LA Times Crossword 19 Mar 19, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Gail Grabowski & Bruce Venzke
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Put on a Show

Themed answers each end with a word to which one can add “SHOW”:

  • 57A Perform in the theater … and what can be done to the end of 17-, 25-, 37- and 48-Across : PUT ON A SHOW
  • 17A Period with dreams, e.g. : SLEEP STAGE (giving “stage show”)
  • 25A Subject of some weather advisories : SMALL CRAFT (giving “craft show”)
  • 37A Apple tablet from 2013 to 2016 : IPAD AIR (giving “air show”)
  • 48A Summit Plummet at Disney World, for one : WATER SLIDE (giving “slide show”)

Bill’s time: 6m 56s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Factory work period : SHIFT

In a three-shift working system, the shifts are known by various names:

  1. First shift, day shift
  2. Second shift, swing shift
  3. Third shift, night shift, graveyard shift

6 Choral part : ALTO

In choral music, an alto (plural “alti”) is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word “alto” describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term “contralto” describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male’s voice (not a boy’s) with the same range as an alto is called a “countertenor”.

16 Nabisco nibble : OREO

If you take a close look at the embossed design on the front and back of an Oreo cookie, you’ll spot the main elements of the Nabisco logo. Those elements are an oval with a cross on top, a cross with two bars. Usually the company name “Nabisco” is inside the oval, but for the cookie it’s the brand name “Oreo”. The current embossed design was introduced 1952.

19 Screenwriter Ephron : NORA

Nora Ephron had many talents, including writing film scripts and novels. Many of the movies that she wrote, she also directed. These would include some of my favorite movies of all time like “Sleepless in Seattle”, “You’ve Got Mail” and most recently, the wonderful “Julie & Julia”. And, did you know that Nora Ephron’s second marriage was to journalist Carl Bernstein of Watergate fame? She wrote an autobiographical novel based on her life with Bernstein, which deals in particular with Bernstein’s affair with the daughter of British Prime Minister James Callaghan.

20 __ Ark : NOAH’S

The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah’s life-preserver during the flood.

22 Timber shaper : ADZE

An adze (also “adz”) is similar to an axe, but is different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool’s shaft. An axe blade is set in line with the shaft.

28 Stars and Stripes squad : TEAM USA

Legend has it that Betsy Ross made the first American flag for General George Washington. However, this story only surfaced during the centennial celebrations of 1876, and although Betsy Ross was indeed one of several flag makers in Philadelphia in the days of George Washington, sadly there’s no definitive evidence that Ross provided that first Stars and Stripes.

31 Delivery doc : OB/GYN

Obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN)

32 Movie lab assistant : IGOR

In the world of movies, Igor has been the assistant to Dracula, Frankenstein and Young Frankenstein among others. Igor is almost invariably portrayed as a hunchback.

36 Gp. that isn’t gun-shy : NRA

National Rifle Association (NRA)

37 Apple tablet from 2013 to 2016 : IPAD AIR (giving “air show”)

The iPad Air is Apple’s 5th-generation table computer. The Air is just 7.5 mm thick, and is 22% lighter than the iPad 2.

40 Real estate buy : LOT

In the world of law, there are two main classes of property: personal property and real property. Personal property is basically movable property. Real property is immovable, such as land or buildings and related assets.

41 Have some grub : EAT

The larvae of stag beetles are commonly known as grubs, and the pupa known as the chrysalis. “Grub” is also slang for food. The word “grub” has been used in this sense since way back in the 1600s, possible derived from birds eating grubs.

43 Botanical swelling : EDEMA

Both animals and plants can suffer from edema, which is a swelling caused by excessive accumulation of fluid.

45 Yellow Brick Road dog : TOTO

Toto is Dorothy’s dog in the film “The Wizard of Oz”, and in the original book “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum. Toto was played in the movie by a dog called Terry, but Terry’s name was soon changed to Toto in real life due to the success of the film.

According to L. Frank Baum’s series of “Oz” novels, there are two Yellow Brick Roads that lead to the Emerald City from Munchkin Country, and it turns out that Dorothy chose the harder of the two. In addition to the yellow roads, there is also a Red Brick Road, which leads from Munchkin County to the Country of the Quadlings.

