LA Times Crossword Answers 22 May 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Gail Grabowski
THEME: Holding Out … today’s themed answers are well-known phrases with the letter sequence OUT removed, we WITHHOLD OUT:

27A. Exertion while getting up? STANDING EFFORT (from “outstanding effort”)
41A. Angry reaction to insolent trick-or-treaters? HALLOWEEN FIT (from “Halloween outfit”)
60A. Pickup shtick that needs refinement? ROUGH LINE (from “rough outline”)
70A. Place for perjurers? LYING AREA (from “outlying area”)
86A. Ship’s secure containers? BOUND FREIGHT (from “outbound freight”)
102A. Wing for rugby’s Wallabies? AUSTRALIAN BACK (from “Australian Outback”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 34s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Hyde Park carriage PRAM
Another word used in the UK that’s rarely used over here is “pram”, which in my day was the most common term for what is called a baby carriage in the US. “Pram” is short for “perambulator”.

Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in central London. A famous element in Hyde Park is Speakers’ Corner, located in the northeast corner of the park. Speakers’ Corner was the site of the infamous Tyburn gallows that was used for public executions in centuries past. Today, Speakers’ Corner is a site for public speeches and debate, and a center for public protest. Some say that the tradition of allowing free speech at the site dates back to the condemned man being allowed to say his piece prior to execution at the Tyburn gallows.

5. One with ropelike tresses RASTA
I must admit that I don’t really understand Rastafarianism. I do know that a “Rasta”, like Bob Marley, is a follower of the movement. Some say that Rastafarianism is a religion, some not. I also know that it involves the worship of Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia.

10. Enjoys King and Queen READS
Stephen King is a remarkably successful author having sold over 350 million copies of his books, many of which have been made into hit movies. I’ve tried reading two or three, but never finished one. I really don’t do horror …

The Ellery Queen series of detective novels was somewhat unique in that Ellery Queen was the hero of the tales, and was also the pen name of the author. Actually, the “author” was a pair of writers; two cousins from Brooklyn, New York.

19. Seat of Allen County, Kansas IOLA
Iola is a city in Southeast Kansas. The city is named for Iola, wife of J. F. Colburn, one of the owners of the land that was chosen as a site for the town in the late 1850s.

20. __ Bell: Emily Brontë pen name ELLIS
The first work that any of the three Brontë sisters had in print was an 1846 collection of poetry that they published jointly. This first work was titled “Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell”, each using a male pen name. Charlotte Brontë published her novel “Jane Eyre” under the name Currer Bell. Emily Brontë followed soon after with “Wuthering Heights” published under the name Ellis Bell. The youngest sister, Anne Brontë, published “Agnes Grey” using the name Acton Bell.

21. Run the show EMCEE
The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

22. Morales of “Jericho” ESAI
The actor Esai Morales is best known for his role in the 1987 movie “La Bamba”, which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai).

“Jericho” is a drama series, initially produced by CBS, that tells of life in the aftermath of nuclear attacks on many cities in the US.

23. Mongolian for “waterless place” GOBI
The large desert in Asia called the Gobi lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. The Gobi desert is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity. The Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so called “Green Wall of China”. The name “Gobi” is Mongolian for “waterless place, semidesert”.

24. Half a Yale cheer BOOLA!
“Boola Boola” is a fight song of Yale University that was composed in 1900, although it was based on a song called “La Hoola Boola” that had been around in the 1800s. The tune of “Boola Boola” is used by the University of Oklahoma for its fight song, “Boomer Sooner”.

25. Order to attack SIC ‘EM!
“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

26. Reason to ban a book PORN
The word “pornography” comes from the Greek “pornographos” meaning “writing of prostitutes”.

32. Shows some spunk DARES
We’ve been using the word “spunk” to mean “pluck, courage” since the late 1700s. Prior to that it was a Scottish word meaning “spark”, a word that we absorbed into English.

