LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Aug 16, Thursday




LA Times Crossword Solution 11 Aug 16







Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Goofy Start

Today’s themed answers each start with a synonym of “goofy”.

  • 20A…Toon with the catchphrase “You’re despicable!”..DAFFY DUCK
  • 27A…With “The,” Julius Kelp, in a 1963 movie..NUTTY PROFESSOR
  • 34A…Alfred E. Neuman trademark..SILLY GRIN
  • 46A…Dr. Seuss book about an odd time of the week..WACKY WEDNESDAY
  • 56A…Riding crop relative..BUGGY WHIP

Bill’s time: 8m 10s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

5…Little biter..GNAT

Gnats are attracted to the smell of rotting food, and to vinegar. Simple homemade traps that use vinegar are often constructed to attract and kill gnats.

14…Introductory French infinitive..ETRE

The French for “to be” is “être”.

15…Girl in a Manilow song with “a dress cut down to there”..LOLA

The Copacabana of song is the Copacabana nightclub in New York City (which is also the subject of the Frank Sinatra song “Meet Me at the Copa”). The Copa opened in 1940 and is still going today although it is struggling. The club had to move due to impending construction and is now “sharing” a location with the Columbus 72 nightclub.

Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl
With yellow feathers in her hair and a dress cut down to there
She would merengue and do the cha-cha
And while she tried to be a star
Tony always tended bar
Across the crowded floor, they worked from 8 til 4
They were young and they had each other
Who could ask for more?

16…Left Bank lunch choice..CREPE

“Crêpe” is the French word for “pancake”.

The famous “Left Bank” (“La Rive Gauche”) of the River Seine in Paris is the river’s southern bank. The area south of the river was traditionally quite bohemian and was home to artists, students and intellectuals.

18…Fossey subjects..APES

The gorilla is the largest primate still in existence, and is one of the nearest living species to humans. Molecular biology studies have shown that our nearest relatives are in fact the species in the genus Pan (the chimpanzee and the bonobo), which split from the human branch of the family 4-6 million years ago. Gorillas and humans diverged at a point about 7 million years ago. The term “gorilla” derives from the Greek “gorillai” meaning “tribe of hairy women”. Wow!

Dian Fossey carried out her famous study of gorilla populations in the mountain forests of Rwanda (NB: it was Jane Goodall that worked with chimpanzees). Sadly, Fossey was found dead in her cabin in Rwanda in 1986, murdered in her bedroom, her skull split open by a machete. The crime was never solved.

20…Toon with the catchphrase “You’re despicable!”..DAFFY DUCK

Daffy Duck first appeared on the screen in “Porky’s Duck Hunt” in 1937. In the original cartoon, Daffy was just meant to have a small role, but he was a big hit as he had so much sass. Even back then, Daffy was voiced by the ubiquitous Mel Blanc.

25…Offer as proof..ADDUCE

“To adduce” is to cite as an example or as a means of proof.

27…With “The,” Julius Kelp, in a 1963 movie..NUTTY PROFESSOR

The 1963 comedy film “The Nutty Professor” is a parody of Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”. Star of the film is Jerry Lewis, and filming was mainly on the Arizona State University campus in Tempe, Arizona. “The Nutty Professor” as remade in 1996 starring Eddie Murphy.

32…Struggling sea..ARAL

The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

33…Cadillac model..ATS

The Cadillac model known as the ATS is so called because it is an “A-Series Touring Sedan”.

34…Alfred E. Neuman trademark..SILLY GRIN

Alfred E. Neuman is the mascot of “Mad” magazine, although the image of the smiling, jug-eared youth had been around for decades before the magazine. “Mad” first used the likeness in 1955, and young Mr. Neuman has appeared on the cover of almost every issue of the magazine since then. Neuman’s name was inspired by American composer Alfred Newman, a prolific writer of film scores.

