LA Times Crossword 3 Sep 19, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Winston Emmons
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer(s): End Run

Themed answers each END with a synonym of “RUN”:

  • 69A With 72-Across, evasive strategy … and a hint to the last several letters of the four longest Across answers : END …
  • 72A See 69-Across : … RUN
  • 18A Redeeming quality : SAVING GRACE (giving “race”)
  • 36A Paper for papers : NEWSPRINT (giving “sprint”)
  • 44A Small museum piece : OBJET D’ART (giving “dart”)
  • 63A Citrus-flavored soda : ORANGE CRUSH (giving “rush”)

Bill’s time: 5m 53s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

4 Title for Bovary or Defarge : MADAME

“Madame Bovary” is the most famous novel written by Gustave Flaubert. The title character is a doctor’s wife named Emma Bovary, who lives a luxurious life beyond her means and has many adulterous affairs. The novel had a rousing reception, including an attack by public prosecutors who labeled is as obscene, which I am sure later helped “Madame Bovary” to become a bestseller.

Madame Thérèse Defarge is a character in the Charles Dickens novel “A Tale of Two Cities”. As part of her role in the story, Mme. Defarge sits knitting while observing the guillotine doing its macabre work.

10 Feudal estate : FIEF

Feudalism was a legal and military system that flourished in medieval Europe. Central to the system were the concepts of lords, vassals and fiefs. Lords would grant fiefs (land or rights) to vassals in exchange for allegiance and service.

14 Computer application file suffix : EXE

In the Windows operating system, a file with the extension .exe is an “executable” file.

15 European peninsula : IBERIA

The Iberian Peninsula in Europe is largely made up of Spain and Portugal. However, also included is the Principality of Andorra in the Pyrénées, a small part of the south of France, and the British Territory of Gibraltar. Iberia takes its name from the Ebro, the longest river in Spain, which the Romans named the “Iber”.

16 “A Jug of Wine … ” poet : OMAR

Here are some lines by 11th-century poet Omar Khayyam:

A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread–and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness–
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!

17 Ala. neighbor : FLA

What we know as the US state of Florida, was named by Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León, who led the first Europeans to the area in 1513. The actual name he used was “La Florida”, Spanish for “the Flowery (Land)”.

20 Many Montenegrins : SERBS

Serbs are an ethnic group native to the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Although Serbs exist as a minority group in many countries in the region, they are the majority ethnic group in Serbia, in Montenegro and in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Montenegro is a country in Southeastern Europe that once was part of Yugoslavia. “Montenegro” is a historical Italianate translation of “black mountain”.

23 “Weekend Update” comic Michael : CHE

Michael Che is a standup comedian from New York City. Che had worked as a writer for “Saturday Night Live” (SNL), and then started to appear in front of SNL cameras in September 2014. One of his roles was co-anchor for the “Weekend Update” segment of the show.

38 Person of the Year awarder : TIME

“Time” magazine started naming a “Man of the Year” in 1927, only changing the concept to “Person of the Year” in 1999. Prior to 1999, the magazine did recognize four females as “Woman of the Year”: Wallis Simpson (1936), Soong May-ling a.k.a. Madame Chiang Kai-shek (1937), Queen Elizabeth II (1952) and Corazon Aquino (1986). “Time” named Albert Einstein as Person of the Century in 1999, with Franklin D. Roosevelt and Mahatma Gandhi as runners-up.

40 “__ John B”: Beach Boys hit : SLOOP

The Beach Boys hit “Sloop John B” is a traditional folk song from the West Indies that was originally titled “The John B. Sails”. The John B. was a real boat, one used for collecting sponges. The John B. foundered and sank in Governor’s Harbor on the Bahamas on or about 1900. The folk song was around as far back is 1927, with recordings being made as early as 1935. The Kingston Trio recorded a version in 1958, as did Johnny Cash in 1959. The Beach Boys version of the song made it to #3 in the US charts in 1966. We liked it even more in Ireland and sent it to the top of the Irish charts.

42 Former govt. agency devoted to public diplomacy : USIA

The United States Information Agency (USIA) was established under President Eisenhower in 1953, and continued operating until 1999. It’s mission was “public diplomacy”, another term for propaganda broadcast over radio airwaves. The intent from day one was to avoid having the broadcasts identified as propaganda. Speaking as a former listener to the USIA’s Voice of America (VOA) over in Europe, there were a lot of fun programs that had one coming back to hear more, but we all knew it was propaganda quite frankly …

43 Chianti Classico, per esempio : VINO

Chianti is a red wine from the Chianti region of central Tuscany in Italy. Historically, Chianti was stored in a characteristically bulbous bottle wrapped in a straw basket. However, the pragmatists have won the day and regular wine bottles tend to be used nowadays.

