LA Times Crossword Answers 17 Apr 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Matt McKinley
THEME: A Storm is Brewing … each of today’s themed answers starts with a word associated with a STORM, and with thunder and lightning in particular:

23A. *Vegas visitor’s hope STREAK OF LUCK
25A. *Seemingly impromptu public performance FLASH MOB
45A. *Classic 1974 sports contest RUMBLE IN THE JUNGLE
68A. *Solution for a forgotten combination BOLT CUTTERS
92A. *Historic 20th-century disaster CRASH OF TWENTY-NINE
115A. *Bama rallying cry ROLL TIDE!
118A. *Arrange hastily CLAP TOGETHER

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 13s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

12. Golfer for whom the original web.com Tour was named BEN HOGAN
Ben Hogan was one of only five golfers to win all four majors (alongside Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Gary Player and Gene Sarazen). Hogan’s record is particularly remarkable as he survived a near-fatal car accident when he was 36, after which doctors suggested he might never walk again. Hogan and his wife had been in a head-on collision with a Greyhound bus.

20. Vols’ school UTENN
The Tennessee Volunteers (the Vols) is the name given to the men’s sports teams at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. The women’s teams are called the Lady Volunteers.

22. Baja tourist city ENSENADA
Ensenada is a city in Baja California, Mexico which sits on the coast about 80 miles south of San Diego. Ensenada is noted as a cruise ship destination, and is also a producer of outstanding wine.

25. *Seemingly impromptu public performance FLASH MOB
A flash mob is a group of people who gather to perform a sudden, brief act in a public location and then quickly disperse. Flash mobs originated in Manhattan in 2003, as a social experiment by an editor of “Harper’s Magazine” called Bill Wasik. Wasik’s first attempt to form a flash mob was unsuccessful, but the second attempt worked. The first successful flash mob was relatively tame by today’s elaborate standards, and consisted of about 130 people gathered on the 9th floor of Macy’s department store pretending to be shopping en masse for a “love rug”.

29. Buffalo NHLer SABRE
The Buffalo Sabres joined the National Hockey League in the 1970-71 season. The team took the name “Sabres” following a fan contest.

30. Director Jean-__ Godard LUC
Jean-Luc Godard is a so-called “Nouvelle Vague” (New Wave) cinematographer, making movies that challenge the conventions of both traditional Hollywood and French cinema.

36. Troon turndowns NAES
“Nae” is the Scottish vernacular for “no”.

Troon is a town on the west coast of Scotland just north of Glasgow. One of Troon’s claims to fame is the Royal Troon golf course which regularly hosts the British Open Golf Championship.

37. Greek earth goddess GAIA
In ancient Greek religion, Gaia was the Earth goddess, the mother of everything. The Roman equivalent was the goddess Terra.

43. Frisbee golf starting point TEE PAD
The Frisbee concept started back in 1938 with a couple who had an upturned cake pan that they were tossing between each other on Santa Monica Beach in California. They were offered 25 cents for the pan on the spot, and as pans could be bought for 5 cents, the pair figured there was a living to be earned.

45. *Classic 1974 sports contest RUMBLE IN THE JUNGLE
The Rumble in the Jungle was the celebrated 1974 fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman that took place in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo). The fight was set in Zaire because of financial arrangements between promoter Don King and Zaire’s President Mobutu Seko. Ali coined the term “Rope-a-dope” to describe his incredibly successful strategy in the contest. From the second round onwards, Ali adopted a protected stance on the ropes letting Foreman pound him with blows to the body and head, with Ali using his arms to dissipate the power of the punches. He kept this up until the eighth round and then opened up and downed the exhausted Foreman with a left-right combination. I hate boxing but I have to say, that was an fascinating fight.

51. Barcelona bye ADIOS
The term “adios” is Spanish for “goodbye”. In the Spanish language, “adios” comes from the phrase “a dios vos acomiendo” meaning “I commend you to God”.

