LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Aug 16, Tuesday




LA Times Crossword Solution 16 Aug 16







Constructed by: Patti Varol

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Attention-Getter

Today’s themed answers each contain a hidden word (shown using circled letters). Those hidden words are ATTENTION-GETTERS:

  • 60A…Verbal nudge found in each set of puzzle circles..ATTENTION-GETTER
  • 17A…Annual Time honoree..PERSON OF THE YEAR (hiding “Hey!”)
  • 27A…Nickname of a Nobel-winning novelist..PAPA HEMINGWAY (hiding “Ahem!”)
  • 47A…Doesn’t get confused, as facts..KEEPS STRAIGHT (hiding “Psst!”)

Bill’s time: 6m 10s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1…Sherbet flavor..LIME

The frozen dessert called “sherbet” is a very similar to “sorbet”, the difference being that sherbet contains a small amount of milkfat.

9…Rumor, to a rumor mill..GRIST

When grain has been separated from its chaff, to prepare it for grinding, it is called “grist”. Indeed, the word “grist” is derived from the word “grind”. Grist can be ground into a relatively coarse meal, or into a fine flour. The names can be confusing though. For example, the grist from maize when ground to a coarse consistency is called “grits”, and when ground to a fine consistency is called “corn meal”. There is an idiomatic phrase “grist for one’s mill”, meaning something used to one’s advantage. The grinding mechanism, or the building that holds the mechanism, is known as a “gristmill”.

14…With 5-Down, “Spanglish” actor..ADAM
(5D…See 14-Across..SANDLER)

Adam Sandler’s big break came with “Saturday Night Live” (SNL). He then went on to make several successful movies and now Sandler has his own movie and television production company. Personally, I am not a fan …

“Spanglish” is a 2004 comedy film starring Adam Sandler, Téa Leoni and Paz Vega. Vega plays a poor Mexican single mother who is hired as a housekeeper by a couple played by Sandler and Leoni. Hilarity ensues, I am told …

15…Capital of Samoa..APIA

Apia is the capital city, and in fact the only city, of the Pacific island-nation of Samoa. The harbor of Apia is famous for a very foolish incident in 1889 involving seven naval vessels from Germany, the US and Britain. A typhoon was approaching so the safest thing to do was to head for open water away from land, but no nation would move its ships for fear of losing face in front of the others. Six of the ships were lost in the typhoon as a result and 200 American and German sailors perished. The British cruiser HMS Calliope barely managed to escape from the harbor and rode out the storm safely.

17…Annual Time honoree..PERSON OF THE YEAR

“Time” magazine started naming a “Man of the Year” in 1927, only changing the concept to “Person of the Year” in 1999. Prior to 1999, the magazine did recognize four females as “Woman of the Year”: Wallis Simpson (1936), Soong May-ling a.k.a. Madame Chiang Kai-shek (1937), Queen Elizabeth II (1952) and Corazon Aquino (1986). “Time” named Albert Einstein as Person of the Century in 1999, with Franklin D. Roosevelt and Mahatma Gandhi as runners-up.

23…Like LAX and JFK..INTL

LAX (Los Angeles) and JFK (John F. Kennedy) are international (intl.) airports.

25…__ colada..PINA

“Piña colada” is a Spanish term which translates into “strained pineapple”. The Piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

27…Nickname of a Nobel-winning novelist..PAPA HEMINGWAY

Apparently, the author Ernest Hemingway picked up the moniker “Papa” on the birth of his first child (as one might expect!). Hemingway seemed to the like the nickname, and welcomed its use outside of the family, and his admirers obliged.

If you’ve read Ernest Hemingway’s “The Old Man And The Sea” (maybe first at school, like me!) you’ll likely remember it as a quick read as it is a novella, although it might be better described as a “long short story”. It was first published in 1952, the last major work that Hemingway had published in his lifetime. That first publication was as a story in “Life Magazine”, and it was such a hit that the magazine sold 5 million copies in the first two days. “The Old Man and the Sea” won a Pulitzer in 1952 and two years later the title was cited when Hemingway was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

32…DVR button..REC

DVR (Digital Video Recorder)

33…Mogadishu is its cap…SOM

Mogadishu is a major port city on the east coast of Africa, and is the capital of Somalia. The city is known locally as Xamar.

