LA Times Crossword 8 May 19, Wednesday

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Constructed by: Sam Acker
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Draw Conclusions

Themed answers CONCLUDE with things that are DRAWN:

  • 7D Infer … or what the answers to starred clues end with? : DRAW CONCLUSIONS
  • 17A *Mint target : BAD BREATH (giving “draw breath”)
  • 20A *Overhead buzzers : POWERLINES (giving “draw lines”)
  • 31A *Lists of wrestling matches, say : EVENT CARDS (giving “draw cards”)
  • 39A *Building sites : VACANT LOTS (giving “draw lots”)
  • 50A *Civil War volley : CANNON FIRE (giving “draw fire”)
  • 57A *HBO vampire series : TRUE BLOOD (giving “draw blood”)

Bill’s time: 7m 37s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6 Org. concerned with outbreaks : CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The CDC started out life during WWII as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. The CDC worries about much more than malaria these days …

9 Follower of Guru Nanak : SIKH

Sikhism is a religion that was founded in the Punjab region, which straddles the India-Pakistan border. Even though Sikhism was established relatively recently, it is now the fifth-largest organized religion in the world. Sikhism was founded in the 15th century by Guru Nanak.

14 Shapiro of NPR : ARI

Ari Shapiro served very ably as White House correspondent for National Public Radio (NPR) for several years. He then became a co-host of network’s drive-time program “All Things Considered” in 2015.

15 Sunlit lobbies : ATRIA

In modern architecture, an atrium (plural “atria” or “atriums”) is a large open space usually in the center of a building and extending upwards to the roof. The original atrium was an open court in the center of an Ancient Roman house. One could access most of the enclosed rooms of the house from the atrium.

19 Soccer legend Mia : HAMM

Mia Hamm is a retired American soccer player. She was a forward who played on the US national team that won the FIFA women’s World Cup in 1991. Hamm has scored 158 international goals, more than other player in the world, male or female. Amazingly, Hamm was born with a clubfoot, and so had to wear corrective shoes when she was growing up.

21 Verb type without a direct obj. : INTR

Transitive verbs are those that can take direct objects, and intransitive verbs are those that do not. Examples of transitive verbs are “throw (the ball)” and “injure (a leg)”. Examples of intransitive verbs are “fall” and “sit”.

24 Bad guy you root for : ANTIHERO

An “antihero” is a character perhaps in a movie or novel. He or she is the “hero” of the piece, but is also someone who doesn’t exhibit the qualities associated traditionally with a hero, such as bravery or moral fortitude.

27 __ de cologne : EAU

Back in 1709, an Italian perfume-maker moved to Cologne in Germany. There he invented a new fragrance that he named Eau de Cologne after his newly adopted town. The fragrance is still produced in Cologne, using a secret formulation. However, the terms “Eau de Cologne” and “cologne”, are now used generically.

35 Prepare to drag : REV

Back in the 18th century “drag” was slang for a wagon or buggy, as it was “dragged” along by a horse or horses. In the 1930s, the underworld adopted “drag” as slang for an automobile. This sense of the word was imported into automobile racing in the forties, giving the name to “drag racing”. A drag race is basically a competition between two cars to determine which can accelerate faster from a standstill.

41 “Wherever __”: OneRepublic song : I GO

OneRepublic is a pop rock band that formed in 2002 in Colorado Springs. Initially, the band used the name “Republic”, but changed to “OneRepublic” to avoid possible conflict with similar band names.

45 Flightless birds : RHEAS

The rhea is a flightless bird that is native to South America. The rhea takes its name from the Greek Titan Rhea. It’s an apt name for a flightless bird as “rhea” comes from the Greek word meaning “ground”.

49 Aspiring DA’s exam : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

54 Pet healers : VETS

“Vet” is an abbreviation for “veterinarian”, a professional who treat animals for disease and injury. The word “veterinary” comes from the Latin “veterinae” meaning “working animals, beasts of burden”.