Barcelona is the second largest city in Spain, after the capital Madrid. Barcelona is the largest European city that sits on the Mediterranean coast. It is also the capital city of the autonomous community of Catalonia.

52. Chargers linebacker Manti __ TE’O
Manti Te’o is college football player who was in the news not too long ago. Te’o was noted for playing particularly well after the death of his grandmother and girlfriend. It turned out that his relationship with the “girlfriend” was an online affair and a hoax. A male acquaintance of Te’o had posed as a girl and lured him into a relationship. Wanting to put an end to the deception, the hoaxer “killed off” the girlfriend by “giving” her leukemia.

59. Sales chart metaphor PIE
A “pie chart” can also be referred to as a “circle graph”.

61. Reputed UFO fliers ETS
One might speculate that an unidentified flying object (UFO) is flown by an extraterrestrial (ET).

62. Arcade no-no TILT
In a game of pinball, some players get an irresistible urge to “nudge” the machine . Such a nudge, a movement of the machine designed to influence the path taken by the ball, is called a “tilt”. Most pinball machines have sensors designed to detect a tilt, and when activated a “tilt” warning light comes on and the player’s controls are temporarily disabled.

Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

63. Where to find “The Blacklist” ON NBC
“The Blacklist” is an entertaining, albeit a little formulaic, crime drama TV show starring James Spader and Megan Boone. Spader plays a successful criminal who surrenders to the FBI in order to help catch a “blacklist” of high-profile criminals.

65. “Mr. __ Passes By”: Milne play PIM
A. A. Milne (of “Winnie-the-Pooh” fame) wrote a play called “Mr. Pim Passes By” in 1919. The play was a big hit and starred Leslie Howard in the original London production.

66. Time fraction: Abbr. NSEC
“Nanosecond” is more correctly abbreviated to “ns”, and really is a tiny amount of time: one billionth of a second.

72. USAF noncom TSGT
Technical Sergeant (TSgt)

75. Driver’s lic. info DOB
Date of Birth (DOB)

77. Aired for binge-watching, say RERAN
I’m a big fan of binge-watching, the practice of watching perhaps two or three (even four!) episodes of a show in a row. My wife and I will often deliberately avoid watching a recommended show “live” and wait until whole series have been released on DVD or online. I’m not a big fan of “tune in next week …”

78. Film princess LEIA
Princess Leia is Luke Skywalker’s sister in the original “Star Wars” trilogy and was played by Carrie Fisher. Carrie Fisher has stated that she hated the famous “cinnamon bun hairstyle” that she had to wear in the films, as she felt it made her face look too round. She also had to to sit for two hours every day just to get her hair styled. Two hours to get your hair done? It takes me just two seconds …

81. Nestlé candy with a white covering SNO-CAPS
Sno-Caps are a brand of candy usually only available in movie theaters. Sno-caps have been around since the 1920s, would you believe?

85. Old-style delivery man TOWN CRIER
Town criers make public announcements on the streets, usually shouting “Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!” to attract attention. The term “oyez” derives from the Anglo-Norman word for “listen” and is used in this instance to me “Hear ye!”

87. Exotic pet IGUANA
An iguana is a lizard, and as such is cold-blooded. There are times when pet iguanas need heat from an IR lamp to maintain body temperature.

88. Bermuda hrs. AST
Atlantic Standard Time (AST) is four hours behind Greenwich Mean Time and one hour ahead of Eastern Standard Time. The list of locations that use AST includes Puerto Rico, Bermuda and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Bermuda is a British Overseas Territory that is located off the east coast of the US. It is named for the Spaniard Juan de Bermúdez who in 1503 become the first European to discover the archipelago. Bermuda is the oldest remaining British Overseas Territory (since Newfoundland became part of Canada in 1949). It is also the most populous British Overseas Territory (since Hong Kong was returned to China in 1997).

90. Long-eared critters HARES
Hares belong to the genus Lepus, and young hares, that are under one-year-old, are called leverets.

