LA Times Crossword Answers 17 Jan 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Joseph Groat
THEME: “Sh!” … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but with the letter sequence “TCH” changed to “SH”.

23A. Score for Hawkeye’s team? M*A*S*H POINT (from “match point”)
25A. With 70-Across, clothing magnate David posing with a bass? ABERCROMBIE
70A. See 25-Across AND FISH (from “Abercrombie and Fitch”)
39A. Convenient snack? NOSH IN ONE’S BELT (from “notch in one’s belt”)
99A. Money for fast-food fries? SHOESTRING CASH (from “shoestring catch”)
115A. Outback outlaw? BUSH CASSIDY (from “Butch Cassidy”)
118A. Self-cleaning laundry? SMART WASH (from “smartwatch”)
33D. Avoid diner dishes? ESCAPE HASH (from “escape hatch”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 27m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 4 … BOAZ (Baaz), KEL (Kal), PICOT (picat), HECUBA (Hacuba)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Taxco title: Abbr. SRTA
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish and mademoiselle (Mlle.) is French for “Miss”.

Taxco de Alarcón is a small city in southern Mexico. Taxco is a center for silver mining, and is also well known for the production of silverware and fine items made using silver.

19. Apple variety IMAC
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

20. Sleuth with numbered offspring CHAN
Charlie Chan is the main character in a series of novels by Earl Derr Biggers. Chan is a Chinese-American detective working with the Honolulu police department. There have been almost 50 movies made featuring the Charlie Chan character.

21. Olympic champion on a 1939 Time cover HENIE
Sonja Henie was a World and Olympic Champion figure skater from Norway from the days when “amateur” sports stars were not paid. Henie made up for her lack of income from competing by developing a career in Hollywood. She was one of highest-paid film stars at the height of her movie career.

22. Dancer Castle IRENE
Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-wife team of ballroom dancers who regularly performed on Broadway at the start of the 20th century. The Castles have been credited with creating or at least popularizing the dance known as the “foxtrot”.

23. Score for Hawkeye’s team? M*A*S*H POINT (from “match point”)
Hawkeye Pierce is the lead character in the “M*A*S*H” novel, movie and TV series. Hawkeye was originally portrayed by Donald Sutherland in the film, and then by Alan Alda in the television show. Pierce is the only character appearing in all 250 episodes of the groundbreaking TV series.

25. With 70-Across, clothing magnate David posing with a bass? ABERCROMBIE
(70A. See 25-Across AND FISH)
Ezra Fitch was a co-founder with David Abercrombie of the clothing retailer Abercrombie & Fitch. It is Ezra Fitch who gets the credit for introducing the Chinese game of mahjong into the US. Fitch bought up as many mahjong sets as he could find in villages all over China and sold them through Abercrombie & Fitch outlets.

30. Bowling initials AMF
AMF Bowling Centers, Inc. is an operator of bowling allies, the largest such company in the world in fact.

34. Longfellow’s bell town ATRI
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote “The Sicilian’s Tale; The Bell of Atri”, a narrative poem set in the small town of Atri in the Abruzzo region of Italy.

37. Mai __ TAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic’s restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum.

39. Convenient snack? NOSH IN ONE’S BELT (from “notch in one’s belt”)
Our word “nosh” has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word “nashn” meaning “to nibble”. We use “nosh” as a noun that means snack, or as a verb meaning to eat between meals.

44. __ diem PER
“Per diem” is the Latin for “by the day”. We tend to use the term for a daily allowance for expenses when traveling for work.

45. ’50s British prime minister EDEN
Sir Anthony Eden served as Britain’s Foreign Secretary during WWII, and then as Prime Minister from 1955-57. I think it’s fair to say that Eden doesn’t have a great reputation as a statesman. He was proud of his stance in favor of peace over war, so his critics characterized him as an appeaser. His major stumble on the world stage occurred with the Suez Crisis in 1956. Egypt’s President Nasser unilaterally nationalized the Suez Canal causing war to be declared on Egypt by Britain, France and Israel. Within a few months political pressure from the US and the USSR caused the allies to withdraw, bolstering Egypt’s national reputation. Eden never recovered from the loss of face at home, and it is felt that the stress even affected his health. Eden resigned in January 1957.