57 *HBO vampire series : TRUE BLOOD (giving “draw blood”)

“True Blood” is a television drama made by HBO. The series is based on a series of novels written by Charlaine Harris that describe human and vampires co-existing in a small town in Louisiana. I don’t do vampires …

58 San Diego player : PADRE

The San Diego Padres baseball team was founded in 1969, and immediately joined the ranks of Major League Baseball as an expansion team. The Padres took their name from a Minor League team that had been in the the city since 1936. The name is Spanish for “fathers” and is a reference to the Franciscan Friars from Spain who founded San Diego in 1769.

59 Like games in an arcade bar : RETRO

Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

60 Protein-building molecule : RNA

The two most common nucleic acids are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), both of which play crucial roles in genetics. The DNA contains the genetic instructions used to keep living organisms functioning, and RNA is used to transcribe that information from the DNA to protein “generators” called ribosomes.

61 Shoelace tip : AGLET

An aglet is a plastic or metal sheath that is found on the end of a shoelace or perhaps a drawstring. The name “aglet” comes from the Old French word “aiguillette” meaning “needle”.

64 Spanish rulers : REYES

In Spanish, “reyes” (kings) rule.

Down

1 Kid : JOSH

When the verb “to josh”, meaning “to kid”, was coined in the 1840s as an American slang term, it was written with a capital J. It is likely that the term somehow comes from the proper name “Joshua”, but no one seems to remember why.

2 Nike competitor : AVIA

The “Avia” brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as “avia” is the Latin word for “to fly”, and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

3 Jewish girl’s coming-of-age : BAT MITZVAH

A Jewish girl becomes a Bat Mitzvah at 12 years of age, the age at which she becomes responsible for her actions. Boys become Bar Mitzvahs at 13. The terms translate into English as daughter and son of the commandments.

5 Baker’s meas. : TSP

Teaspoon (tsp.)

6 __ San Lucas: Baja resort : CABO

Cabo San Lucas is a major tourist destination at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico. “Cabo” is sometimes referred to as the “Fort Lauderdale of Mexico”.

9 “Gone With the Wind” composer Max : STEINER

Max Steiner was an Austrian-born composer who moved to Hollywood in 1929, and who earned himself the moniker “the father of film music”. Steiner composed over 300 film scores, including, “King Kong” (1933), “Little Women” (1933), “Casablanca” (1942) and “Gone with the Wind” (1939).

10 Shiraz’s country : IRAN

The Iranian city of Shiraz has long been associated with wine, but there is no proven link between the city and the wine/grape we know today as “Shiraz” (also called “Syrah”). Having said that, some clay jars were found just outside of the city of Shiraz that contained wine; wine that was 7,000 years old!

15 Woody’s son : ARLO

Singer Arlo Guthrie is known for his protest songs, just like his father Woody Guthrie. The younger Guthrie only ever had one song in the top 40: a cover version of “City of New Orleans”. He has lived for years in the town of Washington, just outside Pittsfield, Massachusetts. His 1976 song “Massachusetts” has been the official folk song of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1981.

20 Musician André with 11 Grammys : PREVIN

André Previn was a pianist, conductor and composer who was born in Berlin, Germany but who grew up in Los Angeles. Previn won four Oscars for his work on the musical scores of “Gigi” (1958), “Porgy & Bess” (1959), “Irma la Douce” (1963) and “My Fair Lady” (1964). Previn was married five time, most famously probably to actress Mia Farrow.

22 GIs’ support gp. : THE VA

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) was formed in 1930 to manage pre-existing government benefits for war veterans. Some of those benefits dated back to the Continental Congress.

24 Like six starred puz. answers : ACR

Across (acr.)

25 New, in Nogales : NUEVO

Nogales (properly called “Heroica Nogales”) is a city in the Mexican State of Sonora. Nogales lies right on the Mexico-US border, opposite the city of Nogales, Arizona.

33 Nautilus cousin : CUTTLE

Cuttlefish are marine animals that are related to squids and octopodes. Cuttlefish have a unique internal shell and are molluscs, not fish.

The marine creature called a nautilus (plural “nautili”) is referred to as a “living fossil”, as it looks just like the spiral-shelled creatures that are commonly found in fossils. The spiral shape is a great example of the Fibonacci series defining a natural phenomenon, as the spiral is a Fibonacci spiral, described by the famous series of numbers. The nautilus moves using jet propulsion, by ingesting water at one end and then squirting it out at the other.

