LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Aug 16, Wednesday




LA Times Crossword Solution 24 Aug 16







Constructed by: Gail Grabowski & Bruce Venzke

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: In the Middle With

Today’s themed answers are common items, but the word WITH has been inserted in the middle of the two-word name to give a completely new meaning:

  • 17A…Tweak some violin holders?..FIDDLE WITH CASES (from “fiddle cases”)
  • 27A…Tweak some church chimers?..TINKER WITH BELLS (from “Tinker Bell’s”)
  • 49A…Tweak some ski parkas?..MESS WITH JACKETS (from “mess jackets”)
  • 63A…Tweak some business outfits?..MONKEY WITH SUITS (from “monkey suits”)

Bill’s time: 6m 22s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1…Just open..AJAR

Our word “ajar” is thought to come from Scottish dialect, in which “a char” means “slightly open”.

15…West Indies volcano..PELEE

Mount Pelee on the Caribbean island of Martinique is still active and is considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes on the planet. When it erupted in 1902, it killed over 30,000 people. Most of those fatalities occurred when a cloud of hot gases settled over the town of St. Pierre, instantly igniting everything that was flammable.

16…Site of Napoleon’s first exile..ELBA

I had a lovely two-week vacation in Tuscany once, including what was supposed to be a two-night stay on the island of Elba. I had envisioned Elba as a place full of history, and maybe it is, but it is also overrun with tourists who use it as a beach getaway. We left after one day and we won’t be going back again …

20…Maker of many kitchen rolls..ALCOA

The Aluminum Corporation of America (ALCOA) is the largest producer of aluminum in the United States. The company was founded in 1888 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where its headquarters are to this day.

21…Wall St. deal..LBO

A leveraged buyout (LBO) is a transaction in which an investor acquires a controlling volume of stock in a company, but buys that stock with borrowed funds (hence “leveraged”). Often the assets of the acquired company are used as collateral for the borrowed money. There is a special form of LBO known as a management buyout (MBO) in which the company’s own management team purchases the controlling interest.

25…Tach nos…RPMS

The tachometer takes its name from the Greek word “tachos” meaning “speed”. A tachometer measures engine revolutions per minute (rpm).

27…Tweak some church chimers?..TINKER WITH BELLS (from “Tinker Bell’s”)

Tinker Bell is a fairy in the “Peter Pan” story by J. M. Barrie. “Tink” is a minor character in the original play and novel, but evolved into a major character in the many, many film and television adaptation of the tale.

34…Brit. record label..EMI

EMI was a British music company, with the abbreviation standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

35…A few bucks?..DEER

A male deer is usually called a “buck”, and a female a “doe”.

37…Part of a sitcom farewell..NANU

Mork & Mindy was broadcast from 1978 to 1982. We were first introduced to Mork (played by Robin Williams) in a special episode of “Happy Days”. The particular episode in question has a bizarre storyline culminating in Fonzie and Mork having a thumb-to-finger duel. Eventually Richie wakes up in bed, and alien Mork was just part of a dream! Oh, and “Nanu Nanu” means both “hello” and “goodbye” back on the planet Ork. “I am Mork from Ork, Nanu Nanu”. Great stuff …

41…Spot for a 48-Across..SOFA
(48A…Short snooze..NAP )

“Sofa” is a Turkish word meaning “bench”.

45…Nintendo rival..SEGA

Sega is a Japanese videogame company headquartered in Tokyo. Sega actually started out 1940 in the US as Standard Games and was located in Honolulu, Hawaii. The owners moved the operation to Tokyo in 1951 and renamed the company to Service Games. The name “Sega” is a combination of the first two letters of the words “Se-rvice” and “Ga-mes”.

49…Tweak some ski parkas?..MESS WITH JACKETS (from “mess jackets”)

A parka is a hooded, often fur jacket that is worn in cold weather. The original parka was a pullover design, but nowadays it is usually zipped at the front. “Parka” is the Russian name for the garment , absorbed into English in the late 1700s via the Aleut language.

52…__ helmet..PITH

Pith helmets were worn by mainly Europeans in the tropics, often on safari or as part of a military uniform. The helmet was light in weight, covered with cloth and made from cork or pith. Pith helmets were also called safari helmets, topees and topis.

