LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Jul 15, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Frank Virzi
THEME: Oh, I Get It! … each of today’s themed answers sounds like a common phrase, but with an “O” sound inserted:

22A. Glass insulation consideration? WINDOW CHILL FACTOR (from “wind chill factor”)
43A. Dessert served to waiting commuters? DEPOT-DISH APPLE PIE (from “deep-dish apple pie”)
98A. Skits at teatime? PEKOE PERFORMANCES (from “peak performances”)
122A. Where clay letters are mailed? PLAY-DOH POST OFFICE (from “played post office”)
3D. Alaskan butcher’s tool? JUNEAU CLEAVER (from “June Cleaver”)
59D. Fruit used in a numbers game? BINGO CHERRIES (from “Bing cherries”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 06s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … SHAZAM (shazah!!!), MASH-UP (hash-up!!!)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. ’80s IBM flop nicknamed “Peanut” PCJR
The IBM PC entered the personal computer market in 1981, and was by all accounts a surprising success, even to many IBM executives. The PC was directed at the business world, and in 1983 IBM made its first foray into the home computing world with the introduction of the PCjr. Codenamed “Peanut” during development, the PCjr has been described as one of the biggest commercial flops in computing history. Various reasons have been cited for the failure, including the poorly-designed keyboard, relatively high price and lack of compatibility with existing IBM products.

15. “Lord, is __?”: Matthew IT I
At the Last Supper, Jesus told his apostles that one of them would betray him that day. According to the Gospel of Matthew:
And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?

18. Shivering fit AGUE
An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

21. AOL rival MSN
MSN was originally called The Microsoft Network, and was introduced in 1995 as an integral part of Microsoft’s Windows 95 operating system. MSN is a whole bundle of services including email, instant messaging, and the MSN.com portal (which is the 9th most visited site on the Internet).

25. Shanty HUT
Our word “shanty” is used for a rough cabin. It comes from the Canadian French word “chantier”, which is a “lumberjack’s headquarters”.

28. Interval between mi and fa HALFTONE
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

32. Destroyer attacked in Aden in Oct., 2000 USS COLE
The USS Cole is a guided missile destroyer with a homeport in Norfolk, Virginia. The Cole fell victim to a suicide attack in 2000 by Al-Qaeda bombers who detonated an explosion on a boat close to the navy vessel while it was at anchor in Aden. 17 of the Cole’s crew members were killed in the attack, which blew a hole in the port side of the ship.

39. This, in Tijuana ESTO
Tijuana is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California, and lies just across the US-Mexico border from San Diego. Tijuana is also the most westerly of all Mexican cities. A lot of Tijuana’s growth took place in the twenties as tourists flocked south of the border during the days of prohibition in the US. One of the many casinos and hotels that flourished at that time was Hotel Caesar’s in the Avenida Revolución area. Hotel Caesar’s claims to be the birthplace of the now ubiquitous Caesar Salad.

42. Firm finish? INC
A company that has incorporated uses the abbreviation “Inc.” after its name. By incorporating, a company forms a corporation, which is a legal entity that has legal rights similar to those of an individual. For example, a corporation can sue another corporation or individual. However, a corporation does not have all the rights of citizens. A corporation does not have the Fifth Amendment right of protections against self-incrimination, for example. It is perhaps understandable that the concept of “corporations as persons” is a frequent subject for debate.

43. Dessert served to waiting commuters? DEPOT-DISH APPLE PIE (from “deep-dish apple pie”)
Our term “depot”, meaning a station or warehouse, derives from the word “dépôt”, French for “deposit” or “place of deposit”.

47. Flo’s workplace MEL’S
Florence Jean “Flo” Castleberry was a waitress in the sitcom “Alice” which aired on CBS in the 70s and 80s. Flo got her own sitcom (called “Flo”) which had a brief run in the early 80s. I saw a few episodes of “Alice”, but that’s about it. Oh, and Flo was played by Polly Holliday.

50. Minuscule time fraction: Abbr. NSEC
“Nanosecond” is more correctly abbreviated to “ns”, and really is a tiny amount of time: one billionth of a second.

51. Martinique, par exemple ILE
The island of Martinique in the eastern Caribbean is actually a part of France, and is referred to as an “overseas department”. As such, Martinique is part of the European Union, and even uses the euro as its currency. The island is fully represented in the French National Assembly and Senate, just like any department within France. It’s sort of like the status of Hawaii within the US.

