
The lyre is a stringed instrument most closely associated with Ancient Greece, and with the gods Hermes and Apollo in particular. According to myth, Hermes slaughtered a cow from a sacred herd belonging to Apollo and offered it to the gods but kept the entrails. Hermes used the entrails to make strings that he stretched across the shell of a tortoise, creating the first lyre. Apollo liked the sound from the lyre and agreed to accept it as a trade for his herd of cattle.

Down
1. Wise guys? MAGI
“Magi” is the plural of the Latin word “magus”, a term applied to someone who was able to read the stars. Hence, magi is commonly used with reference to the “wise men from the East” who followed the star and visited Jesus soon after he was born.

6. Duffer’s dream EAGLE
The following terms are routinely used in golf for scores relative to par:

– Bogey: one over par
– Par
– Birdie: one under par
– Eagle: two under par
– Albatross (also “double eagle”): three under par
– Condor: four under par

No one has ever recorded a condor during a professional tournament.

A “duffer” is a golfer, and not a very good one.

9. Cause of fear BUGABOO
“Bugaboo” is another term for a bogeyman, an imaginary and scary creature used to frighten children. More generally, a bugaboo is something that creates fear or worry.

11. Big name in little trains LIONEL
Lionel is the name most associated with toy trains in the US. The first Lionel trains rolled off the production line in 1901 and they are still produced today, although the original Lionel Corporation is long gone. In 1995, the brand was bought by an investment company that included train enthusiast Neil Young (the singer), and operated as Lionel, LLC. Neil Young’s financial involvement ended after a 2008 reorganization of the company following a Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing, but the company is still producing and selling.

14. “King Kong” heroine ANN
“King Kong” really is a classic movie. It stars Fay Wray as the young woman (Ann Darrow) with whom Kong falls in love. Wray was very interested in the role as she was told that she would be playing opposite the “tallest, darkest leading man in Hollywood”. She thought it might be Clark Gable. At least that’s how the story goes …

16. “Brave New World” band IRON MAIDEN
Iron Maiden is a heavy metal band from London that has been around since 1975.

18. Friend’s address THEE
Members of the Religious Society of Friends are known as Friends or Quakers. The Christian sect started in England in the 1640s, led by George Fox. The principal tenet at that point was that Christians could have direct experience of Jesus Christ without the mediation of clergy, a reflection of the increasing dissatisfaction with the established church at that time. The term “Quaker” is thought to have been used earlier in reference to foreign religious sects whose followers were given to fits of shaking during religious fervor. Somehow that term became used for members of the Religious Society of Friends.

33. Asian nation surrounded by five countries LAOS
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country’s name is “Meuang Lao”. The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of “Lao” entities united into one, the French added the “S” and so today we tend to use “Laos” instead of “Lao”.

37. Mao __-tung TSE
Mao Zedong (also “Mao Tse-tung”) was born on December 16, 1893 in the Hunan Province of China. As Mao was the son of a peasant farmer, his prospects for education were limited. Indeed he left school at age 13 to work on the family farm but did eventually get to secondary school in Changsha, the provincial capital. In the years following, Mao continued his education in Beijing and turned down an opportunity to study in France.

38. Grain-free cat food brand SHEBA
Sheba is a brand of canned cat food made by Mars, the M&M folks. Let’s hope there are two separate production lines …

39. Earth goddess GAEA
The Greek goddess personifying the earth was Gaea (meaning “land” or “earth” in Greek). The Roman equivalent goddess was Terra Mater, “Mother Earth”.

41. Technical sch. INST
Institute (inst.)

42. Bete __ NOIRE
“Bête noire” translates from French as “black beast” and is used in English to describe something or someone that is disliked.

58. Knocks ’em dead at the jazz club WAILS
The verb “to wail” has been used in the world of jazz to mean “to play very well”, starting from the mid-fifties.

59. Volvo home: Abbr. SWED
Volvo is a Swedish manufacturers of cars, trucks and construction equipment. The Volvo name was chosen as “volvo” is Latin for “I roll”.

63. Some, in Havana UNAS
Havana is the capital city of Cuba. The city was founded by the Spanish in the early 1500s after which it became a strategic location for Spain’s exploration and conquest of the Americas. In particular, Havana was used as a stopping-off point for treasure-laden ships on the return journey to Spain.

64. Damson source PLUM TREE
Damsons are plum-like fruit that are mainly grown in Britain and Ireland. The word “damson” derives from the Latin “prunum damascenum” meaning “plum of Damascus”. The suggestion is that damson originated in around Damascus in Syria and were brought to Ancient Britain by the Romans.

