LA Times Crossword Answers 20 Mar 2018, Tuesday

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Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Reveal Answer: IV Drips

Themed answers are all in the down-direction, and each contains the letter sequence “IV” hidden within:

  • 24D. Hosp. fluid-administration methods hidden in 3-, 9-, 31- and 34-Down : IV DRIPS
  • 3D. Handheld cleaner : MINI-VACUUM
  • 9D. 2006 cop drama set in Florida : MIAMI VICE
  • 31D. Reagan Library site : SIMI VALLEY
  • 34D. Like much Norton software : ANTIVIRUS

Bill’s time: 6m 18s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

14. Gal pal, in Genoa : AMICA

Genoa is a seaport in the very north of Italy, in the region known as Liguria. One of Genoa’s most famous sons was Christopher Columbus. Another was the violinist Niccolò Paganini.

15. Searchlight used by Gotham police : BAT-SIGNAL

Batman is an ally of Police Commissioner Gordon of Gotham City. Gordon orders the shining of a searchlight, known as the Bat-Signal, into the sky to summon Batman when he is needed.

24. Long Island town : ISLIP

The town of Islip on the south shore of Long Island is home to Islip Airport. Now known as Long Island MacArthur Airport, it is used by many as a viable alternative to JFK and LaGuardia.

28. 605, to Seneca : DCV

Seneca the Younger was a tutor and advisor to the Emperor Nero of Ancient Rome. Although maybe innocent, Seneca was forced to commit suicide by Nero as it was alleged that Seneca participated in a plot to kill the emperor. To kill himself, Seneca cut into a number of veins in order to bleed to death.

30. Stop, to swabs : AVAST

“Avast” is a nautical term used to tell someone to stop or desist from what they are doing. The word comes from the Dutch “hou vast” meaning “hold fast”.

39. Class with smocks : ART

A smock is an outer garment that is often worn as protection for one’s clothing. Today, the term often applies to the protective garment worn by a painter.

40. Punctuation in many lists : COMMA

Our word “comma” comes into English via Latin from the Greek “komma” meaning “clause in a sentence”.

43. Like yoga teachers : LITHE

In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

45. Many a craft beer, for short : IPA

India pale ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

49. Enterprise rival : AVIS

Avis has been around since 1946, and is the second largest car rental agency after Hertz. Avis has the distinction of being the first car rental company to locate a branch at an airport.

Enterprise Rent-A-Car was established in 1957 by Jack. C. Taylor in St. Louis, Missouri, where the company is still headquartered today. The company was originally called Executive Leasing Company. The name was changed in 1962 in honor of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, on which Taylor served during WWII.

50. KitchenAid appliances : OVENS

The KitchenAid brand of home appliances were introduced in 1919 by the Hobart Corporation. The first product produced was the famous KitchenAid line of stand mixers.

52. __ colada: rum drink : PINA

“Piña colada” is a Spanish term which translates into “strained pineapple”. The piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

54. Old vitamin bottle no. : RDA

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

57. Shiba __ : Japanese dog : INU

The Shiba Inu is a Japanese breed of dog that was developed for hunting. Although the exact etymology of “Shibu” is unclear, the term translates as “brushwood”. “Inu” is Japanese for “dog”.

58. Scored well under par, in golf lingo : WENT LOW

Lingo is a specialized vocabulary. “Journalese” and “legalese” would be good examples.

61. Bart Simpson’s “Holy cow!” : AY, CARAMBA!

Bart Simpson apparently uses the expression “Ay, caramba!” when he is positively surprised about something, often something related to a female I am told …

64. “Love Me Like You Do” singer Goulding : ELLIE

Ellie Goulding is a singer-songwriter from England. One of Goulding’s claims to fame is that she sang at the wedding reception of Prince William and Kate Middleton at Buckingham Palace in 2011.

“Love Me Like You Do” is a 2015 song recorded by English singer-songwriter Ellie Goulding. The song was written specifically for the soundtrack of the movie “Fifty Shades of Grey”.

65. Apple Store support station : GENIUS BAR

The technical support desk found in Apple Retail Stores is rather inventively called the Genius Bar. The certified support technicians are known as “Geniuses”. The trainees are called GYOs: Grow-Your-Own-Geniuses.

69. Risky rendezvous : TRYST

In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting. Further, a tryst taking place at lunchtime is sometimes referred to as a nooner.

A rendezvous is a meeting. The noun used in English come the French phrase “rendez vous” meaning “present yourselves”.