38. Tel __ AVIV
The full name of Israel’s second largest city is Tel Aviv-Yafo. Tel Aviv translates into “Spring Mound”, a name chosen in 1910.

40. Many August births LEOS
Leo is the fifth astrological sign of the Zodiac. People born from July 23 to August 22 are Leos.

41. Angry reaction to insolent trick-or-treaters? HALLOWEEN FIT (from “Halloween outfit”)
All Saints’ Day is November 1st each year. The day before All Saints’ Day is All Hallows Eve, better known by the Scottish term, “Halloween”.

45. Short deli order? BLT
The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second-most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

48. Russian retreat DACHA
Dachas are usually second homes in Russia and the former Soviet Union that are located outside the city limits in rural areas. Residents/tenants of dachas are often called dachniks.

53. Member of college music’s Whiffenpoofs ELI
Eli is the nickname for a graduate of Yale University, a term used in honor of the Yale benefactor Elihu Yale.

The Yale Whiffenpoofs are an a cappella group based in Yale University. They are the oldest such university group in this country, established in 1909. “The Whiffenpoof Song” is the group’s traditional closing number. The song was first performed back in 1909, and has been recorded by many artists including Rudy Vallee and Bing Crosby.

We’re poor little lambs
Who have lost our way,
Baa Baa Baa,
We’re little black sheep
Who have gone astray
Baa Baa Baa.

54. Long Island airport town ISLIP
The town of Islip is on the south shore of Long Island. It is home to Islip Airport, now known as Long Island MacArthur Airport, used by many as a viable alternative to JFK and LaGuardia.

56. Shock source TASER
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called “Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle”. The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym TASER stands for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle”.

59. Bug-loving org. NSA
The National Security Agency (NSA) was set up in 1952 by President Truman, a replacement for the Armed Forces Security Agency that had existed in the Department of Defense since 1949. The NSA has always been clouded in secrecy and even the 1952 letter from President Truman that established the agency was kept under wraps from the public for over a generation. I really like the organization’s nickname … “No Such Agency”.

60. Pickup shtick that needs refinement? ROUGH LINE (from “rough outline”)
A “shtick” is a routine, a bit, a piece of entertainment. It comes from the Yiddish “shtick”, which has the same meaning and derives from the Middle High German word “stücke”, the word for “piece”.

65. Ref’s call TKO
In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can’t get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly “knocked out”. A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter’s safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

66. Capital east of the Black Hills PIERRE
Here’s an old chestnut of a trivia question for you … what’s the only state capital in the Union for which the name of the capital and the name of its state share no common letters? You guessed it: Pierre, South Dakota …

The Black Hills are a mountain range in South Dakota and Wyoming. The Black Hills are home to some celebrated locations including Mount Rushmore, Wind Cave National Park, the Crazy Horse Memorial and the historic city of Deadwood.

72. MD associates RNS
One might find a registered nurse (RN) or a medical doctor (MD) in an emergency room (ER).

75. Three-time Olympics host country ITALY
Italy hosted the Olympic Games on three occasions:

– 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina d’Ampezzo
– 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome
– 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin

79. Cioppino cooker POT
“Cioppino” is a fish stew that originated in San Francisco, despite the Italian-sounding name. That said, the dish is considered part of Italian-American cuisine. Cioppino came out of the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco in the late 19th century, which was then home to Italian immigrants mainly from the port city of Genoa. The name comes from “ciuppin”, a soup from the Liguria region in north-western Italy.

81. Steinbeck surname JOAD
Tom Joad is a character in the John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath”. The role of Joad was played by Henry Fonda in the 1940 film adaptation directed by John Ford. Ford’s movie has a place in history, as it was one of the first 25 movies selected for preservation in the US National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.

