LA Times Crossword 16 Mar 19, Saturday

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Constructed by: Samuel A. Donaldson & Erik Agard
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 13m 23s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Some halftime performers : MAJORETTES

A drum major is a the leader of a marching band, and is a position that originated in the British Army Corp of Drums in 1650. The drum major’s job is to lead the group and ensure that the whole ensemble keeps time. To help him do so, a drum major often uses a large baton. Over time, it became customary for the baton to be twirled and tossed in an elaborate display. The drum major tradition was embraced by high school marching bands in America. Drum-majorettes became popular in the 1930s, with groups of females taking up baton-twirling and marching with bands. According to an article in “Life” magazine published on October 10th, 1938, “the perfect majorette is a pert, shapely, smiling extrovert, who loves big, noisy crowds and knows how to make those crowds love her.” It was a different time …

11. Galaxy array : APPS

The Galaxy is a series of mobile computing devices made by Samsung that was introduced in 2009. Almost all of the Galaxy devices have used Google’s Android operating system, until a Windows 10 Galaxy device was introduced by Samsung in 2016.

15. Home to Gotham City, Metropolis, etc. : DC UNIVERSE

DC Comics takes its name from what used to be a highly popular series called “Detective Comics”. The main competitor to DC Comics is Marvel Comics, and between the two companies, they command 80% of comic sales in the US market. Nowadays of course, a lot of company income comes from movies that use the most popular characters from the original comics.

“Gotham” had been a nickname for New York City long before it was picked up by comic books as a setting for Batman tales. The term was coined by Washington Irving in a periodical that he published in 1807. Irving was lampooning New York politics and culture, and lifted the name from the village of Gotham in Nottinghamshire, England. The original Gotham was, according to folklore, inhabited by fools.

In the world of DC Comics, Metropolis is a city-state in America that is inspired by real-life New York City. Famously, Metropolis is home to Superman. The fictional city is nicknamed “the Big Apricot”.

16. Persian for “king” : SHAH

“Shah” was a title used by Persian emperors that translate into English as “king”. The full title in Persian is “Sahahsah”, which means “King of Kings”.

17. Technology term from the Greek for “far sight” : TELEVISION

Scottish inventor John Logie Baird is credited as the inventor of the television. Baird’s invention is classified as a “mechanical” television because it used a mechanical device to scan the scene and generate the video signal. Modern televisions use “electronic” scanning technology. A mechanical scanning device might be a rotating disc or mirror, whereas an electronic scanning device might be a cathode ray tube.

18. Rhode Island’s motto : HOPE

Rhode Island is the smallest state in the union, and is the second most densely populated. (after New Jersey). Rhode Island is known as the Ocean State, largely because about 14% of the state’s area is made up of ocean bays and inlets. Exactly how Rhode Island got its name is a little unclear. What is known is that way back in 1524, long before the Pilgrims came to New England, the Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano likened an island in the area to the Island of Rhodes in the Mediterranean. There were subsequent references to “Rhode Island” in English publications, before the colonists arrived.

22. Queen who sings, “The cold never bothered me anyway” : ELSA

“The cold never bothered me anyway” is a line from the Disney song “Let It Go”.

“Let It Go” is an incredibly successful song from the Disney animated film “Frozen” released in 2013. It was performed in the movie by Idina Menzel, who also was the voice actor for the character Elsa. “Let It Go” is one of the very few Disney songs to make it into the Billboard Top Ten.

24. Church marriage notice : BANNS

In the Christian tradition, the banns of marriage are the public announcement posted in a parish church of an intended marriage. The banns are intended to give anyone a chance to raise any valid objections to the union.

27. Red head of the 20th century : MAO

The association of the color red with communism dates back to the French Revolution. A red flag was chosen as a symbol by the revolutionaries, with the color representing the blood of workers who had died in the fight against capitalism.

31. Fathom, e.g. : UNIT

Our word “fathom” comes from the Old English word used to describe the length of the outstretched arms. Today, a fathom is equal to six feet.

34. Hawaiian for “long” : LOA

Mauna Loa on the “Big Island” of Hawaii is the largest volcano on the planet (in terms of volume). The name “Mauna Loa” is Hawaiian for “Long Mountain”.