Down

1. Fashionable Kentucky Derby array : HATS

The first Kentucky Derby took place in 1875, and is a race modeled on the Epsom Derby in England and the Grand Prix de Paris (now called the “Prix de l‘Arc de Triomphe”). As such, the Kentucky Derby was run over 1½ miles, although in 1896 this was shortened to 1¼ miles. The winning horse is presented with a very elaborate blanket made of red roses, and so the Derby is nicknamed “Run for the Roses”. The race is held on the first Saturday in May each year, and is limited to 3-year-old horses.

4. Spotted wildcat : OCELOT

The ocelot is a wildcat found mainly in South and Central America, although there have been sightings as far north as Arkansas. An ocelot doesn’t look too different from a domestic cat, and some have been kept as pets. Perhaps most famously, Salvador Dali had one that he carried around everywhere with him.

5. Thomas of “That Girl” : MARLO

Marlo Thomas’s most famous role was playing the title character in the television sitcom “That Girl”. Thomas is also well known as a spokesperson for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

9. 2006 cop drama set in Florida : MIAMI VICE

“Miami Vice” is a detective television show that originally aired in 1984-1989. Stars of the show are Don Johnson and Philip Michael Thomas. There is a 2006 film adaptation of “Miami Vice” starring Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx.

12. Welles’ “Citizen” : KANE

1941’s “Citizen Kane” was the first film made by Orson Welles, and considered by many to be the finest film ever made. It’s a remarkable achievement by Wells, as he played the lead, and also produced and directed. Despite all the accolades for “Citizen Kane” over the decades, the movie was far from a commercial success in its early run and actually lost money at the box office.

16. Six-time Super Bowl coach Don : SHULA

Don Shula is a former football player and coach. Shula appeared as head coach in a record six Super Bowls, including a run of three successive Super Bowls (1971-73, winning twice). Shula holds the record for most NFL career wins (347). He also led the Miami Dolphins during their 1972 perfect season, the only perfect season in the history of the NFL.

20. Website with film profiles : IMDB

The website called the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) was launched in 1990, and is now owned by Amazon.com. It’s a great site for answering question one has about movies and actors.

24. Hosp. fluid-administration methods hidden in 3-, 9-, 31- and 34-Down : IV DRIPS

One might see an intravenous drips (IV) in an intensive care unit (ICU).

25. __ Alto, Calif. : PALO

The city of Palo Alto, California takes its name from a specific redwood tree called El Palo Alto (Spanish for “the tall stick”) that is located within the bounds of the city. The tree is 110 feet tall and over a thousand years old.

26. Tampa __ Buccaneers : BAY

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers joined the NFL in 1976 along with the Seattle Seahawks as expansion teams. The Bucs had a tough start in the NFL, losing their first 26 games. Things went better in the early eighties, but then the team went through 14 consecutive losing seasons. Their luck changed again though, and they won the Super Bowl at the end of the 2002 season.

29. West Virginia natural resource : COAL

The vast coalfields of West Virginia were used to fuel, literally, the Industrial Revolution in the United States. It is, perhaps, no surprise that the West Virginia official state rock is bituminous coal.

31. Reagan Library site : SIMI VALLEY

Simi Valley, California is perhaps best known as home to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. The library is a great place to visit, and there you can tour one of the retired Air Force One planes.

32. Allegro, largo, lento, etc. : TEMPI

The tempo (plural “tempi”) of a piece of music is usually designated with an Italian word on the score. For example, “grave” is slow and solemn, “andante” is at a walking pace, “scherzo” is fast and light-hearted, and “allegro” is fast, quickly and bright.

34. Like much Norton software : ANTIVIRUS

Norton Antivirus software is produced by Symantec. The Norton brand name originated with Peter Norton Computing, a company that Symantec acquired in 1990. Peter Norton’s most famous product was Norton Utilities, and he never produced an antivirus application. Symantec decided to use the respected Norton brand for the antivirus product that it developed and introduced in 1991.

35. Bluesy James : ETTA

Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song “At Last”. Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

38. Japanese golf great Aoki : ISAO

Isao Aoki is one of Japan’s greatest golfers. Aoki’s best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

47. Dunham and Olin : LENAS

Lena Dunham is a co-star in the HBO series “Girls”, and is also the show’s creator. Dunham garnered a lot of attention for herself during the 2012 US Presidential election cycle as she starred in an ad focused on getting out the youth vote. In the spot, she compared voting for the first time with having sex for the first time.

Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, and clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Her mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin’s breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being” released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

49. Buck horn : ANTLER

A male deer is usually called a buck, and a female is a doe. However, the male red deer is usually referred to as a stag. The males of even larger species of deer are often called bulls, and females cows. In older English, male deer of over 5 years were called harts, and females of over 3 years were called hinds. The young of small species are known as fawns, and of larger species are called calves. All very confusing …

51. Anesthetizes : NUMBS

“Aisthesis” is the Greek word for “feeling”, from which “anaisthesia” is Greek for “want of feeling, lack of sensation”. And that’s how we get our English term “anesthesia”.