52. Where Lux. is EUR
Luxembourg is a relatively small country in central Europe, just 100 square miles in area with a population of over half a million. The country is a representative democracy (just like the United Kingdom) and it has a constitutional monarch, namely Henri, Grand Duke of Luxembourg. As such, Luxembourg is the only remaining sovereign Grand Duchy in the world.

54. __ Caesar, slain heir of Emperor Augustus GAIUS
Gaius Caesar and his brother Lucius Caesar were adopted in the year 17 BCE by Emperor Augustus, who was their maternal grandfather. The two toddlers were taken in by Augustus so that he could name them his heirs. The two brothers died quite young, in their late teens or early twenties. This led Augustus to adopt his stepson Tiberius, who eventually succeeded him as Emperor of Rome.

56. Like some property REAL
In the world of law, there are two main classes of property: personal property and real property. Personal property is basically movable property. Real property is immovable, such as land or buildings and related assets.

58. Ground rule hits: Abbr. DBLS
In baseball, a “ground rule double” allows all baserunners to advance by two bases after a fair hit that has been affected in some way by the conditions at the particular ballpark where the game is being played. For example, a ball hit fairly into the ivy at Wrigley Field results in a ground rule double.

62. Gomer Pyle’s “Well, I’ll be!” SHAZAM!
“Shazam!” is a word that was coined in the “Captain Marvel” comics in 1940.

Jim Nabors was discovered by Andy Griffith and brought onto “The Andy Griffith Show” as Gomer Pyle, the gas station attendant. Famously, Nabors then got his own show called “Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.” Gomer had a cousin on the “The Andy Griffiths Show” called Goober Pyle. Goober was played by George Lindsay. Lindsay had auditioned for the Gomer part, but that went to Nabors.

65. Classic orange soda FANTA
The soft drink “Fanta” has quite an interesting history. As WWII approached, the Coca-Cola plant in Germany had trouble obtaining the ingredients it needed to continue production of the cola beverage, so the plant manager decided to create a new drink from what was available. The new beverage was built around whey (left over from cheese production) and pomace (left over after juice has been extracted from fruit). The inventor asked his colleagues to use their imagination (“Fantasie” in German) and come up with a name for the drink, so they piped up “Fanta!”

67. Kit Carson House site TAOS
The city of Taos, New Mexico is named for the Native American village nearby called Taos Pueblo. Taos is famous for its art colony. Artists began to settle in Taos in 1899, and the Taos Society of Artists was founded in 1915.

Kit Carson was a frontiersman who moved west from Missouri when he was just 16 years old. Kit Carson’s life was immortalized in the novels of John C. Fremont, an explorer who hired Carson as a guide for his travels through California, Oregon and Nevada. Carson later served with the US Army. He is thought to be the only American to have achieved the rank of general without being able to read or write.

72. Rapscallion SCAMP
We might call a little imp a rapscallion, an evolution from “rascallion”, which in turn comes from “rascal”.

76. With 125-Down, fictional tall-hat wearer THE …
(125D. See 76-Across … CAT)
“The Cat in the Hat” is a 1957 book penned by Dr. Seuss (aka Theodor Geisel). Written to teach young children how to read, Geisel stated in 1983, “It is the book I’m proudest of because it had something to do with the death of the Dick and Jane primers.”

88. Latin 101 verb AMO
“Amo, amas, amat: … “I love, you love, he/she/it loves”, in Latin.

89. Kwik-E-Mart owner on “The Simpsons” APU
The fictional Kwik-E-Mart store is operated by Apu Nahasapeemapetilon on “The Simpsons” TV show. Apu is married to Manjula , and the couple have eight children, actually eight octuplets. The convenience store owner doesn’t seem to be making much use of his Ph.D in computer science that he earned in the US. Apu’s undergraduate degree is from Caltech (the Calcutta Technical Institute), where he graduated top of his class of seven million students …

95. Old Canadian skit show SCTV
“Second City Television” (SCTV) is a sketch show that was produced in Canada from 1976 to 1984.

98. Skits at teatime? PEKOE PERFORMANCES (from “peak performances”)
A pekoe (or more commonly, orange pekoe) is a medium-grade black tea. There is no orange flavor in an orange pekoe tea. The “orange” name most likely derived from the name of the trading company that brought the tea to Europe from Asia.

