LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Jan 16, Wednesday

Quicklink
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: C.C. Burnikel
THEME: Order Now! … each of today’s themed answers start with a way that one might order products from a catalog:

40D. Catalog come-on … three ways to do it begin 18-, 37- and 61-Across ORDER NOW!

18A. Worker in a red, white and blue truck MAIL CARRIER (order by mail)
37A. eBay event ONLINE AUCTION (order online)
61A. Document that might be subpoenaed PHONE RECORD (order by phone)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 09s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Texting protocol initials SMS
Short Message Service (SMS) is the name for the text messaging service that many of us still use on our cell phones to “text” our friends and family.

9. Immortal Jazz trumpeter, to fans SATCH
Louis Armstrong was born in New Orleans in 1900. Armstrong had a poor upbringing, and only stayed in school till he was 11 years old. The exact origin of Louis’s nickname “Satchmo” seems to be a little unclear. One story is that he used to dance for pennies in New Orleans as a youngster and would hide those pennies in his mouth away from the other kids. For this he earned the nickname “satchel mouth”, which was shortened to “Satchmo”.

15. “That Girl” star Thomas MARLO
Marlo Thomas’s most famous role was playing the title character in the television sitcom “That Girl”. Thomas is also well known as a spokesperson for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

16. Chef Hall who co-hosts “The Chew” CARLA
Carla Hall is a chef. She is one of the co-hosts on the ABC talk show “The Chew”, which discusses food.

17. “Bambi” character ENA
Ena is Bambi’s aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel “Bambi, A Life in the Woods” written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

18. Worker in a red, white and blue truck MAIL CARRIER (order by mail)
The US Postal Service (USPS) is a remarkable agency in many ways. For starters, the government’s right and responsibility to establish the Post Office is specifically called out in Article One of the US constitution. Also, the first postmaster general was none other than Benjamin Franklin. And the USPS operates over 200,000 vehicles, which is the largest vehicle fleet in the world.

20. Fastest of Columbus’ ships PINTA
Christopher Columbus used three ships in his first voyage across the Atlantic: the Santa Maria, the Niña and the Pinta. The Pinta was the fastest of the three, and it was from the Pinta that the New World was first spotted, by a sailor named Rodrigo de Triana who was a lookout on the fateful day. Pinta was a nickname for the ship that translated as “the painted one”. The Pinta’s real name has been lost in mists of time.

22. Progressive rival GEICO
GEICO was founded in 1936 with a very specific mission, to provide auto insurance for employees of the federal government and their families, hence the name Government Employees Insurance Company (GEICO). GEICO is a private company, despite the word “government” in its name. The founders’ idea was to focus on government employees as they believed such a group represented a lower risk profile than the rest of the population. Nowadays any qualifying person can take out a policy with GEICO.

Progressive is a popular auto insurance company, the one that uses the perky character named “Flo” as a spokeswoman. Flo is played by comedienne and actress Stephanie Courtney.

23. Kilmer of “The Doors” VAL
Val Kilmer’s first big leading role in a movie was playing Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone’s 1991 biopic “The Doors”. A few years later, Kilmer was chosen for the lead in another big production, “Batman Forever”. Things haven’t really gone as well for Kilmer since then, I’d say. Off the screen, he flirted with the idea of running for Governor of New Mexico in 2010. A Hollywood actor as a Governor? Would never happen …

24. Cyclist’s violation DOPING
Blood doping increases the number of red blood cells in a person’s bloodstream. The extra red blood cells boost aerobic capacity, allowing more oxygen to be carried from the lungs to the muscles. The use of blood doping in sports probably dates back to the seventies, and the practice was not banned until 1986.

26. Unlikely smartphone user LUDDITE
In contemporary usage, a “Luddite” is someone who is slow to adopt new technology. This usage has even been extended to “Neo-Luddism”, meaning the active opposition to some technologies. It has been suggested that the term “Luddism” commemorates a youth called Ned Ludd, who smashed two mechanical knitting machines in 1779, in the belief that they represented automation that took away jobs. In the following decades, Luddism became an active movement, with Luddites going on rampages, smashing equipment that was deemed to create unemployment.

37. eBay event ONLINE AUCTION (order online)
eBay is an auction site with a twist. If you don’t want to enter into an auction to purchase an item, there’s a “Buy It Now” price. Agree to pay it, and the item is yours!

