LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Jun 17, Sunday










Constructed by: James Sajdak

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Getting Old

Today’s themed answers are common phrases that are “getting old”, that have AGE added:

  • 23A. “Reduce, reuse, recycle”? : MESSAGE OF GREENS (from “mess of greens”)
  • 32A. Harm caused by some lodge builders? : BEAVER DAMAGE (from “beaver dam”)
  • 47A. Black Friday scene? : ENTRY RAMPAGE (from “entry ramp”)
  • 64A. Shredder fodder? : CLERICAL GARBAGE (from “clerical garb”)
  • 82A. Inventory alert at the highway sign supplier? : STOP SHORTAGE (from “stop short”)
  • 98A. Aromatic oils? : MASSAGE MEDIA (from “mass media”)
  • 111A. Saw you can’t discuss publicly? : CLASSIFIED ADAGE (from “classified ad”)

Bill’s time: 17m 20s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

7. Bottle in a playpen? : BABA

A young child might say “wawa” for water, and “baba” for bottle.

11. [Not my mistake] : SIC

[Sic] indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. “Sic” is Latin for “thus, like this”. The term is more completely written as “sic erat scriptum”, which translates as “thus was it written”.

14. Six-time NBA All-Star Stoudemire : AMARE

Amar’e Stoudemire is a former NBA basketball player who played with the Phoenix Suns, the New York Knicks and the Dallas Mavericks. After retiring from the NBA, Stoudemire signed up to play for Israel’s Hapoel Jerusalem, a team that he co-owns. He is very active off the court, and has his own clothing line, his own record label and has even written a book for children.

19. Beethoven’s “Appassionata,” e.g. : SONATA

Beethoven’s lovely sonata that’s nicknamed the “Appassionata”, wasn’t named by the composer. That name was added by a music publisher some ten years after Beethoven had died.

20. Designer Cassini : OLEG

Oleg Cassini, the French-born American fashion designer, had two big names particularly associated with his designs. In the sixties he produced the state wardrobe for First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and he was also the exclusive designer for Hollywood’s Gene Tierney, who was Cassini’s second wife.

22. Meet competitor : MILER

The 4-minute barrier for the mile run was first broken in 1954 by Roger Bannister, when he finished in just over 3m 59s. The record for males now stands at 3m 43s. If you plan on running a 4-minute mile, you should probably be warned that this means you have to run the whole race at an average speed of over 15 mph (do the math!).

23. “Reduce, reuse, recycle”? : MESSAGE OF GREENS (from “mess of greens”)

The so called “waste hierarchy” can be restated as the three Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. The preferences are in order:

  1. Reduce consumption
  2. Reuse manufactured products
  3. Recycle raw materials

26. “__ Mio” : O SOLE

“‘O sole mio” is a famous Italian song from Naples, written in 1898. The song’s lyrics are usually sung in the original Neapolitan, as opposed to Italian. The title translates from Neapolitan into “My Sun” (and not into “O, My Sun” as one might expect). It’s a love song of course, sung by a young man declaring that there is a sun brighter than that in the sky, the sun that is his lover’s face. Awww …

31. About six weeks on the liturgical calendar : LENT

In Latin, the Christian season that is now called Lent was termed “quadragesima” (meaning “fortieth”), a reference to the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before beginning his public ministry. When the church began its move in the Middle Ages towards using the vernacular, the term “Lent” was introduced. “Lent” comes from “lenz”, the German word for “spring”.

32. Harm caused by some lodge builders? : BEAVER DAMAGE (from “beaver dam”)

Beavers build dams so that they can live in and around the slower and deeper water that builds up above the dam. This deeper water provides more protection for the beavers from predators such as bears. Beavers are nocturnal animals and do all their construction work at night. The homes that beavers build for themselves in the water above the dam is known as a beaver lodge.

34. Cod and others : CAPES

Cape Cod is indeed named after the fish. It was first called Cape Cod by English navigator Bartholomew Gosnold in 1602 as his men caught so many fish there.

39. Mantilla material : LACE

A mantilla is a traditional lace or silk shawl from Spain. It is often worn over a high comb called a “peineta”, which makes creates the illusion that the wearer is taller than she actually is.

