LA Times Crossword 13 Oct 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: Kevin Salat
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Flip the Switch

Themed answers are each common phrases including the word ON or OFF, but that word has been FLIPPED/SWITCHED to OFF or ON:

  • 22A Lectured about links? : SPOKE ON THE CUFF (from “spoke off the cuff”)
  • 47A “We have that in stock,” e.g.? : ONHAND REMARK (from “offhand remark”)
  • 70A Extra-base hit, likely? : FLY OFF THE WALL (from “fly on the wall”)
  • 91A Fake modeling material? : KNOCKOFF WOOD (from “knock on wood”)
  • 117A Let go of a factory workers unit? : LAID OFF THE LINE (from “laid on the line”)
  • 32D Guidebook for throwing a shot? : ON PUTTING (from “off-putting”)
  • 60D Stage hog staying sober? : HAM OFF RYE (from “ham on rye”)

Bill’s time: 21m 02s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

19 Stand-up sort : MENSCH

“Mensch” is a word that comes to us via Yiddish, and is ultimately derived from the German “mensch” meaning “human being”. We use the term to describe someone of integrity and honor.

20 Filmmaker for whom a Golden Globe award is named : DEMILLE

Cecil B. Demille was a movie director and producer who started his professional career in the silent era. DeMille’s movies were often epic works, such “Cleopatra” (1936), “Samson and Delilah” (1949), “The Greatest Show on Earth” (1952) and “The Ten Commandments” (1956). The Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award is named in his honor, and indeed he was its first recipient.

The first Golden Globe Awards ceremony was held in 1944 to honor the best in filmmaking. The award was created by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, which had been formed the year before by a group of writers in Los Angeles. One of the most famous of the Golden Globes is the Cecil B. DeMille Award, which is presented for “outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment”.

21 Part of TNT : -NITRO-

“TNT” is an abbreviation for “trinitrotoluene”. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

22 Lectured about links? : SPOKE ON THE CUFF (from “spoke off the cuff”)

To speak off the cuff is to speak extemporaneously. The idea is that someone doing so would not be using learned lines, but rather is speaking with the use of a few notes that have been jotted on his cuffs or shirtsleeves.

24 Got out of the pen : SPRUNG

That would be sprung (broken out) from jail.

26 1974 Peace Nobelist from Japan : SATO

Prime Minister Eisaku Sato of Japan won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1974 (sharing it with Irishman Sean MacBride). He won for “his renunciation of the nuclear option for Japan and his efforts to further regional reconciliation”. Sato defined Japan’s nuclear policy in the sixties by laying out “Three Non-Nuclear Principles”. The principles are that Japan will not possess, nor manufacture nuclear weapons, not permit introduction of nuclear weapons into Japanese territory.

27 Gram opening : INSTA-

Instagram is a photo-sharing application, one that is extremely popular. Instagram was started in San Francisco in 2010. Facebook purchased Instagram two years later, paying $1 billion. The billion-dollar Instagram company had just 13 employees at the time of the sale …

30 __-cone : SNO

A sno-cone (also “snow cone”) is just a paper cone filled with crushed ice and topped with flavored water. Italian ice is similar, but different. Whereas the flavoring is added on top of the ice to make a sno-cone, Italian ice is made with water that is flavored before it is frozen.

33 Portable preparedness kit : GO BAG

A bug-out bag (also “go bag”) is a portable collection of items that one would grab when evacuating from a disaster. One well-accepted guideline is that a bug-out bag contains all that would be needed to survive for 72 hours. A related kit is a get-home bag that might be kept in one’s car or place of work. A get-home bag contains the items needed to get back home in the absence of public transportation. My wife and I put together bug-out bags recently, having moved into an area that is at high risk for wildfires …

37 2019 NCAA hoops champ : UVA

The University of Virginia (UVA) was founded by Thomas Jefferson, who then sat on the original Board of Visitors alongside former US Presidents James Madison and James Monroe. In fact, the original UVA campus was built on land near Charlottesville that was once a farm belonging to President Monroe.