42. Funds for the future, briefly IRA
Individual Retirement Account (IRA)

43. Finish filming WRAP
When shooting of a film is concluded the movie is said to “wrap”, and everyone heads to the wrap party. There is one story that “wrap” is actually an acronym for “wind, reel and print”, a reference to the transition of the filming process into post-production. But, this explanation is disputed.

46. Butler’s home, for a while TARA
Rhett Butler woos Scarlett O’Hara at the Tara plantation in Margaret Mitchell’s “Gone with the Wind”. Tara was founded by Scarlett’s father, Irish immigrant Gerald O’Hara. Gerald named his new abode after the Hill of Tara back in his home country, the ancient seat of the High King of Ireland. Rhett’s rival for the affections of Scarlet is Ashley Wilkes who lives at the nearby Twelve Oaks plantation.

52. Lex Luthor and Superman, e.g. ENEMIES
Lex Luthor is the arch-nemesis of Superman in comics. Luthor has been portrayed in a number of guises in the comic world as well in movies and on the small screen. For example, he appeared as Atom Man in the 1950 film series “Atom Man vs. Superman”, and was played by actor Lyle Talbot, opposite Kirk Alyn’s Superman.

54. Mic users EMCEES
The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

56. CXVI years ago MCM
In Roman numerals, the year MCM (1900) was CXVI (116) years ago, as this year is MMXVI (2016).

57. Indian royals RANIS
A ranee (also spelled rani) is a queen or a princess, the female equivalent of a raja in India.

60. Belgrade natives SERBS
Serbs are an ethnic group native to the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Although Serbs exist as a minority group in many countries in the region, they are the majority ethnic group in Serbia, in Montenegro and in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Belgrade is the capital city of Serbia. The name Belgrade translates into “White City”.

61. Document that might be subpoenaed PHONE RECORD (order by phone)
A “subpoena” is a writ, a formal written order issued by a court compelling testimony or production of evidence. A “subpoena ad testificandum” orders a person to testify, and a “subpoena duces tecum” orders a person or organization to produce evidence. The term “subpoena” comes from the Latin “under penalty”, a reference to the fact that a person must comply with the writ or suffer a penalty.

64. Mets’ div. NLE
National League East (NLE)

65. Best Actress winner for “Two Women” LOREN
Sophia Loren certainly has earned her exalted position in the world of movies. In 1962 Loren won an Oscar for Best Actress for her role in the Italian film “Two Women”, the first actress to win an Academy Award for a non-English speaking performance. She received a second nomination for Best Actress for her role in “Marriage Italian-Style”, another Italian-language movie, released in 1964.

“Two Women” is a disturbing Italian film released in 1960, starring Sophia Loren as a woman trying to protect her 12-year-old daughter during WWII. Based on a novel called “La ciociara” by Alberto Moravia, the film includes a scene where mother and daughter are gang-raped in a church by Moroccan soldiers of the French Army. Although the story is fictional, the mass-rape and killings really took place in the days following the Allied victory at the Battle of Monte Cassino. Referred to in Italy as “Marocchinate”, colonial troops in the French Army from Morocco reportedly raped thousands of women and murdered almost a thousand men who were trying to protect their wives and daughters.

67. “Days of __ Lives” OUR
NBC’s “Days of Our Lives” is the second-longest running soap opera on US television, second only to “General Hospital”. “Days …” has been aired since November 1965.

69. Stuck-up types SNOBS
Back in the 1780s, a “snob” was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn’t a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

Down
1. Jay Pritchett, to Manny, on “Modern Family” STEPDAD
Ed O’Neill made it big on television playing Al Bundy on the sitcom “Married … with Children”, not a show I ever cared for. However, I really enjoy watching O’Neill playing Jay Pritchett on the excellent sitcom “Modern Family”.

“Modern Family” is a marvelous television show shown on ABC since 2009. The show’s format is that of a “mockumentary”, with the cast often addressing the camera directly. In that respect “Modern Family” resembles two other excellent shows: “The Office” and “Parks and Recreation”, both of which might also be described a “mockumentaries”.

2. Bite-size cookie MINI OREO
Bite-sized Oreo cookies were introduced in 1991 under the brand name Mini Oreo. Mini Oreos were dropped in the late nineties, but reintroduced in 2000 as part of a promotion for the Dodge Caravan. They’re still around, and you can now even get a mint version.