44 Small museum piece : OBJET D’ART (giving “dart”)

An “objet d’art” is an item that has artistic merit. The term is French for “art object”. The plural is “objets d’art”.

49 Chestnut horses : SORRELS

The sorrel color of horse is a copper-red, although the term is often used these days to describe any horse with chestnut coloring.

50 Angler’s decoy : LURE

We use the verb “to angle” to mean “to fish” because “angel” is an Old English word meaning “hook”.

53 Résumé writer’s goal : JOB

A résumé is a summary of a person’s job experience and education and is used as a tool by a job seeker. In many countries, a résumé is equivalent to a curriculum vitae. “Résumé” is the French word for “summary”.

56 Resignee of 1974 : NIXON

Facing almost certain impeachment, President Richard Nixon resigned the presidency in September 1974. One month later, President Gerald Ford granted Nixon a “full, free, and absolute pardon”.

59 Forever __ : STAMP

The forever stamp for first-class postage was introduced in 2006 (and about time!). Now we have stamps that are good for first-class postage forever, no matter how often the rates change.

63 Citrus-flavored soda : ORANGE CRUSH (giving “rush”)

The Crush brand of soft drinks was formulated in 1916. The first product was an orange-flavored beverage sold as Ward’s Orange Crush.

66 Chillax : VEG

“Chillax” is a slang term meaning “chill and relax”. Who’da thunk it …?

67 Poi source : TARO

I am a big fan of starch (being an Irishman I love potatoes). That said, I think that poi tastes horrible! Poi is made from the bulbous tubers (corm) of the taro plant by cooking the corm in water and mashing it until the desired consistency is achieved.

70 Large number : SLEW

Our usage of “slew” to mean “large number” has nothing to do with the verb “to slew” meaning “to turn, skid”. The noun “slew” came into English in the early 1800s from the Irish word “sluagh” meaning “host, crowd, multitude”.

71 On the schedule : SLATED

Back in the early 1800s, “to slate” meant “to nominate”, perhaps by writing a name on a slate. By the end of the 1800s, this usage of “slate” extended to “propose, schedule”.

Down

3 __ Abby : DEAR

The advice column “Dear Abby” first appeared in 1956. Pauline Phillips was Abby back then, but now the column is written by Jeanne Phillips, her daughter. The full name of the “Abby” pen name is Abigail Van Buren, which Pauline Phillips came up with by combining “Abigail” from the biblical Book of Samuel, and “Van Buren” after the former US president. “Dear Abby” was also a radio show in the sixties and seventies.

5 Attorney’s org. : ABA

American Bar Association (ABA)

6 “Whip It” rock band : DEVO

Devo is a band from Akron, Ohio formed back in 1973. The band’s biggest hit is “Whip It” released in 1980. Devo have a gimmick: the wearing of red, terraced plastic hats that are referred to as “energy domes”. Why? I have no idea …

11 All-in-one Apple : IMAC

The iMac is a desktop computer platform that Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such as strawberry, blueberry and lime.

19 Wrap with tzatziki sauce : GYRO

A gyro is a traditional Greek dish of meat roasted on a tall vertical spit that is sliced from the spit as required. Gyros are usually served inside a lightly grilled piece of pita bread, along with tomato, onion and tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce).

21 Happy hour perch : BARSTOOL

I personally think that Happy Hour is best enjoyed shaken, not stirred; and with a good crossword …

25 Rover’s territory : MARS

There have been several rovers sent to Mars from Earth. The Soviet Union’s Mars 2 landed in 1971, and failed. Mars 3 landed the same year, and ceased operation just 20 seconds after landing. NASA’s Sojourner landed in 1997 (what a great day that was!) and operated from July through September. The British rover Beagle 2 was lost six days before its scheduled entry into the Martian atmosphere. NASA’s Spirit landed in 2004, and operated successfully for over six years before getting trapped in sand and eventually ceasing to communicate. NASA’s Opportunity also landed in 2004, and it is still going. And then NASA’s Curiosity made a spectacular, hi-tech landing in 2012 and is continuing to explore the planet today.

29 Jacob and Esau, e.g. : TWINS

Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins “the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)”. As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father’s wealth (it was his “birthright”). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a “mess of pottage” (a meal of lentils).