36…Concern for an orthodontist..GAP

Orthodontics is a branch of dentistry dealing with the straightening of teeth. The name comes from the Greek “orthos” meaning “straight” and “dontia” meaning “teeth”.

38…NFLer again in 2016..LA RAM

The Los Angeles Rams are the only franchise to have won NFL championships in three different cities, i.e. Cleveland (1945), Los Angeles (1951) and St. Louis (1999). The Rams were based in Cleveland from 1936 to 1945, in Los Angeles from 1946 to 1994, in St. Louis from 1995 to 2015, and returned to Los Angeles in 2016.

42…Old tape initials..VHS

The video standard known as VHS is more fully referred to as the Video Home System. VHS was one of many standards touted by various manufacturers in the seventies. The biggest rival to VHS was Betamax, but we all knew which of the two standards won the final round in that fight.

44…Detective Spade..SAM

Private detective Sam Spade is the main character in Dashiell Hammett’s novel “The Maltese Falcon”. Famously, Spade was played by Humphrey Bogart in the 1941 film adaptation directed by John Huston.

46…Greek letter that would be last in English..ZETA

Zeta is the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a precursor of our Roman letter Z. The word “zeta” is also the ancestor of the name “zed”, which became “zee”, the pronunciation that we use here in the US.

50…”The Greatest” boxer..ALI

Muhammad Ali won 56 professional fights, 37 of which were knockouts. He lost 5 fights, 4 being decisions and one being a technical knockout (TKO). The TKO-loss was Ali’s second-last fight, against Larry Holmes. By the time Ali took on Holmes, he was already showing signs of Parkinson’s Syndrome, although the diagnosis would not come until four years later.

52…__-chic: hippie-influenced fashion style..BOHO

Boho-chic is a style of fashion that grew out of the bohemian and hippie looks.

54…Letterman’s successor..COLBERT

Stephen Colbert is a political satirist who hosted his own show on Comedy Central, “The Colbert Report”. Colbert’s first love was theater, and so he studied to become an actor. He then moved into comedy, and ended up on the “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart”. He left “The Daily Show” in 2005 to set up his own spinoff, “The Colbert Report”. In his own inimitable way, Colbert likes to use a “French” pronunciation for the name of his show, so “The Colbert Report” comes out as “The Col-bear Rep-oar”. Colbert took over the “Late Show” when David Letterman retired.

57…Winter illness..FLU

Influenza (flu) is an ailment that is caused by a virus. The virus is readily inactivated by the use of soap, so washing hands and surfaces is especially helpful in containing flu outbreaks.

64…Advertising award..CLIO

The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

67…Green Hornet’s sidekick..KATO

In “The Green Hornet” television series, Kato was famously played by Bruce Lee. The Kato role has been cited as a driving force behind the increase in popularity of martial arts in the US during the sixties.

Down

2…Cannes concept..IDEE

“Idée” is French for “idea”.

Cannes is a city on the French Riviera, noted as host of the Cannes Film Festival. The idea of the annual film festival was adopted by the city just before WWII. However, the festival had to wait for the end of the war for its launch in 1946.

3…Oft-molded almond confection..MARZIPAN

Marzipan is a scrumptious confection made from almond meal sweetened with sugar or honey. The former English name was “marchpane” meaning “March bread”. We now use “marzipan”, which is the German name.

4…Ambulance letters..EMS

Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

7…Picture file suffix..GIF

A bitmap is an image file format used to store digital images. Basically, each pixel in a bitmap file is stored as a “bit” of information, hence the name “bitmap”. In 1987, CompuServe introduced a new type of image file called the Graphics Interchange Format (GIF). A GIF image takes the same information as a bitmap and then compresses it, resulting in a smaller file size. However, during compression the image may lose some resolution. The GIF format also handles short video clips, usually animations.