3. Co-screenwriter and star of “The Gunman” SEAN PENN
Actor Sean Penn is a two-time Oscar winner, for his roles in “Mystic River” released in 2003 and “Milk” released in 2008. Penn’s celebrity on screen is only matched with his fame off the screen. Apart from his “big name” marriages to singer Madonna and actress Robin Wright, Penn is also well known for political and social activism. He perhaps inherited some of his political views from his father, actor and director Leo Penn. As an actor, Leo refused to “name names” in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee and so was blacklisted in Hollywood and had to move into directing to put bread on the table. In later years as a director he gave his son Sean his first acting role, in a 1974 episode of “Little House on the Prairie”.

“The Gunman” is a 2015 action movie starring Sean Penn as a retired mercenary who is targeted by hit squads hired by a large private security firm. This one wasn’t favored by the critics.

4. University of Jordan city AMMAN
Amman is the capital city of Jordan, and is one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in the world. Amman has been occupied by a number of different civilizations over the centuries, including the Greeks who called it Philadelphia, a name retained by the Romans when they occupied the city just after 100 AD.

5. Billy’s cry MAA!
Males goats are called “bucks” or “billies”, although castrated males are known as “wethers”. Female goats are called “does” or “nannies”, and young goats are referred to as “kids”.

7. Allure rackmate ELLE
“Elle” magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. “Elle” is the French word for “she”. “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

“Allure” is a magazine published by Condé Nast in New York that was founded in 1991 by Linda Wells. “Allure” contains articles on beauty, fashion and women’s health.

8. Not likely to bite DOCILE
Something described as “docile” is easily managed or readily trained. The term ultimately derives from the Latin “docere” meaning “to teach”.

9. New England whitefish SCROD
Scrod is the name given to fish that has been “scrawed” i.e. split open, dried and then broiled.

10. Longest river entirely in Switzerland AAR
The Aar (also called the “Aare” in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland.

11. Small stuff TRIVIA
Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

12. Lacrosse shoes CLEATS
Even though lacrosse was dropped from the Olympics after the 1908 games, it is currently enjoying a resurgence of popularity outside of North America.

13. Road hog? HARLEY
The Harley-Davidson motorcycle company was started up in the very early 1900s by two childhood friends, William Harley and Arthur Davidson, . Their first design was in effect an engine hooked up to a pedal bicycle, but the 116 cc cylinder capacity simply couldn’t generate enough power to get up the hills of their native city of Milwaukee. The pair came up with a redesigned model that had a cylinder capacity of 405 cc, which the partners built in a shed at the back of Davidson’s house. In 1906, the partners built their first factory, located where the company’s headquarters is to this day, on Juneau Avenue in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Harley-Davidson motorcycles are often referred to as “hogs”.

21. Niña’s aunt TIA
In Spanish, a “tia”(aunt) is a member of “la familia” (the family).

In Spanish, a “niña” is a young girl, a child. The term “chica” applies to an older girl or perhaps a young woman.. The term “muchacha” applies to girls in general, I think …

27. Ricky portrayer DESI
In the hit television show “I Love Lucy”, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz played Lucy and Ricky Ricardo. The Ricardos’ best friends were also their landlords, Fred and Ethel Mertz. The Mertz’s were played by William Frawley and Vivian Vance.

30. “Think again, laddie!” NAE!
“Nae” is the Scottish vernacular for “no”.

34. Dubbed dude SIR
Kneel, and the Queen might “dub thee a knight” if you’re lucky. “Dub” is a specific term derived from Old English that was used to mean “make a knight”. As the knight was also given a knightly name at the same time, “dub” has come to mean “give someone a name”.

36. Additive sold at AutoZone STP
STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name STP comes from “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

AutoZone is the second-largest retailer of aftermarket automotive parts in the US (after Advance Auto Parts).

38. Hemsworth who plays Gale in “The Hunger Games” LIAM
Liam Hemsworth is an Australian actor who is best known these days for playing Gale Hawthorne in “The Hunger Games” series of films. Hemsworth met Miley Cyrus while working on the movie “The Last Song”, and the two actors were engaged for a while. Liam is a younger brother of actor Chris Hemsworth, who plays the superhero “Thor” on the big screen.