82. Some light beers BUDS
The first light beer was produced by Chicago’s Meister Brau brewery in the sixties. Miller took over Meister Brau, reformulated the light beer using the same process and became the first of the big breweries to come out with a light beer, “Lite Beer from Miller” introduced in 1973. There really wasn’t a serious competitor to Miller Lite until Anheuser-Busch finally came up with a process and a product in 1982 that they called Bud Light.

85. Ambulance VIP EMT
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

90. Salinger title teen ESME
J. D. Salinger wrote a short story called “For Esmé – with Love and Squalor”, originally published in “The New Yorker” in 1950. It is a story about a young English girl called Esme and an American soldier, and is set in WWII.

95. Split the tab GO DUTCH
A Dutch door has a top and a bottom equally divided in area. There is a suggestion that the term “go Dutch” originated with the Dutch door. The bill is “split”, and so are Dutch doors. That said, when people “go Dutch” they each pay for themselves, as opposed to even splitting the tab.

102. Wing for rugby’s Wallabies? AUSTRALIAN BACK (from “Australian Outback”)
In Australia, the land outside of urban area is referred to as “the Outback” or “the bush”. Although, I think that “Outback” can also be used for the more remote parts of the bush.

The Australian national rugby team are nicknamed “the Wallabies”. The name is a reference to the Australian marsupial called the wallaby.

107. Retina feature CONE
The retina is the tissue that lines the inside of the eye, the tissue that is light-sensitive. There are (mainly) two types of cell in the retina that are sensitive to light, called rods and cones. Rods are cells that best function in very dim light and only provide black-and-white vision. Cones on the other hand function in brighter light and can perceive color.

108. “Invisible Man” author Ellison RALPH
The author Ralph Ellison’s most famous book is “Invisible Man”, which won the National Book Award in 1953. Ellison’s full name is Ralph Waldo Ellison, as he was named for Ralph Waldo Emerson.

110. Chan portrayer OLAND
Warner Oland was a Swedish actor, best remembered for his portrayal of Charlie Chan in a series of 16 highly successful Hollywood movies. Before playing Charlie Chan, Oland made a name for himself playing another Asian role on screen, that of Dr. Fu Manchu.

112. Rock band famous for face paint KISS
KISS is a hard rock band from New York City. KISS is the group whose band members use all that scary face paint and wear wacky outfits on stage.

115. Northern terminus of I-79 ERIE
Interstate 79 runs from Charleston, West Virginia in the south to Erie, Pennsylvania in the north.

116. Some Neruda poems ODES
Pablo Neruda was the pen name, and eventually the legal name, used by Chilean writer Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. Basoalto chose the name as a homage to Czech poet Jan Neruda.

119. Peace Nobelist Cassin RENE
René Cassin drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights after WWII that was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1948. This work led to Cassin being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1968.

Down
1. Fairy tale trio PIGS
The fairy tale of “The Three Little Pigs” has been around for centuries, although it first appeared in print in the 1840s. One little pig built a house using straw and another built one using wood. The cleverest little pig built its house using bricks.

3. Goya’s “Duchess of __” ALBA
María Cayetana de Silva was the 13th duchess of Alba. She was a favorite subject of the Spanish painter Francisco Goya. The duchess is the subject in the famous portraits known as “La maja desnuda” (The Nude Maja) and “La maja vestida” (The Clothed Maja). “Maja” translates from Spanish as “beautiful lady”.

8. Scrabble piece TILE
The game of Scrabble has been produced in many international versions, and each of these editions has its own tile distribution to suit the local language. For example, in English we have two tiles worth ten points: one “Q” and one “Z”. If you play the game in French then there are five tiles worth ten points: one “K”, one “W”, one “X”, one “Y” and one “Z”.

11. Qatari bigwigs EMIRS
In English, emir can also be written as emeer, amir and ameer (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry. Qatar is scheduled to who the 2022 FIFA World Cup, although the nation’s eligibility to do so is under question after a far-reaching bribery scandal was uncovered at the sport’s governing body.