38 Start of a few choice words? : EENIE

Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

40 World Golf Hall of Famer Lorena : OCHOA

Lorena Ochoa is a retired professional golfer from Mexico who was ranked as the number one female golfer in the world from 2007 to 2010.

42 Big discount events : FIRE SALES

A fire sale is a sale of goods at deeply discounted prices. The original fire sales were sales of goods that had been damaged in a fire, hence the name.

46 Govt. health org. : CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The CDC started out life during WWII as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. The CDC worries about much more than malaria these days …

49 Uniformed “O Canada” singer : BLUE JAY

The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

Canada’s national anthem “O Canada” was commissioned in 1880 by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec, so the original words are in French. The first English translation was made in 1906. The current English lyrics have been revised a few times, but the French version remains the same as it did back in 1880.

O Canada!
Our home and native land!
True patriot love in all of us command.
With glowing hearts we see thee rise,
The True North strong and free!
From far and wide,
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.
God keep our land glorious and free!
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

51 Prom coif : UPDO

A coif is a hairdo. The term “coif” comes from an old French term “coife” describing a skull-cap that was worn under a helmet back in the late 13th century.

52 Maple syrup base : SAP

About 75% of the world’s maple syrup comes from the province of Quebec. The US’s biggest producer is the state of Vermont, which produces 5-6% of the world’s supply.

53 Oktoberfest vessel : STEIN

Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I’ve been there twice, and it really is a great party …

54 Balaam’s mount : ASS

The ass or donkey is mentioned several times in the Bible. One of the most-quoted biblical stories involving an ass is the story of Balaam. Balaam was a diviner who appears in the Book of Numbers in. In one account, Balaam is held to task by an angel for particularly cruel treatment of an ass.

55 “In memoriam” piece : OBIT

Our word “obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”. The Latin term was used for “record of the death of a person”, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

“In memoriam” is a Latin phrase that we use in English to mean “in memory of” when referring to a person that is deceased.

63 Peach center : PIT

There are two broad categories of peaches: freestones and clingstones. Clingstones (also “cling peaches”) have flesh that clings tightly to the pit. Freestones are easier to consume as the flesh separates easily from the pit.

64 “Cabaret” film director : FOSSE

Bob Fosse won more Tony Awards for choreography than anyone else, a grand total of eight (and another Tony for direction). Fosse also won an Oscar for Best Director for the 1972 movie “Cabaret”, even beating out the formidable Francis Ford Coppola who was nominated that same year for “The Godfather”.

The musical “Cabaret” is based on “I Am a Camera”, a 1951 play written by John Van Druten. In turn, the play was adapted from a novel “Goodbye to Berlin” written by Christopher Isherwood. The action in the musical takes place in the 1930s, in a seedy Berlin cabaret called the Kit Kat Club. “Cabaret” is a great stage musical, although the 1972 film of the musical isn’t one of my favorites.

68 Foo Fighters frontman Grohl : DAVE

Foo Fighters are described as an alternative rock band, one formed in 1994 by the drummer from Nirvana, Dave Grohl. The term “foo fighters” originally applied to unidentified flying objects reported by allied airmen during WWII. Spooky …

70 Extra-base hit, likely? : FLY OFF THE WALL (from “fly on the wall”)

That would be baseball.

73 Guys : MEN

Even when I was a kid living in England in the 1960s, we would make up an effigy of Guy Fawkes to parade around the streets in the runup to Guy Fawkes Day, November 5th. Guy Fawkes was the man who led the Gunpowder Plot to blow up the British king and Parliament on November 5, 1605. We kids would use the effigy to raise money from strangers by approaching them with the phrase “penny for the guy”. The money collected was used to buy fireworks that we’d shoot off on Bonfire Night, the name given to the evening of Guy Fawkes Day. The effigy known as “the guy” gave rise in the UK to the use of “guy” to describe a poorly-dressed man. By the mid-1800s, the term “guy” was adopted into American-English to mean simply “fellow”.