40. Teach improperly? : LEARN

One might (improperly) use the verb “to learn” to mean “to teach”, as in “I’m gonna learn him!”

44. Half a score, or a perfect one : TEN

Our verb “to score” meaning “to tally”, comes from the Old Norse “skor”, which is a “mark, notch”. It is likely that items such a livestock were counted by placing a notch in a stick for each set of twenty, hence our use of the noun “score” to mean “twenty”.

47. Black Friday scene? : ENTRY RAMPAGE (from “entry ramp”)

In the world of retail, “Black Friday” is the day after Thanksgiving in the US. Black Friday is when many stores start the holiday shopping season, and so offer deep discounts to get ahead of the competition.

51. On topic : GERMANE

Something that is “germane” is relevant. “Germane” originally meant “having the same parents”, but it was used more figuratively as “on topic” by William Shakespeare in “Hamlet”. And that’s the way we’ve been using it ever since “Hamlet” was first performed in the 1600s.

55. First name in Solidarity : LECH

Lech Walesa worked as an electrician in the Gdansk Shipyards in Poland. Walesa was active in the trade union movement in the days when unions were not welcome behind the Iron Curtain. His efforts resulted in the founding of Solidarity, the first independent trade union in Soviet-controlled territory. For his work, Walesa was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1983, and in 1990 he became the first democratically elected President of Poland. He has lost support in Poland in recent years, but he is a very popular booking on the international speaking circuit.

58. It may be set in stages : OATER

The term “oater” that is used for a western movie comes from the number of horses seen, as horses love oats!

Although the stagecoach is very much associated with the Wild West, the vehicle originated in England in the 16th century. Stagecoaches provided transportation for travellers and goods over long distances. The rest points for the travellers were known as “stages”, and later “stations”, hence the name “stagecoach”.

59. Certain dancer’s accessory : FAN

The fan dance performed using ostrich feathers was popularized by burlesque star Sally Rand. “Sally Rand” was a stage name used by Helen Beck. The Rand name was given to her by film director Cecil B. DeMille, inspired by the Rand McNally road atlas. Rand’s most famous performance was at the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair. While performing at the Fair she was arrested four times for public nudity, even though the nudity was only an illusion as Rand was in fact wearing a bodysuit at the time.

61. Michelangelo work : PIETA

The Pietà is a representation of the Virgin Mary holding in her arms the dead body of her son Jesus. The most famous Pietà is probably the sculpted rendition by Michelangelo which is located in St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. In some depictions, Mary and her son are surrounded by other figures from the New Testament, and these depictions are known as Lamentations.

63. Unborn, after “in” : UTERO

“In utero” is a Latin term meaning “in the uterus”. The Latin “uterus” translates as both “womb” and “belly”. The Latin word was derived from the Greek “hystera” also meaning womb, which gives us the words “hysterectomy”, and “hysterical”.

71. Tasteless : TACKY

Something “tacky” is “in bad taste”. The term derives from the noun “tackey” that was used in the early 1800s to describe a neglected horse.

76. Gold standard : KARAT

A karat (also “carat”, the spelling outside of North America) is a measure of the purity of gold alloys, with 24-karat representing pure gold.

86. Actor Morales : ESAI

The actor Esai Morales is best known in the world of film for the 1987 movie “La Bamba”, which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai). On the small screen, Morales plays Lt. Tony Rodriguez on “NYPD Blue” and Joseph Adama on “Caprica”.

89. They come from têtes : IDEES

In French, one’s “tête” (head) might produce an “idée” (idea).

90. Sans opposite : AVEC

In French, “avec” (with) is the opposite of “sans” (without).

96. Gay song locale : PAREE

“Who Said Gay Paree?” is a song from the Cole Porter musical “Can-Can”.

101. Pelts : FURS

A “pelt” is the skin of a furry animal.

105. 1898 Dewey victory site : MANILA BAY

The Battle of Manila Bay was an engagement during the Spanish-American War that took place on May 1, 1898. The US forces were led by Commodore George Dewey, who was aboard his flagship the USS Olympia. The USS Olympia is on display at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia, but she is destined to be scuttled or scrapped unless the museum can find a new owner for her.