“The Hunger Games” is a 2008 novel by Suzanne Collins, the first in a trilogy of titles that also includes “Catching Fire” (2009) and “Mockingjay” (2010). “The Hunger Games” was adapted into a very successful movie released in 2012, with the sequels following soon after. Amazon.com reports more sales of “The Hunger Games” books than even the “Harry Potter” series.

41. Color similar to cerulean NILE BLUE
Cerulean is a blue color, with the name probably coming from the Latin “caeruleus” meaning “blue”.

46. Head piece? TEMPLE
The sides of the head behind the eyes are known as the “temples”.

48. Shark hanger-on REMORA
Remoras are also called suckerfish, which name is descriptive of one of the fish’s basic behaviors. One of the remoras dorsal fins is in the shape of a “sucker”, allowing it to take a firm hold on a larger marine animal, hitching a ride.

50. Mag that merged with World Report in 1948 US NEWS
“US News & World Report” is a web-based news source that was known mainly as a magazine until 2010. “United States News” magazine and “World Report” merged to form “US News & World Report” in 1948.

53. Greek goddess of peace IRENE
Eirene (also “Irene”) was the Greek goddess of peace, with “eirene” being the Greek word for “peace”. The Roman equivalent to Eirene was the goddess Pax.

55. Early PC platform MS-DOS
MS-DOS (short for Microsoft Disk Operating System) was the main operating system used by IBM-compatible PCs in the eighties and for much of the nineties.

59. London district SOHO
The area of London called Soho had a very poor reputation for most of the 20th century as it was home to the city’s red light district. Soho has been transformed though, and has been a very fashionable neighborhood since the 1980s.

62. Wii forerunner NES
The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was sold in North America from 1985 to to 1995. The NES was the biggest selling gaming console of the era.

The Wii is currently the biggest-selling game console in the world.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Texting protocol initials SMS
4. Fired (up) AMPED
9. Immortal Jazz trumpeter, to fans SATCH
14. Power __ TIE
15. “That Girl” star Thomas MARLO
16. Chef Hall who co-hosts “The Chew” CARLA
17. “Bambi” character ENA
18. Worker in a red, white and blue truck MAIL CARRIER (order by mail)
20. Fastest of Columbus’ ships PINTA
22. Progressive rival GEICO
23. Kilmer of “The Doors” VAL
24. Cyclist’s violation DOPING
26. Unlikely smartphone user LUDDITE
28. Picnic __ AREA
29. Opening ONSET
32. “Piece of cake!” EASY!
33. Room for family game night DEN
34. Chambermaid’s supply SOAP
35. Hook shape ESS
37. eBay event ONLINE AUCTION (order online)
42. Funds for the future, briefly IRA
43. Finish filming WRAP
44. Done with, with “of” RID
46. Butler’s home, for a while TARA
49. Technician with a fork TUNER
51. Inactive IDLE
52. Lex Luthor and Superman, e.g. ENEMIES
54. Mic users EMCEES
56. CXVI years ago MCM
57. Indian royals RANIS
60. Belgrade natives SERBS
61. Document that might be subpoenaed PHONE RECORD (order by phone)
64. Mets’ div. NLE
65. Best Actress winner for “Two Women” LOREN
66. “Hooray!” WAHOO!
67. “Days of __ Lives” OUR
68. Strike out ERASE
69. Stuck-up types SNOBS
70. Like freshly applied polish WET

Down
1. Jay Pritchett, to Manny, on “Modern Family” STEPDAD
2. Bite-size cookie MINI OREO
3. Co-screenwriter and star of “The Gunman” SEAN PENN
4. University of Jordan city AMMAN
5. Billy’s cry MAA!
6. Uptight type PRIG
7. Allure rackmate ELLE
8. Not likely to bite DOCILE
9. New England whitefish SCROD
10. Longest river entirely in Switzerland AAR
11. Small stuff TRIVIA
12. Lacrosse shoes CLEATS
13. Road hog? HARLEY
19. Clinic service for serious injuries ACUTE CARE
21. Niña’s aunt TIA
25. Run wild GO ON A TEAR
27. Ricky portrayer DESI
30. “Think again, laddie!” NAE!
31. Bring forth SPAWN
34. Dubbed dude SIR
36. Additive sold at AutoZone STP
38. Hemsworth who plays Gale in “The Hunger Games” LIAM
39. Suffix with text -URE
40. Catalog come-on … three ways to do it begin 18-, 37- and 61-Across ORDER NOW!
41. Color similar to cerulean NILE BLUE
45. Piece of cake, e.g. DESSERT
46. Head piece? TEMPLE
47. Relay race closer ANCHOR
48. Shark hanger-on REMORA
50. Mag that merged with World Report in 1948 US NEWS
51. Picked cubes ICE
53. Greek goddess of peace IRENE
55. Early PC platform MS-DOS
58. “__ hardly wait!” I CAN
59. London district SOHO
62. Wii forerunner NES
63. Steal from ROB