77 Similarly named rival of a video game plumber : WARIO

Wario is a character in the “Mario” video game universe. He is a rival of Mario, and indeed the name “Wario” is a portmanteau of the Japanese word “warui” (meaning “bad”) and “Mario”. Bad Mario …

78 PDX : Portland :: __ : Chicago : ORD

The IATA airport code for O’Hare International in Chicago is ORD, which comes from Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field (OR-D).

Portland International Airport has the IATA airport code PDX. PDX is the largest airport in Oregon and is used jointly for civil and military traffic. Portland International opened in 1927, and was dedicated by celebrated aviator Charles Lindbergh.

83 Tips politely : DOFFS

One doffs one’s hat, usually as a mark of respect. To doff is to take off, with “doff” being a contraction of “do off”. The opposite of “doff” is “don” meaning “to put on”.

97 Round number? : PAR

That would be golf.

98 Obama Education secretary Duncan : ARNE

Long before Arne Duncan became Secretary of Education, he was a professional basketball player, but not in the NBA. Duncan played for the National Basketball League of Australia, with the Eastside Spectres in Melbourne.

100 Big name in grills : WEBER

In 1952, George Stephen was working for the Weber Brothers Metal works in Chicago. One of the company’s products was a line of half-spheres that were welded together to make buoys used in Lake Michigan. Stephens took two of these metal hemispheres and converted them into the original kettle grill. The Weber company set up a barbecue division that Stephens ran, and Stephen became so successful that he bought out the Weber Brothers factory and converted all production to the manufacture of grills.

102 Utah’s __ Canyon : BRYCE

Bryce Canyon National Park is truly a beautiful part of America. The strange thing is that Bryce isn’t a canyon at all, but rather is a natural amphitheater created by erosion of sedimentary rocks that are part of the Paunsaugunt Plateau.

106 Cara of “Fame” : IRENE

Irene Cara co-wrote and sang the Oscar-winning song “Flashdance… What a Feeling” from the 1983 movie “Flashdance”. Cara also sang the title song for the 1980 movie “Fame”, and indeed played the lead role of student Coco Hernandez.

110 Law firm fig. : ATT

Attorney (att.)

122 Intel-gathering mission : RECON

A reconnaissance (recon) is a preliminary survey carried out to gather information. The term “reconnaissance” came into English in the early 19th century from French, from which language it translates literally as “recognition”.

123 Premier League powerhouse : ARSENAL

Arsenal Football Club (nicknamed “the Gunners”) is an English soccer team based in the Holloway district of London. The club was founded in 1886 as Dial Square by workers at the Royal Arsenal munitions factory. Dial Square was the name given to the workshops at the center of the Royal Arsenal complex. After just a few weeks in existence, the club changed its name to Royal Arsenal, which was eventually shortened to just Arsenal.

The best soccer teams in England and Wales play in the Premier League. The league was founded in 1992 as the FA Premier League to take advantage of a generous television deal. Today, the Premier League is the most-watched soccer league in the world.

124 Syrian city : ALEPPO

Aleppo is the largest city in Syria and is located not far from Damascus, the nation’s capital. Aleppo owes it size and history of prosperity to its location at the end of the Silk Road, the trade route that linked Asia to Europe (and other locations). The Suez Canal was opened up in 1869 bringing a new route for transport of goods, and so Aleppo’s prosperity declined over the past one hundred years or so. The city’s population has suffered terribly since the start of the Syrian Civil War, with the Battle of Aleppo raging from 2012 to 2016.

125 Rainbow-shaped : ARCED

Sunlight shining through airborne water droplets can produce rainbows. The water droplets act as little prisms, dispersing the white light into its constituent colors. Sometimes we see double rainbows. If we look carefully, we can see that the order of the colors in the first and second arcs is reversed.