40 Least gooey brownie pieces : CORNERS

Apparently, the first brownies were created for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The recipe was developed by a pastry chef at the city’s Palmer House Hotel. The idea was to produce a cake-like dessert that was small enough and dainty enough to be eaten by ladies as part of a boxed lunch.

46 Stereotypical train hopper : HOBO

No one seems to know for sure how the term “hobo” originated, although there are lots of colorful theories. My favorite is that “hobo” comes from the first letters in the words “ho-meward bo-und”, but it doesn’t seem very plausible. A kind blog reader tells me that according to Click and Clack from PBS’s “Car Talk” (a great source!), “hobo” comes from “hoe boy”. Hoe boys were young men with hoes looking for work after the Civil War. Hobos differed from “tramps” and “bums”, in that “bums” refused to work, “tramps” worked when they had to, while “hobos” traveled in search of work.

47 Blowup: Abbr. : ENL

Enlargement (enl.)

50 Bottom row PC key : CTRL

The Control (CTRL) key on a PC keyboard is used to modify the function of other keys. For example, pressing CTRL+C copies a selection to the clipboard, and CTRL+V pastes the contents of the clipboard to a location defined by the cursor. Control keys were introduced on teletypewriters to generate “control characters”, which are non-printing characters that instruct a computer to do something like print a page, ring a bell etc.

51 Real estate calculation : AREA

The terms “realty” and “real estate” actually date back to the late 1600s. Back then, the terms meant “real possessions, things owned that are tangible and real”.

53 Nutritional stds. : RDAS

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

55 Christmas decoration : TREE

The custom of decorating trees at Christmas seems to have originated in Renaissance Germany. Those first trees were placed in guildhalls and were decorated with sweets and candy for the apprentices and children. After the Protestant Reformation, the Christmas tree became an alternative in Protestant homes for the Roman Catholic Christmas cribs. The Christmas tree tradition was imported into Britain by the royal family because of its German heritage. That tradition spread from Britain into North America.

58 72 for 18 holes, often : PAR

There’s an urban myth that the standard number of holes on a golf course is 18 because it takes 18 shots to polish off a fifth of scotch whisky. However, the truth is that the standard number of holes in the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland happened to settle down over time at 18, and that standard was adopted all around the world.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Try to punch : JAB AT
6 Org. concerned with outbreaks : CDC
9 Follower of Guru Nanak : SIKH
13 Shapes for running laps : OVALS
14 Shapiro of NPR : ARI
15 Sunlit lobbies : ATRIA
16 Crunch-like exercise : SIT-UP
17 *Mint target : BAD BREATH (giving “draw breath”)
19 Soccer legend Mia : HAMM
20 *Overhead buzzers : POWERLINES (giving “draw lines”)
21 Verb type without a direct obj. : INTR
23 Sing smoothly : CROON
24 Bad guy you root for : ANTIHERO
27 __ de cologne : EAU
30 Slangy “No reason” : CUZ
31 *Lists of wrestling matches, say : EVENT CARDS (giving “draw cards”)
35 Prepare to drag : REV
36 Like maple syrup : VISCOUS
37 Geographical resource : MAP
39 *Building sites : VACANT LOTS (giving “draw lots”)
41 “Wherever __”: OneRepublic song : I GO
42 “I see it now!” : OHO!
43 Yet to be tried : UNTESTED
45 Flightless birds : RHEAS
49 Aspiring DA’s exam : LSAT
50 *Civil War volley : CANNON FIRE (giving “draw fire”)
54 Pet healers : VETS
57 *HBO vampire series : TRUE BLOOD (giving “draw blood”)
58 San Diego player : PADRE
59 Like games in an arcade bar : RETRO
60 Protein-building molecule : RNA
61 Shoelace tip : AGLET
62 Young woman : LASS
63 Mountain road curve : ESS
64 Spanish rulers : REYES