110. Airheads : TWITS

“Twit” is a word not used very often here in America. It’s a slang term that was quite common in England where it was used for “someone foolish and idiotic”.

114. Late, in Los Cabos : TARDE

Los Cabos is a municipality located right at the very southern tip of Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula. Los Cabos has a very vibrant tourist industry.

116. River to the Caspian : URAL

The Ural River rises in the Ural Mountains in Russia and flows for half its length through Russian territory until it crosses the border into Kazakhstan, finally emptying into the Caspian Sea.

118. Guatemala girls: Abbr. : SRTAS

Guatemala in Central America became independent from Spain in 1821, first becoming part of the Mexican Empire, and then becoming completely independent two years later.

Down

2. Coward often quoted : NOEL

Noel Coward was the most flamboyant of personalities, a playwright, composer and actor. Coward worked in a remarkable range of genres. He wrote the wonderfully airy play “Blithe Spirit”, as well as the Oscar-winning WWII naval drama “In Which We Serve”. A couple of his more famous songs, many of which he performed himself in cabaret, were “Mad Dogs and Englishmen” and “London Pride”.

3. Massachusetts motto opener : ENSE

The motto of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is “Ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem”, a Latin phrase that can be translated as “By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty”. The quotation is from a passage written by English politician Algernon Sidney who was executed for treason by King Charles II.

4. Freelancer’s enc. : SASE

An SAE is a “stamped, addressed envelope”. An SASE is a “self-addressed, stamped envelope”.

The term “free lance” was coined by Sir Walter Scott in his 1820 novel “Ivanhoe”, using it to describe a medieval mercenary warrior. Forty years later, a freelancer was a journalist who did work for more than one publication without a long-term commitment.

6. “Tequila Sunrise” group : EAGLES

“Tequila Sunrise” is a 1973 song recorded by the Eagles, and co-written by band founding members Glenn Frey and Don Henley. The song’s title was inspired by the cocktail of the same name.

8. UFO pilots : ALFS

An alien life form (ALF) might pilot an unidentified flying object (UFO).

13. Activist Chavez : CESAR

César Chávez was a Mexican American farm worker, and co-founder of the union today known as the United Farm Workers. Chávez was born in Yuma, Arizona, but moved to California as a child with his family. He never attended high school, dropping out to become a full-time migrant farm worker. In 1944, at 17 years of age, he joined the US Navy and served for two years. 5-6 years after returning from the military, back working as a farm laborer, Chávez became politically active and rose to national attention as an articulate union leader during some high profile strikes. He is remembered annually here in California on his birthday, March 31, which is a state holiday.

16. Nickname based on a salutation : ALOHA STATE

The Hawaiian word “Aloha” has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently “aloha” has come to mean “hello” and “goodbye”, but only since the mid-1800s.

18. “Maid of Athens, __ part”: Byron : ERE WE

Lord Byron wrote his poem “Maid of Athens, ere we part” while living in Athens in 1810, and dedicated it to the daughter of his landlady.

32. Vamp Theda : BARA

A “vamp” (short for vampire) is a seductive woman. The term was first used in reference to the sultry performance of actress Theda Bara in the 1915 film “A Fool There Was”. The movie’s title is a quotation from Rudyard Kipling’s 1897 poem “The Vampire”. Bara’s role was positioned as a “vampire”, a woman out to seduce a man, launching the use of “vamp” as an alternative term for a “femme fatale”.

33. Community coll. class : ESL

English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

34. Tropical plant with large foliage : CANNA

The Canna is a genus of flowering plant that is sometimes called the canna lily, even though it isn’t actually a true lily. The name “Canna” comes from the Latin for “cane, reed”.

37. Gavel sounds : RAPS

The small hammer that one raps on a table or desk to call a meeting to order, or perhaps to signify a sale at an auction, that’s called a gavel. The term “gavel” is actually American English, a word that emerged in the early 19th century.

39. Adventurer Ericson : LEIF

Leif Erikson was a Norse explorer and was the first European to land in North America, some 500 years before Christopher Columbus’s landing in 1492. The Norsemen named the area they discovered “Vinland”, which might translate as “Wine Land” or “Pasture Land”. Erikson built a small settlement called Leifsbudir, which archaeologists believe they have found in modern day Newfoundland, at L’Anse aux Meadows. The settlement discovered in Newfoundland is definitely Norse, but there is some dispute over whether it is actually Erikson’s Leifsbudir.