92. *Historic 20th-century disaster CRASH OF TWENTY-NINE
The Wall Street Crash of 1929 that signalled the start of the Great Depression did not happen on just one day. The first big drop in the market took place on October 24 (Black Thursday). Things stabilized on Friday, and then the slide continued on the 28th (Black Monday) and the 29th (Black Tuesday).

97. “Frankenstein” genre GOTHIC
Mary Shelley’s Gothic novel has the full title of “Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus”. The subtitle underscores one of the themes of the book, a warning about man’s expansion into the Industrial Revolution.

99. Old Roman road ITER
“Iter” is the Latin for “road”.

107. 2003 NBA Rookie of the Year Stoudemire AMAR’E
Amar’e Stoudemire is a professional basketball player who has played with the Phoenix Suns, the New York Knicks and the Dallas Mavericks. Stoudemire is very active off the court, and has his own clothing line, his own record label and has even written a book for children.

109. Brian of ambient music ENO
Brian Eno was one of the pioneers of the “ambient” genre of music. Eno composed an album in 1978 called “Ambient 1: Music for Airports”, the first in a series of four albums with an ambient theme. Eno named the tracks somewhat inventively: 1/1, 2/1, 2/1 and 2/2.

115. *Bama rallying cry ROLL TIDE!
The athletic teams of the University of Alabama (“Bama”) are nicknamed the Crimson Tide, a reference to the team colors of crimson and white.

122. It established Congress ARTICLE I
Article One of the US Constitution establishes the US Congress. The second section of Article One establishes the House of Representatives, and the third section establishes the US Senate. Section 8 of Article One lists the powers delegated to the legislature.

123. Ancient serfs HELOTS
The helots were a population of poorly-treated slaves who served the citizens of Sparta.

Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece, famous for her military might. Spartan children had a tough upbringing, and newborn babies were bathed in wine to see if the child was strong enough to survive. Every child was presented to a council of elders that decided if the baby was suitable for rearing. Those children deemed too puny were executed by tossing them into a chasm. We’ve been using the term “spartan” to describe something self-disciplined or austere since the 1600s.

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

125. Box for bags TEA CHEST
When I was growing up across the pond, a “tea chest” was an extremely large wooden box used to ship loose tea. We used to purchased used empty tea chest to store things in our attic. But I have learned that a North American tea chest is a wooden box with compartments for varieties of bagged teas.

126. Plant swellings EDEMAS
Both animals and plants can suffer from edema, a swelling cause by excessive accumulation of fluid.

127. Best Game and Best Upset ESPYS
The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

Down
1. Disarray MUSS
A “muss” is state of disorder, and a term that probably evolved from “mess”. The phrase “no muss, no fuss” means “no bother, no mess made, no excessive hustle and bustle”.

2. Words to a traitor ET TU
It was Shakespeare who popularized the words “Et tu, Brute?” (And you, Brutus?), in his play “Julius Caesar”, although the phrase had been around long before he penned his drama. It’s not known what Julius Caesar actually said in real life just before he was assassinated on the steps of the Senate in Rome.

3. Grand Marquis, for short MERC
The Mercury Grand Marquis was the premium model produced by Ford using the Mercury label. The first Grand Marquis rolled off the production line in 1983, and the last in January 2011, when the Mercury brand was retired.

4. 100 smackers ONE C
“Smacker” is American slang for “money”, with “smackers” often being used to mean ”dollars”. It is suggested that the term might come from “smacking” a banknote into one’s hand.

5. Mail modifier SNAIL
“Snail mail” is regular mail delivered by the postal service. The term “snail mail” arose as email gained in popularity, and is a reference to the difference in speed between email and paper mail.

6. Ristorante dumplings GNOCCHI
Gnocchi are small dumplings in Italian cuisine that can be made from various ingredients including potato, my personal favorite. The name “gnocchi” might be derived from the Italian “nocchio” meaning “knot in wood”.