105. Start of a fitness buff’s motto USE IT …
… or lose it.

106. Entre __ NOUS
“Entre nous” is French for “between us”.

107. Steve Martin won its 2015 Life Achievement Award: Abbr. AFI
The American Film Institute (AFI) was founded in 1967 by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). One of the AFI’s more visible programs is the “100 Year Series”, including lists of Best Movies in several categories and a list of the Best Movie Quotes in 100 years of movie-making.

108. Porcupine, e.g. RODENT
By definition, a rodent is a mammal which has front teeth that are continuously growing, and they have to continuously gnaw away on things to keep those teeth short. There are a lot of rodents in the world, as they make up forty percent of all mammalian species.

112. Recent delivery NEONATE
A “neonate” is a newborn infant.

115. “Phooey!” NERTS!
“Nerts” is a slang term. It is a corruption of “nuts!” and has the same meaning.

116. Storage closets PANTRIES
The word “pantry” dates back to 1300 when it came into English from the Old French “panetrie” meaning a “bread room”. Bread is “pain” in French, and “panis” in Latin.

118. Actress Penélope CRUZ
Penélope Cruz is an actress from Madrid, Spain. Cruz was the first Spanish actress to win an Oscar, and to be given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

119. Cacophonous AROAR
“Cacophony” is such a lovely word, one used to describe a harsh or jarring sound. The term arises from the Greek “kakos” (bad) and “phone” (voice).

121. Sugar suffix -OSE
Sugars are usually named using the “-ose” suffix e.g. glucose, fructose, sucrose.

122. Where clay letters are mailed? PLAY-DOH POST OFFICE (from “played post office”)
Back in the 1930s, a manufacturer in Cincinnati produced a doughy compound that was used to clean wallpaper. Twenty years later, school-kids started using the cleaning material as a modelling compound, so the manufacturer reworked the formula, and sold it to local schools. It was given the name Play-Doh.

“Post Office” is a kissing game played by young people at parties. We used to play a similar game as kids called “Postman’s Knock”. The idea in both cases is that the person receiving a letter must pay for it by giving the postman a kiss.

129. 67, for Beethoven’s Fifth OPUS
If I had to name which of Beethoven’s symphonies I listen to most often, at the top of the list comes the 7th followed closely by the 9th, and then the 5th a little further down. But that four-note opening of the 5th … that is superb …

131. USCG rank ENS
Ensign is (usually) the most junior rank of commissioned officer in the armed forces. The name comes from the tradition that the junior officer would be given the task of carrying the ensign flag.

The US Coast Guard (USCG) has the distinction of being the country’s oldest continuous seagoing service. The USCG was founded as the Revenue Cutter Service by Alexander Hamilton in 1790.

132. Highlands legend nickname NESSIE
The “Surgeon’s Photograph” is an image that was taken in 1934, supposedly of the Loch Ness monster. It is perhaps the most famous picture of Nessie to this day, the one with a “head” and “neck” sticking up out of the water. The picture’s renown doesn’t seem to have abated, even though in the mid-nineties the photograph was shown to be a hoax. The picture is called the “Surgeon’s Photograph” because it was “taken” by a Dr. Wilson.

134. Prefix with -itis OSTE-
Osteitis is inflammation of bone.

The suffix “-itis” is used to denote inflammation, as in laryngitis (inflammation of the larynx) and sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses).

Down
2. “Frozen” FX CGI
Computer-generated imagery (CGI)

“FX” is an abbreviation for “effects”, as in “special effects”.

“Frozen” is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”.

3. Alaskan butcher’s tool? JUNEAU CLEAVER (from “June Cleaver”)
Given that it’s the capital of the vast state of Alaska, it is perhaps not surprising to learn that the municipality of Juneau is almost as big as the area of the states of Rhode Island and Delaware combined, and yet has only a population of about 31,000 people! Juneau is also unique as a capital city in the US in that it has no direct road connection to the rest of the state, nor to the rest of North America. If you want to drive your car to Juneau, you need to use a car ferry.

Ward Cleaver and his wife June were the parents of Wally Cleaver and his younger brother “The Beaver”. The four family members appeared in the fifties sitcom “Leave It to Beaver”.

We used to see a lot of American television programming growing up in Ireland, but “Leave It to Beaver” was one show that didn’t make it across the Atlantic. I’ve seen a couple of episodes, and I am not sure it would travel well. The show went on the air for the first time the very same day that Sputnik was launched by the Russians. The final episode was aired just a few months before President Kennedy was assassinated. An iconic series, by all accounts.

