LA Times Crossword Answers 9 Jun 17, Friday










Constructed by: David Alfred Bywaters

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: G is T

Today’s themed answers are common phrases in which a letter G IS now a letter T, in which a letter G is replaced by a letter T:

  • 69A. Essence … and, read differently, a hint to six puzzle answers : GIST … and G IS T
  • 17A. Sports geek get-togethers? : STAT PARTIES (from “stag parties”)
  • 25A. Halloween decoration? : PAPER BAT (from “paper bag”)
  • 32A. Longhair cat’s inability to move on? : PERSIAN RUT (from “Persian rug”)
  • 43A. Last one left angrily carrying on? : LONE RANTER (from “Lone Ranger”)
  • 48A. Imperfection in a pointillist painting? : STRAY DOT (from “stray dog”)

Bill’s time: 8m 07s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

14. It replaced the Cypriot pound : EURO

The Cypriot pound was named for the pound sterling, which the British introduced on the island in 1879. The Cypriot pound broke parity with the pound sterling some twelve years after Cyprus gained independence from the UK in 1960. Today’s Republic of Cyprus replaced the Cypriot pound with the euro in 2008. However, the breakaway Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus continues to use the Turkish lira, which was introduced following a unilateral declaration of independence for that part of the island in 1983.

15. Go back : RENEGE

To renege on something is to back out of it. It’s a verb commonly used in card games like bridge and whist. A renege is when a player doesn’t follow suit, even though there may be a card of the suit led in his/her hand.

17. Sports geek get-togethers? : STAT PARTIES (from “stag parties”)

Back where I come from, bachelor parties are called stag parties, and bachelorette parties are known as hen parties.

22. Pesters online, in a way : SPAMS

Apparently the term “spam”, used for unwanted email, is taken from a “Monty Python” sketch. In the sketch (which I’ve seen) the dialog is taken over by the word Spam, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So “spam” is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a “Monty Python” sketch to describe an online phenomenon …

24. Wall St. event : IPO

An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

25. Halloween decoration? : PAPER BAT (from “paper bag”)

All Saints’ Day is November 1st each year. The day before All Saints’ Day is All Hallows’ Eve, better known by the Scottish term “Halloween”.

27. Western city named for a Suquamish chief : SEATTLE

The Washington city of Seattle was founded on a site that had been occupied by Native Americans for over 4,000 years before the first Europeans arrived in the area. The name “Seattle” was chosen in honor of Duwamish Chief Seattle, who had a reputation for welcoming white settlers.

32. Longhair cat’s monotonous routine? : PERSIAN RUT (from “Persian rug”)

The Persian is that long-haired cat with a squashed muzzle. The breed takes its name from its place of origin, namely Persia (Iran).

39. Early computer : ENIAC

The acronym ENIAC stands for Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator (although many folks insist that the C was for “Computer”). ENIAC was introduced at the University of Pennsylvania in 1946, at which time it was the first general-purpose electronic computer, and dubbed “Giant Brain” by the press. Its original purpose was the calculation of artillery firing tables, but it ended up being used early on to make calculations necessary for the development of the hydrogen bomb. Given its uses, it’s not surprising to hear that development of ENIAC was funded by the US Army during WWII.

40. Hound over a debt : DUN

“To dun” is to insist on payment of a debt. The etymology of the term is unclear, with one suggestion that it dates back to a famous debt collector in London named Joe Dun.

43. Last one left angrily carrying on? : LONE RANTER (from “Lone Ranger”)

“The Lone Ranger” was both a radio and television show, dating back to its first radio performance in 1933 on a Detroit station. The line “Hi-yo, Silver! Away!” was a device used in the storyline to signal that a riding sequence was starting, so cue the music!

45. Job ad abbr. : EOE

Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE)

48. Imperfection in a pointillist painting? : STRAY DOT (from “stray dog”)

Pointillism is a style of painting that grew out of Impressionism. The pointillist technique calls for the artist to use small, distinct dots of bold color to build up the image. Pointillism was developed in the late 1800s by the great French painter, Georges Seurat. You can go see his magnificent work “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte” at The Art Institute of Chicago the next time you’re in town.

53. Corp. leaders : MGT

Management (mgt.)

57. Printemps month : MAI

In French, the month of “mai” (May) is in the season of “printemps” (spring).

60. Addams family cousin : ITT

In the television sitcom “The Addams Family”, the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

They’re creepy and they’re kooky,
Mysterious and spooky,
They’re altogether ooky,
The Addams Family.

