LA Times Crossword Answers 10 Jul 2017, Monday










Constructed by: George Jasper

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Middle Age

Each of today’s themed answers a hidden word, right in the MIDDLE, that is shown by the circled letters in the grid. That hidden MIDDLE word is a type of AGE:

  • 61A. Period after young adulthood … and a hint to each set of circles : MIDDLE AGE
  • 17A. Beverage from a German vineyard : RHINE WINE (giving “New Age”)
  • 27A. Unauthorized recording : BOOTLEG ALBUM (giving “legal age”)
  • 44A. Nuclear power : ATOMIC ENERGY (giving “ice age”)

Bill’s time: 5m 22s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Stinging insect : WASP

While the wasp is considered to be a nuisance by many, the insect is very important to the agricultural industry. Wasps prey on many pest insects, while having very little impact on crops.

5. Storied broom riders : HAGS

“Hag” is a shortened form of the Old English word “haegtesse” meaning, “witch”.

14. Govt. workplace monitor : OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

15. Yemen neighbor : OMAN

The Arabian Peninsula is shaped like a boot, with the Sultanate of Oman occupying the toe of that boot.

16. Copier need : TONER

The key features of a laser printer (or copier) are that it uses plain paper and produces quality text at high speed. Laser printers work by projecting a laser image of the printed page onto a rotating drum that is coated with photoconductors (material that becomes conductive when exposed to light). The areas of the drum exposed to the laser carry a different charge than the unexposed areas. Dry ink (toner) sticks to the exposed areas due to electrostatic charge. The toner is then transferred to paper by contact and is fused into the paper by the application of heat. So, that explains why paper coming out of a laser printer is warm, and sometimes powdery.

17. Beverage from a German vineyard : RHINE WINE (giving “New Age”)

The majority of German wines are produced in vineyards located along the river Rhine, or along tributaries of the Rhine. Such wines are usually referred to as “Rhine wines”.

New-Age music is created to provide a relaxing and stress-free atmosphere. The New Age movement is often said to have begun with the release of an album called “Spectrum Suite” by Steven Halpern in 1975.

19. Wheel spokes, geometrically : RADII

“Radius” (plural “radii”) is a Latin word, as one might expect, meaning “spoke of a wheel”. Makes sense, huh …?

20. Triangular Greek letters : DELTAS

Delta is the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet. We are most familiar with an upper-case delta and its distinctive triangular shape. The letter’s shape has influenced terms such as “deltoid muscle” and “river delta”. The upper-case delta is also used in mathematics and science to indicate a change in value. The lower-case delta looks a bit like our lower-case D, and indeed the Greek letter delta gave us our Latin letter D.

23. French fashion monogram : YSL

Yves Saint-Laurent (YSL) was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

26. Anteater’s slurp in the comic “B.C.” : ZOT

“B.C.” is a comic strip that was drawn by Johnny Hart, and now since Hart’s passing, is produced by his grandson. Hart introduced “B.C.” in 1958. One of the non-human characters in the strip is the Anteater, who sucks up ants with his sticky tongue making a “ZOT” sound. Hart’s Anteater is the inspiration for Peter the Anteater, the team mascot for UC Irvine. Johnny Hart’s other famous comic strip is the brilliant “The Wizard of Id”.

27. Unauthorized recording : BOOTLEG ALBUM (giving “legal age”)

“To bootleg” is to make or smuggle alcoholic drinks illegally. The term arose in the late 1800s as slang for the practice of concealing a flask of liquor down the leg of a high boot. The term has been extended to mean the illegal production and sale of just about anything.

36. Like Cheerios : OATY

Cheerios breakfast cereal has the distinction of being the first oat-based cereal introduced into the market, hitting the grocery store shelves in 1941. Back then, Cheerios were known as CheeriOats.

38. Medical ins. plan : HMO

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

44. Nuclear power : ATOMIC ENERGY (giving “ice age”)

Ice ages are periods in the Earth’s history when there are extensive ice sheets present in the northern and southern hemispheres. One might argue that we are still in an ice age that began 2.6 million years ago, as evidenced by the presence of ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica.

48. Put the kibosh on : NIX

The use of “nix” as a verb, meaning “to shoot down”, dates back to the early 1900s. Before that “nix” was just a noun meaning “nothing”. “Nix” comes from the German “nichts”, which also means “nothing”.

Kibosh is something that constrains or checks. “Kibosh” looks like a Yiddish word but it isn’t, and is more likely English slang from the early 1800s.