41. Professor __ : EMERITA

“Emeritus” (female form “emerita”, plural “emeriti”) is a term in the title of some retired professionals, particularly those from academia. Originally an emeritus was a veteran soldier who had served his time. The term comes from the Latin verb “emerere” meaning to complete one’s service.

45. Cabinet dept. formed under Carter : ENER

The US Department of Energy (DOE) came into being largely as a result of the 1973 oil crisis. The DOE was founded in 1977 by the Carter administration. The DOE is responsible for regulating the production of nuclear power, and it is also responsible for the nation’s nuclear weapons. The official DOE seal features symbols denoting five sources of energy: the sun, an atom, an oil derrick, a windmill and a dynamo.

46. Lyre-playing emperor : NERO

The Great Fire of Rome raged for five and a half days in 64 AD. Of the fourteen districts of Rome, three were completely destroyed and seven more suffered serious damage. The emperor at the time was Nero, although reports that he fiddled, played his lyre or sang while the city burned; those accounts are probably not true. In fact, Nero was staying outside of Rome when the fire started and rushed home on hearing the news. He organized a massive relief effort, throwing open his own home to give shelter to many of the citizens who were left living on the street.

50. Formal lament : ELEGY

Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:

  • Celestial fire
  • Far from the Madding Crowd
  • Kindred spirit

53. Game-ending call : MATE

In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be “in check”. If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in “checkmate” and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce “check!”) so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn’t occur.

56. Pilot’s announcement: Abbr. : ETA

Expected time of arrival (ETA)

65. Half a dance : CAN

The Moulin Rouge cabaret is located right in the middle of one of the red light districts of Paris, the district of Pigalle. You can’t miss the Moulin Rouge as it has a huge red windmill on its roof (“moulin rouge” is French for “red windmill”). The nightclub opened its doors in 1889 and soon after, the working girls of the cabaret adopted a “respectable” party dance and used it to entice their clients. That was the birth of the can-can. Nowadays, the Moulin Rouge is home to a lavish, Las Vegas-style show that costs millions of euros to stage. It features showgirls, dancers and acrobats, a whole host of entertainers in fact. And I am sure the can-can features as well …

66. Realty ad count : BATHS

The terms “realty” and “real estate” date back to the later 1600s, and are derived from the earlier meaning “real possession”, something one owns that is tangible and real.

67. Lawrence Welk’s upbeat : A TWO

Lawrence Welk used to count into his performances with “A one and a two …”. He even had a licence plate “A1ANA2”.

73. Mescal source : AGAVE

Mezcal (also “mescal”) is a distilled spirit made from the agave plant. Technically, tequila is a type of mezcal that is distilled specifically from the blue agave.

75. Infinitesimal span, for short : NSEC

“Nanosecond” is more correctly abbreviated to “ns” (as opposed to “nsec”) and really is a tiny amount of time: one billionth of a second.

77. PBS part: Abbr. : SYS

The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) was founded in 1970, and is my favorite of the broadcast networks. I love PBS’s drama and science shows in particular, and always watch the election results coming in with the NewsHour team.

78. Piece of one’s mind? : OP-ED

“Op-ed” is an abbreviation for “opposite the editorial page”. Op-eds started in “The New York Evening World” in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

79. __-Tass : ITAR

TASS is the abbreviation used for the former news agency that had the full name Telegraph Association of the Soviet Union (Telegrafnoe Agentstvo Sovetskogo Soyuza). When the Soviet Union dissolved in 1992, the Moscow-based agency’s scope changed along with its name. It is now known as the Information Telegraph Agency of Russia (ITAR-TASS).

84. Classical theaters : ODEA

In Ancient Greece an odeon (also “odeum”) was like a small theater, with “odeon” literally meaning a “building for musical competition”. Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

88. Swift’s birthplace : IRELAND

Jonathan Swift was an Irish author and cleric. Swift is most famous perhaps for his 1726 novel “Gulliver’s Travels”, but we Irishmen also remember him as the Dean of St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin. Swift was renowned for his wit and satire.