12. Part of IRA: Abbr. ACCT
Individual retirement account (IRA)

13. Wood finish? DEE
The word “wood” finishes with the letter D (dee).

14. Like parts of the Great Plains SEMIARID
The Great Plains lie between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains in North America. This vast grassland is called “the Prairies” in Canada.

16. D.C. location, familiarly US OF A
The District of Columbia was established by the Residence Act in 1790. Article One, Section 8 of the US constitution provides for the establishment of a District outside of the states, over which the federal government has authority. The constitution also specifies that the District cannot exceed an area of ten miles square.

17. Chocolate substitute CAROB
The carob is a tree or shrub in the pea family, mainly grown for its seed pods. The carob seeds are dried or roasted, and when powdered or chipped make a good substitute for chocolate.

28. Court figs. DAS
District Attorney (DA)

29. Texter’s “Just sayin'” FWIW
For what it’s worth (FWIW)

31. Site for techies C|NET
c|net is an excellent technology website. c|net started out in 1994 as a television network specializing in technology news. The host of “American Idol”, Ryan Seacrest, started off his career as host of a c|net show.

34. Nilla product WAFER
As one might expect, “Nilla” is a shortened from of “vanilla”. However, you won’t find any vanilla in Nilla cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, which is synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred …?

35. Pilgrim John ALDEN
John Alden is said to have been the first person to disembark from the Mayflower and to have set foot on Plymouth Rock in 1620. Alden himself was not a Pilgrim as such, and was a carpenter working on the Mayflower before it sailed. He apparently decided to travel with the ship at the last minute, perhaps in pursuit of the passenger who would become his wife, Priscilla Mullens. Alden ended up in a love triangle with Priscilla and Captain Miles Standish, a relationship which is recounted in the Longfellow poem “The Courtship of Miles Standish”. John and Priscilla were the parents of a son, John Alden, who was later to be accused during the Salem witch trials.

38. Hebrew opener ALEPH
“Aleph” is the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and “beth” the second.

39. First word of “The Raven” ONCE
The first verse of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” is:

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore-
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door

“The Raven” is a narrative poem by Edgar Allan Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student’s bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven’s shadow and shall be lifted “nevermore” …

43. “Gone With the Wind” actress LEIGH
As casting proceeded for the movie version of “Gone With the Wind”, Clark Gable was a shoo-in from day one. The role of Scarlett was considered very desirable in the acting community, with Bette Davis on the short list, and Katherine Hepburn demanding an appointment with producer David O. Selznick to discuss the role. Vivien Leigh was an unlikely contender, an English actress for the definitive Southern belle role. Selznick was adamant though, and stuck by his choice despite a lot of protests.

45. Blog entry about garden edging? BORDER POST (from “border outpost”)
Many folks who visit this website regard it as just that, a website. That is true, but more correctly it is referred to as a blog, as I make regular posts (actually daily posts) which then occupy the “front page” of the site. The blog entries are in reverse chronological order, and one can just look back day-by-day, reading older and older posts. “Blog” is a contraction of the term “web log”.

46. Winter Games vehicle LUGE
A luge is a small sled used by one or two people, on which one lies face up and feet first. The luge can be compared to the skeleton, a sled for only one person and on which the rider lies face down and goes down the hill head-first. Yikes!

49. United route AIRWAY
United Airlines (UAL) has a complicated history, but can trace its roots back to Aviation Enterprises, founded in 1944 and later called Texas International. The first use of the “United” name in the company’s history was when airplane pioneer William Boeing merged his Boeing Air Transport with Pratt & Whitney to form the United Aircraft and Transport Corporation (UATC) in 1929. The Air Mail Act of 1934 required that UATC be broken up into United Aircraft (which became United Technologies), the Boeing Aircraft Company and United Air Lines.

56. Maori carvings TIKIS
A tiki is a large carving of wood or stone resembling a human form, found in Polynesian cultures. The carvings often mark out boundaries of sites sacred to the locals.