8. Anago or unagi EEL
“Unagi” is the Japanese word for freshwater eel, and “anago” is the word for salt-water eel.

9. Start to pressure? ACU-
Acupressure and acupuncture are related alternative medical techniques. Both aim to clear blockages in the flow of life energy through the body’s meridians. The treatment is given by stimulating “acupoints’ in the body, by applying pressure in the case of acupressure, and by applying needles in the case of acupuncture.

10. Champagne label word SEC
“Sec” is a term used in France for “dry”.

11. Glacial ridge ESKER
An esker is a long and winding ridge formed by glaciation, made of sand and gravel. The term “esker” comes from the Irish word “eiscir” that describes the same feature.

13. Photo lab svc. ENL
Enlargement (enl.)

14. DOD intel arm NSA
The National Security Agency (NSA) is part of the Department of Defense (DOD).

15. Company with toy trucks HESS
The Hess Corporation is an oil company based in New York City. In 1964, the company started selling toy trucks with the Hess logo on them, in Hess gas stations. The company has been selling them every since, bringing out new models just before Christmas. Hess toy trucks have become quite collectible and the old ones can fetch a pretty penny.

17. Viola da __ GAMBA
The viola da gamba (also called simply the viol) is a bass instrument in what is known as the viol family, with a tonal range that about matches that of the modern-day cello. It is the second largest of all the viols, so is played resting on the floor between the legs. In fact, “viola da gamba” is Italian translating into “viol for the leg”.

19. Theaters in the area, briefly NABES
A “nabe” is a neighborhood, or a familiar term for a local movie theater. Although I’ve never heard “nabe” used in this neighborhood …

24. Immortal coaching name KNUTE
Knute Rockne, America’s most famous football coach many say, was born in the city of Voss in Norway. He came to the United States with his family when he was 5-years-old. Years later he graduated Notre Dame with a degree in Chemistry, but abandoned that career path when he was offered his first real coaching job.

34. Coffee order: Abbr. REG
Regular (reg.)

37. Second Commandment word GRAVEN
In the Christian tradition, the second commandment prohibits the worship of “any graven image”. Usually this means that graven images can be created, but not worshipped.

40. “__ Ben Adhem” ABOU
Abou Ben Adhem, also known as Ibrahim Bin Adham, was an Arab Muslim saint. He was made famous in the western world with the publication in 1838 of the poem “Abou Ben Adhem” that was composed by the English poet James Henry Leigh Hunt.

44. Legendary storyteller AESOP
Aesop is remembered today for his famous fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

46. Future D.A.’s hurdle LSAT
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

50. Salem home: Abbr. ORE
Salem is the state capital of Oregon. It is thought that the city takes its name from the older city of Salem, Massachusetts.

55. Lawyer’s petition WRIT
A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in written form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

58. Then, in Toulouse ALORS
The French “alors” translates as “so, then, yet”.

Toulouse is the fourth largest city in France, and is located in the southwest of the country. These days, Toulouse is noted as home to the Airbus headquarters and is known as the center of the European aerospace industry.

59. Egyptian currency POUND
The main currency of Egypt is the Egyptian pound, divided into 100 piastres (also piasters). The piastre used to the Egyptian currency until is was replaced by Royal Decree with the Egyptian pound in 1834. The piaster continued in circulation and was pegged at 1/100 of a pound.

70. Spanish song CANTO
“El canto” is Spanish for “the song”.

73. “The Quiet American” author GREENE
Graham Greene was a writer and playwright from England. Greene wrote some of my favorite novels, including “Brighton Rock”, “The End of the Affair”, “The Confidential Agent”, “The Third Man”, “The Quiet American” and “Our Man in Havana”. Greene’s books often feature espionage in exotic locales. Greene himself worked for MI6, the UK’s foreign intelligence agency. In fact, Greene’s MI6 supervisor was Kim Philby, the famed Soviet spy who penetrated high into British intelligence.