39…”Shameless” network, in TV listings..SHO

“Shameless” is a comedy drama TV series about a dysfunctional Chicago family consisting of a six children and single father who spends his days drunk. The US show is a remake of the original British “Shameless” that is based on a similar family who live in Manchester in the North of England.

42…Old Venetian judge..DOGE

Doges were the elected chief magistrates of the former republics of Venice and Genoa.

46…Dr. Seuss book about an odd time of the week..WACKY WEDNESDAY

Dr. Seuss was the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel. He first used the pen name while studying at Dartmouth College and at the University of Oxford. Back then, Geisel pronounced “Seuss” as it would be in German, i.e. rhyming with “voice”. After his books found success in the US, he went with the pronunciation being used widely by the public, quite happy to have a name that rhymed with “Mother Goose”.

55…Shore bird..TERN

Terns are seabirds that are found all over the world. The Arctic Tern makes a very long-distance migration. One Arctic Tern that was tagged as a chick in Great Britain in the summer of 1982, was spotted in Melbourne, Australia just three months later. The bird had traveled over 14,000 miles in over those three months, an average of about 150 miles a day. Remarkable …

61…Algerian coastal city..ORAN

Oran lies on the Algerian coast, and is famous for being the port where the French Navy was largely destroyed by the British during WWII in order to avoid the French vessels falling into the hands of Nazi Germany after France surrendered. This decisive and unexpected unilateral action by the British sent a very strong message around the world that Britain was willing to fight alone against the axis powers if necessary.

62…__-Tahoe Airport..RENO

Reno-Tahoe International Airport is located a few miles from downtown Reno, Nevada. The airport’s IATA code is RNO.

64…Gp. joined by Croatia in 2009..NATO

The Republic of Croatia is a Balkan country. The Croats declared independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. Croatia became a member of NATO in 2009, and a member of the European Union in 2013.

65…2012 Best Picture..ARGO

“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I saw “Argo” recently and recommend it highly, although I found the scenes of religious fervor pretty frightening …

67…Cassini of fashion..OLEG

Oleg Cassini, the French-born American fashion designer, had two big names particularly associated with his designs. In the sixties he produced the state wardrobe for First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and he was also the exclusive designer for Hollywood’s Gene Tierney, who was Cassini’s second wife.

Down

4…Lifestyle magazine..SELF

“Self” is a women’s magazine that has been published since 1979. It is a publication that focuses on health, beauty, wellness and style.

6…Tropicana option..NO PULP

The Tropicana company is most famous for its orange juice. The company is headquartered in Chicago, where not many oranges are grown …

7…Guinness on screen..ALEC

Sir Alec Guinness played many great roles over a long and distinguished career, but nowadays is best remembered (sadly, I think) for playing the original Obi-Wan Kenobi in “Star Wars”.

9…”__ du lieber!”..ACH

The German exclamation “Ach du lieber” translates as “Oh dear”.

10…Doctrines..CREEDS

A creed is a confession of faith, or a system of belief or principles. The word “creed” comes from the Latin “credo” meaning “I believe”.

13…British cruciverbalists..SETTERS

Cruciverbalist is a term developed in the 1990s to describe crossword enthusiasts. The word comes from the Latin for cross (crux) and word (verbum). “Cruciverbalist” is sometimes limited to those who actually construct the puzzles. Over on the other side of the Atlantic, we call such people “setters”.

21…”__ Brutus says he was ambitious”: Antony..YET

The famous “Friends, Romans, countrymen …” speech by Antony in William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” includes the lines:

… The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—
For Brutus is an honorable man;
So are they all, all honorable men—
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
But Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honorable man.

26…Section with a slicer..DELI

The word “delicatessen” (or “deli” for short) came into English from the German “Delikatessen”. The Germans borrowed the word from French, in which language “délicatesse” means “delicious things (to eat)”. The term’s ultimate root is “delicatus”, the Latin for “giving pleasure, delightful”.