47. Great-grandfather of David, in the Bible BOAZ
In the Bible’s Book of Ruth, the widowed Ruth marries a wealthy landowner from Bethlehem called Boaz. Ruth and Boaz had a son Obed, who was the father of Jesse and grandfather of David.

50. Funny Bombeck ERMA
Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years, producing more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns describing her home life in suburbia. Bombeck also wrote “Aunt Erma’s Cope Book”, published in 1979.

56. Octane Booster brand STP
STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name STP comes from “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

The difference between a premium and regular gasoline is its octane rating. The octane rating is measure of the resistance of the gasoline to auto-ignition i.e. its resistance to ignition just by virtue of being compressed in the cylinder. This auto-ignition is undesirable as multiple-cylinder engines are designed so that ignition within each cylinder takes place precisely when the plug sparks, and not before. If ignition occurs before the spark is created, the resulting phenomenon is called “knocking”.

59. Works with a Singer SEWS
Isaac Singer was not only an inventor, but also an actor. For much of his life, profits made from his inventions supported him while he pursued his acting career. Singer didn’t actually invent the sewing machine, and never claimed to have done so. What he did do though, was invent a version of the machine that was practical and easily used in the home.

68. Samsung Galaxy competitor IPHONE
Apple started development of the iPhone in 2004 in collaboration with Cingular Wireless (now AT&T Mobility). The confidential program was given the name “Project Purple”, and took thirty months to complete at a cost of about $150 million. The iPhone was introduced in 2007 at the Macworld convention in San Francisco.

The Galaxy is a series of mobile computing devices made by Samsung that was introduced in 2009.

74. Many beatniks wore them GOATEES
A goatee is a beard formed just by hair on a man’s chin. The name probably comes from the tuft of hair seen on an adult goat.

The term “beatnik” was coined by journalist Herb Caen in 1958 when he used it to describe the stereotypical young person of the “beat generation” that was oft associated with the writer Jack Kerouac. That stereotypical beatnik would be playing the bongos and rolling his or her own cigarettes. Male beatniks also tended to sport goatees and wear berets.

76. Mississippi’s __ City YAZOO
Yazoo City in Mississippi is named after the Yazoo River, which in turn was named for the Yazoo tribe of Native Americans that lived near the river’s mouth.

77. Amateur who won the 1968 US Open ASHE
Arthur Ashe was a professional tennis player from Richmond, Virginia. In his youth, Ashe found himself having to travel great distances to play against Caucasian opponents due to the segregation that still existed in his home state. He was rewarded for his dedication by being selected for the 1963 US Davis Cup team, the first African American player to be so honored. Ashe continued to run into trouble because of his ethnicity though, and in 1968 was denied entry into South Africa to play in the South African Open. In 1979 Ashe suffered a heart attack and had bypass surgery, with follow-up surgery four years later during which he contracted HIV from blood transfusions. Ashe passed away in 1993 due to complications from AIDS. Shortly afterwards, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton.

91. Turbaned Punjabis SIKHS
Sikhism is a religion that was founded in the Punjab region, which straddles the India-Pakistan border. Even though Sikhism was established relatively recently, it is now the fifth-largest organized religion in the world. Sikhism was founded in the 15th century by Guru Nanak.

Punjab is the most populous province in Pakistan and is home to over half of the country’s citizens. “Punjab” (also “Panjab”) translates as “Five Waters”, a reference to five rivers that form tributaries to the Indus River: Chenab, Jhelum, Ravi, Beas and Sutlej.

93. Italian counterpart of the BBC RAI
Rai 1, 2 & 3 are three television channels owned and operated by the Italian government. Rai stands for “Radiotelevisione Italiana”, Italian public broadcasting.

The marvelous British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is mainly funded by the UK government through a television licence fee that is levied annually on all households watching TV transmissions. Currently the fee is 145 UK pounds, about 230 US dollars.

97. “The Good Wife” figs. DAS
District Attorney (DA)

“The Good Wife” is a legal drama showing on CBS starring Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick, a litigator who returns to practicing the law after spending 13 years as a stay-at-home mom. I binge-watched a few series of the show some time back. I find it to be well-written, with a great cast and great acting …

99. Money for fast-food fries? SHOESTRING CASH (from “shoestring catch”)
Food that has been julienned has been cut into long thin strips, sometimes called “shoestrings”, as in shoestring potatoes.