53…Pre-coll. catchall..ELHI

“Elhi” is an informal word used to describe anything related to schooling from grades 1 through 12, i.e. elementary through high school.

66…Arctic formation..FLOE

An ice floe is a sheet of ice that has separated from an ice field and is floating freely on the ocean.

68…Scientology guru Hubbard..L RON

L. Ron Hubbard wrote a self-improvement book in 1950 called “Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health”. A few years later, he use the concepts in the book as he founded his Church of Scientology.

69…Like most fairways, daily..MOWN

That would be in golf.

70…Some Parliament members..LORDS

The UK Parliament is divided into two houses, with the upper house known as the House of Lords and the lower house as the House of Commons. The members of the House of Commons are elected, but most new members of the House of Lords are appointed. Historically, a large proportion of the membership of the upper house were hereditary peers, but recent legislative changes are reducing the numbers who can sit in the House of Lords by virtue of birthright.

Down

1…NATO alphabet starter..ALFA

The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. It goes Alfa, Bravo, Charlie … Zulu.

2…Monopoly corner..JAIL

The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of “The Landlord’s Game” created in 1903 by a Quaker woman called Lizzie Phillips. Phillips used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord’s Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

3…Adapter letters..AC/DC

Anyone with a laptop with an external power supply has an AC/DC converter, that big “block” in the power cord. It converts the AC current from a wall socket into the DC current that is used by the laptop.

4…New Jersey’s state tree..RED OAK

The northern red oak is a tree that is native to North America. The northern red oak is sometimes referred to as the champion oak, and is the state tree of New Jersey. There is also a southern red oak, which is sometimes called the Spanish oak. If you see the unqualified “red oak” term, then it’s probably a northern red oak.

12…Lyft rival..UBER

Uber is a ridesharing service that was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. The service is somewhat controversial and has been described as an illegal taxicab operation. Central to Uber’s service is the company’s mobile app, which can use the client’s GPS location to help find the nearest available ride. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft. Personally, I love the service and have only had good experiences …

18…Performed light surgery on?..LASED

The term “laser” comes is an acronym, “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation” (LASER). It has been pointed out that a more precise name for laser technology is “Light Oscillation by Stimulated Emission of Radiation”, but the resulting acronym isn’t quite so appealing, namely LOSER …

24…Eur. power until 1806..HRE

The Holy Roman Empire (HRE) existed from 962 to 1806 AD and was a territory of varying size over the centuries that centered on the Kingdom of Germany. The HRE was a successor to the western half of the Ancient Roman Empire.

26…Third deg.?..PHD

PhD is an abbreviation for “philosophiae doctor”, Latin for “teacher of philosophy”. Often, candidates for an earned PhD already hold a bachelor’s and a master’s degree, so a PhD might be considered a “third degree”.

30…Like Oscar Wilde..IRISH

If you didn’t know Oscar Wilde was Irish, you will when you see the name he was given at birth: Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde!

31…Big name in spaghetti westerns..LEONE

Sergio Leone was an Italian film director, and someone very much associated with the genre known as “Spaghetti Westerns”. Perhaps most famous of Leone’s westerns were the so-called “Man with No Name” trilogy that starred Clint Eastwood. The three films are:

  • “A Fistful of Dollars” (1964)
  • “For a Few Dollars More” (1965)
  • “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” (1966)

43…Shipping department supply..TWINE

Our word “twine”, meaning a light string, has the same root as our word “twin”. The original Old English “twin” was a double thread.

44…Lab order?..SIT!

The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814. The breed comes in three registered colors: black, yellow and chocolate.

46…Milk purch…GAL

The name of our fluid measure called a “gallon” ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin term “galleta” meaning “bucket, pail”.

50…”My Generation” band..THE WHO

The English rock band called the Who was formed in 1964, bringing together famed musicians Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend, John Entwistle and Keith Moon. According to “Rolling Stone” magazine, the Who were the third arm of the holy trinity of British rock, alongside the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.

51…Portmanteau for a grownup who hasn’t yet grown-up..KIDULT

An adult who exhibits traits more akin to that of an adolescent is sometimes referred to as a “kidult” or an “adultescent”.

55…Caramel-filled candy..ROLO

Rolo was a hugely popular chocolate candy in Ireland when I was growing up. Rolo was introduced in the thirties in the UK, and is produced under license in the US by Hershey. I was a little disappointed when I had my first taste of the American version as the center is very hard and chewy. The recipe used on the other side of the Atlantic calls for a soft gooey center.