68. Berry promoted as a superfood ACAI
Açaí is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

69. Salinger character who said, “I prefer stories about squalor” ESME
J. D. Salinger wrote a short story called “For Esme – with Love and Squalor”, originally published in “The New Yorker” in 1950. It is a story about a young English girl called Esme and an American soldier, and is set in WWII. The soldier is an unpublished short-story writer, and there is an exchange between the GI and Esme, in which she shares that her father was also a writer:

‘My father wrote beautifully,’ Esme interrupted ‘I’m saving a number of his letters for posterity. . . . I’d be extremely flattered if you’d write a story exclusively for me sometime. I’m an avid reader.’

I told her I certainly would, if I could. I said that I wasn’t terribly prolific.

‘It doesn’t have to be so terribly prolific! Just so that it isn’t childish and silly.’ She reflected. ‘I prefer stories about squalor.’
‘About what?’ I said, leaning forward.

‘Squalor. I’m extremely interested in squalor.’

And when Esme takes her leave, it is with an eerie politeness that is or ought to be immortal: “Goodbye,” she says. “I hope you return from the war with all your faculties intact.”

71. Pequod co-owner PELEG
The Pequod is the ship that figures in Herman Melville’s classic novel “Moby Dick”. The ship is owned by a consortium of the citizens of Nantucket Island, including Captains Ahab, Bildad and Peleg.

72. Kennedy associate ALITO
Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy of the US Supreme Court was appointed by President Reagan in 1988. Although Justice Kennedy’s decisions are viewed as largely conservative, after Sandra Day O’Connor has retired he has been considered by many as the “swing vote” on the court.

77. Big name in fashion KLEIN
Calvin Klein is an American fashion designer, born in the Bronx in New York City. Klein’s biography entitled “Obsession” takes its name from one of the most famous brands in his line of fragrances.

82. Celtic language ERSE
There are actually three Erse languages: Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be Gaeilge (in Ireland), Gaelg (on the Isle of Man) and Gaidhlig (in Scotland).

84. Debatable “gift” ESP
Extrasensory perception (ESP)

87. Spokescritter with a British accent GECKO
The Gecko is the “spokes-lizard” for GEICO. When the Gecko was introduced in 1999, he was voiced by actor Kelsey Grammer of “Cheers” and “Frasier” fame. Since then, the Gecko has been voiced by British radio presenter Dave Kelly and most recently by actor Jake Wood, who plays Max Branning on the British soap opera “EastEnders”.

GEICO was founded in 1936 with a very specific mission, to provide auto insurance for employees of the federal government and their families, hence the name Government Employees Insurance Company (GEICO). GEICO is a private company, despite the word “government” in its name. The founders’ idea was to focus on government employees as they believed such a group represented a lower risk profile than the rest of the population. Nowadays any qualifying person can take out a policy with GEICO.

88. Longtime TV journalist Marvin KALB
Marvin Kalb is a journalist most famous for his 30-year stint reporting for CBS and NBC News. Kalb was the last person to be recruited by journalism icon Edward R. Murrow.

89. 1950 sci-fi classic I, ROBOT
Science fiction author Isaac Asimov wrote a marvelous collection of short stories called “I. Robot”. In the stories, he made repeated reference to the Three Laws of Robotics, which he introduced in the story “Runaround”, first published in 1942. The three laws are:

1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

92. Williams of “Happy Days” ANSON
Anson Williams played the lovable Warren “Potsie” Weber character on “Happy Days”. After “Happy Days” finished its run, Williams moved into directing and has directed episodes of “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine”, “Xena: Warrior Princess”, “Sabrina the Teenage Witch”, “Melrose Place”, “Beverly Hills 90210” and other shows. But Williams’ true claim to fame has to be that he is the second cousin of Dr. Henry Heimlich, who invented the Heimlich Maneuver!

98. Mulligan DO-OVER
There doesn’t seem to be a definitive account for the origin of the term “Mulligan”, most often used for a shot do-over in golf. There are lots of stories about golfers named Mulligan though, and I suspect one of them may be true.

101. Legislation signed 6/22/1944 by FDR … and, initially, what the nine longest across answers in this puzzle comprise GI BILL
What we commonly refer to as the GI Bill is more correctly called the Serviceman’s Readjustment Act of 1944.