“The Quiet American” is a 1955 Graham Greene novel depicting the transition of French and British colonialism with American influence in Southeast Asia. The book was adapted for the big screen twice, once in 1958 with Audie Murphy leading the cast, and again in 2002 with Michael Caine taking top billing.

76. Baccarat call BANCO
Baccarat, in all of its three variants, is a relatively simple casino card game. Baccarat is the favored game of chance for James Bond 007, and it looks so cool when he plays it! Banco!

81. [Originally shown this way] SIC
“Sic” indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. “Sic” is Latin for “thus, like this”. The term is more completely written as “sic erat scriptum”, which translates as “thus was it written”.

82. Park __: airport facility N GO
“Park N Go” (park and go)

85. Like a lion’s coat TAWNY
Something described as “tawny” is yellow-brown or tan in color. The term comes from the Anglo-French “tauné” meaning “the color of tanned leather”.

86. Hindu royal RANI
“Raja” (also “rajah”) is word derived from Sanskrit that is used particularly in India for a monarch or princely ruler. The female form is “rani” (also “ranee”) and is used for a raja’s wife.

89. Editor’s mark STET
“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

93. Master Kan portrayer on “Kung Fu” AHN
The actor Philip Ahn is perhaps best known for playing Master Kahn, one of Caine’s teachers on the television show “Kung Fu”. Ahn was the first Asian-American actor to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

94. Part of TGIF: Abbr. FRI
“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

96. “Perry Mason” lieutenant TRAGG
In the “Perry Mason” stories, the title character constantly goes up against L.A. district attorney Hamilton Burger and LAPD homicide detective Lt. Arthur Tragg.

I must have read all of the Perry Mason books when I was in college. I think they kept me sane when I was facing the pressure of exams. Author Erle Stanley Gardner was himself a lawyer, although he didn’t get into the profession the easy way. Gardner went to law school, but got himself suspended after a month. So, he became a self-taught attorney and opened his own law office in Merced, California. Understandably, he gave up the law once his novels became successful.

100. Corday victim MARAT
Jean-Paul Marat was a prominent figure in the French Revolution. Marat was famously murdered in his bath by a young woman named Charlotte Corday who was a Royalist. The gruesome event was immortalized in a celebrated painting by Jacques-Louis David called “The Death of Marat”.

102. European island nation MALTA
The island state of Malta is relatively small, but its large number of inhabitants makes it one of the most densely populated countries in Europe. Malta’s strategic location has made it a prized possession for the conquering empires of the world. Most recently it was part of the British Empire and was an important fleet headquarters. Malta played a crucial role for the Allies during WWII as it was located very close to the Axis shipping lanes in the Mediterranean. The Siege of Malta lasted from 1940 to 1942, a prolonged attack by the Italians and Germans on the RAF and Royal Navy, and the people of Malta. When the siege was lifted, King George VI awarded the George Cross to the people of Malta collectively in recognition of their heroism and devotion to the Allied cause. The George Cross can still be seen on the Maltese flag, even though Britain granted Malta independence in 1964.

104. Night in Nogales NOCHE
Nogales (properly called “Heroica Nogales”) is a city in the Mexican State of Sonora. Nogales lies right on the Mexico-US border, opposite the city of Nogales, Arizona.

111. Part of CDC: Abbr. CTRS
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The CDC started out life during WWII as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. The CDC worries about much more than malaria these days …

112. Rooty Jr. server IHOP
The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn’t do too well in marketing tests …

114. Sea eagles ERNS
The ern (also erne) is sometimes called the white-tailed eagle, or the sea-eagle.

116. Key for Ravel? ILE
In French, one might go to an “île” (island) in the middle of “l’océan” (the ocean).

A “key” (also “cay”) is a low island offshore, as in the Florida Keys. Our term in English comes from the Spanish “cayo” meaning “shoal, reef”.