96. Serengeti families : PRIDES

Here are some colorful collective nouns:

  • A pride of lions
  • A shrewdness of apes
  • A cloud of bats
  • A bench of bishops
  • A clowder of cats
  • A waddling of ducks
  • An army of frogs
  • A knot of toads

The Serengeti is a region in Africa, located in northern Tanzania and southwest Kenya. The name “Serengeti” comes from the Maasai language and means “Endless Plains”.

99. Co-Nobelist with Menachem : ANWAR

Anwar Sadat was the third President of Egypt right up to the time of his assassination in 1981. Sadat won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1978 along with Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin for the role played in crafting the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty of 1978 at Camp David. It was this agreement that largely led to Sadat’s assassination three years later.

100. __ Sketch : ETCH A

Etch A Sketch was introduced in 1960. The toy was developed in France by inventor André Cassagnes.

102. Article in Le Monde? : UNE

“Le Monde” is a newspaper published each evening in France. “Le Monde” is one of the two most famous French papers, along with “Le Figaro”.

105. Curators’ credentials, on a C.V. : MFAS

A curriculum vitae (CV) is a listing of someone’s work experience and qualifications, and is used mainly in making a job application. The term “curriculum vitae” can be translated from Latin as “course of life”.

106. “__ dash of … “: recipe words : ADD A

In cooking, the terms “dash”, “pinch” and “smidgen” can all be used for a very small measure, one that is often undefined. However, you can in fact buy some measuring spoons that define these amounts as follows:

  • a dash is 1/8 teaspoon
  • a pinch is 1/16 teaspoon
  • a smidgen is 1/32 teaspoon

107. Request for Alpo? : BARK

Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with “Alpo” being an abbreviation for “Allen Products”. Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

108. Feverish feeling : AGUE

An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

109. Itches : YENS

The word “yen”, meaning “urge”, has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word “yin” imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

112. Quarterback Dawson : LEN

Len Dawson is a retired AFL-NFL quarterback who played for the Kansas City Chiefs (originally the Dallas Texans).

113. Novelist Levin : IRA

As well as writing novels, Ira Levin was a dramatist and a songwriter. Levin’s first novel was “A Kiss Before Dying”, and his most famous work was “Rosemary’s Baby” which became a Hollywood hit. His best known play is “Deathtrap”, a production that is often seen in local theater (I’ve seen it a couple of times around here). “Deathtrap” was also was a successful movie, starring Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve. My favorite of Levin’s novels though are “The Boys from Brazil” and “The Stepford Wives”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Actually existing : IN ESSE

7. Bottle in a playpen? : BABA

11. [Not my mistake] : SIC

14. Six-time NBA All-Star Stoudemire : AMARE

19. Beethoven’s “Appassionata,” e.g. : SONATA

20. Designer Cassini : OLEG

21. Anguish : WOE

22. Meet competitor : MILER

23. “Reduce, reuse, recycle”? : MESSAGE OF GREENS (from “mess of greens”)

26. “__ Mio” : O SOLE

27. Involving a lot of tossing, perhaps : SLEEPLESS

28. Go wrong : ERR

29. Stunt setting : AIR SHOW

31. About six weeks on the liturgical calendar : LENT

32. Harm caused by some lodge builders? : BEAVER DAMAGE (from “beaver dam”)

34. Cod and others : CAPES

37. Ups : RAISES

38. Tap output : ALES

39. Mantilla material : LACE

40. Teach improperly? : LEARN

42. Pejorative : SLUR

44. Half a score, or a perfect one : TEN

47. Black Friday scene? : ENTRY RAMPAGE (from “entry ramp”)

51. On topic : GERMANE

54. Gets going : INITIATES

55. First name in Solidarity : LECH

58. It may be set in stages : OATER

59. Certain dancer’s accessory : FAN

60. In any way : EVER

61. Michelangelo work : PIETA

63. Unborn, after “in” : UTERO

64. Shredder fodder? : CLERICAL GARBAGE (from “clerical garb”)

68. “Heavens!” : OH GOD!