54. Sauce brand with an accent on its last letter : RAGU

The Ragú brand of pasta sauce is owned by Unilever. The name ” Ragù” is the Italian word for a sauce used to dress pasta, however the spelling is off a little. In Italian the word is “Ragù” with a grave accent over the “u”, but if you look at a jar of the sauce on the supermarket shelf it is spelled “Ragú” on the label, with an acute accent. Sometimes I think we just don’t try …

56. OXY 10 target : ACNE

OXY 10 is a brand name for a medication with the active ingredient benzoyl peroxide. Benzoyl peroxide is used as an acne treatment, as well as for dyeing hair, for whitening teeth and in the preparation of flour.

63. Scrooge’s scoff : BAH!

The classic 1843 novella “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens has left us with a few famous phrases and words. Firstly, it led to popular use of the phrase “Merry Christmas”, and secondly it gave us the word “scrooge” meaning a miserly person. And thirdly, everyone knows that Ebenezer Scrooge uttered the words “Bah! Humbug!”.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Affectionate sideline greeting : HI, MOM!
6. “I understand now!” : AHA!
9. Mud bath coverings : MASKS
14. Gal pal, in Genoa : AMICA
15. Searchlight used by Gotham police : BAT-SIGNAL
17. One changing pitches : TUNER
18. “Are you declining?” : IS THAT A NO?
19. “Tell me!” : SPILL IT!
21. Response to a tasty treat : YUM
22. Understand : GET
23. “Va-va-__!” : VOOM
24. Long Island town : ISLIP
26. Dog-tired : BEAT
28. 605, to Seneca : DCV
30. Stop, to swabs : AVAST
33. Circle segment : ARC
34. “Humble” home : ABODE
36. “Why would __?” : I LIE
37. Dealer’s query : YOU IN?
39. Class with smocks : ART
40. Punctuation in many lists : COMMA
42. Sign of disuse : DUST
43. Like yoga teachers : LITHE
45. Many a craft beer, for short : IPA
46. Online box filler : EMAIL
48. Cough up the cash : PAY
49. Enterprise rival : AVIS
50. KitchenAid appliances : OVENS
52. __ colada: rum drink : PINA
54. Old vitamin bottle no. : RDA
57. Shiba __ : Japanese dog : INU
58. Scored well under par, in golf lingo : WENT LOW
61. Bart Simpson’s “Holy cow!” : AY, CARAMBA!
64. “Love Me Like You Do” singer Goulding : ELLIE
65. Apple Store support station : GENIUS BAR
66. Preps, as potatoes : PEELS
67. Icon tappers : USERS
68. Bashful : SHY
69. Risky rendezvous : TRYST

Down

1. Fashionable Kentucky Derby array : HATS
2. “My turn to bat” : I’M UP
3. Handheld cleaner : MINI-VACUUM
4. Spotted wildcat : OCELOT
5. Thomas of “That Girl” : MARLO
6. Somewhat : A BIT
7. Polishes off : HAS
8. Legal dept. staffers : ATTYS
9. 2006 cop drama set in Florida : MIAMI VICE
10. Star’s rep. : AGT
11. Hose mishap : SNAG
12. Welles’ “Citizen” : KANE
13. Schedule opening : SLOT
16. Six-time Super Bowl coach Don : SHULA
20. Website with film profiles : IMDB
24. Hosp. fluid-administration methods hidden in 3-, 9-, 31- and 34-Down : IV DRIPS
25. __ Alto, Calif. : PALO
26. Tampa __ Buccaneers : BAY
27. Slowly wear away : ERODE
29. West Virginia natural resource : COAL
31. Reagan Library site : SIMI VALLEY
32. Allegro, largo, lento, etc. : TEMPI
34. Like much Norton software : ANTIVIRUS
35. Bluesy James : ETTA
38. Japanese golf great Aoki : ISAO
41. Remote batteries : AAS
44. Promote aggressively : HYPE
47. Dunham and Olin : LENAS
49. Buck horn : ANTLER
51. Anesthetizes : NUMBS
53. Bumbling : INEPT
54. Sauce brand with an accent on its last letter : RAGU
55. Salon colorings : DYES
56. OXY 10 target : ACNE
58. Suspicious (of) : WARY
59. Art store buys : OILS
60. Wild or Old area : WEST
62. Balloon filler : AIR
63. Scrooge’s scoff : BAH!

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14 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 20 Mar 2018, Tuesday”

  1. LAT: 9:59 after finding and fixing a typo. I did this one just before going to bed last night and I really shouldn’t have: For once, I really wasn’t in the mood for yet another puzzle. (It happens … ?.)