Maurice Ravel was a great French composer of the Romantic Era. His most famous piece of music by far is his “Bolero”, the success of which he found somewhat irksome as he thought it to be a trivial work. Personally though, I love the minimalism and simplicity …

117. __ Moines DES
The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French “Riviere des Moines” meaning “River of the Monks”. It looks like there isn’t any “monkish” connection to the city’s name per se. “Des Moines” was just the name given by French traders who corrupted “Moingona”, the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

121. Fluffy toy, briefly POM
The Pomeranian is a breed of small dog, named for the Pomerania region of Europe (part of eastern Germany and northern Poland). The breed was much loved by the royalty of Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. In the 19th century, Queen Victoria owned a particularly small Pomeranian. Due to the notoriety of the monarch’s pet, the Pomeranian was bred for small size, so that during the Queen’s admittedly long reign, the size of the average “pom” was reduced by 50% …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Office alerts MEMOS
6. Lubricate GREASE
12. Golfer for whom the original web.com Tour was named BEN HOGAN
20. Vols’ school UTENN
21. Family reunion attendees NIECES
22. Baja tourist city ENSENADA
23. *Vegas visitor’s hope STREAK OF LUCK
25. *Seemingly impromptu public performance FLASH MOB
26. Brief and on point SUCCINCT
27. Corn serving EAR
29. Buffalo NHLer SABRE
30. Director Jean-__ Godard LUC
31. Formal opening DEAR SIRS
36. Troon turndowns NAES
37. Greek earth goddess GAIA
41. Caught in __ THE ACT
43. Frisbee golf starting point TEE PAD
45. *Classic 1974 sports contest RUMBLE IN THE JUNGLE
48. Word to a restaurant host TWO
51. Barcelona bye ADIOS
52. Chargers linebacker Manti __ TE’O
53. Unusual ODD
54. “Honest!” I SWEAR!
56. Sales chart, e.g. VISUAL AID
59. Sales chart metaphor PIE
60. Attic function STORAGE
61. Reputed UFO fliers ETS
62. Arcade no-no TILT
63. Where to find “The Blacklist” ON NBC
65. “Mr. __ Passes By”: Milne play PIM
66. Time fraction: Abbr. NSEC
68. *Solution for a forgotten combination BOLT CUTTERS
72. USAF noncom TSGT
75. Driver’s lic. info DOB
77. Aired for binge-watching, say RERAN
78. Film princess LEIA
80. Screened leader? PRE-
81. Nestlé candy with a white covering SNO-CAPS
84. “Another thing … ” AND …
85. Old-style delivery man TOWN CRIER
87. Exotic pet IGUANA
88. Bermuda hrs. AST
89. Word in discount store names SAV
90. Long-eared critters HARES
91. Base bed COT
92. *Historic 20th-century disaster CRASH OF TWENTY-NINE
97. “Frankenstein” genre GOTHIC
98. Cause to be RENDER
99. Old Roman road ITER
100. Word from a doll MAMA
103. Extreme folly INSANITY
105. 120-Down source TAP
107. 2003 NBA Rookie of the Year Stoudemire AMAR’E
109. Brian of ambient music ENO
110. Fish pond treatment ALGICIDE
115. *Bama rallying cry ROLL TIDE!
118. *Arrange hastily CLAP TOGETHER
122. It established Congress ARTICLE I
123. Ancient serfs HELOTS
124. Dental treatment CROWN
125. Box for bags TEA CHEST
126. Plant swellings EDEMAS
127. Best Game and Best Upset ESPYS