The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. The Māori are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting sometime in the late 13th century. The word “māori” simply means “normal”, distinguishing the mortal human being from spiritual entities.

57. Like many an Internet troll: Abbr. ANON
In Internet terms, a “troll” is someone who attempts to disrupt online group activities. The fishing term “troll” is used to describe such a person, as he or she throws out off-topic remarks in an attempt to “lure” others into some emotional response.

61. Interstellar dist. LT YR
A light-year (lt. yr.) is a measure of distance, not time. It is the distance that light travels in a vacuum in one year. The accepted abbreviation for a light-year is “ly”. A light-second is a lot shorter distance: about 186,282 miles.

66. Cincy-based consumer products giant P AND G
Procter & Gamble was a founded in 1837 by William Procter and James Gamble. Procter was a candlemaker, an immigrant from England. Gamble was a soapmaker, an immigrant from Ireland. The pair had settled in Cincinnati and married two sisters. Their father-in-law persuaded the two to set up in business together, and rest is history.

Cincinnati (Cincy)

67. Like Oscar Wilde IRISH
If you didn’t know Oscar Wilde was Irish, you will when you see the name he was given at birth: Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde!

70. “This Gun for Hire” actor LADD
The last few years of actor Alan Ladd’s life were pretty rough. In 1962 he was found unconscious in a pool of blood with a bullet wound in his chest, an abortive suicide attempt. Two years later he was found dead, apparently having succumbed to an accidental overdose of drugs and sedatives. He was 50 years old.

“This Gun for Hire” is a 1942 movie based on a 1936 novel by Graham Greene. The big headliner in this film noir is femme fatale Veronica Lake, but the movie is perhaps best remembered for providing Alan Ladd’s breakthrough role.

71. Astronaut’s garb G-SUIT
A G-suit is needed when astronauts and aviators are subject to high accelerations. Such acceleration can cause blood to pool in the lower part of the body, reducing the supply to the brain and possibly leading to a blackout. A G-suit is basically a special pair of tight-fitting pants that are fitted with inflatable bladders. The bladders inflate during high accelerations, tightening around the legs and abdomen, reducing the amount of blood pooling. So, a “G-suit” is more correctly referred to as an “anti-G suit”.

76. Word in two state names SOUTH
Those would be South Carolina and South Dakota …

81. Department of Labor training program JOB CORPS
Job Corps is a Department of Labour training program for young people from 16 through 24. It was established in 1964 as part of President Johnson’s War on Poverty, and is modelled on the Civilian Conservation Corps set up up during the Great Depression.

84. Not-too-potent potable NEAR BEER
“Near beer” is slang term for a malt liquor that doesn’t contain enough alcohol to be labelled as “beer”. An example would be “O’Doul’s”, a beverage that I tend to consume in a glass full of ice when I am the designated driver.

89. Potter’s pedal TREADLE
A “treadle” is a foot pedal that is used to create motion in a machine such as a loom or a potter’s wheel.

95. Tropical lizard GECKO
The word “gecko” comes from an Indonesian/Javanese word “tokek”, which is imitative of the reptile’s chirping sound. In making such a sound, geckos are unique in the world of lizards. More interesting to me than a gecko’s chirping is its ability to cling to walls and to other vertical surfaces. Their feet are specially adapted with “toes” that make extremely intimate, close contact to a surface. The toes have millions of hairs called setae that enable the clinging. It isn’t suction that supports them, but rather van der Waals forces (weak “gravitational” attractions). Fascinating stuff …

96. Like jellybeans OVOID
Jelly beans are thought to have originated in Boston, and it is documented that they were sent by families and friends of soldiers fighting in the Civil War.

98. One learning the ropes PUPIL
As one might expect perhaps, the phrase “learning the ropes” is nautical in origin. A new recruit on a sailing vessel would have to learn how to tie the appropriate knots and learn which rope controlled which sail or spar.