104. Fast movement PRESTO
On a musical score, presto is used to indicate a fast tempo. “Presto” is the Italian word for “quick”.

105. Kenan’s comedy partner KEL
“Kenan & Kel” is a sitcom that aired on Nickelodeon from 1996 to 2000. It starred Kenan Thompson (now of “Saturday Night Live”), and Kel Mitchell.

106. Prussian pronoun SIE
“Sie” is a German word for “you”.

Prussia was a German kingdom that had as its capital the city of Berlin. The German monarchies were abolished after WWI, and “Prussia” ceased to exist as an entity right after WWII.

108. Two-time U.S. Women’s Open winner Patty SHEEHAN
Patty Sheehan is a professional golfer who joined the LPGA in 1980 and won six majors.

110. Cold cuts qty. ONE LB
The unit of mass that we know today as a “pound” is descended from the old Roman unit of weight known as a “libra”. That “libra” connection is why we abbreviate “pound” to “lb”. The name “pound” though comes from the Latin “pondo” meaning “weight”. Our term “ounce” comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a Roman “libra”.

112. Space cadet’s world LA-LA LAND
The expression “space cadet” is used to describe someone who is eccentric and disconnected with reality. It may even imply that the person is a user of hallucinogens. The phrase has been around since the sixties, and may be derived from the science fiction TV show “Tom Corbett, Space Cadet” which aired in the fifties.

115. Outback outlaw? BUSH CASSIDY (from “Butch Cassidy”)
In Australia, the land outside of urban area is referred to as “the outback” or “the bush”. Although, I think that “outback” can also be used for the more remote parts of the bush.

The Old West train and bank robber Robert Parker was better known by the name Butch Cassidy. His partner in crime Harry Longabaugh was known as the Sundance Kid. Famously, the Butch and Sundance’s exploits were reenacted in the marvelous 1969 film “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid”.

122. Old Apple laptop IBOOK
From 1996 to 2006 Apple sold a relatively cost-effective line of laptops they called the iBook. Basically, an iBook was a stripped-down version of the high-end PowerBook, in a different form factor and targeted at the consumer and education markets. The iBook was replaced by the MacBook in 2006.

124. DVR pioneer TIVO
TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world’s first commercially successful DVR (Digital Video Recorder).

126. Beatles trademark BANGS
The classic Beatles haircut was called the mop-top. Apparently John Lennon and Paul McCartney saw someone wearing the style in Hamburg, and they liked it. The pair hitchhiked from Hamburg to Paris, and when at their destination had their hair cut that way for the first time.

127. Firewood measure STERE
“Stere” is a metric measure, although it is not part of the modern metric system. Nowadays the stere is used as a measure for firewood, and is equal to one cubic meter.

128. Meeting of Cong. SESS
A legislative (legis.) meeting of Congress (Cong.) might be called a session (sess.).

129. Golfer’s putting woes, with “the” YIPS
The informal term “yips” applies to the nervous twitching that can sometimes spoil and sportsman’s performance, especially a golfer’s putting stroke.

Down
1. Dandy guy? JIM
A jim-dandy is someone or something that is excellent. The term might possibly arise from the song “Dandy Jim of Caroline” that was popular in the 1840s.

2. Actress Thurman UMA
Robert Thurman was the first westerner to be ordained a Tibetan Buddhist monk. Robert raised his children in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and called his daughter “Uma” as it is a phonetic spelling of the Buddhist name “Dbuma”. Uma’s big break in movies came with her starring role in Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 hit “Pulp Fiction”. My favorite Uma Thurman film is the wonderful 1996 romantic comedy “The Truth About Cats and Dogs”.

4. Mushy quality SCHMALTZ
“Schmaltz” is an informal term used to describe things that are excessively sentimental. The word comes from the Yiddish “shmalts”, which means “melted fat”. Indeed, the modern German word for fat or grease is Schmaltz, and it can be used in the same figurative way in that language.

6. Safari park critter RHINO
There are five types of rhinoceros that survive today, and the smaller Javan Rhino is the most rare. The rhinoceros is probably the rarest large mammal on the planet, thanks to poaching. Hunters mainly prize the horn of the rhino as it is used in powdered form in traditional Chinese medicine.

“Safari” is a Swahili word, meaning “journey” or “expedition”.