60…Copter’s forerunner..GIRO

“Giro” is a reference to the autogyro, an aircraft that uses an unpowered rotor to create lift, and a powered propeller to provide thrust. The first autogyro was flown in 1923 in Spain, where it was invented.

61…David Cameron’s alma mater..ETON

David Cameron was Prime Minister of the UK from 2010 until 2016. Conservative Cameron came to power as the head of a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats. The Conservative Party emerged victorious in a 2015 general election, after which Cameron led a majority government. Cameron’s administration will surely be remembered in part for two major referenda. In one, Scotland voted by a narrow majority to remain in the UK. In the second, the UK voted to exit the European Union, a vote that led to Cameron’s resignation the next day.

62…Three-part figs…SSNS

A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot, as since 2011 SSN’s are assigned randomly.

64…Monogram on some pricey handbags..YSL

Yves Saint-Laurent (YSL) was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…Just open..AJAR

5…Hot under the collar..ANGRY

10…Loot from a heist..HAUL

14…Dainty trim..LACE

15…West Indies volcano..PELEE

16…Site of Napoleon’s first exile..ELBA

17…Tweak some violin holders?..FIDDLE WITH CASES (from “fiddle cases”)

20…Maker of many kitchen rolls..ALCOA

21…Wall St. deal..LBO

22…Baking soda targets..ODORS

23…Like used fireplaces..ASHY

25…Tach nos…RPMS

27…Tweak some church chimers?..TINKER WITH BELLS (from “Tinker Bell’s”)

34…Brit. record label..EMI

35…A few bucks?..DEER

36…Fuss over..DOTE ON

37…Part of a sitcom farewell..NANU

39…Pulled off..DID

41…Spot for a 48-Across..SOFA

42…Representatives..AGENTS

45…Nintendo rival..SEGA

48…Short snooze..NAP

49…Tweak some ski parkas?..MESS WITH JACKETS (from “mess jackets”)

52…__ helmet..PITH

53…Pre-coll. catchall..ELHI

54…Torch job..ARSON

57…And such: Abbr…ETC

59…Trims, as a lawn..EDGES

63…Tweak some business outfits?..MONKEY WITH SUITS (from “monkey suits”)

66…Arctic formation..FLOE

67…Transparent..SHEER

68…Scientology guru Hubbard..L RON

69…Like most fairways, daily..MOWN

70…Some Parliament members..LORDS

71…A whole bunch..TONS

Down

1…NATO alphabet starter..ALFA

2…Monopoly corner..JAIL

3…Adapter letters..AC/DC

4…New Jersey’s state tree..RED OAK

5…Chest thumper..APE

6…One recently hitched..NEWLYWED

7…Smooth-talking..GLIB

8…Parting shot..RETORT

9…Slangy “Sure”..YEH

10…Hands-free devices..HEADSETS

11…To boot..ALSO

12…Lyft rival..UBER

13…Scottish miss..LASS

18…Performed light surgery on?..LASED

19…Jazz club performers..COMBO

24…Eur. power until 1806..HRE

26…Third deg.?..PHD

27…Midmorning hour..TEN AM

28…Reflection..IMAGE

29…Little League teams..NINES

30…Like Oscar Wilde..IRISH

31…Big name in spaghetti westerns..LEONE

32…OK for dieters..LO-FAT

33…Breaks like a branch..SNAPS

38…Implied..UNSPOKEN

40…Down in the dumps..DEJECTED

43…Shipping department supply..TWINE

44…Lab order?..SIT!

46…Milk purch…GAL

47…Feels the pain..ACHES

50…”My Generation” band..THE WHO

51…Portmanteau for a grownup who hasn’t yet grown-up..KIDULT

54…Switch on a boom box..AM/FM

55…Caramel-filled candy..ROLO

56…Put one over on..SNOW

58…Stadium ticket specification..TIER

60…Copter’s forerunner..GIRO

61…David Cameron’s alma mater..ETON

62…Three-part figs…SSNS

64…Monogram on some pricey handbags..YSL

65…Store door nos…HRS




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11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Aug 16, Wednesday”

  1. Ohno, not the first !

    I was too late yesterday, to leave a comment. I was shocked, really shocked, to find out that Kindergarden ( as spoken in the UK) is pronounced and spelled KindergarTen here. I quizzed my wife, who was half asleep, last night, …. and even she (!) spelled it correctly ! Depressed me to the nth degree. On second thoughts, – it makes sense – it is, after all, a german word and concept, despite Maria Montessori and all.