127 Academy bestowals : OSCARS

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is the organization that gives the annual Academy Awards, also known as the “Oscars”. The root of the name “Oscar” is hotly debated, but what is agreed is that the award was officially named “Oscar” in 1939. The first Academy Awards were presented at a brunch in 1929 with an audience of just 29 people. The Awards ceremony is a slightly bigger event these days …

Down

1 Downing St. VIPs : PMS

The Prime Minister (PM) of the UK has powers equivalent to the US President, but with major differences. The office of prime minister exists by convention and not by any constitution. The convention is that the King or Queen of England appoints as PM the person most likely to have the confidence of the House of Commons, and that person is usually the leader of the party with the most seats in the Commons. There is no term limit and the PM serves “at his/her majesty’s pleasure”. The first UK PM wasn’t actually called “Prime Minister”, and the person first attributed with the equivalent powers was Sir Robert Walpole, the First Lord of the Treasury in 1721.

10 Downing Street is one of the most famous street addresses in the world and is the official London residence of the British Prime Minister. Although it may not look it on television, it’s a spacious pad, actually a larger house made by combining three older houses back in the 1700s. Although Number 10 has over one hundred rooms, they are mostly offices and reception rooms and the actual residence itself is quite modest. It was so modest that when Tony Blair came to power he opted to move himself and his family into the more spacious residence next door at Number 11, an apartment traditionally reserved for the Chancellor of the Exchequer (the UK equivalent of the Secretary of the Treasury).

3 “Blueprint for a Sunrise” artist : ONO

“Blueprint for a Sunrise” is a 2001 album released by Yoko Ono. It is a feminist work with the suffering of women as the theme. In the liner notes, Ono talks about “waking up in the middle of the night hearing thousands of women screaming”.

5 Frigid time : ICE AGE

Ice ages are periods in the Earth’s history when there are extensive ice sheets present in the northern and southern hemispheres. One might argue that we are still in an ice age that began 2.6 million years ago, as evidenced by the presence of ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica.

6 ID card feature : PHOTO

Identity document (ID)

7 New Orleans summer hrs. : CDT

Central Daylight Time (CDT)

The city of New Orleans, Louisiana has the nickname “The Big Easy”. This name might come from the early 1900s when musicians found it relatively “easy” to find work there. The city is also known by the acronym NOLA, standing for New Orleans (NO), Louisiana (LA).

8 Bethlehem university : LEHIGH

The Lehigh Valley metropolitan area in Pennsylvania is primarily composed of the three cities Allentown, Bethlehem and Easton.

Lehigh University is a private school in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania that was established in 1865 by railroad pioneer Asa Packer. The list of Lehigh alumni includes Lee Iacocca (ex-CEO of of Chrysler) and Jesse W. Reno (inventor of the escalator).

10 Prop for an emcee : MIC STAND

The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism used for a Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

11 Olive pursuer of comics : BLUTO

Bluto is the villain in the Popeye cartoon strip, a character who has been around since 1932. Sometimes you will see Bluto go by the name Brutus, depending on the date of the publication. This “confusion” arose because there was an unfounded concern that the name “Bluto” was owned by someone else. Bluto, Brutus … it’s the same guy.

12 Sprouts source : ALFALFA

The forage crop known as alfalfa may take its name from the Arabic “al-fisfisa” meaning “fresh fodder”.

16 P.O. delivery : LTR

Letter (ltr.)

17 Peppery salad green : ARUGULA

Eruca sativa is an edible plant that is known as “arugula” in the US, and “rocket” in Britain and Ireland and in Canada. The Italian name for the plant is “rucola”, from the Latin name. It is “rucula” that evolved into the American term “arugula”.

23 Twerp : NOBODY

“Twerp” and “pipsqueak” are both terms used for someone who is insignificant and contemptible.