9…Misses military roll call, maybe..GOES AWOL

The Military Police (MPs) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

10…Rob __: cocktails..ROYS

Rob Roy was a folk hero in Scotland from the 18th century. He was a sort of Scottish Robin Hood, an outlaw who had the support of the populace. Rob Roy’s full name was Robert Roy MacGregor, itself an anglicization of the Scottish Raibeart Ruadh. He gave his name to a famous cocktail called a Rob Roy, a relative of the Manhattan that is made with Scotch instead of bourbon.

12…Wolfgang Puck’s restaurant..SPAGO

Wolfgang Puck is a celebrity chef from Austria. Puck is the man behind the famous pair of restaurants in Southern California called Spago.

25…”Guernica” muralist Pablo..PICASSO

“Guernica” is a painting by Pablo Picasso that he completed in 1937. Picasso painted it soon after the aerial bombing of the Basque town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War. The attack was carried out by German warplanes sent by Adolf Hitler at the request of the Spanish Nationalist government. The town was regarded as a bastion of Republican resistance, although it had no military significance. As the town was largely left without men who were fighting for the Republican cause, the vast majority of casualties were women and children.

27…Rank below cpl…PFC

Private First Class (PFC)

28…__ française..A LA

When a meal is served “à la russe” (in the Russian style), courses are brought to the table sequentially. This contrasts with a meal served “à la française” (in the French style), in which all the courses are brought to the table at the same time.

29…”Family Guy” daughter..MEG

Mila Kunis is a Ukrainian-born, American actress, who plays Jackie Burkhart on “That ’70s Show”. Fans of the cartoon series “Family Guy” might recognize her voicing the Meg Griffin character. In ”Black Swan”, Kunis plays a rival ballet dancer to the character played by Natalie Portman. In her personal life, Kunis dated Macaulay Culkin for 8 years, but married Ashton Kutcher, her costar from “That 70s Show”, in 2015.

30…Like the ’69 N.Y. Mets..AMAZIN’

The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” (aka “Amazin’ Mets”) who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

35…Diver’s sickness..THE BENDS

“The bends” is a colloquial term used for decompression sickness, a condition that can arise when a diver comes to the surface too quickly. As a sometime SCUBA diver, it’s something I am very much aware of. When a diver is at depth he or she is breathing in air under pressure. At pressure, more nitrogen is dissolved in the blood than normal, and as one surfaces and pressure decreases, the excess nitrogen “bubbles” out of the blood. The body can cope with this bubbling if takes place sufficiently slowly. If it occurs too quickly the nitrogen can build up in pockets in the body causing the acute pain referred to as the bends. Even when you come up slowly, you can “hear” tiny bubbles of nitrogen coming out of the blood near the ear, a crackling sound like popcorn popping.

40…Olympics entrant: Abbr…ATH

Athlete (ath.)

41…Yoga class need..MAT

In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

45…Nearsighted cartoon character..MR MAGOO

Mr. Quincy Magoo is a wonderful cartoon character voiced by Jim Backus. Backus is probably equally well-known for playing Mr. Magoo as well as Thurston Howell, III on “Gilligan’s Island”. Mr. Magoo first appeared on the screen in a short called “The Ragtime Bear” in 1949. His persona was at least in part based on the antics of W. C. Fields. Backus originally used a fake rubber nose that pinched his nostrils in order to create the distinctive voice, although in time he learned to do the voice without the prop. My absolute favorite appearance by Mr. Magoo is in “Mr Magoo’s Christmas Carol”, a true classic from the sixties. There was a movie adaptation of “Mr Magoo” released in 1997, with Leslie Nielsen playing the title role.

47…Off-__: askew..KILTER

To be “off-kilter” is to be off balance, not aligned. To be “out of kilter” is to be out of order, not in good condition.

48…Cornball routine..SHTICK

A “shtick” is a routine, a bit, a piece of entertainment. It comes from the Yiddish “shtick”, which has the same meaning and derives from the Middle High German word “stücke”, the word for “piece”.