107. Cheerios shelfmate TRIX
Trix is a corn-based breakfast cereal that has been around since 1954, produced by General Mills. Ads for the cereal featured Trix Rabbit, who would try hard to get hold of bowls of the cereal. He would always get caught though, and be admonished with, “Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids!” With 46% sugar content, the rabbit probably wouldn’t have liked it anyway …

Cheerios breakfast cereal has the distinction of being the first oat-based cereal introduced into the market, hitting the grocery store shelves in 1941. Back then, “Cheerios” were known as CheeriOats.

109. Commodities trading areas PITS
The “pit” is that part of a trading floor in a stock exchange where buyers and sellers are shouting and using hand signals to make sales.

112. Pepper et al.: Abbr. SGTS
Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band was the alter-ego of the Beatles and was the title of a famous studio album released in 1967.

114. ’70s Israeli prime minister MEIR
Golda Meir was known as the “Iron Lady” when she was Prime Minister of Israel, long before that sobriquet came to be associated with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Golda Meir was born Golda Mabovitch in Kiev (in modern-day Ukraine), and when she was a young girl she moved with her family to the United States and settled in Milwaukee. As a teenager she relocated to Denver where she met and married Morris Meyerson, at the age of 19. She and her husband joined a kibbutz in Palestine in 1921, when she was in her twenties. Meir had been active in politics in the US, and continued her political work in Palestine. She was very influential during WWII, and played a leading role in negotiations after the war leading to the setting up of the state of Israel. By the time she was called on to lead the country, Meir had already retired, citing exhaustion and ill health. But serve she did, and led Israel during turbulent times (e.g. the massacre at the Munich Olympics, and the Yom Kippur War). She eventually resigned in 1974, saying that was what the people wanted.

115. It passes between Swiss banks AARE
The Aar (also called the “Aare” in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. A famous spot along the Aar is the Reichenbach Falls in the center of the country, actually a series of waterfalls near the city of Meiringen. These falls are renowned in the world of literature as it was here that Sherlock Holmes fell to his supposed doom with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (in “The Adventure of the Final Problem”).

117. Body shop no. EST
Estimate (est.)

118. Ph.D. hopeful’s hurdle GRE
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

120. Once-sacred snake ASP
The venomous snake called an asp was a symbol of royalty in Ancient Egypt.

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Queens swingers METS
5. Like New York’s Waldorf Astoria DECO
9. Ball queen BELLE
14. Sought-after guests A-LIST
19. “The African Queen” co-screenwriter AGEE
20. Bring in EARN
21. “The sharpest-sighted Spirit of all in Heaven,” in “Paradise Lost” URIEL
22. Jazzy Jones NORAH
23. High-end bar? GOLD INGOT
25. IRS Schedule C, line 7 GROSS INCOME
27. Religion of most Malaysians ISLAM
28. Shower sponge LOOFA
30. Telecom unit NSEC
31. Tot perch KNEE
32. Like some kisses STOLEN
34. Annual theater award OBIE
36. Bullet point ITEM
38. Start of an assembly STEP A
39. Search feature that shows results as you type GOOGLE INSTANT
44. “I knew it!” AHA!
45. Frustrating waiting time, facetiously EON
47. Loads A TON
48. 21-Across, in Le Havre ANGE
49. Marker IOU
50. “Massaging” Dr. Scholl’s product GEL INSOLES
53. Goes (for) OPTS
55. Polish prose EDIT
56. Clark Kent’s father, in 1950s TV EBEN
57. Arthur of “Maude” BEA
58. Takes by force WRESTS
60. Sleekly designed AERO
61. By and large AS A RULE
64. Talk pioneer PAAR
65. Time __ WARNER
67. Broad appeal GENERAL INTEREST
71. Eastern temple PAGODA
74. Like-minded group CULT
75. Bungler SAD SACK
78. Tiger’s ex ELIN
79. Riles (up) STEAMS
82. Rescue pro EMT
83. Heavy wind GALE
85. Historian seen in “I, Claudius” LIVY
86. League, e.g. UNIT
87. Popular Aegean vacation spots GREEK ISLES
90. Vacation time in Versailles ETE
91. Pusher’s nemesis NARC
93. Regrets RUES
95. __ es Salaam DAR
96. Edge LIP
97. Teacher of the Year awardee, say GOOD INFLUENCE
100. Prepare to surf LOG IN
102. Doesn’t keep ROTS
103. Quick kiss PECK
104. Roger, for one RABBIT
106. Maestro Klemperer OTTO
108. Milky stone OPAL
111. Mr. Wrong? LOSER
113. Let’s Move! campaign launcher Michelle OBAMA
116. Exodus prohibition GRAVEN IMAGE
119. “That could work!” GREAT IDEA!
121. Gives a thumbs-up LIKES
122. Colorful swimmer TETRA
123. Shore acquisitions TANS
124. Wildlife refuge LAIR
125. Put forth, as effort EXERT
126. Hook’s look SNEER
127. Go ape SNAP
128. Ancient strings LYRE