28…Positions for Ph.D. students..TAS

Teaching Assistants (TAs)

30…Cousin of edu..ORG

The .org domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

.com (commercial enterprise)
.net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
.mil (US military)
.org (not-for-profit organization)
.gov (US federal government entity)
.edu (college-level educational institution)

35…Pastoral poem..IDYL

An “idyll” (also “idyl”) is a short poem with a pastoral theme, usually depicting the scene in romantic and idealized terms. The word comes from the Greek “eidyllion”, which literally translates to “little picture” but was a word describing a short, poem with a rustic theme.

40…Hors d’oeuvres server’s suggestion..HAVE ONE

An hors d’oeuvre is the first course in a meal. “Hors d’oeuvre” translates from French as “apart from the work”, really meaning “not the main course”.

41…Ancient instrument with finger holes..OCARINA

An ocarina is an ancient wind-instrument that sounds like and is played like a flute. Usually an ocarina has an egg-shaped body with a number of finger holes cut into the material making up the instrument (usually ceramic). There is a tube protruding from the body through which one blows to make sounds. The air vibrates within the body of the instrument, and the pitch of the vibrations is changed by covering and uncovering the finger-holes. Ocarinas date back as far as 12,000 years ago when they were used both in China and Central America. The ocarina was brought to Italy in the 1800s where it became popular as a child’s toy, but also as a serious instrument. It was given the name “ocarina” as its shape resembles that of a goose, and “ocarina”is a diminutive word stemming from “oca”, the Italian word for “goose”.

49…Seasonal quaff..EGGNOG

It’s not really clear where the term “nog” (as in “eggnog”) comes from although it might derive from the word “noggin”, which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

50…Vegan staple..SOY

What are known as soybeans here in the US are called “soya beans” in most other English-speaking countries. So, I drink soy milk here in America, but when I am over in Ireland I drink “soya milk”.

56…U2 frontman..BONO

Irish singer Bono is a Dubliner, born Paul David Hewson. As a youth, Hewson was given the nickname “Bono Vox” by a friend, a Latin expression meaning “good voice”, and so the singer has been known as Bono since the late seventies. His band’s first name was “Feedback”, later changed to “The Hype”. The band members searched for yet another name and chose U2 from a list of six names suggested by a friend. They picked U2 because it was the name they disliked least …

57…Russia’s __ Mountains..URAL

The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

60…Oil giant, on the NYSE..OXY

Occidental Petroleum is an oil and gas company based in Houston that was founded in 1920 in California.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…They don’t last long..FADS

5…Little biter..GNAT

9…Take the role of..ACT AS

14…Introductory French infinitive..ETRE

15…Girl in a Manilow song with “a dress cut down to there”..LOLA

16…Left Bank lunch choice..CREPE

17…Gas, for one: Abbr…UTIL

18…Fossey subjects..APES

19…Crux..HEART

20…Toon with the catchphrase “You’re despicable!”..DAFFY DUCK

22…Send out..EMIT

23…Trainer’s command..SIT!