8. Lit. compilation ANTH
Strictly speaking, an “anthology” is a collection of poetic works, although the meaning has broadened over time to cover any literary collection, or even a collection of ideas, comments, complaints etc. The term derives from the Greek “anthologia”, a word for a collection of short poems by several authors. The literal meaning is “flower collection” from “anthos” and “logia”, so an anthology is a book containing “flowers” of verse.

13. Carbohydrate used in jellies PECTIN
Pectin is a starch-like material found in the cell walls of plants. Pectin can be extracted from plants (usually citrus fruit) and then used in cooking as a gelling agent.

14. Bacchus, to the Greeks DIONYSUS
Dionysus was the party animal of Greek mythology. Dionysus was the god of the wine, ritual madness and ecstasy! The Roman name for Dionysus was Bacchus.

17. Kingdom member ANIMAL
Biological classification is a method used to group organisms by biological type. The method uses a hierarchy of nested classes, with an organism being classified with reference to evolutionary traits. The major taxonomic ranks used are:

– Life
– Domain
– Kingdom
– Phylum (plural “phyla”)
– Class
– Order
– Family
– Genus (plural “genera”)
– Species

24. Facebook attention-getters POKES
When you “poke” someone on Facebook, an icon shows up on the poked person’s Facebook page telling them they have been “poked” and by whom. I guess it’s a way of saying “hi”, but I am very much a Facebook neophyte …

26. Mississippi, e.g. RIVER
The Mississippi River runs right through the Midwest. It originates in Lake Itasca, Minnesota and flows into the Gulf of Mexico about a hundred miles below New Orleans. The name Mississippi is a corruption of a Native American name “misi-ziibi”, meaning “Great River”.

28. Western treaty gp. OAS
The Organization of American States (OAS) has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. All the independent states in the Americas are members of the group except Honduras, which had its membership suspended after the country’s 2009 coup.

31. Autos from Trollhättan SAABS
Trollhättan is a city in Sweden located about 75 km north of Gothenburg, in the southwest of the country. Trollhättan is home to the headquarters and main manufacturing plant of National Electric Vehicle Sweden, formerly known as SAAB Automotive.

32. Crochet loop PICOT
A picot is a loop of thread, either for function or for decoration, at the edge of some knitted or tatted material.

Crochet is the process of making a fabric using a hooked needle called a crochet hook. “Crochet” is a French word meaning “hook”.

33. Avoid diner dishes? ESCAPE HASH (from “escape hatch”)
“Hash”, meaning a dish of beef and vegetables mashed together, is a very American term and one that really surprised me when I first came across it. “Hash” just seems like such an unappetizing item, but I soon found out how delicious it was. The name “hash” in this context comes from the French “hacher” meaning “to chop”. Back in the early 1900s the dish called “hashed browned potatoes” was developed, which quickly morphed into “hash browns”. From there the likes of corned beef hash was introduced.

42. “‘Come to my arms, my __ boy!'”: “Jabberwocky” BEAMISH
Here is a verse from “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll, probably the one poem that we all just loved learning to recite at school:

And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”
He chortled in his joy.

44. Spanish preposition POR
“Por” is Spanish for “for”.

49. Lingerie item TEDDY
The item of lingerie known as a teddy can also be called “camiknickers”. The alternative name was used when the one-piece garment was introduced in the twenties, a combination of a camisole and panties (aka knickers).

54. Morales of “Caprica” ESAI
The actor Esai Morales is best known for his role in the 1987 movie “La Bamba”, which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai).

“Caprica” is a sci-fi television series that was written as a prequel to the show “Battlestar Galactica”. “Caprica” didn’t sit well with the public and was cancelled after just one season.

57. Wilder in films GENE
Gene Wilder is a retired actor who is noted for his comedic roles. Wilder had a successful collaboration with Mel Brooks on three great films: “The Producers”, “Blazing Saddles” and my favorite “Young Frankenstein”. For a while, Wilder dated his “Young Frankenstein” co-star Teri Garr, but he was married most famously to “Saturday Night Live” star Gilda Radner.

60. Treasured strings STRADS
Generations of the Stradivari family produced violins, the most famous of which were constructed by Antonio Stradivari.

68. “House,” in Inuit IGLU
The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar, namely “igdlo”.