    Newsday: 5:21, no errors. WSJ: 11:54, no errors. Matt Jones: 11:04, no errors. Croce in the offing …

    1. Tim Croce: 1:08:21 (but that includes time spent in ordering and eating a meal at Perkins), no errors. Another of those Croce specials that initially look impossible and slowly give up the battle, eventually becoming almost easy.

  2. 15:16 and even that seemed to wear me out. I’m 10 puzzles behind (Thurs-Mon for both NYT and LAT) which would take Bill and Dave an afternoon to catch up on. For me it will take a month or so.

    As usual, I had a great time in Puerto Vallarta and certainly had my share of tequila and a surprisingly good Mexican cigar. I see more and more Canadians and Americans retiring there because of the weather, the cost of living etc..

    Oh well, nice puzzle to get started on. Amazing how fast your crossword skills can atrophy. We’ll see how it goes from here.

    Best –

  3. Not finding a Jones puzzle today…

    @Dave
    I ended up doing the last 12 days of Puzzle Society puzzles – I’m gathering it’s relatively new by the titles on some of the themeless grids. Looks like it’s a good CrossSynergy equivalent (if you remember that). They’re anywhere from NYT Mon-Tues difficulty in my view. I ended up averaging around 9 minutes on the Mon-Tues grids and 17 minutes on Wed-Sun. Then I caught one error on 03-17 at 32A-24D (never heard of either), and 3 errors on 21D & 37D (wrong guesses on those). I probably won’t do them regularly, but it’ll be a good option for lots and something to remember if I need to do something different. I thought they were all quality grids.

    1. @Glenn … The Jones puzzles seem to become available from

      “herbach.dnsalias.com/Jonesin/jzYYMMDD.puz”

      well before they become available on his own website.

      I tried three different puzzles from that NOLA site and wasn’t too impressed. Among other things, each of them involved a slightly different online interface, none of which were exactly like any of the online interfaces I currently use … with differences enough to drive a man crazy … especially if it’s a short drive … ?.

      In any case, I have more or less committed myself to an experiment with old NYT puzzles, one which could keep me busy for a while. (See the other blog.)

      1. @Dave
        You likely did last week’s Matt Jones puzzle (unless something got seriously broken somewhere). The current one (jz180322.puz) isn’t available in either place.

        As for the Puzzle Society grids, I didn’t think much of the software myself. I printed out everything.

        1. @Glenn … Okay … a comedy of errors: In the past, I have found that the Jones puzzles show up first on the “herbach” site and I can prove this by looking at creation times for the files on my iMac. (For example, my file “MattJones20180315.puz” was created at 6:10PM on Monday, 2018/03/12, and I just verified that it’s the correct puzzle for that week.) However, this week, I accidentally typed a “2” instead of a “3”, got last month’s puzzle, and did it again without recognizing it. (And, curiously, it took me almost two minutes longer!)

  4. No error, no-peek fun puzzle. Was looking for another “i” in antivirus… figuring the “i’s” were “dripping “mini” – “Simi” and “Miami” — then saw that the “i” and “v” were connected. AHA!!

  5. No error, no-peek fun puzzle. Was looking for another “i” in antivirus… figuring the “i’s” were “dripping “mini” – “Simi” and “Miami” — then saw that the “i” and “v” were connected. AHA!!

  6. I had to think a lot – this was a somewhat challenging puzzle – and its only Tuesday. I forgot to post yesterday – ( it was well past my bedtime when I got to it. ) CC uses very rare and arcane clues, but I appreciate that, since it makes you think a lot – which I need a lot of, nowadays. I did not ‘get’ the theme, but I completed it in good time.

    I read the blog post by Raul, yesterday, and am glad that others also appreciate, like Carrie, what Bill does, to increase out knowledge and understanding in this language world …. Ttust me, Bill, we are extremely grateful. !!@!

    Thank you for the word, Aisthesis ( feeling ) … the next time my wife tells me I have no ‘aesthetic sense’, which is, unfortunately, often ….. I can reply, aha, but …. that you have no aisthesis.
    Despite having practiced as an anesthetist, she does know the meaning of the word, ‘aisthesis’ ….

    have a nice day, all.

  7. Jeff, so nice to have you back ….
    You were missed… and the tequila, as well.
    The bars in Puerto Vallerta must be bemoaning their fate …. and the tequila stocks will slowly start creeping up again.
    You made it back to the US in time for the Spring Equinox.

  8. Hey y’all! ?
    No errors on a fun Tuesday puzzle. As usual for early-week grids, I didn’t pay attention to the theme. Didn’t know ELLIE. My tablet is acting up so I better cut this short. ??
    Be well~~™?

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