Down

1 Kid : JOSH
2 Nike competitor : AVIA
3 Jewish girl’s coming-of-age : BAT MITZVAH
4 Many college donors : ALUMNI
5 Baker’s meas. : TSP
6 __ San Lucas: Baja resort : CABO
7 Infer … or what the answers to starred clues end with? : DRAW CONCLUSIONS
8 Fall drink : CIDER
9 “Gone With the Wind” composer Max : STEINER
10 Shiraz’s country : IRAN
11 Toy on a string : KITE
12 Guffaws : HAHS
15 Woody’s son : ARLO
18 Pal : BRO
20 Musician André with 11 Grammys : PREVIN
22 GIs’ support gp. : THE VA
24 Like six starred puz. answers : ACR
25 New, in Nogales : NUEVO
26 Snooze : REST
28 “Truth be told … ” : ADMITTEDLY …
29 Grammarian’s concern : USAGE
32 Animation creation : TOON
33 Nautilus cousin : CUTTLE
34 Donkeys : ASSES
38 Sci-fi escape unit : POD
40 Least gooey brownie pieces : CORNERS
44 Brutal : SAVAGE
46 Stereotypical train hopper : HOBO
47 Blowup: Abbr. : ENL
48 Ere : AFORE
50 Bottom row PC key : CTRL
51 Real estate calculation : AREA
52 Bar freebies : NUTS
53 Nutritional stds. : RDAS
55 Christmas decoration : TREE
56 “Action!” places : SETS
58 72 for 18 holes, often : PAR

23 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 8 May 19, Wednesday”

  1. LAT: 10:09, no errors. Newsday: 5:36, no errors. WSJ: 11:54, no errors. Jones: 11:25, no errors.

    1. And … Tim Croce’s latest: 59:48, no errors; a lot easier than the one from 2016 that I did yesterday … 😜.

  2. 26:35 no errors….never did pick up on the theme……a couple of clues like 33D and 36A were IMO a little obscure and before you say anything Mr Dave , I’m talking about us regular folks.

    1. Well, just for the record … it seems to me that regular folks buy motor oil, anyone who buys motor oil knows about “viscosity”, and “viscous” is the related adjective. “Cuttle” by itself gave me pause, but I’ve heard of “cuttlefish”, so it wasn’t much of a stretch to fill that in (particularly since it was the only thing that fit).

      And … shucks and dagnabit … I thought I was a regular folk … 😜.

  3. John Daigle –

    Just read your comments from yesterday. I’m curious where you were an assistant pro in Missouri. I grew up in the St. Louis area playing at Algonquin Golf Club, if you’re familiar with it.

    1. I am very familiar with Algonquin CC, because it was in the PGA Section
      where I worked for Jim Fogertey at Sunset CC for two seasons. Can’t
      recall who was the pro at ACC then. I knew Sid Solomon (check spelling)
      and all of the other assistants and pros. Dutch Harrison was there then. I gave up after a total of 4 years of not really getting where I wanted to get and having no life except golf. Thanks for the comment. Still play and can easily beat my advanced age of 85. Shot 75 this past Monday. If you want to become e-friends, write me a note at jadsli@camtel.net.

      For the group – close to 2 hours today, managed 0 errors and thoroughly
      enjoyed the puzzle because I found hardly no help in the dictionary. I felt
      good about all but a couple of my guesses and my wife got a crucial one
      that I would not have gotten. Bill took 2 minutes longer than his typical 5
      minutes, so I can see why we also took longer as well.

      1. John D. –
        I don’t know which years you’re referring to, but do either of the names Milon Marusic (sp?) or Wayne Morris sound familiar? Wayne was a character, but I believe he still holds the course record at Algonquin (64). Milon was the pro there in the early 70’s. Wayne was after that.

        I never played Sunset but am very familiar with it.

        My grandfather always strove to shoot his age. He was a lifelong 6 handicap. No distance as he aged, but could chip and putt better than anyone I”ve ever seen. I think the closest he came was shooting a 77 at age 75 or something like that. That type of accomplishment is usually newspaper-worthy – like a hole in one.

        Sid Soloman’s family owned the Blues hockey franchise. I went to school with their son.

        Wow. Small world.