30 DEA agent’s find : KILO

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was set up in 1973 while President Nixon was in office.

31 Hoity-toity types : SNOBS

Believe it or not, the term “hoity-toity” has been in the English language since the 1660s, but back then it meant “riotous behavior”. It began to mean “haughty” in the late 1800s, simply because the “haughty” sounds similar to “hoity”.

33 Strong fiber : SISAL

The sisal plant is an agave, and as far as I can tell, its flesh is not used in making tequila. Sisal is grown instead for the fibers that run the length of its leaves. The fiber is used extensively for twine, rope, carpeting, wall coverings etc. My favorite application though, is in the construction of dartboards. Sisal takes its name from the port of Sisal in Yucatan, Mexico that was a major shipping point for sisal plants.

34 Qatari bigwigs : EMIRS

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry. Qatar is scheduled to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, although the nation’s eligibility to do so is under question after a far-reaching bribery scandal was uncovered at the sport’s governing body.

36 __ Scotia : NOVA

The Canadian province of Nova Scotia (NS) lies on the east coast of the country and is a peninsula surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean. The area was settled by Scots starting in 1621, and Nova Scotia is Latin for “New Scotland”.

37 Japanese leader during WWII : TOJO

Hideki Tojo was a general and the Prime Minister of Japan during most of WWII. Although the attack on Pearl Harbor was planned before he took office, Tojo was the Prime Minister who made the decision to declare war on the US. After Japan surrendered, General MacArthur ordered Tojo’s arrest. Tojo attempted to commit suicide by shooting himself in the heart, but missed. There is a story that while recovering, Tojo was given a set of replacement dentures that were made by an American dentist. Apparently the dentist drilled the message “Remember Pearl Harbor” into the teeth in Morse code. Tojo was hanged for war crimes in 1948.

41 Salon offering : PERM

“Perm” is the common name given to a permanent wave, a chemical or thermal treatment of hair to produce waves or curls.

51 Spreadsheet program in Microsoft Office : EXCEL

Microsoft Excel is the spreadsheet program included in the Microsoft Office suite of applications. Microsoft’s first spreadsheet program was introduced back in 1982 and called Multiplan. Multiplan’s popularity waned due to the success of the competing product Lotus 1-2-3. Microsoft then introduced Excel, initially just for the Macintosh. When Excel was extended to Windows, Lotus was slow to respond and Microsoft took over the market.

57 Penguin predator : ORCA

The taxonomic name for the killer whale is “Orcinus orca”. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

Penguins are flightless, aquatic birds that spend half their lives on land, and half in the sea. All species of penguins, bar one, live in the southern hemisphere. The one species found north of the equator is the Galápagos penguin that is endemic to the Galápagos Islands located west of Ecuador. Adult male penguins are called cocks, females are hens, and the young are chicks. A group of penguins in the water is a raft, and on land is a waddle. Apt, and cute …

58 Nantes night : NUIT

Nantes is a beautiful city located on the delta of the Loire, Erdre and Sèvre rivers. It has the well deserved nickname of “The Venice of the West”. I had the privilege of visiting Nantes a couple of times on business, and I can attest that it really is a charming city …

62 Scrolling key : PGDN

PGUP (Page Up) and PGDN (Page Down) are two navigation keys found on a PC keyboard.

65 Sault __ Marie : STE

Sault Ste. Marie is the name of two cities on either side of the Canada-US border, one in Ontario and the other in Michigan. The two cities were originally one settlement in the 17th century, established by Jesuit Missionaries. The missionaries gave the settlement the name “Sault Sainte Marie”, which can be translated as “Saint Mary’s Falls”. The city was one community until 1817, when a US-UK Joint Boundary Commission set the border along the St. Mary’s River.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 “Way cool!” : RAD!
4 Title for Bovary or Defarge : MADAME
10 Feudal estate : FIEF
14 Computer application file suffix : EXE
15 European peninsula : IBERIA
16 “A Jug of Wine … ” poet : OMAR
17 Ala. neighbor : FLA
18 Redeeming quality : SAVING GRACE (giving “race”)
20 Many Montenegrins : SERBS
22 “Much to my surprise … ” : ODDLY …
23 “Weekend Update” comic Michael : CHE
24 Cash dispenser : ATM
26 “Buona __”: Italian “Good evening” : SERA
28 Lines of lightning … or lightening : STREAKS
32 Coin flips : TOSSES
36 Paper for papers : NEWSPRINT (giving “sprint”)
38 Person of the Year awarder : TIME
39 Leave out : OMIT
40 “__ John B”: Beach Boys hit : SLOOP
42 Former govt. agency devoted to public diplomacy : USIA
43 Chianti Classico, per esempio : VINO
44 Small museum piece : OBJET D’ART (giving “dart”)
46 Distribute into groups : ASSORT
49 Chestnut horses : SORRELS
50 Angler’s decoy : LURE
52 Fellow : MAN
53 Résumé writer’s goal : JOB
56 Resignee of 1974 : NIXON
59 Forever __ : STAMP
63 Citrus-flavored soda : ORANGE CRUSH (giving “rush”)
66 Chillax : VEG
67 Poi source : TARO
68 Repeat from memory : RECITE
69 With 72-Across, evasive strategy … and a hint to the last several letters of the four longest Across answers : END …
70 Large number : SLEW
71 On the schedule : SLATED
72 See 69-Across : … RUN