48 Summit Plummet at Disney World, for one : WATER SLIDE (giving “slide show”)

Disney’s Blizzard Beach is a water park in Walt Disney World in Florida. One of the park’s most famous attractions is the Summit Plummet, which is one of the tallest and fastest free-fall water slides in the world.

52 Bit of pageant attire : SASH

The oldest beauty pageant still operating in the US is the Miss America contest. The Miss America beauty pageant started out as a marketing ploy in the early twenties to attract tourists to the Atlantic City boardwalk after Labor Day. Today, contestants must be between 17 and 24 years of age. Before those limits were introduced, Marian Bergeron won the 1933 title at only 15 years of age.

53 Fashionista Mary-Kate : OLSEN

I know very little about the Olsen twins, but I am told that many folks believe Mary-Kate and Ashley to be identical twins. They look very much alike, but are in fact fraternal twins. The sisters were cast as Michelle Tanner on the eighties sitcom “Full House”, taking turns playing the role.

The Spanish suffix “-ista” indicates a supporter or follower. Examples would be “fashionista” (a follower of fashion) and “Sandinista” (member of a Nicaraguan political party named for revolutionary Augusto César Sandino).

54 Flowers, in Florence : FIORI

Florence is the capital city of the Tuscany region in Italy. Something from or related to Florence is described as “Florentine”. The city is known as “Firenze” in Italian.

63 Chicago mayor Emanuel : RAHM

Rahm Emanuel was an Illinois representative in the US House before resigning in 2009 to take up President Obama’s offer to become the White House Chief of Staff. Emanuel moved on from the White House the following year in order to run as a candidate in Chicago’s mayoral election in 2011. He won the 2011 race, and was re-elected in 2015.

64 Scrabble 10-pointer : Z-TILE

The game of Scrabble has been produced in many international versions, and each of these editions has its own tile distribution to suit the local language. For example, in English we have two tiles worth ten points: one “Q” and one “Z”. If you play the game in French then there are five tiles worth ten points: one “K”, one “W”, one “X”, one “Y” and one “Z”.

Down

1 Wall and Bourbon: Abbr. : STS

New York’s famous Wall Street was originally named by the Dutch “de Waalstraat”.

When New Orleans was founded by the French, the House of Bourbon was ruling France. Bourbon Street was named in its honor.

2 Kubrick’s out-of-control computer : HAL

In Arthur C. Clarke’s “Space Odyssey” (famously adapted for the big screen as “2001: A Space Odyssey”) the computer system that went rogue was called HAL 9000, or simply “HAL”. HAL stands for Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic computer. Even though, Clarke denied it, there’s a good argument that can be made that the acronym HAL is a veiled reference to IBM, the big player in the world of computing at the time of the novel’s publication (1968). The acronym HAL is just a one-letter shift from the initials “IBM”.

Stanley Kubrick was a film director from New York who worked mainly in the UK. Kubrick directed “Spartacus” in Hollywood in 1960, and then relocated to the UK to shoot “Lolita” in 1962. His next film was “Doctor Strangelove”, which also had to be shot in the UK. At that point, Kubrick decided to make England his home.

3 Dublin’s land: Abbr. : IRE

The city of Dublin, the capital of Ireland, is known as “Baile Átha Cliath” in Irish (“town of the hurdled ford”). The English name “Dublin” is an anglicized form of the older Irish name for the city “Dubh Linn”, meaning “black pool”.

4 Faux ally : FRENEMY

A frenemy is someone who feigns friendship but who is actually an enemy or competitor.

6 Bronchial woe : ASTHMA

In the human body, the windpipe (trachea) divides into the left and right bronchi, which enter the lungs. Inflammation of the bronchi can cause the airways to contract and narrow, leading to the condition known as asthma.

7 Capital of Tibet : LHASA

Lhasa is the capital city of Tibet, with the name “Lhasa” translating as “place of the gods”. However, Lhasa used to be called Rasa, a name that translates into the less auspicious “goat’s place”. Lhasa was also once called the “Forbidden City” due to its inaccessible location high in the Himalayas and a traditional hostility exhibited by residents to outsiders. The “forbidden” nature of the city has been reinforced since the Chinese took over Tibet in the early 1950s as it has been difficult for foreigners to get permission to visit Lhasa.