Return to top of page

11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Jan 16, Wednesday”

  1. Tricky puzzle, but I finished. I think it took me my Monday and Tuesday times combined to finish this one though. The theme helped a little too.

    REMORA was new to me and had to be done via crosses. I didn't know what a LUDDITE was. When I got it with crosses, I assumed it was a sect of the Mennonites or something. Uh wrong.

    Ihad yahoo before WAHOO (??), baa before MAA, and drag before PRIG, but they all got sorted out.
    Fun puzzles of the week start tomorrow.

    Best –

  2. Luddite was an easy fill for me as I am always accusing my brother of being one (he has no computer and no television!). Count me as another "yahoo" before "wahoo" filler inner…

    Have a good hump day all.

  3. I knew what a Luddite is because I have Luddite-ish tendencies. The nice part of passing 50 is that one gains the luxury of ignoring trends! And no, I don't have a smartphone, but often I'm glad my husband does.

    easy puzzle except SW corner-didn't get Irene/Loren had error instead of erase.

    Take care-
    Bella

  4. Fairy tough puzzle. Too many names I didn't know, so of no help – just a hindrance. Luddite and remora I've heard of, and was familiar with, but they came after some crosses. I too had Yahoo before Wahoo, and Baa before Maa, and Prim before prig. I always thought of Prim as a nice comment, and Prig as derogatory. But same mistakes as Jeff …. good minds think alike.

    I remmeber ex-Prseident Reagan, was awarded the Grand Cross of the Honorable Order of the Bath, ( G.C.B.) one the top 'medals' of chivalry by the present queen, in 1989. Reputably, he did not have to kneel, and was not dubbed ( he spoke his own lines – ) and on the other hand, he would not have been referred to as 'Sir'. Other than as a courtsey, as an ex-Prseident, and as a gentleman.

    On Luddite, which I must read up on, …. one of our friend's wife,(who is also a friend – ) has a Singer electro-mechanical knitting machine, which she loves very much. It is an odd contraption, very sophisticated and complicated, but once you get the hang (pun?) of the gizmo, I guess its a great help.

    Have a great day, all.

  5. Satch? This is just wrong. In your comments, you use Satchmo, so I don't see why Satch was used in the puzzle.

  6. ^– because "Satchmo" doesn't fit the grid. Blame the constructor, not the blogger.

    No real problems here. Tony, do you think a LUDDITE would still use MSDOS? 😉

  7. I finished w/o Google but didn't know what some answers were.

    Mr. Butler – please don't assume everyone knows "simple" athletic concepts. What is an ANCHOR in reference to relay races? The only one you didn't describe. I've managed to survive to my age never having had to do those things.

    I'm partially Luddite. I have an old sewing machine that uses cams for fancy stitches.

    I had a loom and made a coat on it. Pastel plaid of my own design.

  8. @Sfingi – The anchor leg in a relay race is the last leg of that race, being the one who brings the baton home across the finish line.

  9. OMGEE AGAIN I MUST STATE–RHETT NEVER LIVED AT TARA!!! Careless clue! He never courted Scarlett there. Would not have visited, because he wasn't received by "polite" society. He only showed up at Twelve Oaks as a tag-along. After he and Scarlett married, he never accompanied her on her visits to Tara. Unless this clue is referring to Scarlett–but even then, she never lived there after marrying Butler. Not in the book or the movie. I PROTEST!!
    Annnyway, enough of that… Today's was a nice challenge. Got held up in the SW corner, at least in part because I refused to write TARA…on sorry, I'm at it again:- Did not know IRENE, and had WHIFF initially instead of ERASE.
    Today feels like Spring already, here in LA. Sun is out till after 5 pm! Baseball is right around the corner–sort of.
    Forgive my rant, and
    Be well~~™

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.