30 NBA’s Nikola Jokic, e.g. : SERB

Nikola Jokić is a professional basketball player who was born in former-Yugoslavia. He was playing in the Serbian League before being drafted in 2014 by the Denver Nuggets of the NBA. Jokić won a silver medal with the Serbian national team when they lost to the USA in the 2016 Summer Olympics.

31 “Lost in Yonkers” playwright : NEIL SIMON

Neil Simon was one of my favorite playwrights. Simon wrote over thirty plays and about thirty screenplays. He received more nominations for Oscars and Tony Awards than any other writer. My favorite play penned by Simon has to be “Brighton Beach Memoirs”, but the list of his great stage works seems endless and includes “Barefoot in the Park”, “The Odd Couple”, “Sweet Charity”, “Plaza Suite”, “California Suite”, “Biloxi Blues” and “The Goodbye Girl”.

“Lost in Yonkers” is a Neil Simon play that premiered in 1990, and won the 1991 Pulitzer for Drama.

32 Guidebook for throwing a shot? : ON PUTTING (from “off-putting”)

Shot put, or events like shot put, have been around for millennia, but the first events that truly resemble today’s track and field event had to come with the invention of the cannonball. Soldiers would “putt” (throw) cannonballs as far as possible in attempts to outperform each other. Shot put has been in the modern Olympic Games since day-one, with American Robert Garrett winning the gold in the first games in 1896.

34 37-Across conf. : ACC
(37A 2019 NCAA hoops champ : UVA)

Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC)

36 “Hamilton” creator __-Manuel Miranda : LIN

Lin-Manuel Miranda is a composer and playwright from New York City, and the creator and star of the hit Broadway musicals “Hamilton” and “In the Heights”. Miranda also co-wrote the songs for the 2016 Disney animated feature “Moana”. He started composing early, and wrote jingles as a child. One of those jingles was later used by Eliot Spitzer in his 2006 gubernatorial campaign.

41 “I’m such a klutz!” : OOPS!

A klutz is an awkward individual, with the term “klutz” coming from Yiddish. The Yiddish word for a clumsy person is “klots”.

46 Cooking oil option : CANOLA

Canola is a type of rapeseed, and Canola oil is made from the seeds. The particular cultivar used in oil production was developed in Canada, and the name Canola in fact comes from “CANadian Oil, Low Acid”.

48 Poor spirits? : HOOCH

In the Klondike gold rush, a favorite tipple of the miners was “Hoochinoo”, a liquor made by the native Alaskans. Soon after “hooch” (also “hootch”) was adopted as a word for cheap whiskey.

50 Sec : JIFF

“Jiff” or “jiffy”, meaning “short time, instant” is thought originally to be thieves’ slang for “lightning”.

57 Waterloo resident : IOWAN

The Iowa city of Waterloo is part of the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Metropolitan Area. Originally settled in 1845 and called Prairie Rapids Crossing, the town’s name was changed to Waterloo in 1851.

58 Ruler until 1917 : TSAR

The year 1917 saw two revolutions in Russia, with the pair collectively called “the Russian Revolution”. As a result of the February Revolution that centered on Petrograd, the last Emperor of Russia (Tsar Nicholas II) abdicated and members of the Imperial parliament took control of the country, forming the Russian Provisional Government. The Provisional Government was itself overthrown in the October Revolution, which was led by Vladimir Lenin and the Bolshevik party.

60 Stage hog staying sober? : HAM OFF RYE (from “ham on rye”)

The word “ham”, describing a performer who overacts, is a shortened form of “hamfatter” and dates back to the late 1800s. “Hamfatter” comes from a song in old minstrel shows called “The Ham-Fat Man”. It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the “acting” qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

63 Rollin’ stone, in a Motown classic : PAPA

“Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone” is a 1971 song that was originally released by a Motown act called the Undisputed Truth. The song was re-released the following year by the Temptations, and became a number-one hit. The Temptations version is an impressive twelve minutes in length, with an instrumental introduction that lasts almost four minutes.