56…Foul mood..SNIT

The exact etymology of “snit”, meaning “fit of temper”, isn’t really known. The term was first used in print in the play “Kiss the Boys Goodbye” by Clare Booth Luce, which dates back to the 1930s and is set in the American South.

61…Suffix with pay or Cray..-OLA

“Payola” is the illegal practice of paying radio stations or disk jockeys to repeatedly play a particular piece of music. The impetus behind the crime is that the more often a song is played, the more likely it is to sell. The term “payola” comes from the words “pay” and “Victrola”, an RCA brand name for an early phonograph.

In the year 2000 the Crayola company, very cleverly I think, held the “Crayola Color Census 2000” in which people were polled and asked for their favorite Crayola colors. President George W. Bush chose “Blue Bell” and Tiger Woods chose “Wild Strawberry”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…Sherbet flavor..LIME

5…Exhalation of relief..SIGH

9…Rumor, to a rumor mill..GRIST

14…With 5-Down, “Spanglish” actor..ADAM

15…Capital of Samoa..APIA

16…Vitality..OOMPH

17…Annual Time honoree..PERSON OF THE YEAR

20…”__ who?!”..SEZ

21…Throw in..ADD

22…Selection for a reading..PASSAGE

23…Like LAX and JFK..INTL

25…__ colada..PINA

26…Plant, as seed..SOW

27…Nickname of a Nobel-winning novelist..PAPA HEMINGWAY

31…Under the intended pitch..FLAT

32…DVR button..REC

33…Mogadishu is its cap…SOM

34…”Shush!”..CAN IT!

36…Concern for an orthodontist..GAP

38…NFLer again in 2016..LA RAM

42…Old tape initials..VHS

44…Detective Spade..SAM

46…Greek letter that would be last in English..ZETA

47…Doesn’t get confused, as facts..KEEPS STRAIGHT

50…”The Greatest” boxer..ALI

52…__-chic: hippie-influenced fashion style..BOHO

53…Knee-baring skirt..MINI

54…Letterman’s successor..COLBERT

56…Like a texter who types “:-(“..SAD

57…Winter illness..FLU

60…Verbal nudge found in each set of puzzle circles..ATTENTION-GETTER

63…Trusty mount..STEED

64…Advertising award..CLIO

65…Gradually withdraw..WEAN

66…Makes by working..EARNS

67…Green Hornet’s sidekick..KATO

68…Betting numbers..ODDS

Down

1…Gym class punishment, perhaps..LAPS

2…Cannes concept..IDEE

3…Oft-molded almond confection..MARZIPAN

4…Ambulance letters..EMS

5…See 14-Across..SANDLER

6…Apple with earbuds..IPOD

7…Picture file suffix..GIF

8…Something stuck in a bonnet..HAT PIN

9…Misses military roll call, maybe..GOES AWOL

10…Rob __: cocktails..ROYS

11…”Whatever works”..I’M EASY

12…Wolfgang Puck’s restaurant..SPAGO

13…Pitched..THREW

18…Inaugural recitation..OATH

19…Puts on the museum wall..HANGS

24…One born there..NATIVE

25…”Guernica” muralist Pablo..PICASSO

27…Rank below cpl…PFC

28…__ française..A LA

29…”Family Guy” daughter..MEG

30…Like the ’69 N.Y. Mets..AMAZIN’

35…Diver’s sickness..THE BENDS

37…Bit of butter..PAT

39…Found a new home for, as an unwanted present..REGIFTED

40…Olympics entrant: Abbr…ATH

41…Yoga class need..MAT

43…Baseball or golf..SPORT

45…Nearsighted cartoon character..MR MAGOO

47…Off-__: askew..KILTER

48…Cornball routine..SHTICK

49…Executive’s confidante..AIDE

50…Make __ for: argue in favor of..A CASE

51…Ton of, slangily..LOTTA

55…”It’s __ fun”..BEEN

56…Foul mood..SNIT

58…Set the pace..LEAD

59…Coffee servers..URNS

61…Suffix with pay or Cray..-OLA

62…Couple..TWO




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21 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Aug 16, Tuesday”

  1. I found this grid to be just a bit more difficult than the usual Tuesday. Not as hard as Wednesday, but somewhere in between.