37. Rough case : BUR

“Bur” is a variant spelling of the word “burr”. Both terms apply to a seed vessel that has hooks or prickles on the outside.

38. “The More You Know” segment, briefly : PSA

“The More You Know” is a series of public service announcements (PSAs) that have been broadcast by NBC since 1989. The spots usually feature personalities from NBC shows who deliver some sort of educational message. Then President Barack Obama participated in 2010 and 2011, as did Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush after they left office.

39. Tribute opening : A TOAST …

The tradition of toasting someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

40. Green roller : PUTT

That would be golf.

43. Messenger substance : RNA

Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

45. Montana team in the ’80s : NINERS

Joe Montana played most of his NFL career with the San Francisco 49ers, and the last two seasons with the Kansas City Chiefs. With the 49ers, Montana went to the Super Bowl four times, winning every time. In retirement one of his activities is to produce wine, so keep an eye out for his “Montagia” label.

47. Subject of the 1975 film “Overlord” : D-DAY

“Overlord” is a 1975 film centered on the D-Day Normandy invasion, which was known as “Operation Overlord”. The central character in the movie is a young soldier who looks back over his life after being called up to serve in the British Army. It doesn’t end well for him …

49. Triangular pastry : SAMOSA

A samosa is quite a tasty appetizer. It is usually a triangular-shaped savory that often has a vegetarian filling. The word “samosa” is primarily used on Indian menus, and the name comes from “sanbosag”, the name for the dish in Persia.

54. Hardly a lost cause : CORRIGIBLE

Something that is corrigible can be set right, corrected.

57. Pine product : CONE

The cones of conifers are the tree’s reproductive structures. There are both male and female cones. We are most familiar with woody cones, and these are the female structures that produce seeds. Male cones are softer and are not woody, and they produce pollen.

58. Jicama or rutabaga : EDIBLE ROOT

The plant called the jícama is also known as the Mexican yam and Mexican turnip. Jícama is grown for its tuberous root. The tuber’s interior is usually eaten raw.

The names of veggies cause me grief sometimes. What’s called a turnip here in the US, we call a swede back in Ireland. An Irishman’s turnip is a rutabaga over here. Thank goodness a potato is a potato, or I’d just give up altogether 🙂

Down

1. Colo. summer setting : MDT

Mountain Daylight Time (MDT)

2. Dell alternative : ACER

Acer is a Taiwanese company that I visited a couple of times when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed back then with the company’s dedication to quality, although I have heard that things haven’t gone so well in recent years …

3. “Three Coins in the Fountain” composer Styne : JULE

Jule Styne was an English songwriter who made a name for himself in America with a series of popular musicals. Styne wrote a number of famous songs including “Don’t Rain on My Parade” from “Funny Girl”, “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” from “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, and “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” from “Gypsy”.

“Three Coins in the Fountain” is a 1954 film about three young American women in Rome looking for romance. In the story, each of the girls throws a coin into the city’s famous Trevi fountain making a wish. The title song, performed by an uncredited Frank Sinatra, is probably the most famous composition by Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn.

4. The slightest change : ONE CENT

The US one-cent coin has borne the profile of President Abraham Lincoln since 1909, the centennial of Lincoln’s birth. Fifty years later, a representation of the Lincoln Memorial was added to the reverse side.

5. Watterson’s Calvin and Susie, at times : RIVALS

In the “Calvin and Hobbes” cartoon strip, Calvin has a love/hate relationship with his classmate Susie Derkins. Susie is a strong female character. She often plays imaginary games in which she is a lawyer or politician, and Calvin is her househusband. The strip’s creator Bill Watterson has confessed that Susie’s character represents the type of woman that he himself found attractive, and indeed married.

6. What Pandora released : EVILS

According to Greek mythology, Pandora was the first woman. She was created by the gods, with each god bestowing on her a gift. Her name can be translated from Greek as “all-gifted”. Pandora is famous for the story of “Pandora’s Box”. In actual fact, the story should be about Pandora’s “Jar” as a 16th-century error in translation created a “box” out of the “jar”. In the story of Pandora’s Box, curiosity got the better of her and she opened up a box she was meant to leave alone. As a result she released all the evils of mankind, just closing it in time to trap hope inside.