61. Moral? : TALE WARNING (from “gale warning”)

A gale is a very strong wind, a wind that is defined by Beaufort Wind Scale as a wind with speeds from 50 to just over 100 kilometers per hour.

64. Tasseled hat : FEZ

A fez is a red cylindrical hat worn mainly in North Africa, and by Shriners here in the US. The fez used to be a very popular hat across the Ottoman Empire. The etymology of “fez” is unclear, although it might have something to do with the Moroccan city named Fez.

65. Pair of ones? : ELEVEN

Down

5. Tropical Rain Forest seller since 1993 : CRAYOLA

In the year 2000 the Crayola company, very cleverly I think, held the “Crayola Color Census 2000” in which people were polled and asked for their favorite Crayola colors. President George W. Bush chose “Blue Bell” and Tiger Woods chose “Wild Strawberry”.

13. Take forcibly : WREST

The verb “to wrest” can mean to obtain by violent twisting and pulling. The word “wrest” derives from the Middle English “wresten” meaning “to twist”. Our word “wrestling” has the same etymology.

23. Administrative district : PRECINCT

A “precinct” is a defined area, often in a city, that is established for administrative purposes. For electoral purposes in the US, the term “precinct” is sometimes used interchangeably with “election district”. Famously, the city of New York uses the term “precinct” for its police stations. The term comes from the Medieval Latin word “precinctum” meaning “enclosure, boundary line”.

26. Winter hrs. in Berkeley : PST

Pacific Standard Time (PST)

The University of California, Berkeley (Cal) is the most difficult public university to get into in the world. The school opened in 1869 and is named for Anglo-Irish philosopher George Berkeley.

29. “Nessun dorma,” e.g. : ARIA

“Nessun dorma” has to be the tenor aria that most tugs at the heart strings. It is taken from the last act of Puccini’s opera “Turandot”, and translates as “None shall sleep”. Back in my part of the world, “Nessun dorma” became a hit in the popular music charts, with a version by Pavarotti being used as the theme song to the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy. No other classical recording has ever done better in the charts.

30. Prefix with scope : ENDO-

An endoscope is an instrument used to make a visual examination of the inside of an organ or cavity of the body.

46. Bivalve at a bar : OYSTER

Bivalves are marine and freshwater molluscs that have bodies enclosed in a two-part hinged shell. Examples are clams, oysters, mussels and scallops. The taxonomic name “Bivalvia” comes from the Latin “bis” meaning “two” and “valvae” meaning “leaves of a door”.

49. Spud : TATER

The word “spud” is used as a slang term for a potato and was first recorded in the mid-1800s, in New Zealand would you believe?

50. Posh : RITZY

No one really knows the etymology of the word “posh”. The popular myth that POSH is actually an acronym standing for “Port Out, Starboard Home” is completely untrue, and is a story that can actually be traced back to the 1968 movie “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang”. The myth is that wealthy British passengers travelling to and from India would book cabins on the port side for the outward journey and the starboard side for the home journey. This trick was supposedly designed to keep their cabins out of the direct sunlight.

52. Rome’s Fontana di __ : TREVI

The Trevi Fountain (“Fontana di Trevi”) is a huge fountain in Rome, the largest constructed in the Baroque style. The tradition is that if one throws a coin in the fountain then one is guaranteed a return visit to the city. Tourists throw in an amazing 3,000 euros (over $4,000) every day. The money is collected and is used to stock a supermarket for the needy of the city.

59. “__ Rhythm” : I GOT

“I Got Rhythm” is a song composed by George and Ira Gershwin in 1930 for the musical “Girl Crazy”. The song was performed by Ethel Merman in the original production on Broadway. “I Got Rhythm” makes another appearance in a George Gershwin work, in the 1951 musical film “An American in Paris”. Gene Kelly sang the song in the movie, while tap-dancing.

63. Frothy quaff : NOG

It’s not really clear where the term “nog” (as in “eggnog”) comes from although it might derive from the word “noggin”, which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Dirt removal method : BATH