    If you don’t mind my mentioning it, I’ve posted a new recipe (well, recipes) on my site. You can check it out at justjoel59.wordpress.com

    Thanks for your continued support!

  2. 12:22, no errors.

    Yesterday’s discussion of various old duplicating “machines” sent me on a search to determine just what it was that my rural Iowa grade-school teacher used … and I finally figured it out. It was a Hectograph:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lUGf19571vI

    Not really a machine – just a tray full of gelatin, a special ink pen, and a stack of paper – probably all the school could afford, given that the entire K-8 school had at most fifteen pupils during any single year I was there. (In kindergarten and first grade, I had two classmates; I skipped second grade; and I was the only kid in my class for grades three through eight.)

    Later on, in high school, I undoubtedly saw ditto machines and mimeographs, but I don’t remember the smell that others have mentioned.

  3. I found this puzzle more compatible to the day of the week – it was quite Tuesday easy. I had a very good time, and really enjoyed myself. (It doesn’t take much for me to enjoy myself …) .

    From yesterday, Jeff mentioned that Gatwick airport had only one runway. I googled other airports , yesterday afternoon, and found out that most airports have only one major runway. Another lesser used one is only for emergencies, or while the first aforementioned is having major repairs. BTW, the Atlanta airport is the busiest in the world.

    Gatwick, by the way, has no major US airlines landing there, since U S Air ceased going there – or ceased business (?). The logistics of airport control are such that 2 runways, especially crosswise can cause the whole business of landings and takeoffs to actually REDUCE, because of strong safety issues involved.

    I used to think that planes normally landed and tookoff — both in the same direction – ‘into the wind’ for better lift for takeoff and for better control while landing, — but sometimes, they apparently do so in opposite directions. In such a case, the runway takes up two names, depending on which direction the pilot is supposed to land the darn plane.

    So, runway 22L (left) may become runway 9R (right)…. makes sense …. and reduces ambiguity.

    BTW, the Apia (Samoa) airport , the Fale’olo INTERNATIONAL airport, also doubles as a highway ( actually a low way, around the coast) all around the island. Makes sense, why waste the ‘imported’ asphalt / Macadam / pitch/ tar when you have one plane landing every month. 😉

    to be continued ….

    1. Since everyone here likes factoids, the numbering of runways is based on their primary compass orientation while landing. Thus, a runway with a primarily southwest direction (225 degrees) is likely to be numbered as runway 22. When landing in the reverse direction, therefore, the number is 18 away (180 degrees), so 22L becomes 4R (not 9R which would be impossible).

      Mike

  4. Agree that this was a little trickier than a lot of Tuesdays, but my time was near my normal regardless.

    Thanks Dirk and Dave for the “*..graph” info. Didn’t realize I was talking about a ditto graph yesterday, but I do remember them well. Why don’t we just get a 3D laser printer and create some new ones that way. Would that be like the opposite of cannabalism?

    That scenario reminds me of a line from a Nelson DeMille novel where a detective said they had so much DNA evidence, they could clone their own suspect and arrest him…

    Houston Intercontinental Airport I believe has 5 runways although they’re obviously not all used at the same time. I suppose it’s atypical in that it’s reportedly the 7th busiest airport in the world in terms of aircraft movement. A few years ago when they were adding runways, I remember the cost was nearly $500 million per runway. That seemed a staggering sum to me for a stretch of road – albeit a very sturdily built stretch of road. I guess graft is expensive too…..

    I wonder if Willie has been watching the epee events in Rio. I saw the team event was completed a few days ago..

    Best –

  5. EMS ,GIF, INTL, REC, SOM, VHS, PFC, ATH, OLA.
    CAN IT! LOTTA, SEZ……and, wait for it, AMAZIN’.
    I think I’ll take up crossword construction if I can get away with all that junk fill.
    D minus for me.