7. Model X maker, before 2017 : TESLA MOTORS

Tesla Motors was founded in 2003 as a manufacturer of electric vehicles based in Palo Alto, California. Tesla is noted for producing the first electric sports car, called the Tesla Roadster. The company followed the sports car with a luxury sedan, the Model S. The Model S was the world’s best selling plug-in electric vehicle of 2015. Tesla Motors shortened its name to Tesla in early 2017.

The Model X is an all-electric crossover SUV made by Tesla Motors in Fremont, California. The Model X is built on Tesla’s Model S sedan platform.

8. “Divergent” heroine __ Prior : TRIS

Beatrice “Tris” Prior is the protagonist in the “Divergent” series of movies, and is played by actress Shailene Woodley.

21. “The Sound of Music” name : TRAPP

“The Sound of Music” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical that was made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on “The Story of the Trapp Family Singers”, a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war, and one family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives here in the same town in which I live in California.

23. Squee-worthy : TOTES ADORBS

“Totes adorbs” is a slang term meaning “totally adorable”.

24. Goose __ : BUMPS

The terms “goose bumps” and “goose flesh” come from the fact that skin which is cold can look like the flesh of a plucked goose.

25. Snack that doesn’t sound very appetizing : ANTS ON A LOG

“Ants on a log” is a snack food prepared by spreading something like peanut butter or cream cheese on celery and placing raisins on top. If you leave out the raisins, the snack becomes “ants on vacation”.

26. “To Be Young, Gifted and Black” singer : NINA SIMONE

“Nina Simone” was the stage name of Eunice Waymon. Simone was very much associated with jazz music, although she really wanted to be a classical musician early in her career. She was inspired by a love for the music of Bach.

“To Be Young, Gifted and Black” is a 1970 Nina Simone song. Simone wrote the music herself, and Weldon Irvine wrote the lyrics. Simone composes “To Be Young, Gifted and Black” in memory of her friend Lorraine Hansberry, author of the pay “A Raisin in the Sun”, who had died a few years earlier at the age of 34.

28. Guitarist, slangily : AXMAN

I guess a guitar looks like an ax(e) …

30. Wonderland trial evidence : TARTS

In the Lewis Carroll novel “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”, Alice attends a trial in which the Knave of Hearts is accused of stealing tarts belonging to the Queen of Hearts.

33. Unsafe? : OUT

That would be baseball.

36. Underworld : HADES

Hades was the god of the underworld to the ancient Greeks. Over time, Hades gave his name to the underworld itself, the place where the dead reside. The term “Hades” was also adopted into the Christian tradition, as an alternative name for hell. But, the concept of hell in Christianity is more akin to the Greek “Tartarus”, which is a dark and gloomy dungeon located in Hades, a place of suffering and torment.

40. Prospector’s prize : PAY DIRT

“To hit pay dirt” is to succeed, make a profit. The expression comes from the mining industry, when hitting pay dirt was finding the mother lode, as it were.

42. Cell terminals : ANODES

A battery is a device that converts chemical energy into electric energy. A simple battery is made up of three parts: a cathode, an anode and a liquid electrolyte. Ions from the electrolyte react chemically with the material in the anode producing a compound and releasing electrons. At the same time, the electrolyte reacts with the material in the cathode, absorbing electrons and producing a different chemical compound. In this way, there is a buildup of electrons at the anode and a deficit of electrons at the cathode. When a connection (wire, say) is made between the cathode and anode, electrons flow through the resulting circuit from the anode to cathode in an attempt to rectify the electron imbalance.

44. Sacred Indian river : GANGES

The River Ganges rises in the western Himalaya and flows through the northeast of India before crossing into Bangladesh where it enters the Bay of Bengal. The Ganges is worshipped by Hindus as the goddess Ganga, and is the most sacred of all rivers in Hinduism.

48. Deadpan : DRILY

The term “deadpan”, slang for an impassive expression, comes from “dead” (expressionless) and “pan” (slang for “face”).

49. Spot saver?: Abbr. : SPCA

Unlike most developed countries, the US has no umbrella organization with the goal of preventing cruelty to animals. Instead there are independent organizations set up all over the nation using the name SPCA. Having said that, there is an organization called the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) that was originally intended to operate across the country, but really it now focuses its efforts in New York City.