49. Klutz : OAF

A klutz is an awkward individual, and the term comes from Yiddish. The Yiddish word for a clumsy person is “klots”.

50. Noah’s boat : ARK

The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah’s life-preserver during the flood.

53. One of a group of versifiers that included Wordsworth : LAKE POET

The Lake Poets were a group of Romantic poets who lived in the Lake District of northern England in the late 1700s and early 1800s. The three most prominent members of the group were William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey.

The great English poet William Wordsworth is intrinsically linked with the Lake District in the north of England, where he lived from much of his life. The Lake District is a beautiful part of the country, and I’ve been fortunate enough to visit Dove Cottage in Grasmere a couple of times, where Wordsworth lived with his wife Dorothy …

60. Whitney Houston’s “__ Always Love You” : I WILL

“I Will Always Love You” is a fabulous song written, and originally recorded, by Dolly Parton. Parton wrote the song on the occasion of her professional breakup with Porter Wagoner, with whom she sang as part of a duo for six years. Famously, Whitney Houston recorded a highly successful rearranged cover version of “I Will Always Love You”, primarily for the soundtrack of “The Bodyguard”. Houston starred in the movie “The Bodyguard” alongside Kevin Costner.

Whitney Houston is the only singer to have a run of seven consecutive Billboard number-one hits. Houston’s recording of the wonderful Dolly Parton song “I Will Always Love You”, from the soundtrack of 1992’s “The Bodyguard”, is the best-selling single for a female artist in the history of recorded music. Houston died at the age of 48 in 2012, drowning in her bathtub.

65. On a yawl, say : ASEA

A yawl is a two-masted sailing vessel. There is a main mast forward, and a smaller mizzen mast close to the stern. A yawl is similar to a ketch, in that both rigs have two masts. The mizzen mast is forward of the rudderpost in a ketch, and after of the rudderpost in a yawl.

66. Small hippo type : PYGMY

The pygmy hippopotamus and the much larger common hippopotamus are the only two extant species in the family Hippopotamidae. Pygmy hippos are native to West Africa, and are nocturnal beasts. One of the more famous examples of the species was Billy the pygmy hippo, a beast that Harvey Firestone of Firestone Tires fame presented to President Calvin Coolidge for Washington Zoo in 1927. Most pygmy hippos in zoos around the country today are related to Billy.

67. Trillion: Pref. : TERA-

The prefix “tera-” signifies a trillion, and comes from the Greek word “teras” meaning “monster”.

Down

3. Con man’s setup man : SHILL

A shill is someone planted, perhaps in an audience, with the job of feigning enthusiasm.

13. Pre-calc math course : TRIG

Trigonometry (trig) is a branch of mathematics dealing with triangles, and calculations based on the relationships between a triangle’s angles and the lengths of its sides.

Remember doing calculus at school, and all those derivatives and integrals? Well, you probably also remember that an integral calculates the area under a curve (for example), and a derivative calculates the slope of a tangent at a particular point on a curve.

22. Get dolled (up) : TOG

The verb “tog up”, meaning to dress up, comes from the Latin “toga”, the garment worn in Ancient Rome. “Tog” can be also be used as an informal word for a coat or a cloak. Back in Ireland, togs are what we call swimming shorts.

27. __ buddy : BOSOM

“Bosm” is an Old English word for breast, which came into English as “bosom” meaning “breast, chest” without any association with either gender. It was only in the late fifties that the meaning narrowed to mean a woman’s breasts”. Terms like “bosom-friend” have been around since the late 16th century, and “bosom buddy” since the 1920s.

29. Senseless : LOONY

Something described as “loony” is insane, crazy. “Loony” is short for “lunatic”, an adjective “lunatic” is now considered offensive. The term arose in the late 1400s, when it meant “affected with periodic insanity”, i.e. insanity attacks brought on by the cycles of the moon. “Lunatic” comes from the Latin “luna” meaning “moon”.

30. South Pacific resort island : BALI

Bali is both an island and a province in Indonesia. It is a popular tourist spot, although the number of visitors dropped for a few years as a result of terrorist bombings in 2002 and 2005 that killed mainly tourists. Bali became more popular starting in 2008 due to a significant and favorable change in the exchange rate between the US dollar and the Indonesian rupiah.

31. Sport-__: versatile vehicles : UTES

A utility vehicle is often called a “ute” for short. Nowadays one mainly hears about sports utes and crossover utes.

32. Classic PC game : MYST

In the days when I played the occasional video game, the best of the bunch was undoubtedly Myst. It is a game full of puzzles with the player wandering through a beautifully-designed (for its day) interactive world.