Down

1 Sports officials : REFS
2 Wheel shaft : AXLE
3 __ Abby : DEAR
4 Wrong move : MISSTEP
5 Attorney’s org. : ABA
6 “Whip It” rock band : DEVO
7 Like much of the Southwest : ARID
8 Objects to : MINDS
9 Aerie newborn : EAGLET
10 Pro : FOR
11 All-in-one Apple : IMAC
12 Per unit : EACH
13 On the house : FREE
19 Wrap with tzatziki sauce : GYRO
21 Happy hour perch : BARSTOOL
25 Rover’s territory : MARS
27 One at the head of the class : A-STUDENT
28 Round with four teams, say : SEMIS
29 Jacob and Esau, e.g. : TWINS
30 DEA agent’s find : KILO
31 Hoity-toity types : SNOBS
33 Strong fiber : SISAL
34 Qatari bigwigs : EMIRS
35 It may be saved at a movie : SEAT
36 __ Scotia : NOVA
37 Japanese leader during WWII : TOJO
41 Salon offering : PERM
45 Ruined : TRASHED
47 Step on a ladder : RUNG
48 They make an effort : TRIERS
51 Spreadsheet program in Microsoft Office : EXCEL
53 Scribbles (down) : JOTS
54 Like some exams : ORAL
55 Naked : BARE
57 Penguin predator : ORCA
58 Nantes night : NUIT
60 State with conviction : AVER
61 List of options : MENU
62 Scrolling key : PGDN
64 At the moment : NOW
65 Sault __ Marie : STE

21 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 3 Sep 19, Tuesday”

  1. I really resent that we are supposed to know the French word for night. Or that Nantes is a French city, for that matter. Also, I finally know what chillax means. I realize it’s a portmanteau, but what a dumb word.

  2. @Ol Man – agree. Why did I study German, Dutch and Italian? French is no more a universal language than German, which was slated to be the language of science. We all should be learning Spanish,

    Had Stub before SEAT.

    Had a Nattick at VEG crosses PGDN. Never heard of chillax, and don’t think there’s an abbrev for everything,

    1. There’s always something. I read the new dictionary additions for this year. Things like go-cup, smexy, mocktail, hangry, womxn, colorism, whitelash, and zoodle. One reason crosswords work is that English isn’t very formal and people just make up words that might make sense or not. Those are many of the debuts I’m expecting.

      1. The clue at one time was “Nine mile mark of the Boston Marathon”, which turns out to be NATICK. Of course this caused much hollering from almost anyone who doesn’t live in Boston or had ever run the Boston Marathon.

        Henceforth, any clue relying on a very specific geographic, or just very specific knowledge, is now referred to as a “Natick.”

        And since I’m here, took 17 minutes with no errors. Pretty tricky for a Tuesday, but I managed.

    2. 0 errors.
      I remember a NASA scientist talking about the Mars Rover mission. When asked what they were looking for, he said “We are looking for frozen water; ice, if you will.” I couldn’t find the video of it today, but the transcript is still on-line.
      Re Mme Lafarge: The classic film mostly showed her knitting at the tribunals. A deli restaurant downtown Chicago has a trivia contest every 15 min. Once, the guy said “From French history, who knitted during the revolutionary tribunals?” I said “That’s not history- that’s Dickens.
      38A: I forget- is it Time or Newsweek that heals all wounds?
      6D: Devo appeared in Neil Young’s film Human Highway, also starring Young, Dean Stockwell, and Dennis Hopper.
      Re foreign language content: When I resumed crosswords on retiring, I was surprised to see it, because I don’t remember any of that from the old days. Also, if an answer had multiple words, the clue would indicate how many. About Spanish being preferred- reminds me of Paul Rodriguez’s joke about riding an elevator in Chicago with two women speaking Polish. He said “Ladies, please, this is America- you should speak Spanish!”