69. Bear in a red shirt POOH
Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author, best known for his delightful “Winnie-the-Pooh” series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin’s real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

72. What the Wonderland caterpillar smokes HOOKAH
A hookah is a waterpipe, a device for smoking tobacco in which the smoke is passed through a water basin before it is inhaled.

The Caterpillar is a character in Lewis Carroll’s novel “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. When Alice meets the Caterpillar, he is smoking tobacco in a hookah. Alice doesn’t have a good first impression of the Caterpillar as he appears to be quite rude, talking in terse sentences in between puffs on his pipe.

80. Like Singha beer THAI
Singha is a lager beer from Thailand. “Singha” is the name of a powerful mythological lion, which is represented on the label.

85. Range that includes Kings Peak UINTA
The Uinta Mountains are a sub-range of the Rocky Mountains located mainly in northeastern Utah, approximately 100 miles east of Salt Lake City. The highest point in the Uintas is Kings Peak, the highest point in Utah.

86. Push EGG ON
The verb “edge” has been used to mean to incite, to urge on, from the 16th century. Somewhere along the way, “edge” was mistakenly replaced with “egg”, giving us our term “to egg on” meaning “to goad”.

88. Places to put your feet up HASSOCKS
A “hassock” is an item of furniture that is covered in cloth and used as a low seat or footstool. The name comes from the Old English “hassuc” meaning “clump of grass”. “Hassock” was first used to describe a kneeling cushion, a usage that persists in churches to this day.

90. Ship of Greek myth ARGO
In Greek mythology, Jason and the Argonauts sailed on the Argo in search of the Golden Fleece. The vessel was called the “Argo” in honor of the ship’s builder, a man named Argus.

92. Indy 500 town, aptly SPEEDWAY
The residential suburb of Speedway in Indianapolis was founded in 1926. The town of Speedway is named for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway that opened in the area in 1909.

94. Autobiography featuring Ike I, TINA
“I, Tina” is the 1986 autobiography of Tina Turner. The book was so successful it was adapted into a movie called “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” The film version was released in 1993 and starring Angela Bassett as Tina Turner.

Ike and Tina Turner were together as a husband/wife duo recording music for 16 years in the sixties and seventies. Ike and Tina’s biggest hit has to be “Proud Mary”, released in 1971. The partnership ended, along with their marriage, in the late seventies with Tina making accusations of abuse by her drug-addicted husband.

96. Altar attendant ACOLYTE
The word “acolyte” comes from the Greek “akolouthos” meaning “companion, attendant, helper”. In the Christian tradition, an acolyte is an individual who assists some way in a ceremony, by lighting candles for example. In more general terms, an acolyte is a devoted follower or attendant.

100. Trojan War queen HECUBA
Hecuba was the wife of King Priam of Troy in Greek mythology. Queen Hecuba had 19 children with King Priam, including Hector, Paris and Cassandra the prophetess.

101. “Little House” antagonist Nellie __ OLESON
Laura Ingalls Wilder was an author from Pepin, Wisconsin who is best remembered for her “Little House” series of children’s novels. The series was based on her own childhood in a pioneer family that moved from Wisconsin to Kansas and back again.

102. Popular pieces REESE’S
Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups were invented by Harry Burnett “H.B.” Reese. Peanut Butter Cups were originally called penny cups, reflecting the price at which they were sold. Then inflation took over, and maybe that’s why they were broken into smaller “Pieces” …

103. Physicians’ org. AMA
American Medical Association (AMA)

104. Alexandria lighthouse that’s one of the Seven Wonders PHAROS
Alexandria is the largest seaport in Egypt. As one might tell from its name, the city was founded by Alexander the Great, in about 331 BC. Alexandria was the capital city of Egypt for almost a thousand years and was one of the most famous cities in the ancient world. It was also famous for its lighthouse, which is one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The lighthouse was located on the island of Pharos, just off the coast of Alexandria, an island which gave its name to the lighthouse.

108. Serbs and Croats SLAVS
The Slavic peoples are in the majority in communities covering over half of Europe. This large ethnic group is traditionally broken down into three smaller groups:

– the West Slavic (including Czechs and Poles)
– the East Slavic (including Russians and Ukrainians)
– the South Slavic (including Bulgarians and Serbs)

111. Future J.D.’s exam LSAT
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

The law degree that is abbreviated to J.D. is more completed called Juris Doctor.