4. Household pest RED ANT
Fire ants are stinging ants, many species of which are called red ants. Most stinging ants bite their prey and then spray acid on the wound. The fire ant however, bites to hold on and then injects an alkaloid venom from its abdomen, creating a burning sensation in humans that have been nipped.

5. Chem class abbr. AT WT
The atomic weight (at. wt.) of an element is the mass of one atom of the element, relative to the mass of an atom of carbon (which is assumed to have an atomic weight of 12).

6. __ Picchu MACHU
Machu Picchu is known as “The Lost City of the Incas”, and it can be visited on a mountain ridge in Peru, 50 miles northwest of the city of Cuzco in the southeast of the country. The name Machu Picchu means “old peak”. The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu originates about 50 miles from Cuzco on the Urubamba River in Peru. It can take travelers about 5 days to trek the full length of the trail, passing through many Incan ruins before reaching the Sun Gate on Machu Picchu mountain. The trail was becoming greatly overused, forcing the Peruvian government to limit the number of people on the trail each day to 500. Book early …

8. Plants with their own national day every December 12 POINSETTIAS
The poinsettia plant is named for botanist Joel Roberts Poinsett, who was also the first US Minister to Mexico. Poinsett introduced the species into the US from south of the border in 1828. The association of the poinsettia with the Christmas season started in Mexico and are based on a 16th-century tale. It tells of a young girl who could not afford a gift to celebrate Christmas so she was told by an angel to gather weeds from the side of the road and place them on the church altar. The weeds blossomed into showy poinsettias. Since 2002, here in the US we’ve been celebrating Poinsettia Day on December 12th, which is the day that Joel Roberts Poinsett died.

13. Beef recall cause E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

14. “Throw it indoors” toy NERF BALL
Nerf is the name given to the soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for “safe” play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. “NERF” is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.
“Throw it indoors; you can’t damage lamps or break windows. You can’t hurt babies or old people.”

15. Architect of Egypt’s Step Pyramid of Djoser IMHOTEP
Imhotep was early Egyptian polymath who was a noted architect, engineer and physician. He designed and supervised the construction of the Step Pyramid of Djoser, which held the remains of Imhotep’s Pharaoh Djoser. Imhotep also constructed his own tomb, the existence of which is well documented, although it has never been located. It is believed that Imhotep constructed his tomb in such a way that it would remain hidden.

16. Quake consequence TSUNAMI
“Tsunami” is a Japanese word meaning “harbor wave”.

20. It’s for the dogs ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with “Alpo” being an abbreviation for “Allen Products”. Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

23. “The full-__ moon with unchanged ray”: Thoreau ORBED
Henry David Thoreau wrote a poem called “The Moon”.

The full-orbed moon with unchanged ray
Mounts up the eastern sky,
Not doomed to these short nights for aye,
But shining steadily.

She does not wane, but my fortune,
Which her rays do not bless,
My wayward path declineth soon,
But she shines not the less.

And if she faintly glimmers here,
And paled is her light,
Yet alway in her proper sphere
She’s mistress of the night.

33. Minn. college ST OLAF
St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota was named for the former king and patron saint of Norway, Olaf II.

34. Surrey town where demo versions of many “White Album” songs were recorded ESHER
The Beatles recorded demo versions of several songs in a 1968 session, which songs later appeared on the “White Album”. The session took place in George Harrison’s home in Esher, Surrey just outside London.

40. “Be quiet,” in scores TACET
“Tacet” is a musical direction meaning “be silent”. It is typically written on a score to instruct a particular voice or instrument to remain silent for a whole movement. “Tacet” is Latin for “it is silent”.

44. __ Latin PIG
Pig Latin is in effect a game. One takes the first consonant or consonant cluster of an English word and moves it to the end of the word, and then adds the letters “ay”. So the Pig Latin for the word “nix” is “ix-n-ay” … ixnay, and for “scram” is “am-scr-ay”

48. “If You Knew __…”: Quatro album SUZI
“If You Knew Suzi… “ is an album released by Suzi Quatro in 1978. It was destined to become the British-based Quatro’s highest-charting album here in the US.

Suzi Quatro is a rock singer and bass guitar player from Detroit, although she relocated to the UK when she was 21 years old. Quatro had a few great, great hits in the mid-seventies, most famously “Can the Can” (1973) and “Devil Gate Drive” (1974). She also played the character “Leather Tuscadero”, a female bass player on the American sitcom “Happy Days”.