102. Wasatch Mountains resort ALTA
Alta ski resort actually lies within the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area. The first ski lift in the resort was opened way back in 1939. Today, Alta is one of only three ski resorts in the country that prohibits snowboarding (along with Deer Valley, Utah and Mad River Glen, Vermont. The ski resort of Snowbird located next to Alta has been in operation since 1971.

The Wasatch Range is at the western edge of the Rocky Mountains and runs through Utah. “Wasatch” is a Ute word meaning “mountain pass”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Hyde Park carriage PRAM
5. One with ropelike tresses RASTA
10. Enjoys King and Queen READS
15. Water carrier DUCT
19. Seat of Allen County, Kansas IOLA
20. __ Bell: Emily Brontë pen name ELLIS
21. Run the show EMCEE
22. Morales of “Jericho” ESAI
23. Mongolian for “waterless place” GOBI
24. Half a Yale cheer BOOLA!
25. Order to attack SIC ‘EM!
26. Reason to ban a book PORN
27. Exertion while getting up? STANDING EFFORT (from “outstanding effort”)
30. Crystallized mist ICE FOG
32. Shows some spunk DARES
33. Leather piercers AWLS
34. Aspirant WANNABE
35. Take under one’s wing ASSIST
38. Tel __ AVIV
39. Had a row? OARED
40. Many August births LEOS
41. Angry reaction to insolent trick-or-treaters? HALLOWEEN FIT (from “Halloween outfit”)
45. Short deli order? BLT
48. Russian retreat DACHA
50. Pressure source PEER
51. Completed with one stroke ACED
52. Really come down POUR
53. Member of college music’s Whiffenpoofs ELI
54. Long Island airport town ISLIP
56. Shock source TASER
58. __ pants CARGO
59. Bug-loving org. NSA
60. Pickup shtick that needs refinement? ROUGH LINE (from “rough outline”)
62. Attacked without warning RAIDED
63. Somewhat soft, as a sound LOWISH
65. Ref’s call TKO
66. Capital east of the Black Hills PIERRE
68. Spa treatment FACIAL
70. Place for perjurers? LYING AREA (from “outlying area”)
72. MD associates RNS
75. Three-time Olympics host country ITALY
76. They may be emotional SCARS
78. Express disdain (at) SNIFF
79. Cioppino cooker POT
80. Curious to a fault NOSY
81. Steinbeck surname JOAD
82. Some light beers BUDS
83. Cyberjotting E-NOTE
85. Ambulance VIP EMT
86. Ship’s secure containers? BOUND FREIGHT (from “outbound freight”)
90. Salinger title teen ESME
91. Collectors’ items? DEBTS
92. Go on LAST
93. Too violent, perhaps R-RATED
95. Split the tab GO DUTCH
98. Fourth down play PUNT
99. Bit of ugly politics SMEAR
101. Extremely EVER SO
102. Wing for rugby’s Wallabies? AUSTRALIAN BACK (from “Australian Outback”)
107. Retina feature CONE
108. “Invisible Man” author Ellison RALPH
110. Chan portrayer OLAND
111. Supply-and-demand sci. ECON
112. Rock band famous for face paint KISS
113. Often-bricked surface PATIO
114. King creation NOVEL
115. Northern terminus of I-79 ERIE
116. Some Neruda poems ODES
117. Old will? SHALT
118. Noisy fliers GEESE
119. Peace Nobelist Cassin RENE