113. D-Day fleet LSTS
LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs were the large vessels used mainly in WWII that had doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles could roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

114. Parisian honey AMIE
A male friend in France is “un ami”, and a female friend is “une amie”.

116. Biker’s wheels HOG
“Hog” is a nickname for a Harley-Davidson motorcycle.

The Harley-Davidson motorcycle company was started up in the very early 1900s by two childhood friends, William Harley and Arthur Davidson, . Their first design was in effect an engine hooked up to a pedal bicycle, but the 116 cc cylinder capacity simply couldn’t generate enough power to get up the hills of their native city of Milwaukee. The pair came up with a redesigned model that had a cylinder capacity of 405 cc, which the partners built in a shed at the back of Davidson’s house. In 1906, the partners built their first factory, located where the company’s headquarters is to this day, on Juneau Avenue in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

117. __ es Salaam DAR
Dar es Salaam is the largest city in Tanzania, and sits right on the east coast of Africa. The city’s name is usually translated from Arabic as “Haven of Peace”.

119. Jackie’s second ARI
Jackie Kennedy Onassis was born into a privileged family, the daughter of a Wall Street stock broker, John Vernou Bouvier III. Ms. Bouvier moved in the same social circles as the Kennedy clan, and first met the then-US Representative John Kennedy at a dinner party hosted by mutual friends. After she saw her husband assassinated, and then her brother-in-law Bobby Kennedy, she declared that she feared for the life of her children as they bore the Kennedy name. She left the country, eventually meeting and marrying Aristotle Onassis. Reportedly she was very satisfied that the Greek shipping magnate was able to provide privacy and security for her children.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Wine holders JUGS
5. Taxco title: Abbr. SRTA
9. Beat but bad WHOMP
14. Crib cries DADAS
19. Apple variety IMAC
20. Sleuth with numbered offspring CHAN
21. Olympic champion on a 1939 Time cover HENIE
22. Dancer Castle IRENE
23. Score for Hawkeye’s team? M*A*S*H POINT (from “match point”)
25. With 70-Across, clothing magnate David posing with a bass? ABERCROMBIE
27. Space program event MOONSHOT
29. Open the door for LET IN
30. Bowling initials AMF
31. Address SPEAK TO
34. Longfellow’s bell town ATRI
36. One climbing the walls IVY
37. Mai __ TAI
38. Row dividers AISLES
39. Convenient snack? NOSH IN ONE’S BELT (from “notch in one’s belt”)
43. Sales rep’s goals: Abbr. ACCTS
44. __ diem PER
45. ’50s British prime minister EDEN
46. Regret RUE
47. Great-grandfather of David, in the Bible BOAZ
48. Want very much COVET
50. Funny Bombeck ERMA
52. Cut SAWED
56. Octane Booster brand STP
57. They’re often attached GARAGES
59. Works with a Singer SEWS
61. Sushi bar soup MISO
62. Dept. with a sun on its seal ENER
64. Bygone birds DODOS
66. Right-minded ETHICAL
68. Samsung Galaxy competitor IPHONE
70. See 25-Across AND FISH (from “Abercrombie and Fitch”)
73. Take the chance RISK IT
74. Many beatniks wore them GOATEES
76. Mississippi’s __ City YAZOO
77. Amateur who won the 1968 US Open ASHE
78. Net __ LOSS
79. Goes bad ROTS
82. Puts more film in RELOADS
84. Like some balances DUE
87. “Yeah, sure” UH-HUH
89. “Not so fast!” WHOA!
91. Turbaned Punjabis SIKHS
92. Healthy drink SWIG
93. Italian counterpart of the BBC RAI
95. Mystique AURA
97. “The Good Wife” figs. DAS
98. Making fun of APING
99. Money for fast-food fries? SHOESTRING CASH (from “shoestring catch”)
104. Fast movement PRESTO
105. Kenan’s comedy partner KEL
106. Prussian pronoun SIE
107. Tragic fate DOOM
108. Two-time U.S. Women’s Open winner Patty SHEEHAN
109. Therapeutic pack filler ICE
110. Cold cuts qty. ONE LB
112. Space cadet’s world LA-LA LAND
115. Outback outlaw? BUSH CASSIDY (from “Butch Cassidy”)
118. Self-cleaning laundry? SMART WASH (from “smartwatch”)
122. Old Apple laptop IBOOK
123. Patronize, in a way EAT AT
124. DVR pioneer TIVO
125. Stage number ARIA
126. Beatles trademark BANGS
127. Firewood measure STERE
128. Meeting of Cong. SESS
129. Golfer’s putting woes, with “the” YIPS