67 Small burger : SLIDER

Sliders are small hamburgers. One suggestion is that the “slider” originated in the US Navy, with the name being a reference to greasy hamburgers sliding back and forth across the grill as a ship pitches and rolls. More recently, the slider became associated with the White Castle fast food chain of restaurants. White Castle introduced the “Slyder” in 1985.

71 Edie of “The Sopranos” : FALCO

Actress Edie Falco won three Emmy Awards for playing Carmela Soprano on HBO’s outstanding drama series called “The Sopranos”. Falco also won an Emmy in 2010 for playing the title role in “Nurse Jackie”, an excellent black comedy.

72 Fish-eating bird : LOON

The common loon (also “great northern diver”) is the provincial bird of Ontario, and the state bird of Minnesota. The loon once appeared on Canadian $20 bills and also appears on the Canadian one-dollar coin, giving the coin the nickname “the loonie”.

75 Academy Award winner Dame Judi __ : DENCH

Dame Judi Dench is an outstanding English actress who has appeared for decades in her home country on stage and screen. Dench’s film career took off in the nineties with a relatively trivial role as “M” in the James Bond series of films. Since then she has played leading roles in several excellent movies including “Shakespeare in Love”, “Mrs. Brown”, “Notes on a Scandal” and “Philomena”.

80 Limnologist’s subject : LAKE

90 Many a “Freaks and Geeks” character : TEEN

“Freaks and Geeks” is a comedy-drama TV series aimed at teens that aired in 1999-2000. The executive producer for the show was Judd Apatow, and it launched the acting career of James Franco, Seth Rogen, Jason Segel and others.

92 Falls for someone who’s married? : NIAGARA

For well over a century now, the twin cities of Niagara Falls, New York and Niagara Falls, Ontario have been popular spots for honeymooners. Niagara Falls got a boost as a honeymoon destination in 1953 with the release of “Niagara”, a film noir starring Marilyn Monroe and Joseph Cotton.

93 Red __: fictional sub : OCTOBER

“The Hunt for Red October” was the first novel published by Tom Clancy, and one of his best in my humble opinion. The story is centered on the defection of the captain of a top-secret Soviet submarine, who attempts to surrender his vessel to the Americans without the knowledge of his crew. The gripping storyline is actually inspired by real events, the failed mutiny on board the Soviet submarine Storozhevoy in 1975. Unusually, the novel was published by the United States Naval Institute, marking the first time it had ever published a fictional work. To this day, “The Hunt for Red October” is the institute’s most successful title.

95 American Heart Mo., aptly : FEB

Saint Valentine’s Day was introduced by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saint’s day was dropped by the Roman Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

102 Frames around smartphone displays : BEZELS

A bezel is a groove that is designed to hold a beveled edge. An example would be the groove around the face of a watch, which accepts the beveled edge of a watch crystal.

107 Mandarin hello : NI HAO

Mandarin Chinese is a group of dialects that are spoken across northern and southwestern China. If Mandarin is considered as one language, then it has more native speakers than any other language on the planet.

112 Hendryx of the “Lady Marmalade” trio Labelle : NONA

Nona Hendryx is a singer-songwriter known for her solo work and for her performances with the girl-group trio Labelle. Nona is a cousin of iconic musician Jimi Hendrix.

“Lady Marmalade” is a song that was most famously recorded by Labelle in 1975. A 2001 cover version by Christina Aguilera, Lil’ Kim, Mya and Pink was also very successful, released from the soundtrack of the film “Moulin Rouge!”. The song is noted for its suggestive chorus “Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ce soir?”, which translates from French as “Do you want to sleep with me tonight?”

116 Include covertly, briefly : BCC

A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

117 Online gaming annoyance : LAG

In Internet terms, lag is a delay in response caused by network latency. We might notice lag when streaming a video, for example.