Down
1. Fairy tale trio PIGS
2. Underlying cause ROOT
3. Goya’s “Duchess of __” ALBA
4. It often includes sides MAIN DISH
5. Second coming REBIRTH
6. How writers usually work ALONE
7. Plods (through) SLOGS
8. Scrabble piece TILE
9. Without obligation AS A FAVOR
10. Work out RESOLVE
11. Qatari bigwigs EMIRS
12. Part of IRA: Abbr. ACCT
13. Wood finish? DEE
14. Like parts of the Great Plains SEMIARID
15. Count (on) DEPEND
16. D.C. location, familiarly US OF A
17. Chocolate substitute CAROB
18. Hint TINGE
28. Court figs. DAS
29. Texter’s “Just sayin'” FWIW
31. Site for techies C|NET
34. Nilla product WAFER
35. Pilgrim John ALDEN
36. They can make good impressions SEALS
37. Gregarious play group? SOCIAL CAST (from “social outcast”)
38. Hebrew opener ALEPH
39. First word of “The Raven” ONCE
42. Distinctive mark A-PLUS
43. “Gone With the Wind” actress LEIGH
44. Assuage EASE
45. Blog entry about garden edging? BORDER POST (from “border outpost”)
46. Winter Games vehicle LUGE
47. Walked (on) TROD
49. United route AIRWAY
52. Two of a kind PAIR
55. It covers a lot of ground SOIL
56. Maori carvings TIKIS
57. Like many an Internet troll: Abbr. ANON
58. Wine order CARAFE
61. Interstellar dist. LT YR
62. Navigation hazard REEF
64. Slick OILY
66. Cincy-based consumer products giant P AND G
67. Like Oscar Wilde IRISH
68. “Whatever floats your boat” FINE
69. Energy source ATOM
70. “This Gun for Hire” actor LADD
71. Astronaut’s garb G-SUIT
73. Innocent words NOT ME
74. Mount to mount STEED
76. Word in two state names SOUTH
77. Soup aisle array CANS
81. Department of Labor training program JOB CORPS
82. “Hang in there” BE STRONG
84. Not-too-potent potable NEAR BEER
86. Gets in the pool, maybe BETS
87. Seasonal pharmacy offering FLU SHOT
88. Frantic monologue RANT
89. Potter’s pedal TREADLE
91. Arm-twisting DURESS
94. Took off RAN
95. Tropical lizard GECKO
96. Like jellybeans OVOID
97. Like urban population DENSE
98. One learning the ropes PUPIL
99. Toil (away) SLAVE
100. Bores for ore MINES
102. Wasatch Mountains resort ALTA
103. Burn remedy ALOE
104. Spread measurement ACRE
105. Mint product COIN
106. Often-skinned spot KNEE
109. Fan reaction? AAH!

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5 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 22 May 16, Sunday”

  1. Okay. Finally finished this with 3 letters off (all Natick-type errors) with way too much time taken (about Fri and Sat combined). Quite a rat's nest of language in this one. More frustrating than clever, for most part.

  2. A little more difficult than a usual LAT Sunday. An awful lot of annoying cluing, but nothing that rises to the level of being criminal.

    I've heard it said that anyone who calls it NEAR BEER has a poor sense of distance. I don't find it that bad, but like Bill I only bother with it if I am driving or have some other reason to appear to be drinking when I'm really not. Club soda on the rocks with lime works the same way so I've been doing that more.

    G SUITS are not there for the comfort of the pilots. Evidently they feel like getting kicked in the gut when they kick in. The average human can handle 5 or 6 g's before passing out. The suits add a G or 2 to that. But some modern fighters get up to 9 G's. Just like not all of us can run the 100 in under 10 seconds or throw a baseball 95 mph, not everyone can be a fighter pilot. They are elite athletes in their own right.

    Best –

  3. Re Near Beer: Apparently, competing for the lite beer market with Miller wasn't good enough for Anheuser Bush. Late in 2015 AB aquired Miller in a $105B deal. Bud Lite and Miller Lite will still be sold separately however.

  4. A friend of mine was a member of the Yale Glee Club while attending there, but not the more prestigious Wiffenpoofs. But attempting to finish this puzzle I can only lament the last line of that song, "Lord have mercy on such as we. Baa baa baa."

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