Down
1. Dandy guy? JIM
2. Actress Thurman UMA
3. __-guzzler GAS
4. Mushy quality SCHMALTZ
5. Slides (over), as on a bench SCOOTS
6. Safari park critter RHINO
7. Summer colors TANS
8. Lit. compilation ANTH
9. “Are you kidding me?!” WHAT THE?!
10. Synagogue lang. HEB
11. Routine components ONE-LINERS
12. Wet tract MIRE
13. Carbohydrate used in jellies PECTIN
14. Bacchus, to the Greeks DIONYSUS
15. Sea extension ARM
16. Argue DEBATE
17. Kingdom member ANIMAL
18. Deem appropriate SEE FIT
24. Facebook attention-getters POKES
26. Mississippi, e.g. RIVER
28. Western treaty gp. OAS
31. Autos from Trollhättan SAABS
32. Crochet loop PICOT
33. Avoid diner dishes? ESCAPE HASH (from “escape hatch”)
35. Tease RIDE
39. 40-Down neighbor NEVADA
40. 39-Down neighbor OREGON
41. “That’s __”: “My bad” ON ME
42. “‘Come to my arms, my __ boy!'”: “Jabberwocky” BEAMISH
44. Spanish preposition POR
48. Lifetime dedication CAREER
49. Lingerie item TEDDY
51. Stun AWE
53. Spell? WICKED WISH (from “wicked witch”)
54. Morales of “Caprica” ESAI
55. Simpleton DOLT
57. Wilder in films GENE
58. To this point SO FAR
60. Treasured strings STRADS
63. Uncertain NOT SURE
65. Evaluates, with “up” SIZES
67. Not a good reception HISS
68. “House,” in Inuit IGLU
69. Bear in a red shirt POOH
71. Cones and spheres SOLIDS
72. What the Wonderland caterpillar smokes HOOKAH
75. Farm female SOW
80. Like Singha beer THAI
81. Nightly news snippet SOUND BITE
83. Sighs of relief AHS
85. Range that includes Kings Peak UINTA
86. Push EGG ON
88. Places to put your feet up HASSOCKS
90. Ship of Greek myth ARGO
92. Indy 500 town, aptly SPEEDWAY
94. Autobiography featuring Ike I, TINA
96. Altar attendant ACOLYTE
98. “__ you clever!” AREN’T
99. Overalls on the slopes SKI BIB
100. Trojan War queen HECUBA
101. “Little House” antagonist Nellie __ OLESON
102. Popular pieces REESE’S
103. Physicians’ org. AMA
104. Alexandria lighthouse that’s one of the Seven Wonders PHAROS
108. Serbs and Croats SLAVS
111. Future J.D.’s exam LSAT
113. D-Day fleet LSTS
114. Parisian honey AMIE
116. Biker’s wheels HOG
117. __ es Salaam DAR
119. Jackie’s second ARI
120. Taste SIP
121. Exhibits, as nerve HAS

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5 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 17 Jan 16, Sunday”

  1. 35:28, no errors. Held up by a couple of stupid missteps at the beginning and interrupted by my Sky Guide app to go out in the cold and look for the International Space Station (too cloudy, so I didn't see it), otherwise a pretty uneventful solve. Liked the theme (which was actually quite helpful).

  2. Just now successfully solved this grid and came to Bill's blog thinking that either this was really harder than most Sunday puzzles, or I had dropped more than a couple of I.Q. points today. When I saw Bill's result I had my answer…this thing was pretty damn difficult! It took me a looooong time to finally get "wicked wish" for 53 down. And that finally gave me "due" for 84 across "Like some balances" which gave me the final piece of the puzzle, "Unita" for 85 down, "Range that includes Kings Peak." Whew!

    I'm going to savor this win for awhile…

  3. Not to be an annoying quibbler, but I don't really think 42D "beamish" is one of the theme answers, because it never was "beamitch." But, that being said, thanks so much for all your answers and explanations. Love them!

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