9 Ace’s value, at times : ONE

In the card game called Blackjack, an ace has the point value of one or eleven. When one of the two cards dealt to a player is an ace, the hand is called “soft”. This means that the player cannot go bust by taking another card, as the ace can be revalued at “one” if necessary in order to stay under 21.

12 Calligrapher’s swirl : SERIF

Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif, using the French word “sans” meaning “without” and “serif” from the Dutch “schreef” meaning “line”. Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I’m not so sure though …

Calligraphy is the art of fine handwriting. The term “calligraphy” comes from the Greek “kallos” meaning “beauty” and “graphein” meaning “to write”.

13 Wedding reception highlight : TOAST

The tradition of toasting someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

23 Messing of “Will & Grace” : DEBRA

Debra Messing is most famous for playing Grace on the television series “Will & Grace”.

I’ve always thought the real stars of “Will & Grace” were not the title characters, by rather the supporting characters Jack (played by Sean Hayes) and Karen (played by Megan Mullally).

24 Restaurant survey creator : ZAGAT

The Zagat Survey is best known for rating restaurants across the major cities of the US, but it also rates things like hotels, nightlife, shopping, airlines and even zoos. The survey was started by Tim and Nina Zagat in 1979, and back then the survey was simply a collection of New York City restaurant ratings provided by friends of the couple.

26 Lexi Thompson’s sports org. : LPGA

Lexi Thompson has been a professional golfer since the age of 15, and won her first LPGA tournament at just 16 years of age, which is a record. Thompson had also qualified for the US Women’s Open when she was the ripe old age of 12 years, making her the youngest golfer to play in that tournament.

27 Sainted fifth-century pope : LEO I

The first pope named Leo is now known as Pope Saint Leo the Great. Leo I is famous for meeting with the feared Attila the Hun and persuading him to turn back his invading force that was threatening to overrun Western Europe.

29 Mythical horned equine : UNICORN

A unicorn is a mythical creature that resembles a horse with a horn projecting from its forehead. The term “unicorn” comes from the Latin “uni-” (one) and “cornus” (horn).

32 Cards with pics : IDS

Identity document (ID)

33 Amazon Echo’s assistant : ALEXA

Amazon’s Alexa is a personal assistant application that is most associated with the Amazon Echo smart speaker. Apparently, one reason the name “Alexa” was chosen is because it might remind one of the Library of Alexandria, the “keeper of all knowledge”.

39 AFB truant : AWOL

MPs (military police officers) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

Air Force Base (AFB)

47 Hard-to-miss sign : NEON

The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

49 Hawaiian hi : ALOHA

The Hawaiian word “aloha” has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently, “aloha” has come to mean “hello” and “goodbye”, but only since the mid-1800s.

50 Romanov royals : TSARS

The House of Romanov was the second and last imperial dynasty to rule over Russia, after the Rurik dynasty. The reign of the Romanovs ended when Emperor Nicholas II abdicated following the February Revolution of 1917. Famously, Nicholas II and his immediate family were murdered soon after he stepped down, and other members of the Romanov Dynasty were sent into exile by the Bolsheviks.

51 “__ shoe fits … ” : IF THE

The phrase “if the shoe fits, wear it” is used on this side of the Atlantic to mean “if the statement applies to you, then admit it”. The adage is a variant of the earlier English phrase “if the cap fits, wear it”. There is a similar phrase from even earlier in the 16th century that refers to the fit of a cloak.

55 Use a wrecking ball on : RAZE

To raze (“rase”, in UK English) is to level to the ground. I’ve always thought it a little quirky that “to raise”, a homophone of “to raze”, means “to build up”.

58 Former Mideast org. : UAR

The United Arab Republic (UAR) was a union between Egypt and Syria established in 1958. The UAR dissolved in 1961 when Syria pulled out of the arrangement.

60 World Cup shout : OLE!

The FIFA World Cup is the most prestigious tournament in the sport of soccer. The competition has been held every four years (excluding the WWII years) since the inaugural event held in Uruguay in 1930. The World Cup is the most widely viewed sporting event in the world, even outranking the Olympic Games.