50. Nursery item : CRIB

In Old English, the word “cribbe” applied to a manger, an open box holding fodder for livestock. Probably because of the association of a manger used as a bed for the infant Jesus, the word “crib” came to describe an enclosed bed for a child.

51. Wind in a pit : OBOE

We’ve all probably heard the phrase “‘tis an ill wind that blows nobody any good”. The poet Ogden Nash made a “punny” statement about the oboe, calling the instrument “an ill wind nobody blows good”. I must say though, I disagree …

52. Grab (onto) : GLOM

“Glom” is a slang term meaning “steal”, although it can also be used to mean “latch onto” when used as “glom onto”. The term probably comes from the Scots word “glam” meaning “to snatch at”.

55. Norfolk sch. : ODU

Old Dominion University (ODU) is a public school in Norfolk, Virginia. ODU was established in 1930 as a two-year branch division of the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg. The school was granted independence in 1962 as Old Dominion College, and became Old Dominion University in 1969. “The Old Dominion” was a nickname given to Virginia by King Charles II in recognition of the loyalty shown by the colony during the English Civil War.

56. Search subjects for 100+ yrs. : ETS

“SETI” is the name given to a number of projects that are searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves) reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Some halftime performers : MAJORETTES
11. Galaxy array : APPS
15. Home to Gotham City, Metropolis, etc. : DC UNIVERSE
16. Persian for “king” : SHAH
17. Technology term from the Greek for “far sight” : TELEVISION
18. Rhode Island’s motto : HOPE
19. Factory problems : RECALLS
20. Maintained : STATED
22. Queen who sings, “The cold never bothered me anyway” : ELSA
23. Holy one? : TERROR
24. Church marriage notice : BANNS
27. Red head of the 20th century : MAO
29. Cut off : APART
31. Fathom, e.g. : UNIT
32. Old-timey proof of purchase : BOX TOP
34. Hawaiian for “long” : LOA
35. 1-Down part: Abbr. : MTN
36. Slangy “Please call” : HIT ME UP
37. Rough case : BUR
38. “The More You Know” segment, briefly : PSA
39. Tribute opening : A TOAST …
40. Green roller : PUTT
41. “What a tragedy” : SO SAD
43. Messenger substance : RNA
44. Play __ : GAMES
45. Montana team in the ’80s : NINERS
47. Subject of the 1975 film “Overlord” : D-DAY
49. Triangular pastry : SAMOSA
50. Fair treat : CORN DOG
53. Walk with effort : PLOD
54. Hardly a lost cause : CORRIGIBLE
57. Pine product : CONE
58. Jicama or rutabaga : EDIBLE ROOT
59. Gets on : AGES
60. Parts of a bigger picture : SUBSYSTEMS

Down

1. Colo. summer setting : MDT
2. Dell alternative : ACER
3. “Three Coins in the Fountain” composer Styne : JULE
4. The slightest change : ONE CENT
5. Watterson’s Calvin and Susie, at times : RIVALS
6. What Pandora released : EVILS
7. Model X maker, before 2017 : TESLA MOTORS
8. “Divergent” heroine __ Prior : TRIS
9. Spanish “that” : ESO
10. Contextual meaning : SENSE
11. Note near B : A-SHARP
12. Facebook upload : PHOTO ALBUM
13. One way to spread the news : PAPER ROUTE
14. Lose : SHED
21. “The Sound of Music” name : TRAPP
23. Squee-worthy : TOTES ADORBS
24. Goose __ : BUMPS
25. Snack that doesn’t sound very appetizing : ANTS ON A LOG
26. “To Be Young, Gifted and Black” singer : NINA SIMONE
28. Guitarist, slangily : AXMAN
30. Wonderland trial evidence : TARTS
32. Was fooled by the fake : BIT
33. Unsafe? : OUT
36. Underworld : HADES
40. Prospector’s prize : PAY DIRT
42. Cell terminals : ANODES
44. Sacred Indian river : GANGES
46. Runs : RACES
48. Deadpan : DRILY
49. Spot saver?: Abbr. : SPCA
50. Nursery item : CRIB
51. Wind in a pit : OBOE
52. Grab (onto) : GLOM
55. Norfolk sch. : ODU
56. Search subjects for 100+ yrs. : ETS

36 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 16 Mar 19, Saturday”

      1. I think not, John (so I guess it’s a good thing I’m not Rene Descartes, huh? 😜).

        According to the Oxford dictionaries, “squee”, as a noun, means “a cry of delight”. so “squee-worthy” would mean “deserving of such a cry”. See the following link:

        https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/squee

        And, as far as I can tell, the answer, “TOTES ADORBS”, basically means “totally adorable”.