  3. 21:05 with one error…somehow seemed like a Wednesday puzzle to me….28D seems like a singular clue with a plural answer.
    I kept getting “this website not available” before getting in throug “the back door”….is it just me?

  4. LAT: 6:37, no errors. Newsday: 6:23, no errors. WSJ: 7:32, no errors. CHE: 7:43, no errors. Jones: 15:27, no errors; held up by a personal Natick Nest in the lower left.

    Croce later …

    @Glenn …

    I’m afraid I can’t be of much help concerning books about the history of crosswords, as I only recently began reading such. (Over the years, I have occasionally come across articles of interest in various places, but that’s not much help. And the book you mentioned is on my Amazon wish list, but I haven’t ordered it yet.)

    In other news: I have finished 140 of the 168 pages of my planned “WSJ meta study guide” and will probably do the other 28 today. Then, I have to decide what to do about the eight months worth of daily WSJ puzzles that I missed in late 2015 and early 2016. Also, I’m still working, at odd moments, on the cryptic from Dean Olsher’s book: I’ve finished 3/4ths of it with some confidence, but I’m still puzzled by some of the clues (and I doubt that I will get seduced into doing a lot more cryptics).

    1. Croce: 1:00:04, with a one-square error that I could kick myself for making … something I forgot to go back and recheck after getting the “hard” stuff out of the way … oh, well , it is what it is, as they say … 😳.

  5. 10:08 with multiple errors in the SORRELS, SISAL, OBJETDART area. I even had MARk before MARS for “Rover’s territory”…as in where he marked his territory. I like my answer better, nevermind that it doesn’t work. I had to work all weekend. These last 6 weeks have worn me out to the point it’s affecting my Tuesday crossword abilities…such as they are…or were.

    I’ve mentioned this here before, but I’ve never been shy about repeating myself. I’ve actually driven the MARS rover. Through various connections I have with the Johnson Space Center in Houston, I got to try it out. It’s exactly as you see it in Matt Damon’s movie “The Martian”. It’s meant to go over some pretty extreme terrain. I was driving it over steep hills and bumps meant to simulate the Martian landscape, and it has the ability to shift its own weight (primarily in its base) so it can’t be rolled or capsized. There’s no joystick, pedals, or steering wheel. It’s a computer mouse that steers it and drives it forward etc – i.e. it goes where you move the mouse. I drove it pretty harshly – enough so that the other people in there with me started to hate me – but I never even felt off balance in that thing. It’s an amazing vehicle.

    Best –

      1. Anon –

        The Mars rover I drove was made for humans to use out there. It hasn’t actually made it to Mars….except in Hollywood.

        Best –

  6. 10 misses for 95%; 2 errors and 8 omissions, all in the SE quadrant.
    Used Avow instead of Aver for the 2 errors. Didn’t know CHILLAX –
    is VEG an abbreviation for vegetate? Crummy. Menu and stamp were
    among my combinations for that area of the puzzle, just couldn’t put it
    all together. Surprised that Old Man did not mention Objetdart, French
    for Object of Art, the small piece in the museum.

    I had fun trying this one, just didn’t do well in that one area.

  7. Quickly changed “slavs” to “serbs” and “moon” to “mars” with the help of the perps. Nice Puzzle.

    There was a govt agency devoted to public diplomacy? Could sure use it now.

  8. Well, I have no problem with the presence of non English words in puzzles. What about all the (arcane to me) scientific terms that pop up almost as often?? We’re asked to identify things from the periodic table, most of which I don’t know, but I ain’t complaining. I’m good with languages but I don’t know science– and I’m not ashamed to admit either fact!!

    No errors, but tricky….Jack! I thought the same thing: seemed like a Wednesday. I had problems in the SE — I do know VEG and it’s a favorite pastime of mine– but I had AVOW at first, like John, and I had “Forever AMBER!!” 🤔 I think that’s the name of a movie.

    NEWSPRINT brings to mind a favorite college memory. While at UCLA I wrote for The Daily Bruin, and I just LOVED the smell of the newsroom, ink and paper …. the florescent lights and clattering typewriters …it was like a miniature of the newsroom in “All the President’s Men”…..

    Be well~~🚋⚾️

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