61 Jazzman Montgomery : WES

Wes Montgomery was a jazz guitarist from Indianapolis.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Factory work period : SHIFT
6 Choral part : ALTO
10 Stand the test of time : LAST
14 Hang around : TARRY
15 Deliberately avoid : SHUN
16 Nabisco nibble : OREO
17 Period with dreams, e.g. : SLEEP STAGE (giving “stage show”)
19 Screenwriter Ephron : NORA
20 __ Ark : NOAH’S
21 Rest area array : SEMIS
22 Timber shaper : ADZE
25 Subject of some weather advisories : SMALL CRAFT (giving “craft show”)
28 Stars and Stripes squad : TEAM USA
30 Soup spheres : PEAS
31 Delivery doc : OB/GYN
32 Movie lab assistant : IGOR
33 App annoyances : ADS
36 Gp. that isn’t gun-shy : NRA
37 Apple tablet from 2013 to 2016 : IPAD AIR (giving “air show”)
40 Real estate buy : LOT
41 Have some grub : EAT
42 Ranch grazers : COWS
43 Botanical swelling : EDEMA
45 Yellow Brick Road dog : TOTO
46 Back-of-book lists : INDEXES
48 Summit Plummet at Disney World, for one : WATER SLIDE (giving “slide show”)
52 Bit of pageant attire : SASH
53 Fashionista Mary-Kate : OLSEN
54 Flowers, in Florence : FIORI
56 Pothole’s place : ROAD
57 Perform in the theater … and what can be done to the end of 17-, 25-, 37- and 48-Across : PUT ON A SHOW
62 Drive-__ window : THRU
63 Chicago mayor Emanuel : RAHM
64 Scrabble 10-pointer : Z-TILE
65 Diary securer : HASP
66 Vein yields : ORES
67 Several hairpin turns : ESSES

Down

1 Wall and Bourbon: Abbr. : STS
2 Kubrick’s out-of-control computer : HAL
3 Dublin’s land: Abbr. : IRE
4 Faux ally : FRENEMY
5 Proofer’s find : TYPO
6 Bronchial woe : ASTHMA
7 Capital of Tibet : LHASA
8 Yank : TUG
9 Ace’s value, at times : ONE
10 They don’t like company : LONERS
11 Taco truck allure : AROMA
12 Calligrapher’s swirl : SERIF
13 Wedding reception highlight : TOAST
18 Mouth off to : SASS
21 Visibly healed, as skin : SCARRED
22 Advice to sinners : ATONE
23 Messing of “Will & Grace” : DEBRA
24 Restaurant survey creator : ZAGAT
26 Lexi Thompson’s sports org. : LPGA
27 Sainted fifth-century pope : LEO I
29 Mythical horned equine : UNICORN
32 Cards with pics : IDS
33 Amazon Echo’s assistant : ALEXA
34 Mosque toppers : DOMES
35 Narc’s discovery : STASH
38 Cookware items : POTS
39 AFB truant : AWOL
44 Calls it off : DESISTS
45 Ready to drive, as a golf ball : TEED UP
46 Figures of speech : IDIOMS
47 Hard-to-miss sign : NEON
48 Value : WORTH
49 Hawaiian hi : ALOHA
50 Romanov royals : TSARS
51 “__ shoe fits … ” : IF THE
55 Use a wrecking ball on : RAZE
57 In favor of : PRO
58 Former Mideast org. : UAR
59 Embroidered pronoun : HIS
60 World Cup shout : OLE!
61 Jazzman Montgomery : WES

16 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 19 Mar 19, Tuesday”

  1. LAT: 6:55, 4 errors. Mainly due to some guesses facilitated by abysmally poor cluing. WSJ: 11:00, no errors. Pretty difficult in comparison to the usual. Newsday: 6:08, no errors. Jones sometime later as I didn’t find it posted.

  2. LAT: 7:10, no errors; didn’t see a problem with the cluing (abysmal or otherwise 😜). Newsday: 5:34, no errors. WSJ: 8:54, no errors. Jones later, if and when it shows up. Croce at 4.