118 St. Pete’s place : FLA

Saint Petersburg, Florida is often referred to as “St. Pete” by locals and visitors alike. Located on a peninsula lying between Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, St. Pete was founded in 1888 and named for Saint Petersburg in Russia. The co-founders were Russian immigrant Peter Demens and Detroit native John C. Williams. The pair tossed a coin for the privilege of naming the new city, and Demens won. Williams lost, but did get to name the city’s first hostelry “The Detroit Hotel”.

119 Beer choice : IPA

India pale ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

120 “Code Switch” airer : NPR

“Code Switch” is blog and associated podcast that was launched by NPR in 2013. The show explores the themes of race, ethnicity and culture. The linguistic term “code-switching” refers to the practice of a speaker switching between languages while in the same conversation.

121 Dawn goddess : EOS

In Greek mythology, Eos was the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos was Aurora. Rather delightfully, Homer referred to Eos as “rosy-fingered dawn” in both “Iliad” and “Odyssey”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Expert’s nugget : PRO TIP
7 Seaside eatery : CLAM BAR
14 Relative challenge for some : IN-LAW
19 Stand-up sort : MENSCH
20 Filmmaker for whom a Golden Globe award is named : DEMILLE
21 Part of TNT : -NITRO-
22 Lectured about links? : SPOKE ON THE CUFF (from “spoke off the cuff”)
24 Got out of the pen : SPRUNG
26 1974 Peace Nobelist from Japan : SATO
27 Gram opening : INSTA-
28 Word on a towel : HIS
29 Icky stuff : GOO
30 __-cone : SNO
33 Portable preparedness kit : GO BAG
35 Rang : TOLLED
37 2019 NCAA hoops champ : UVA
38 Start of a few choice words? : EENIE
40 World Golf Hall of Famer Lorena : OCHOA
42 Big discount events : FIRE SALES
45 Fabric flaws : RIPS
46 Govt. health org. : CDC
47 “We have that in stock,” e.g.? : ONHAND REMARK (from “offhand remark”)
49 Uniformed “O Canada” singer : BLUE JAY
51 Prom coif : UPDO
52 Maple syrup base : SAP
53 Oktoberfest vessel : STEIN
54 Balaam’s mount : ASS
55 “In memoriam” piece : OBIT
59 Adjust the length of : REHEM
63 Peach center : PIT
64 “Cabaret” film director : FOSSE
66 Spanning : ACROSS
68 Foo Fighters frontman Grohl : DAVE
69 “__ dreaming?” : AM I
70 Extra-base hit, likely? : FLY OFF THE WALL (from “fly on the wall”)
73 Guys : MEN
74 Frog hangout : POND
76 Like many awards : ANNUAL
77 Similarly named rival of a video game plumber : WARIO
78 PDX : Portland :: __ : Chicago : ORD
79 Heavenly body? : ANGEL
81 Sentence structure? : CELL
82 Wetland : FEN
83 Tips politely : DOFFS
85 Complainer who won’t quit : NAG
87 Dressed : CLAD
89 Fundraiser : BENEFIT
91 Fake modeling material? : KNOCKOFF WOOD (from “knock on wood”)
97 Round number? : PAR
98 Obama Education secretary Duncan : ARNE
99 Specialized market segment : NICHE AREA
100 Big name in grills : WEBER
102 Utah’s __ Canyon : BRYCE
103 Do brunch, say : EAT
104 Maze navigator : LAB RAT
106 Cara of “Fame” : IRENE
108 Yet, in poetry : E’EN
109 “That was ages __” : AGO
110 Law firm fig. : ATT
111 Brief affair : FLING
113 XL, for one : SIZE
115 Work intermittently (in) : DABBLE
117 Let go of a factory workers unit? : LAID OFF THE LINE (from “laid on the line”)
122 Intel-gathering mission : RECON
123 Premier League powerhouse : ARSENAL
124 Syrian city : ALEPPO
125 Rainbow-shaped : ARCED
126 Has no wrong answers, say : GETS AN A
127 Academy bestowals : OSCARS