    Also on the word for the Mongolian tent – yurt – I wondered if the word had some cognate with yogurt. My favorite food. Mongolians and Tibetians, I’m sure, eat a lot of yogurt. The milk from the yaks is very perishable, and has to made less so, by fermentation or curdling.
    Maybe some mongols said,’ go, take the milk, and start packing, with the yurt, go ‘ ….. and that corrupted to yogurt. Maybe not.

    Today’s puzzle, more challenging, yet a delight. I managed to finish with a respectable time.

    Service Games ….. now, I ask you, what sort of name is that ? Probably a japanese invention. Americans would have had a much more fancier name.

    Carrie, your picture on your Gavatar is really very nice. I would have posted a picture of myself, but I’m worried about scaring off the remaining posters on this blog.

    Have a nice day, all.

  2. Just about the right degree of difficulty for a Wednesday. I thought the theme answers were a bit odd. I had to Google mess jacket after I finished. I’m not sure I’d describe a fiddle case, tinker bell, mess jacket or a monkey suit as common items. Oh well, I didn’t use the theme anyway except identifying the word “with” in all of them.

    Every time I read the blurb on PELEE I’m amazed that such a thing happened. I’ve never been to Martinique, and I’m not making plans any time soon.

    Someone please assure me I never have to use (or hear) the word KIDULT in real life. “Man-child” works for me.

    Willie – nice reference to Ted Drewes yesterday. It’s a place that’s impossible to describe. A frozen custard stand that’s like being back in the 1950’s in a small town, but in the heart of St. Louis. Kids and families running around outside in the lights on a hot summer night, and the place is always packed. Like a piece of lost Americana. I’ve still never seen anything quite like it (them – I think there are 2 of them). For me it’s the atmosphere as much as the product itself – its mainstay being something called a concrete which is not unlike a DQ Blizzard, but a lot better IM (admittedly biased) O.

    Best –

  3. @Carrie
    Whatever it is, I hope you figure out what is going on. Although, I think you have to set that in your “Website” preference somewhere (like on your Gravatar account or the like).

    @RestMyCase
    Lila Cherry really is Rich Norris (“really Rich”) – other than the common page of yesterday, you can find a book reference that will indicate the same (I linked it once). Editors typically do it to avoid too many “well you’re going with your own stuff all the time” criticisms from people who submit grids. Although, I think he only steps in at the moment when he doesn’t have anything else “publication ready” that’s appropriate for the day. Other editors (like Mike Shenk) seem to like constructing as much or more than the editing part, so you’ll tend to see them more, either as aliases or under their real names in other places.

    1. If Mr. Norris finds himself bereft of puzzle submissions, perhaps he has hoisted himself on his own petard. Relying more and more on NYT constructors, who seem more like professionals, has probably discouraged others from trying their hands at making one.

      1. I had to look up “petard” in the dictionary. It’s a case that carries explosives to blow down a door. Is this another way of saying he fell on his sword?

        New words always intrigue me….

  4. Is there anyone out there who, like me, has never heard the term “MESS JACKETS” as a substitute for “parka”??? And, for those who care, even Governor Arnold knows that there’s a “T” in Kindergarten since he was a cop in one!

  5. Hi gang!
    Thanks Vidwan! You always have such nice things to say!
    FWIW, the T in kindergarten is pronounced “D.” A single T sounds like D when it’s between two vowels, or an R and a vowel…unless the syllable beginning with T is stressed.
    And thanks Glenn! I will look into my settings.
    HEY JEFF! That’s so funny: I was thinking how clumsy KIDULT is and that “man-child” would be preferable, and sure nuff, I come here and see your comment! Great minds….
    Good puzzle today… altho didn’t we JUST see NANU like, yesterday?? I wasn’t sure about PELEE till I got here. It occurred to me that YAH or YUH could have been (bad) versions of slang for “Sure.”
    Bye for now!
    Sweet dreams~~™?

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