  1. What a doozy today! I’m not familiar with “Ants on a Log” so totally
    screwed up that corner. I got “totesadorb” not because I knew it,
    but happened to get the across words to fill in. Oh well, it’s Saturday.

  2. LAT: 17:36, no errors. The lower right corner gave me some problems, due to a bad guess that I had a hard time giving up on. And … I’ve had to make my peace with “TOTES ADORBS” (for 23D), given that I’ve now seen it in so many puzzles that it’s become a gimme.

    WSJ: 18:50, no errors. Seemed much easier than usual; not sure why.

    Newsday’s “Saturday Stumper”: 1:34:31, no errors; very difficult, with some wonderfully deceptive cluing. Near the end, with about 90% of it done, I walked away from it for a few minutes, thinking I might give up on it, but, when I picked it up again, it was done in about three more minutes. I still don’t understand how “Fake to the left” gets you “PSEUDO”, though; is that a sports thing?

      1. Oh! My! Gosh! Color me embarrassed … 😜

        One more wonderful bit of deceptive cluing in that puzzle!

        Thanks, Heidi! 😄

    1. WSJ 7A…fumbled as a football…loose?.. the quarterback loosed the ball?? Please shed a light on this. Thank you.

      Steve

  3. Took me an hour. Even though I got it, I didn’t know “totesadorbs.” Spent a lot of wasted time trying to figure out what I had wrong in the surrounding answers. I didn’t know quite a few other clues, but at least my guesses made sense (and were right).

  4. Thanks to Dave Kennison for pointing out that TOTESADORBS has appeared in many other puzzles — now I can stop muttering imprecations against Samuel A. Donaldson and Erik Agard. Still it sounds more like baby talk than slang. Hope we don’t see much more of that. Thought “Green roller” clever — since I’m no golfer took a while for that little light to go on.

  5. My paper version of this totes adorbs puz credits only Mr. Donaldson. Perhaps it’s because the highly esteemed Mr. Agard didn’t want his name on it. (I wouldn’t blame the well-respected Mr. Donaldson if he hadn’t, either). Good grief.

  6. @Z….I agree…I got about 30% of this puzzle and gave up.
    This seems to be par for the course when two egos join up for a puzzle like this one. A wasted Saturday for me.

  7. LAT: 44:47, no errors. Spent about 30 minutes on about 10% of this trying to interpret the jibberish. Otherwise, agreed with the others. Can’t say this was good. WSJ: 29:12, no errors. Newsday: DNF after about 30:00, like usual couldn’t get into the grid. Probably would have spent some more time on it and got more, but wasn’t too happy on doing crosswords after the terrible LAT outing today.

    @Dave
    Wrong link. That’s the Universal 21×21 from last week.

    1. Interesting. The root cause of my mistake was that I didn’t know there was such a thing as a 21×21 Universal puzzle on Sunday, as my local paper publishes a 15×15 on that day. Have to check this out … 😳.

      I’ve been enjoying Steinberg’s puzzles except for the fact that, in the paper, they’re too small to work on comfortably. (I’m also worried that his innovations are going to turn off his customer base, but that’s a different problem.)

  8. 28:02. Tough one. The cluing just about had me pulling my hair out, but I’ll grudgingly admit it was quite clever.

    I had a few missteps – e.g. I had “droll” before DRILY (probably because the cluing was so droll…) and GMU (George Mason U) before ODU. GMU is actually in Fairfax. I’ve been there several times; you’d think I’d have remembered that.

    I would have liked the clue to read “The smallest change” for CENT, but like a lot of things, nobody asked me first…

    I’ve seen “adorbs” several times in puzzles (lamentably). TOTES ADORBS I only sorta remember from a NYT puzzle. I think I tried to black out that memory.