24…Wing, perhaps..ELL

25…Offer as proof..ADDUCE

27…With “The,” Julius Kelp, in a 1963 movie..NUTTY PROFESSOR

31…Restful place..SPA

32…Struggling sea..ARAL

33…Cadillac model..ATS

34…Alfred E. Neuman trademark..SILLY GRIN

39…”Shameless” network, in TV listings..SHO

42…Old Venetian judge..DOGE

43…Special __..OPS

46…Dr. Seuss book about an odd time of the week..WACKY WEDNESDAY

51…Is of use to..AVAILS

52…Source of confidence..EGO

53…Copyright data: Abbr…YRS

55…Shore bird..TERN

56…Riding crop relative..BUGGY WHIP

59…”Granted”..SO I DO

61…Algerian coastal city..ORAN

62…__-Tahoe Airport..RENO

63…Wing, perhaps..ANNEX

64…Gp. joined by Croatia in 2009..NATO

65…2012 Best Picture..ARGO

66…Welling up..TEARY

67…Cassini of fashion..OLEG

68…Glimpse..PEEK

Down

1…Extended conflicts..FEUDS

2…Gets..ATTAINS

3…Rise slowly, as smoke..DRIFT UP

4…Lifestyle magazine..SELF

5…”With pleasure!”..GLADLY

6…Tropicana option..NO PULP

7…Guinness on screen..ALEC

8…Job..TASK

9…”__ du lieber!”..ACH

10…Doctrines..CREEDS

11…Stars and Stripes squad..TEAM USA

12…Nectar source..APRICOT

13…British cruciverbalists..SETTERS

21…”__ Brutus says he was ambitious”: Antony..YET

25…Way off..AFAR

26…Section with a slicer..DELI

28…Positions for Ph.D. students..TAS

29…Like daisies..RAYED

30…Cousin of edu..ORG

35…Pastoral poem..IDYL

36…Some temperature extremes..LOWS

37…Soft drink ord…LGE

38…Subtle assent..NOD

39…Goes after, as a fly..SWATS AT

40…Hors d’oeuvres server’s suggestion..HAVE ONE

41…Ancient instrument with finger holes..OCARINA

44…Sign at the register..PAY HERE

45…Shot source..SYRINGE

47…More comforting..KINDER

48…Void..NEGATE

49…Seasonal quaff..EGGNOG

50…Vegan staple..SOY

54…Frighten, as a horse..SPOOK

56…U2 frontman..BONO

57…Russia’s __ Mountains..URAL

58…Food truck offering..WRAP

60…Oil giant, on the NYSE..OXY




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16 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Aug 16, Thursday”

  1. The puzzle was difficult, and I had to go through it with a lot of introspection.

    Bill, a CSO – shout out to your majesty – in ‘setters’ ….. I thought of you, right away. 😉

    RE: Group joined by Croatia in 2009 …. NATO. If you read modern european history, you will find small countries are often the most vindictive, and most petty. The Croatian application to join the EU and also NATO, was vetoed and negated by Slovenia over a minor border problem of less than 5 square miles …. for 10 years. As also, the application of the Republic of Macedonia, ( now temporarlily called FYROM – The Former Yugoslav(-ian) Republic of Macedonia ) to join EU and NATO has been vetoed and totally stalled by the country of Greece for over 10 years – over what name that little country should go by. I apologize for bringing politics into this blog.

    Finally, in your example of the lines of Marcus Anthony, do not support the clue – ‘Yet, Brutus says he was ambitious’ …. the words in your transcription say ‘But, Brutus says … etc.’ (line 14 – ) …. I looked at the speech, courtesy of Google, and found the ‘Yet, Brutus says ….’ occurs a little later on line 21 and again on line 26. So, undoubtedly you are right, and the clue is right …. but just that your example does not include the pertinent line. No matter. Too much nit picking.

    Thank you, Dirk, from yesterday, about the capture of the submerged, Ft. Henry (wiki) link …. I took the opportunity, to also , read about Gens. Grant, Tilghman (CSA) and Gen. Johnstone and P.T. Beuregard ( both CSA). Despite my many readings, on the US Civil War, I seem to have missed a lot of detail, which is always very interesting. Too bad, many fine noble soldiers and officers who were, in their own way, patriotic and loyal, and full of bravery and integrity, died in that tragic war.

    Have a nice day, all.

    1. Friends, Romans, Vidwan …
      I think that you’ll find the line from the clue towards the end of the chunk of the speech that I reproduced. 🙂

  2. 12:04, no errors, iPad.

    @Bill … Thanks for explaining the term “setter”! I had never heard the usage until I began frequenting your blogs and I thought I was just being ignorant, but now I see that I was simply born on the wrong side of the Atlantic! … 🙂

    1. Dave and Tony.
      I’ve mentioned before that I used to construct crosswords full-time, cryptic crosswords for an Irish national paper. I was an Irish setter …

  3. Today took a bit of thinking to finish. I didn’t go “buggy” while pondering it, but for a Thursday it definitely presented a fair challenge. I only got 13 Down or crosses so that was a new one to me and only when I read Bill’s blog did I find out why “setters” was right. Hope you all have a good day. See you tomorrow.