Down

1 Downing St. VIPs : PMS
2 Union __ : REP
3 “Blueprint for a Sunrise” artist : ONO
4 Chiding sounds : TSKS
5 Frigid time : ICE AGE
6 ID card feature : PHOTO
7 New Orleans summer hrs. : CDT
8 Bethlehem university : LEHIGH
9 “Absolutely!” : AMEN!
10 Prop for an emcee : MIC STAND
11 Olive pursuer of comics : BLUTO
12 Sprouts source : ALFALFA
13 Call the game : REF
14 First to hear the news : INSIDERS
15 Little bites : NIPS
16 P.O. delivery : LTR
17 Peppery salad green : ARUGULA
18 Convinced : WON OVER
23 Twerp : NOBODY
25 “Find out” : GO ASK
28 __ mentality : HERD
30 NBA’s Nikola Jokic, e.g. : SERB
31 “Lost in Yonkers” playwright : NEIL SIMON
32 Guidebook for throwing a shot? : ON PUTTING (from “off-putting”)
34 37-Across conf. : ACC
36 “Hamilton” creator __-Manuel Miranda : LIN
39 “Aha!” : I SEE!
41 “I’m such a klutz!” : OOPS!
43 Char : SEAR
44 Energetically excited : AMPED
46 Cooking oil option : CANOLA
48 Poor spirits? : HOOCH
50 Sec : JIFF
51 Good to have around : USEFUL
54 All together : AS ONE
56 Prepared, as beer : BREWED
57 Waterloo resident : IOWAN
58 Ruler until 1917 : TSAR
60 Stage hog staying sober? : HAM OFF RYE (from “ham on rye”)
61 From then on : EVER SINCE
62 Patch : MEND
63 Rollin’ stone, in a Motown classic : PAPA
65 What collaborators should be in : SYNC
66 46-Across HQ city : ATL
67 Small burger : SLIDER
71 Edie of “The Sopranos” : FALCO
72 Fish-eating bird : LOON
75 Academy Award winner Dame Judi __ : DENCH
80 Limnologist’s subject : LAKE
82 Wither away : FADE
84 Funhouse reaction : FEAR
86 Commit a hoops no-no : GOALTEND
88 Good times to build sand castles : LOW TIDES
89 Least adorned : BAREST
90 Many a “Freaks and Geeks” character : TEEN
91 Manipulate digitally : KNEAD
92 Falls for someone who’s married? : NIAGARA
93 Red __: fictional sub : OCTOBER
94 __ party : FRAT
95 American Heart Mo., aptly : FEB
96 Armed conflict : WARFARE
97 What “/” may mean : PER
101 Ardent enthusiast : BIG FAN
102 Frames around smartphone displays : BEZELS
105 Top-tier : A-LIST
107 Mandarin hello : NI HAO
110 Lotion ingredient : ALOE
112 Hendryx of the “Lady Marmalade” trio Labelle : NONA
114 Util. supply : ELEC
116 Include covertly, briefly : BCC
117 Online gaming annoyance : LAG
118 St. Pete’s place : FLA
119 Beer choice : IPA
120 “Code Switch” airer : NPR
121 Dawn goddess : EOS

8 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 13 Oct 19, Sunday”

  1. I was just about to comment that I didn’t get “KNEAD” as an answer to “manipulate digitally” nor notice an explanation from Bill, only to realize as soon as I got to the “Leave a Reply” box that it meant the *manual* definition of “digital”.

  2. A good 20 percent of this was a mystery to me. I caught on to the theme fairly soon, but it didn’t help much. Top left, lower middle, and sports references did me in.

  3. 27 mins, 4 sec, no errors. But wasn’t very comfortable throughout. Kind of flitted my way around, filling out what I could, and returned to the (many) trouble areas.

  4. No errors, but took a long time and lot of guesses. I believe 32D is in ‘
    reference to the sport of shot-putting and follows the theme
    which would be changing “off-putting” to On Putting.

    The last answer I got was Niagara and it was a groaner at this end.

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