53. __ avis RARA
A “rara avis” is anything that is very rare, and is Latin for “rare bird”.

55. Donald, to Huey UNCA
Donald Duck’s nephews are identical triplets called Huey, Dewey and Louie, and they first appeared on the screen in 1938. Once in awhile due to errors in production, a fourth duck can be seen in the background. This little “mistake” is affectionately called “Phooey Duck” by folks in the industry.

57. Small cells AAS
AA batteries.

59. Fruit used in a numbers game? BINGO CHERRIES (from “Bing cherries”)
The bing cherry is the most widely grown sweet cherry in the US. The cultivar was created in Oregon in 1875 by Seth Lewelling. Lewelling was a horticulturist, and he named the cherry for his Chinese foreman Ah Bing.

60. Theater section LOGE
In most theaters today, “loge” is the name given to the front rows of a mezzanine level. Loge can also be the name given to box seating.

62. Certain NCOs SGTS
An NCO is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces. Usually such an officer is one who has earned his or her rank by promotion through the enlisted ranks. A good example would be a sergeant.

63. Twinkie relative HO HO
Ho Hos snack cakes were first produced in San Francisco in 1967; not the best thing to come out of the sixties I’d say …

The snack cakes called Twinkies have been around since 1930. They were created by a baker called James Dewar, who chose the name from a billboard advertising “Twinkle Toe Shoes”. The original filling in the cake was a banana cream, but this was swapped out as a result of rationing during WWII. The vanilla cream became so popular that the banana recipe was dropped completely.

64. “Glee” specialty MASH-UP
“Mash-up” is a slang term, describing perhaps a television show that is a mixture of content from different programs, or a musical recording combining tracks from two or more recordings.

The TV show called “Glee” has proven to be very popular. The storyline focuses on a high school glee club in Lima, Ohio called New Directions.

68. Miss, in much of S.A. SRTA
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish and mademoiselle (Mlle.) is French for “Miss”.

71. “Go Set a Watchman” author Harper LEE
Nelle Harper Lee is an author from Monroeville, Alabama. Lee wrote only one novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird”, and yet that contribution to the world of literature was enough to earn her the Presidential Medal of Freedom and a Pulitzer Prize. Harper Lee was a close friend of fellow author Truman Capote who was the inspiration for the character named “Dill” in her novel. Lee is all over the news right now as she announced in February 2015 that she will publish a second novel in July 2015. The title is “Go Set a Watchman”, and is a work that she wrote before “To Kill a Mockingbird”.

73. Soup in “That’s Amore” PASTA FAZOOL
The Italian dish “pasta e fagioli” is sometimes pronounced as “pasta fazool” here in the US, as “fazool” sounds like the word for “beans” in the Neapolitan language. Pasta e fagioli comprises pasta and beans, cooked with olive oil, garlic, minced onion, spices and stewed tomatoes. There’s a famous line in the Dean Martin classic “That’s Amore” that goes:
When the stars make you drool, just-a like pasta fazool, that’s amore.

75. Brand at Petco IAMS
Iams dog food was produced by the animal nutritionist Paul Iams. He felt that household pets were suffering somewhat by being fed a diet of table scraps, so he developed a dry dog food that he felt was more nutritious and suitable for pet dogs. He founded the Iams company, now part of Procter & Gamble, in 1946.

Petco is a chain of retail stores that sells live animals and pet supplies. The Petco logo includes the two company mascots, Red Ruff the dog and Blue Mews the cat.

78. Last Olds model ALERO
The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

83. Lao-tzu follower TAOIST
Lao Tse (also Lao-Tzu) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism. Tradition holds that Lao-Tzu wrote the “Tao Te Ching”, a classical Chinese text that is fundamental to the philosophy of Taoism.

90. Book that begins, “All children, except one, grow up” PETER PAN
The author and dramatist J. M. Barrie is best remembered as the creator of Peter Pan. Barrie wrote a play in 1904 called “Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up”. He turned this into a novel called “Peter and Wendy” in 1911, although the novel is often published now with the title “Peter Pan”. The name “Wendy” was very uncommon before Barrie named his character, and he is given credit for making the name as popular as it is today.

92. Heat shield site NOSE CONE
The forwardmost section of a rocket, missile or aircraft is called the “nose cone”.

94. Nice view MER
“Mer” is a French word for “sea”.

The French city of Nice is on the Mediterranean coast in the southeast of the country. Although Nice is only the fifth most populous city in France, it is home to the busiest airport outside of Paris. That’s because of all the tourists flocking to the French Riviera.