  4. 9D: this clue was very easy for me because when I was a small child my late grandmother, who grew up in Vienna, used to sing to me the old Viennese song, “Ach du lieber Augustin.” That brought back memories! There’s a version of it on YouTube.

  5. @Bella – My first thought was “Why would anyone want to crucify a verbalist?” but then again, I didn’t have a clue as to what they were so maybe they needed such treatment…

  6. I knew an American who was working in Tehran when the hostages were taken. He stayed out of sight at home and everyday his Iranian employees would go to the airport to see if it was guarded. One day, there were no guards so he got there ASAP and got on the first flight out regardless of the destination.

  7. @Restmycase – for anyone with a smidgen of German, ACH is obvious. Wish Germans could be thrown a real clue.

    Difficult, DNF. Never heard of Shameless, SETTER, OXY. The theme was good.

    Weather insufferable today in Upstate NY. Humidity.

  8. Thank you Bill, for commenting, on what appears to me, in retrospect to be a silly little thing ….
    As I have mentioned. many. many. many times ….. your blog MUST have a provision for bloggers to delete their own posts, if they change their mind. A mistake spelling or otherwise, made by a poster should not have to remain in cyberspace …. for all eternity !

    I heard of cruciverbalist, when I watched Wordplay, that delectable documentary on setting and solving crosswords. To those who love to solve physical, tangible puzzles like Rubik’s cube, etc. afficianados are called …… metagrobologists. Meta meaning ‘many, or varied ‘ and ‘grobo-logy’ is the science of investigating, and understanding figures, shapes and surfaces.

    A Vexillologist does not make a career to ‘vex’ you ….. he or she studies and designs flags.

    Good night, all.

  9. “ADDUCE”? “CRUCIVERBALISTS”? GMAB! The NE corner put me under the rug! Since I don’t ever use internet sources for help, I simply gave up. Could “verbal elitist” be viable here?? Maybe we need to avoid Thurs. altogether?

  10. Surprised that I finished this with no errors after about :45. Had to come here to verify SOIDO and OCARINA. Also, I’ve never used ADDUCE in polite conversation.

    I first thought cruciverbalists were a type of vegetarian eating only cruciferous vegetables. 🙂 I really should know this one! Also, surprised at CREPE being a lunch choice, but Wikipedia confirms that when filled with cheese, ham, etc it is indeed eaten for lunch.

    @Carrie Gogol is one of my favorite authors and “Dead Souls” is a great novel. I really love the exuberant colorful style with subtle satire throughout. Apparently he wrote this while living in Rome. Arms-akimbo does show up in the text, but not in the context that I described.

  11. Hi folks!!
    DANG!! One letter off: had DORE/LRE instead of DOGE/LGE ……JEEZ!! I figured I was wrong but when I saw the actual answers I knew I SHOULDA TRIED HARDER!!
    I got SETTERS without problem, and I realized it’s probably because I made the connection to the Spanish word for crossword puzzle: “crucigrama.”
    I also got tangled up in the SW corner, OCARINA and the absurd SO I DO.
    Got out alive and kicking myself for that one missed letter. DANG!!
    @Vidwan, interesting stuff about the border disputes in that region. I wonder when FYROM will get a name… As for politics, I guess the issues are political, but I don’t think you’re discussing anything controversial, and I would think it’s not something that we here would object to.
    BTW Vidwan, have you read U.S. Grant’s memoirs? Good book.
    Hey Dirk, I too loved Dead Souls and want my book club to read another of his…any recommendations? (Otherwise I’ll just have to Google Gogol…..)
    Carrie out!
    Be well~~™??

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