Down
1. Disarray MUSS
2. Words to a traitor ET TU
3. Grand Marquis, for short MERC
4. 100 smackers ONE C
5. Mail modifier SNAIL
6. Ristorante dumplings GNOCCHI
7. Break RIFT
8. Anago or unagi EEL
9. Start to pressure? ACU-
10. Champagne label word SEC
11. Glacial ridge ESKER
12. Get close to BEFRIEND
13. Photo lab svc. ENL
14. DOD intel arm NSA
15. Company with toy trucks HESS
16. Available ON HAND
17. Viola da __ GAMBA
18. Cherish ADORE
19. Theaters in the area, briefly NABES
24. Immortal coaching name KNUTE
28. Dean’s list topper A-STUDENT
31. Not exactly new DATED
32. Repeat ECHO
33. Picked at, say ATE
34. Coffee order: Abbr. REG
35. Breakup SPLIT
37. Second Commandment word GRAVEN
38. Annual reviews AUDITS
39. Rueful words about an opportunity I MISSED OUT
40. “__ Ben Adhem” ABOU
42. Give the right ENTITLE
44. Legendary storyteller AESOP
46. Future D.A.’s hurdle LSAT
47. Like some custody JOINT
48. It may be affected by a tough loss TEAM SPIRIT
49. Tail movement WAG
50. Salem home: Abbr. ORE
55. Lawyer’s petition WRIT
57. Women’s __ LIB
58. Then, in Toulouse ALORS
59. Egyptian currency POUND
60. Hardware fastener SCREW
64. Cherished BELOVED
67. Half a soft drink COCA-
69. Place for deleted files? TRASH CAN
70. Spanish song CANTO
71. Offense SIN
73. “The Quiet American” author GREENE
74. Not so wordy TERSER
76. Baccarat call BANCO
79. Sore ACHY
81. [Originally shown this way] SIC
82. Park __: airport facility N GO
83. Saga opening PART I
85. Like a lion’s coat TAWNY
86. Hindu royal RANI
88. “In my opinion … ” AS I SEE IT ….
89. Editor’s mark STET
93. Master Kan portrayer on “Kung Fu” AHN
94. Part of TGIF: Abbr. FRI
95. Disappointing result NET LOSS
96. “Perry Mason” lieutenant TRAGG
97. Spaghetti sauce staple GARLIC
100. Corday victim MARAT
101. Luigi’s love AMORE
102. European island nation MALTA
104. Night in Nogales NOCHE
106. Composition PIECE
108. Engrave ETCH
110. “__ boy!” ATTA
111. Part of CDC: Abbr. CTRS
112. Rooty Jr. server IHOP
113. __-eyed DEWY
114. Sea eagles ERNS
116. Key for Ravel? ILE
117. __ Moines DES
119. Played the first card LED
120. Scottish __ ALE
121. Fluffy toy, briefly POM

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6 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 17 Apr 16, Sunday”

  1. Pretty straightforward Sunday puzzle, but the theme eluded me until I came to the blog. When I finally got PART I (my mind had gone in a completely different direction) SNOCAPS and ALORS fell into place and I was finished.

    I thought it was rather cruel to have a TGIF reference on a Sunday. Sigh…

    James Spader is great in The Blacklist. His performance is the reason I continue to watch that show.

    @Carrie
    No she doesn't read the blog, but I showed her the string where she was mentioned anyway. She did get a kick out of it.

    @Pookie
    I actually have an extra refrigerator magnet. I'll send it General Delivery to "Pookie – California" I'm sure it will get to you.. 🙂

    Best –

  2. 3 clues (1 stupid of me, 1 stupid period, one other), 7 letters off. But a very quick solve, and a better outing compared to most of last week. Of course, I'll see how the rest of today's stuff goes, but a promising outing nonetheless.

  3. Almost finished, no cigar.
    I have NEVER in my life heard "CLAP TOGETHER".
    SE corner was my downfall. Scottish_ wasn't much of a clue for me, never heard of Scottish ALE either.
    But all in all it was a fun puzzle.

    @Jeff Thanks! I'll be looking for it in the mail. ^0^

  4. I had a battle coming up, finally, with "algicide" for 110 Across. But finally it had to be right as "piece" was the only thing for 106 Down's "composition" that made any sense.

    And now I can finally turn my brain to the "neutral" position and relax completely!

    Hope all my fellow crossword loving friends have a good Sunday.

  5. I'd like to call in the Crossword Police over Nabes. Who says that?

    I did not get Ale or Pom, so the south central looked pretty bare.

    whew, it's gonna take some time to recover!

    Bella

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