35. Partnership for Peace international gp. : NATO

The Partnership for Peace (PfP) program is a NATO initiative that dates back to 1994. The intent of the PfP is to foster trust between NATO and the former Soviet Union.

40. “Baa Baa Black Sheep” wool unit : BAGFUL

The old English nursery rhyme “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep” is usually sung as:

Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes, sir, yes, sir,
Three bags full;
One for the master,
And one for the dame,
And one for the little boy
Who lives down the lane.

The tune that accompanies the rhyme is a variant of the French melody “Ah! Vous dirai-je, Maman”, which we know best in English as the tune for “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”.

46. AFL merger partner : CIO

The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was founded in 1886, making it one of the first federations of unions in the country. Over time the AFL became dominated by craft unions, unions representing skilled workers of particular disciplines. In the early thirties, John L. Lewis led a movement within the AFL to organize workers by industry, believing this would be more effective for the members. But the craft unions refused to budge, so Lewis set up a rival federation of unions in 1932, the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). The two federations became bitter rivals for over two decades until finally merging in 1955 to form the AFL-CIO.

51. Bright Orion star : RIGEL

Rigel is the sixth brightest star in the night sky, and the brightest star in the constellation of Orion. If you can imagine the stars in Orion laid out, Rigel is at his left foot. The name “Rigel” is an abbreviated version of the Arabic term for “Left Foot of the Central One”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Stinging insect : WASP

5. Storied broom riders : HAGS

9. Distinctive aroma : SCENT

14. Govt. workplace monitor : OSHA

15. Yemen neighbor : OMAN

16. Copier need : TONER

17. Beverage from a German vineyard : RHINE WINE (giving “New Age”)

19. Wheel spokes, geometrically : RADII

20. Triangular Greek letters : DELTAS

21. Coexist peacefully : GET ALONG

23. French fashion monogram : YSL

24. Boot front : TOE

26. Anteater’s slurp in the comic “B.C.” : ZOT

27. Unauthorized recording : BOOTLEG ALBUM (giving “legal age”)

33. Do the play-by-play, say : ANNOUNCE

36. Like Cheerios : OATY

37. Slightest : LEAST

38. Medical ins. plan : HMO

40. Tree trunks : BOLES

41. “To know me __ love me” : IS TO

42. Musician at ballparks and churches : ORGANIST

44. Nuclear power : ATOMIC ENERGY (giving “ice age”)

48. Put the kibosh on : NIX

49. Klutz : OAF

50. Noah’s boat : ARK

53. One of a group of versifiers that included Wordsworth : LAKE POET

58. Stubby piece : NUBBIN

60. Whitney Houston’s “__ Always Love You” : I WILL

61. Period after young adulthood … and a hint to each set of circles : MIDDLE AGE

63. Excessive enthusiasm : MANIA

64. Partner of proper : PRIM

65. On a yawl, say : ASEA

66. Small hippo type : PYGMY

67. Trillion: Pref. : TERA-

68. Mix together : MELD

Down

1. Verbose : WORDY

2. Barbecue residue : ASHES

3. Con man’s setup man : SHILL

4. Breathe heavily : PANT

5. Question in response to “I need this in a hurry” : HOW SOON?

6. French friend : AMI

7. Criminal group : GANG

8. React to pepper : SNEEZE

9. Layer upon layer : STRATA

10. Mined fuel : COAL

11. Prefix meaning “within” : ENDO-

12. German no : NEIN

13. Pre-calc math course : TRIG

18. Go to a steakhouse, say : EAT OUT

22. Get dolled (up) : TOG

25. Make an engraving : ETCH

27. __ buddy : BOSOM

28. Citrus fruit : LEMON

29. Senseless : LOONY

30. South Pacific resort island : BALI

31. Sport-__: versatile vehicles : UTES

32. Classic PC game : MYST

33. Et __: Latin for “and others” : ALIA

34. Source of many tweets : NEST

35. Partnership for Peace international gp. : NATO

39. Sandwich cookie : OREO

40. “Baa Baa Black Sheep” wool unit : BAGFUL

43. Mom’s mom : GRANDMA

45. Not out-of-bounds, as a ball : IN PLAY

46. AFL merger partner : CIO

47. Not subject to taxes : EXEMPT

50. Demean : ABASE

51. Bright Orion star : RIGEL

52. Work, as dough : KNEAD

53. Like a wet noodle : LIMP

54. On a trip : AWAY

55. Mattress option : KING

56. Kind of tournament round, briefly : ELIM

57. Run out of gas : TIRE

59. Smile broadly : BEAM

62. S, SE or SSE : DIR

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11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 10 Jul 2017, Monday”

  1. 10 minutes, no errors. Pretty slow on this and a few missteps on top of it. Played more like a Wednesday to me.