      2. I knew Milon Marusic well and thought he had been pro at ACC, with
        Dick Shapier as his assistant. Milon beat Jack Burke one year when the
        PGA was match play. I was there 1960-1962. Small world, indeed. I only
        broke 70 once (69) in a Pro-Member tournament and finished second to
        Shapier. Sid Soloman and I would compete to see who could hit the
        longest drive and then miss the shortest putt!

        1. John D –

          I’ll email in the future so we stop boring people on this blog, but another coincidence: Jack Burke started up Champion’s CC in Houston (after leaving River Oaks). That’s right by where I was living when Hurricane Harvey flooded my house with 51 inches of water 21 months ago. I’ve since relocated to higher and drier ground in the Las Vegas area.

  4. 9:49. Fun one, but the theme went right over my head. I didn’t notice it until I finished. I got confused by the clue “Nautilus cousin”. At first I thought of exercise equipment. Then I thought of the nuclear submarine. I got CUTTLE by crosses and never understood it until the blog.

    Pedantic note of the day: In my post yesterday I used the phrase “probably apocryphal”. Isn’t that redundant? It’s like saying a story is probably questionable. It’s either questionable or it’s certain. If I’m not sure the story is true, then it’s apocryphal. Anyone have any other optional alternative ideas about saying something again redundantly?

    On my way to the ATM machine. I hope I don’t forget my PIN number.

    Best –

  5. @Jeff … I posted a response saying I had no problem with the phrase “probably apocryphal” … but then I looked it up in my Webster’s College Dictionary, and found these two definitions: 1) of doubtful authorship or authenticity; 2) not genuine; spurious; counterfeit. The modifier “probably” works with the second of these (which is the one I’ve always assumed, I guess), but not the first. Interesting … 😳.

    I think this may be yet another case of a word’s meaning shifting/broadening/smearing as a result of incorrect usage.

    1. Mr. Dave –
      I think you’re right about the changing of the meaning of “apocryphal”. The word is derived from two books removed from the King James Bible because of unknown origins or at least it was unknown the the Christians if they were indeed “inspired” or not. The second definition which is more absolute (counterfeit) seems like a modern usage thing.

      So I’d prefer to remain wrong rather than see I’m right because of modern usage…or mis-usage. Does that make me too set in my ways?

  6. @Mary – that was the one I Googled, but because I would never watch that sort of thing. Had TRUE deaD before TRUE BLOOD.

    I found this many times more difficult than yesterday. Also had CANNONball before CANNON FIRE, Bud before BRO and aHa before OHO.

    Never heard of STEINER, CABO, EVENT CARDS, I GO.

    @Kozykol – I agree. OHO is another stretch.

  7. Moderately easy Wednesday for me; took about 20 minutes with no errors but quite a bit of moving around and waiting for crosses.

    Had to change aHa to OHO and HAHs, but thats it. Didn’t know what “Nautilus cousin” was until I got here too. I have a huge bottle of the Eau de Cologne which I inherited.

    Good day for Bay Area sports…Giants, Sharks and Warriors. Also, my 1. FC Cologne got promoted back to the Bundesliga on Monday…Yea!

  8. Greetings from the Night Watch!!😎

    No errors, but I also had AHA before OHO. And, for some reason it took me forever to get the CARD part of EVENT CARDS. 🤔

    AGLET!! So those things DO have a name! I remember an episode of The Mary Tyler Moore show where Sue-Ann had a boring date with a fellow who manufactured those things. In the episode, Sue-Ann complains “There isn’t even a name for those things!” Forty two years later I discover that they are called aglets!!😯

    RE “probably apocryphal” — I think the adverb “probably” can be used for either definition. One doesn’t know for sure at this point whether the story is false. Adverbs of degree can’t be used; you can’t say “extremely apocryphal ” with definition one, for example. The story either is or isn’t apocryphal.

    Hey Dirk! Here in the south we Dodgers fans are happy. I guess I should check to see how the Angels are doing — don’t know offhand because, well, American League!!😬

    Be well~~🎂

    1. Hmmm. I think Jeff’s point was that, using definition 1, saying that something is “probably apocryphal” is like saying that it is “probably probably false” – maybe not exactly wrong, but redundant.

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