    @Carrie (from yesterday)… I spent several minutes on that New Yorker clue, thinking it must be intentional – maybe an inside joke of some kind? The clue was “Hubbub before a Februrary shakeup, for sports fans” and the answer was “NFL TRADE RUMORS” (which, given the woefully inadequate nature of my sports knowledge, took me a long time to guess). One thought I had was this: Given that, these days (with the blessings of the dictionaries!), so many people fail to pronounce the first “r” of “February”, perhaps the puzzle setter and/or editor, with a wry sense of humor, shoe-horned in an extra “r” for everyone to leave out 😜.

  3. Dave, I am constantly amazed that how many eagle eyed readers are there in our crowd that an extra ‘r’ can be noticed !! On the other hand a spelling error can whack you in the gut when you least expect it. I have been able to easily and unconsciously detect grammatical errors or changes in the English language when the respondents are British or non Americans …. it just sticks out like a sore thumb !

    I had a good time with the puzzle though thd long answers weren’t immediately obvious. All in all, very satisfying…

    Thanks to Bill’ S lucid explanations etc. I have nothing to add … it’s all wonderful, as it is!

    Have s nice day folks.

    1. @Vidwan … I was rather dyslexic as a kid and had to spend a lot of time working on getting over it, as a result of which I became hyper-aware of little glitches in what I read. Unfortunately, this sometimes makes me incapable of seeing the forest for the trees. (I’m also finding that, as I get older, some types of dyslexia are returning.)

  4. 8:20. Didn’t get the theme until the reveal. Clues all seemed fair enough to me too.

    Heading down to the Phoenix area today to go to a few Spring Training games. Most of my family will be there. I haven’t seen them since Hurricane Harvey flooded my house 20 months ago. Should be fun. My cousin does radio for one of the teams there, and the fam uses that as an excuse to go to AZ every year for vacation. It’s nice that I can just drive down there now from Las Vegas.

    Be back Saturday. I should have time to keep up with puzzles during this trip. Sorry, Carrie, I don’t think I’ll make any Dodger games, but the Cardinals will be at Dodger stadium the first week of August. I just might make those games.

    Best –

  5. Dave, your answer on dyslexia is noted, ….. there’s a silver lining to every cloud.

    I came across some limericks pertinent or not, to today’s word clues … and here they are, anyway …

    ‘Tis a favorite project of mine
    A new value of pi to assign.
    I would fix it at 3
    For its simpler, you see,
    Than 3 point 1 4 1 5 9

    And for those into Einstein’s theory of Rel.

    There was a young lady named Bright
    Whose speed was far faster than light;
    She went out one day,
    In a relative way,
    And returned the previous night.

    The above is commonly known, but here is the follow up ….

    To her friends said the Bright one in chatter,
    « I have learned something new about matter:
    My speed was so great,
    Much increased was my weight,
    Yet I failed to become any fatter »

    And, finally (!!) on ibids, and idems…

    Anon., Idem, Ibid. and Trad.
    Wrote much that is morally bad:
    Some ballads, some chanties,
    All poems on panties——
    And limericks, too, one must add.

  6. Mind you Dave, I’m just typing them from a book ….

    Hickory, Dickory, Dock in French ….

    Digerie, digerie, doge.
    La souris ascend l’horloge.
    L’horloge frappe
    La souris s’e’chappe,
    Digerie, digerie, doge.

    Needless to say, I don’t know french… hence I hope it means what it does ….

  7. I thought of one:

    Hickory Dickory Dock
    Two mice ran up the clock
    The clock struck one
    The other escaped with minor injuries.

    Today, 2 omissions and 0 errors. I had to stay with TEAMUSA; I thought of
    FRENEMY coming down, but neither knew the word nor had the courage
    to even try it. It was a no-lose situation; an omission is the same as an error.
    I found it easier than yesterday’s LAT puzzle. Kudos to all.

  8. Greetings!!🐔

    No errors. The puzzle was fine, but I enjoyed Bill’s write-up and this great bunch of comments more. 😁

    Dave! Nice of you to try to find an explanation!! I just think it’s an error….

    As for catching errors, I’ve been an English teacher for…33 years!! (Had to count that up! Definitely NOT a math teacher….) At any rate, I also attended Catholic school through 6th grade, so looking for language errors is in my DNA.😊

    Jeff! You know I’m also a Cards fan and I’d love to see Dodgers vs Cards…. look for me in August! I’m easy to spot: I’ll be the one wearing a Dodgers cap…..😄⚾️

    Be well~~⚾️

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