    @Tony (Friday, WSJ meta)
    Backflow (or back-flow) and the reference to country in the answer tells us we need to look for rivers in the puzzle backwards. You’ll find AMSTEL, TIBER, ELBE, NILE, and VOLGA in that order. The countries the mouths of those rivers (1-Across) are in Netherlands, Italy, Germany, Egypt, and Russia. In turn, the NIGER river mouth is in Nigeria, which is the answer you would have needed to be correct.

    1. Thanks, Glenn. Wouldn’t have figured that out in a million years. No trouble with today’s grid and finished Sunday without any final errors, but that was a real “hunt & peck” exercise.

  2. Didn’t find it harder than usual. Had fIrm before KING. Didn’t know ZOT. I need to watch more full-length cartoons.

  3. More circles!! They used to have circles on these puzzles once every couple of weeks or so. This was the 4th time in 9 days. All of my current brain power is going towards trying to outsmart the squirrels who keep invading my yard, and I’m losing that battle. Now I have to combat the LAT circle puzzle of the day too?? Completed this one without the aid of circles.

    A tad harder than a normal Monday although I’m not ready to call it Wednesday caliber just yet. Maybe a Tuesday or Tuesday Plus.

    I never realized that the same guy did B.C. and Wizard of Id. I like both of those.

    Best –

    1. Agree it is not in the South Pacific. But it is not in the Indian Ocean either. It is in the Java Sea, almost due north of Perth Australia.

  4. Dev, your answer confounded me. I never thought the Indian Ocean went that deep, both vertically and horizontally, and so brazenly widespread ……

    But, you’re right … the Indian Ocean does go all the way down south, and east, hence it would ‘include’ Bali. Who would have ever thought of that ? Thank you, I learnt something.

    On the other hand, ‘South Pacific’, as in the clue, can also be a pretty general direction …. and might include Australia and New Zealand ….

    If I remember, ‘Bali Ha’i” is one of the most famous songs from the musical, yes …. ‘South Pacific’ 1949, by Rodgers and Hammerstein. I’m sure, the clue referred to that. Wikipedia says that was a mystical island ….

    But, your point is well noted ! And appropriately, humorous !

    1. The actual island of Bali is a pretty mystical and magical place itself. I traveled to vacation there twice in the 80’s, the second time for a month, and had a wonderful time. The people of Bali couldn’t be warmer or more hospitable to all the various visitors from around the world.

  5. Well, I’m so happy, my previous post, with two hyperlinks made it through safely, through Bill’s scan detector software ! Welcome, Dev, to our group !

    I too, found the puzzle a little challenging – for a Monday, but I enjoyed it very much never the less. Like Jeff, I too, liked the Wizard of Id and B.C. – he came up with new ideas every day.

    When I came up with Rhine Wine, I thought we were looking for rhyming words,….. or not.
    I also saw a movie,’Mr. Holmes’, last night, with Sir Ian McKellen ( real age 78, old ‘Holmes’) , where I learned more about the habits of wasps and bees. I highly recommend this movie, A delight.

    Not familiar with BOLES and NuBBIN.. or Lake Poets.
    I liked how Rhine Wine gave us ‘new’, Bootleg gave us ‘legal”, and Atomic gave us ‘Ice ‘…. the very antonym of what we imagine the original word to describe. Very Clever indeed….

    As regarding D capital delta and d as the small delta, Bill has rightly pointed out how while the former stands for change/ difference,
    and the latter ( as a differential function – ) may stand for rate of change/ or speed/ or velocity. Thank you.

    Have a nice day all.

  6. Hi all!
    Hey Jeff — next thing you know those squirrels will be mustering in CIRCLES just to vex you!!
    Vidwan!! Nice catch on the antonym thing…I wouldn’t have noticed! ?
    I found this puzzle pretty easy, tho I did make something of a mess in that SW corner. Like Sfingi, I had FIRM before KING. Then, I got PYGMY but I spelled it wrong!! I had PYMGY!! … Used the M from FIRM! Finally sorted it out.
    Shout out to Dolly Parton for writing I Will Always Love You — her version is so sweet, and IMO much better than Whitney’s bombastic version….?
    Sweet dreams~~™?

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