71. Tasteless : TACKY

72. Swear words : OATH

73. Got an __: aced : A ON

76. Gold standard : KARAT

77. Went under : SANK

78. Means more than : OUTWEIGHS

80. Good as gold, e.g. : ANALOGY

82. Inventory alert at the highway sign supplier? : STOP SHORTAGE (from “stop short”)

85. NFL advances : YDS

86. Actor Morales : ESAI

89. They come from têtes : IDEES

90. Sans opposite : AVEC

91. Season, in a way : SALT

94. Got into the market : TRADED

96. Gay song locale : PAREE

98. Aromatic oils? : MASSAGE MEDIA (from “mass media”)

101. Pelts : FURS

103. Problem when using a well? : INK SPOT

104. Sheltered side : LEE

105. 1898 Dewey victory site : MANILA BAY

110. Airheads : TWITS

111. Saw you can’t discuss publicly? : CLASSIFIED ADAGE (from “classified ad”)

114. Late, in Los Cabos : TARDE

115. Farm layer : HEN

116. River to the Caspian : URAL

117. Evasive tactic : END RUN

118. Guatemala girls: Abbr. : SRTAS

119. “Go on … ” : AND …

120. Hand off : PASS

121. Boundary marks : STAKES

Down

1. Beliefs : ISMS

2. Coward often quoted : NOEL

3. Massachusetts motto opener : ENSE

4. Freelancer’s enc. : SASE

5. Gun insert : STAPLE

6. “Tequila Sunrise” group : EAGLES

7. Lift : BOOST

8. UFO pilots : ALFS

9. Request a pardon? : BEG

10. Seeing eye to eye : AGREEING

11. Changes course suddenly : SWERVES

12. It’s charged : ION

13. Activist Chavez : CESAR

14. Seeing no evil? : AMORAL

15. Long-distance lover’s question : MISS ME?

16. Nickname based on a salutation : ALOHA STATE

17. Enter again : RELOG

18. “Maid of Athens, __ part”: Byron : ERE WE

24. Bard’s nightfall : E’EN

25. Significant times : ERAS

30. “__ you to try it!” : I DARE

32. Vamp Theda : BARA

33. Community coll. class : ESL

34. Tropical plant with large foliage : CANNA

35. Join the cast of : ACT IN

36. Sassy : PERT

37. Gavel sounds : RAPS

39. Adventurer Ericson : LEIF

40. More recent : LATER

41. Professor __ : EMERITA

43. “Gross!” : UGH!

45. Cabinet dept. formed under Carter : ENER

46. Lyre-playing emperor : NERO

48. Retreat in the face of : YIELD TO

49. Wild party : RAVE

50. Formal lament : ELEGY

52. Less polished : ROUGHER

53. Game-ending call : MATE

56. Pilot’s announcement: Abbr. : ETA

57. Do some serious bar-hopping : CAROUSE

61. Scout carriers : PACKS

62. Type : ILK

64. Energy source : COAL

65. Half a dance : CAN

66. Realty ad count : BATHS

67. Lawrence Welk’s upbeat : A TWO

68. Approve : OKAY

69. Set of cards : HAND

70. Island entertainment symbol : GRASS SKIRT

73. Mescal source : AGAVE

74. “Wow!” : OH GEE!

75. Infinitesimal span, for short : NSEC

77. PBS part: Abbr. : SYS

78. Piece of one’s mind? : OP-ED

79. __-Tass : ITAR

81. Start : GET-GO

83. Prepares for guests : TIDIES UP

84. Classical theaters : ODEA

87. Bill passer? : ATM

88. Swift’s birthplace : IRELAND

92. Legal drama fig. : ASST DA

93. Lost moments : LAPSES

95. Citrus drinks : ADES

96. Serengeti families : PRIDES

97. Not upright : ASLANT

98. Diamond equipment : MITTS

99. Co-Nobelist with Menachem : ANWAR

100. __ Sketch : ETCH A

101. Some are epic : FAILS

102. Article in Le Monde? : UNE

105. Curators’ credentials, on a C.V. : MFAS

106. “__ dash of … “: recipe words : ADD A

107. Request for Alpo? : BARK

108. Feverish feeling : AGUE

109. Itches : YENS

112. Quarterback Dawson : LEN

113. Novelist Levin : IRA

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8 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Jun 17, Sunday”

  1. 22:08, no errors. Easy one. Didn’t understand the answer for 8D (ALFS) until I came here. (I got it through crosses and I seemed to remember an old TV program with one ET named ALF, so I went with it, but I didn’t know it was an acronym for “alien life form”.) Live and learn … ?