    If not for the degree of difficulty (high), I’d consider this a bit of a silly puzzle, but silly isn’t necessarily bad – especially on the weekend.

    Best –

  9. …forgot to acknowledge

    Dirk –
    Great Batman clip. Was Julie Newmar the only Catwoman, or did the series actually have another one? “Propinquity”? Did Batman do crosswords??

    Carrie –
    That was definitely a Cardinal….whether it was from St. Louis or not is unknown..

    1. I know Rick Harrison does. At least from a “plot” perspective on Pawn Stars. While waiting on one of his “experts”, he does a crossword. Chumlee comes along and it turns into a bet. Chumlee comes back with his filled in and Rick says “”You can’t put more than one letter in a box.” Hilarious in a way. Old Man calls him on it because they didn’t say he had to do it *correctly* in the bet.

      I will say crosswords show up in media more than you might think.

        1. That was the funny part about it. Of course, they didn’t show anything other than Rick having a newspaper on his desk, so it’s hard to know which one if there was even one. It would have been even funnier if it actually *was* a rebus puzzle. But it’s kinda obvious no one in the production knew about rebus puzzles if they let Rick say that in the final cut of the episode.

  10. And…as a little programming note, the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament (or ACPT) occurs next weekend (7 days)…I have no idea if Bill will be fortunate enough to enter this year or not, but it’ll be something to follow. Contemplating looking at the at-home pack for this one since this is the only contest I’m aware of I haven’t seen (recent) samples of. Probably will stay away from contests from then on, except maybe the one I entered last year, since it’s been well proven I’m not good enough to be respectable in these.

    1. @Glenn
      I did enter this year’s ACPT, Glenn, but had to cancel my travel plans as I am still over here in Ireland. There’s always next year!

  11. Because I do the puzzle in ink I had a lot of very lightly filled in squares for today’s grid. Finally finished and then came here to see if totesadorbs was actually correct for 23 Down, (although I was sure it was right as it worked with all the crosses…which is how I got it in the first place). I’m just pleased to see that Bill was into double digits to solve this thing. Tough Saturday with no final errors.

  12. 14 mins and some change before I threw in the towel, with the top right, and most of the rest of the right side left blank. I knew I wasn’t going to solve this one the second I saw Erik Agard’s name in the credits, and once I saw the clue for the “adorbs” fill, I knew it would be one of those “terms that just are NOT ‘a thing’ “, no matter how much the terminally cool might think they are.
    Our editor is being much too indulgent of our ‘wunderkinder’. Pffft on puzzles like this one.

  13. Fairly tough Saturday, done on-line; took 45:27 but with two peeks at red letters. Had all my trouble in the East and SE, with TART, LOA, BUR and PAYDIRT (where I had gold ore.)

    Still wonderful clues with “Red head of the 20th Century”, “Fair treat” – which I got right away, as it’s my favorite and “Green roller” – which had me fooled for a long time. I’ve seen TOTES ADORBS at least three times here, so it’s no longer a surprise, but I had trouble with “Squee” part of the clue.

    @Jeff – It is a great clip. Julie plays the catwoman for the first two seasons, with the very talented Eartha Kitt taking over for the final season. After the finale, there was a movie, which I’m not sure I saw, featuring Lee Meriwether as catwoman. Here’s Eartha: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_LQXv37RtU

    @Carrie – It may have been campy, but as a 10 yr old when it first aired, I was tremendously affected by Julie Newmar and the show was just great. I love this line from Wiki: It was described by executive producer William Dozier as the only situation comedy on the air without a laugh track.

    1. Dirk! LOL– my three brothers loved it — I think it was more of a guy show, but in retrospect I do enjoy the camp– bet the actors had great fun with it too…!!

  14. Greetings!🐔

    No errors, and I finished in about 35 minutes, which is great for me on a tricky Saturday!! 😯

    Jeff, that’s really a cardinal? Here I thought they were red with black. I just thought it was a cute generic bird!!🐔

    People!! TOTES ADORBS in fact IS a thing, and it’s not a cool young-people phrase either. Recent, yes, but it is very corny. I’m 61 and unafraid to admit I’ve used that phrase!!! At least twice in reference to my great niece alone. It is TOTES dorky and TOTES appropriate for a Saturday puzzle.

    Be well ~~😎

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