97. Lab attendants VETS
“Vet” is an abbreviation for “veterinarian”, a professional who treat animals for disease and injury. The word “veterinary” comes from the Latin “veterinae” meaning “working animals, beasts of burden”.

99. Football’s “Boomer” ESIASON
Boomer Esiason is a retired NFL quarterback, now working as a sports commentator. Esiason has had the nickname “Boomer” since before he was born. His mother called him “Boomer” because he was constantly kicking away in her womb.

100. Watchers of boxers KENNELS
The boxer breed of dog (one of my favorites!) originated in Germany. My first dog was a boxer/Labrador mix, a beautiful animal. Our current family dog is a boxer/pug mix, another gorgeous creature.

111. Lunar valley RILLE
In astronomy, a “rille” (sometimes “rill”) is a trench or valley observed on the moon. Resembling channels, rilles are up to several miles wide and can be hundreds of miles long. Although there are theories, we don’t seem to know for sure how rilles formed.

113. “What’s Hecuba to him, __ to Hecuba”: Hamlet OR HE

O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I!
Is it not monstrous that this player here,
But in a fiction, in a dream of passion,
Could force his soul so to his own conceit
That from her working all his visage wann’d,
Tears in his eyes, distraction in’s aspect,
A broken voice, and his whole function suiting
With forms to his conceit? and all for nothing!
For Hecuba!
What’s Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba,
That he should weep for her?

117. Sylvia of jazz SYMS
Sylvia Syms was a jazz singer from New York. Frank Sinatra called Syms the “world’s greatest saloon singer”. Syms actually died on stage, suffering a heart attack at the age of 74.

120. Eponymous sea discoverer ROSS
The Ross Sea is a bay in the Southern Ocean of Antarctica. It was discovered by one James Ross in 1841. A more recent discovery, in the waters of the Ross Sea, was a 33 feet long giant squid that was captured in 2007.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. ’80s IBM flop nicknamed “Peanut” PCJR
5. “Do I need to draw you __?” A MAP
9. Give some slack LOOSEN
15. “Lord, is __?”: Matthew IT I
18. Shivering fit AGUE
19. Fish-filled fare, frequently TACO
20. High-speed contest AIR RACE
21. AOL rival MSN
22. Glass insulation consideration? WINDOW CHILL FACTOR (from “wind chill factor”)
25. Shanty HUT
26. Ground EARTH
27. It may be covered by a wig NAPE
28. Interval between mi and fa HALFTONE
30. Just-in-case strategy PLAN B
32. Destroyer attacked in Aden in Oct., 2000 USS COLE
35. One known for high living? TIBETAN
36. Beats on streets ROUTES
38. Buttonless top TEE
39. This, in Tijuana ESTO
41. Polite interruptions AHEMS
42. Firm finish? INC
43. Dessert served to waiting commuters? DEPOT-DISH APPLE PIE (from “deep-dish apple pie”)
47. Flo’s workplace MEL’S
49. Go limp WILT
50. Minuscule time fraction: Abbr. NSEC
51. Martinique, par exemple ILE
52. Where Lux. is EUR
54. __ Caesar, slain heir of Emperor Augustus GAIUS
56. Like some property REAL
58. Ground rule hits: Abbr. DBLS
62. Gomer Pyle’s “Well, I’ll be!” SHAZAM!
65. Classic orange soda FANTA
67. Kit Carson House site TAOS
69. Slip in a pot IOU
70. Spread quickly online GO VIRAL
72. Rapscallion SCAMP
74. Musical section STRINGS
76. With 125-Down, fictional tall-hat wearer THE …
77. In a muddle ASEA
79. Spanish souls ALMAS
81. Puts on STAGES
82. Kind SORT
84. Prefix with pad HELI-
86. Short-straw drawer LOSER
88. Latin 101 verb AMO
89. Kwik-E-Mart owner on “The Simpsons” APU
91. Feminine suffix -ENNE
93. Overflow (with) TEEM
95. Old Canadian skit show SCTV
98. Skits at teatime? PEKOE PERFORMANCES (from “peak performances”)
104. Step on it, old-style HIE
105. Start of a fitness buff’s motto USE IT …
106. Entre __ NOUS
107. Steve Martin won its 2015 Life Achievement Award: Abbr. AFI
108. Porcupine, e.g. RODENT
110. Salon workers, at times RINSERS
112. Recent delivery NEONATE
115. “Phooey!” NERTS!
116. Storage closets PANTRIES
118. Actress Penélope CRUZ
119. Cacophonous AROAR
121. Sugar suffix -OSE
122. Where clay letters are mailed? PLAY-DOH POST OFFICE (from “played post office”)
127. Scale note SOL
128. “Hands off!” ALL MINE!
129. 67, for Beethoven’s Fifth OPUS
130. Zoom TEAR
131. USCG rank ENS
132. Highlands legend nickname NESSIE
133. Overtakes, in a way LAPS
134. Prefix with -itis OSTE-