Down
1. Wise guys? MAGI
2. They may clash on a team EGOS
3. Lies TELLS TALES
4. Calm SEDATE
5. Wildlife refuge DEN
6. Duffer’s dream EAGLE
7. Sing jazz standards, perhaps CROON
8. Aware of ONTO
9. Cause of fear BUGABOO
10. Mess up ERR
11. Big name in little trains LIONEL
12. Not as costly LESS
13. Further ELSE
14. “King Kong” heroine ANN
15. Picture holder LOCKET
16. “Brave New World” band IRON MAIDEN
17. Diner’s “I’ll have that also” SAME
18. Friend’s address THEE
24. “Nothing planned for that day” I’M OPEN
26. Sweet finish ICING
29. Pays, as the bill FOOTS
33. Asian nation surrounded by five countries LAOS
35. Uninformed IGNORANT
37. Mao __-tung TSE
38. Grain-free cat food brand SHEBA
39. Earth goddess GAEA
40. Gobbles up EATS
41. Technical sch. INST
42. Bete __ NOIRE
43. One-on-one helper TUTOR
44. __ restriction AGE
46. Blue-blooded NOBLE
51. Really hurting IN AGONY
52. Look like a wolf LEER
54. Impudent PERT
55. Wildlife markers EAR TAGS
58. Knocks ’em dead at the jazz club WAILS
59. Volvo home: Abbr. SWED
62. Light color? RED
63. Some, in Havana UNAS
64. Damson source PLUM TREE
66. Obstinate beast ASS
68. Berry promoted as a superfood ACAI
69. Salinger character who said, “I prefer stories about squalor” ESME
70. Wrote customer reviews on, say RATED
71. Pequod co-owner PELEG
72. Kennedy associate ALITO
73. Approximately GIVE OR TAKE
76. Retire CALL IT A DAY
77. Big name in fashion KLEIN
80. Territory TURF
81. Env. stuffer ENCL
82. Celtic language ERSE
84. Debatable “gift” ESP
87. Spokescritter with a British accent GECKO
88. Longtime TV journalist Marvin KALB
89. 1950 sci-fi classic I, ROBOT
91. Petty peeve NIT
92. Williams of “Happy Days” ANSON
94. Ambiguous UNCLEAR
98. Mulligan DO-OVER
99. Doing some binge-watching, maybe UP LATE
101. Legislation signed 6/22/1944 by FDR … and, initially, what the nine longest across answers in this puzzle comprise GI BILL
104. Played again RERAN
105. Sports center ARENA
106. Look like a wolf OGLE
107. Cheerios shelfmate TRIX
109. Commodities trading areas PITS
110. ”You said it!” AMEN!
112. Pepper et al.: Abbr. SGTS
114. ’70s Israeli prime minister MEIR
115. It passes between Swiss banks AARE
117. Body shop no. EST
118. Ph.D. hopeful’s hurdle GRE
120. Once-sacred snake ASP

Return to top of page

7 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 21 Jun 15, Sunday”

  1. Didn't have time to attempt the puzzle today, but I always enjoy perusing the blog anyway to mine some trivia tidbits.

    Interesting background on Anson Williams. I had no idea.

    I remember wondering how someone could be 20,000 leagues under the sea….they'd be out in space somewhere. I was a few years older when it was explained that the 20,000 leagues were a distance traveled and not a depth.

    Best-

  2. Happy Fathers' Day to all who qualify.

    I thought I knew a lot of trivia. But Eben Kent was a new one on me. How obscure can you get?

  3. Googled LIONEL to finish up (that section was the by far the toughest). I definitely learned some new words.

  4. You did not explain the significance of the letters "GI" from the puzzle's theme. Most of us have heard of G.I. Joe. The most common explanation I have heard is that it came to stand for Government Issue, as a soldier's uniforms, boots, weapons, equipment and food are issued by the government.

    113A Michelle Obama's brother Craig Robinson is no longer the basketball coach at Oregon State University. A former Ivy League player of the year at Princeton and head coach at fellow Ivy League institution Brown University, Robinson could not succeed in Pac-12 conference play and was let go after the 2013-2014 season after six years, replaced by Wayne Tinkle from the University of Montana. Michelle Robinson did ask her brother to check out her intended, which he did by shooting hoops with "Barry".

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.