  2. I found this one a long long slog. Bill and Dave both had similar times for the LAT and NYT today, but I was much faster on the NYT so maybe my poor performance here was my state of mind or still being half asleep. No idea as to my time; I accidentally closed the tab halfway through the grid and had to start over.

    Very interesting evolution of the word GERMANE..as in germinate I suppose.

    LEARN for “Teach improperly?” should be punishable with jail time. Sheesh.

    Bill – One correction – Mezcal can be made from about 28 different varieties of agave. It’s tequila that can only be made from the blue agave. It looks like you were going to say that and just got caught typing too fast.

    The agave plants used to make tequila take about 15 years to grow. There was an agave shortage years ago when tequila popularity took off and it took a while (years) to increase production. Also – blanco is the strongest tequila. It’s raw tequila. Reposado is aged in barrels for 2-11 months. Anejo is aged 12 months or more. I learned all this on the tequila taste tours I’ve taken whenever I go to Puerto Vallarta (in Jalisco) . I continue to go to make sure I have learned everything correctly………at least that’s the reason I give myself when I keep going….

    Glad this one is finished.

    Best –

    1. Thanks, Jeff. I admit to rushing through the write-up for this puzzle (I’m on a road trip vacation right now). Thanks for the insight into the world of mezcal and tequila. I bow to your expert knowledge. I’ve amended the few words that I wrote.

  3. Another bad day for me. Thank goodness tomorrow is Monday! At least I have a fighting chance. I’m not in the same league as the rest of you, but do enjoy the comments. And, so C.C. is female? I didn’t know that. Thanks.

    1. @Kay
      Another fact I learned over at the NYT is her real Mandarin name is Zhoquin which is what she seems to go by over there. Her name in Cantonese, however, is transliterated something like Chou Chen (no idea how to pronounce or transliterate it correctly), and that’s how she arrived at CC for us over here at the LA Times.

      It wasn’t just you. I had a heck of a time with this one as well.

      Best –

      1. @Jeff
        Evidently as I understand it, you can’t publish at the NYT under a pseudonym (which what “C.C.” would be). Hence, Zhouqin, which I understand to be her legal name.

  4. DNF on this one after about 1/4 of it filled in. Got bored with it after a couple of hours.

    @Carrie
    Cheers is definitely one of the cultural TV shows of note for the 80’s (1982-1993), and made most of the cast recognizable household names. It also spawned the show Frasier (1993-2004) off of one of the characters. Definitely worth your time.

    @David
    Good you got to get out and enjoy things – I probably should take several weeks/months off from these crosswords, myself, and get going on my other hobbies along with trying to find some money-making ventures more than I already am now. I got into the Stumper grid finally, but as with most of them, I always end up guessing several things wrong and not getting anywhere when I can’t even hazard guesses at the rest. I’ll probably look at things later with corrections once I get through the NYT stuff I have sitting here.

    Of course, the funny part of all these grids is the kind of time and how people approach them. I would call this grid very hard for certain reasons, but I would have called yesterday quite easy. Of course, my time begged to differ compared to most yesterday, but that’s funny how perception goes.

  5. Hiya folks!
    Gad!! I almost “submitted” but took one more look, changed one letter, and finíshed this thing. Glad I did! I had MESSAGE ON GREENS forever; then I realized the UFO person must be ALF. Still don’t know what a “mess of greens” is!!! Is that a mixed green salad or what? ???
    Didn’t get the AGE thing; just figured the theme was some variety of “common phrases​ spelled weirdly,” which I guess it was.
    I hereby register my objection to ASLANT!! (…. tho it DOES describe Jeff on a tequila tour…! ?)
    Hey Glenn! Y’know, I’ve seen a few episodes of “Cheers” over the years but never cared for it. I happened to see the very first episode of the Andy Griffith Show on METV. Turns out the show is on Netflix, all 8 seasons, 30+ episodes a season. Maybe that will be my new binge fare. ?
    !Hasta mañana!
    Be well~~™⚾

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