5. Like much religious music : CHORAL

11. Uncooked : RAW

14. It replaced the Cypriot pound : EURO

15. Go back : RENEGE

16. Stumble : ERR

17. Sports geek get-togethers? : STAT PARTIES (from “stag parties”)

19. Gardening tool : HOE

20. Upper part : TOP

21. Keep an __ : EYE ON

22. Pesters online, in a way : SPAMS

24. Wall St. event : IPO

25. Halloween decoration? : PAPER BAT (from “paper bag”)

27. Western city named for a Suquamish chief : SEATTLE

31. Witness : SEE

32. Longhair cat’s monotonous routine? : PERSIAN RUT (from “Persian rug”)

35. Throw : CAST

39. Early computer : ENIAC

40. Hound over a debt : DUN

41. Agile : LITHE

42. Group of two : DYAD

43. Last one left angrily carrying on? : LONE RANTER (from “Lone Ranger”)

45. Job ad abbr. : EOE

47. Feature of many negative reviews : SARCASM

48. Imperfection in a pointillist painting? : STRAY DOT (from “stray dog”)

53. Corp. leaders : MGT

54. Greets : HAILS

55. Feel around : GROPE

57. Printemps month : MAI

60. Addams family cousin : ITT

61. Moral? : TALE WARNING (from “gale warning”)

64. Tasseled hat : FEZ

65. Pair of ones? : ELEVEN

66. Wary of : ONTO

67. Test : TRY

68. Fight against : RESIST

69. Essence … and, read differently, a hint to six puzzle answers : GIST … and G IS T

Down

1. Leading : BEST

2. Car : AUTO

3. Door in the floor : TRAP

4. Sweating, maybe : HOT

5. Tropical Rain Forest seller since 1993 : CRAYOLA

6. “__ we go!” : HERE

7. Leading : ON TOP

8. Spanish queen : REINA

9. Birthday count : AGE

10. Car user, maybe : LESSEE

11. Detox locale : REHAB

12. Draw from the oven : AROMA

13. Take forcibly : WREST

18. Digestive : PEPTIC

23. Administrative district : PRECINCT

24. Words spoken while shaking : IT’S A DEAL

26. Winter hrs. in Berkeley : PST

27. Went fast : SPED

28. Bitty : EENY

29. “Nessun dorma,” e.g. : ARIA

30. Prefix with scope : ENDO-

33. Race : RUN

34. Quelques-__: a few, in French : UNES

36. “__ boy!” : ATTA

37. Females : SHES

38. Period : TERM

41. Like L vis-à-vis XL, in some cases : LARGER

43. Set the pace : LED

44. Widespread : RAMPANT

46. Bivalve at a bar : OYSTER

48. Nine to five, e.g. : SHIFT

49. Spud : TATER

50. Posh : RITZY

51. Looks at in a bad way? : OGLES

52. Rome’s Fontana di __ : TREVI

56. Is indebted to : OWES

57. Revealing attire : MINI

58. Social climbers? : ANTS

59. “__ Rhythm” : I GOT

62. Pub offering : ALE

63. Frothy quaff : NOG

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6 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 9 Jun 17, Friday”

  1. Slow last couple of days on here it seems…
    38 minutes, 2 errors on this. One kinda dumb and a bad guess on the other. It’s amazing the amount of stuff they continue to come up with that I never heard of before and never will again.

    25 minutes, 3 errors on the WSJ. Similar with the guessing. Figured out a few things with the meta, but wasn’t sure what direction to go with it – the most logical seemed too obvious, so we’ll see if that particular answer turns out to work or not (probably not).

  2. 29 minutes on this one. I may have been able to finish more quickly if I had started at the bottom and seen GIST earlier. Then again perhaps not. The mere word didn’t make the theme obvious.

    It took me until LONERANTER to figure the theme out. After that I leaned on it heavily and finished quickly.

    “Like L vis-a-vis XL, in some cases” was the clue of the day IMO. At first I just saw 50 vs 40; it was only after a few minutes I noticed Large vs Extra large to explain the “..in some cases” part of it. Very clever. Kind of liked “Pair of ones?” for ELEVEN as well.

    I had no idea SEATTLE was named for an indian chief.

    Fun one. NYT today wasn’t too bad either.

    Best-

  3. Very easy Friday puzzle, for me; about 30 minutes with no errors. Never stopped writing, but had to move around a little to get a few crosses.

    On to Saturday…with at least some confidence.

  4. Hey folks!
    Again I’m the only female! Nolanski, I’m assuming you’re a guy…?
    Agreed; pretty easy Friday, tho not without its moments. Got the basic “change-G-to-T” thing pretty quickly. Got stuck for awhile on the pointillist clue — when I had “S_R___” I thought the answer would include that one pointillist (the only one I know) whose name I can’t spell. Bill can! Seurat! I finally pointed myself in the right direction, so to speak…?
    Also got tied up with OYSTER, not knowing what the heck a bivalve is….Bill knows!!!!
    Speaking of things I don’t know: Dave, does that stand for Rocky Mountains National Park? Sounds lovely!
    Finally finished watching all five seasons of the fabulous old Dick Van Dyke show on Netflix. What to binge on next???
    Be well~~™?

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