  6. I forgot that my earlier posting had a continuation, and I dont have any thing more to offer.

    Sherbet in the indian subcontinent is a cool fruity drink, with no dairy. It is probably also the same from Turkey to Persia – where the original name certainly came from (Turkey, that is – ) . Soaked basil seeds, which have no particular taste, and look like frog eggs, and are ‘slippery’ on the tongue, are very popular and sight-appealing (!?!) for use in sherbets, especially Faloodas. The latter drink, also originally from Iran, is very popular in Bombay (Mumbai) and contains ten percent milk, and a big scoop of ice cream.

    Have a nice day, folks.

  7. I only flubbed 2 letters on this one. SHITICK eluded me.

    Bill, I will agree with you on the Adam Sandler comment. I never enjoyed him on SNL and 99% of the entertaining bits of his movies/albums are because of the supporting actors he always works with. David Spade, Tim Meadows, Norm MacDonald, Steve Buscemi, Robert Smigel, and a bunch of others. I’d be a lot funnier if I had that staff around me all the time too!

  8. I heard that sherbet was an Arab word used during the Arab control of Sicily around 900. It was made by accident on the snows of Etna.

    Had one Natick today LARAM crosses ATH, both sports. Better than the 3 of yesterday. So, DNF because of one letter.

    Never heard of BOHO, didn’t know MEG.

    @Pookie – totally agree.

  9. One minor complaint — although Picasso painted a few murals (painted, that is, directly on a wall) he wasn’t really known as a muralist and “Guernica” is not a mural but instead a very large canvas.

    Also, since I know nothing of the sea, can anyone explain re Bill’s comment about APIA why ships would leave a harbor in a typhoon? I thought that one of the functions of a “safe harbor” was as a place to ride out storms.

  10. Mad Anthony –

    You’re not entirely wrong in your thinking. It’s dependent on the port itself. Some are called “hurricane holes” and are surrounded by cliffs and other shelter. They would certainly be desirable in a storm.

    Some ports/harbors are more open, and I’ assume this was one. In those cases the thrashing of the ships against rocks or whatever are often more dangerous than the storm itself. Also – I don’t know the details of this incident (except it was in the 1880’s), but most modern ships can out run a storm if given enough notice…although I don’t know how good weather.com was in the late 1800’s….

    Modern ships can run on about $10,000 of fuel per day so commerce dictates they deal with the storm rather than bypass them. Again – probably not an issue in the late 19th century and certainly not for a naval ship.

    Best –

    1. Thanks Jeff. I guess the direction of the wind is a big factor. And I just read that for the new Zumwalt class of destroyers storms at sea may again be a problem, since their stealth design has raised questions about their seaworthiness.

  11. A little tougher for me today and I had to do it on-line since they didn’t deliver the local paper in sufficient quantities for me to get one before they ran out. I’m still getting used to the new interface but still :16.

    I read about the Apia incident that Bill mentions on Wikipedia. What a catastrophe.
    The British ship Calliope that finally decided to leave, left with the winds and seas at already imposing levels and just managed to squeeze out between an American ship, whose crews were cheering them (their sanity) on, and a coral reef.

  12. Hi every buddy!
    This talk of sea storms and runways is putting me a little off KILTER — I tend to get motion sickness — but at least I’ve never had THE BENDS. Never heard of it, either. Scary!
    Easy puzzle, with only a few stumbles. I gotta say, if I weren’t a baseball fan I’d be irritated by AMAZIN. It would be tricky.
    Thanks Dave for the hectograph link! Talk about old school.
    Also @Anthony — glad you pointed that out re. “Guernica.”
    Also think this thing had too many initials…
    Seeing as how Willie’s off watching epees fly, I’ll submit the Seinfeld references: I believe the show coined the term “REGIFTED.” Tim Whatley (played by Brian Cranston !!!) REGIFTED the label maker that Elaine gave him. AND, once, Jerry went scuba diving and got what may have been THE BENDS. The corpuscles around his eyes burst, or something like that.
    Have a happy Wednesday; back late tomorrow!!
    Sweet dreams~~™?????

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