Down
1. Dog offering PAW
2. “Frozen” FX CGI
3. Alaskan butcher’s tool? JUNEAU CLEAVER (from “June Cleaver”)
4. Household pest RED ANT
5. Chem class abbr. AT WT
6. __ Picchu MACHU
7. “Jiminy!” in Germany ACH!
8. Plants with their own national day every December 12 POINSETTIAS
9. Lacking zip LIFELESS
10. “… boy __ girl?” OR A
11. Theater ticket abbr. ORCH
12. Perched on SAT ATOP
13. Beef recall cause E COLI
14. “Throw it indoors” toy NERF BALL
15. Architect of Egypt’s Step Pyramid of Djoser IMHOTEP
16. Quake consequence TSUNAMI
17. Strong INTENSE
20. It’s for the dogs ALPO
23. “The full-__ moon with unchanged ray”: Thoreau ORBED
24. Like some punch LACED
29. Tittered TE-HEED
30. Proper companion? PRIM
31. Only LONE
33. Minn. college ST OLAF
34. Surrey town where demo versions of many “White Album” songs were recorded ESHER
37. Put in stitches SEW
40. “Be quiet,” in scores TACET
44. __ Latin PIG
45. Cable guy, e.g. INSTALLER
46. Test episodes PILOTS
48. “If You Knew __…”: Quatro album SUZI
53. __ avis RARA
55. Donald, to Huey UNCA
57. Small cells AAS
59. Fruit used in a numbers game? BINGO CHERRIES (from “Bing cherries”)
60. Theater section LOGE
61. Work (out) SUSS
62. Certain NCOs SGTS
63. Twinkie relative HO HO
64. “Glee” specialty MASH-UP
66. Bullets AMMO
68. Miss, in much of S.A. SRTA
71. “Go Set a Watchman” author Harper LEE
73. Soup in “That’s Amore” PASTA FAZOOL
75. Brand at Petco IAMS
78. Last Olds model ALERO
80. “Already been to that movie” SEEN IT
83. Lao-tzu follower TAOIST
85. Just for kicks IN FUN
87. __ room REC
90. Book that begins, “All children, except one, grow up” PETER PAN
92. Heat shield site NOSE CONE
94. Nice view MER
96. Sunglasses feature TINT
97. Lab attendants VETS
98. Aim PURPOSE
99. Football’s “Boomer” ESIASON
100. Watchers of boxers KENNELS
101. Formally approves, formerly ENSEALS
102. Show some spine MAN UP
103. Ben, in Hebrew names SON OF
109. Ignoring DEAF TO
111. Lunar valley RILLE
113. “What’s Hecuba to him, __ to Hecuba”: Hamlet OR HE
114. Enjoy thoroughly EAT UP
117. Sylvia of jazz SYMS
120. Eponymous sea discoverer ROSS
123. 20% of MMDX DII
124. Place for sweaters SPA
125. See 76-Across … CAT
126. Afore ERE

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3 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Jul 15, Sunday”

  1. Pretty standard Sunday puzzle. Maybe it was a little more difficult than usual. The June Cleaver (JUNEAUCLEAVER) reference was awesome. IMHOTEP was something really pulled out of left field (at least to me it was), but it was quite interesting. I'd like to see more of that in these crosswords. I know – easy for me to say…

    Those heat shields are a phenomenal acheivement of materials science. I was at a demonstration once where they held a 3000 degree torch on one of the tiles for almost a minute. Immediately afterwards, the heat tile wasn't really even warm to the touch.

    Best –

  2. The distance between mi and fa is a HALF STEP or a SEMITONE. HALFTONE is not a musical term.
    Bill, for crying out loud, stay away from SNAKES!

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