LA Times Crossword 10 Mar 20, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Amanda Rafkin & Ross Trudeau
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Together You and I

Themed answers each include two incidents of the letter sequence UI:

  • 59A 2011 Dolly Parton single, and what homophonically happens twice in 16-, 27- and 47-Across : TOGETHER YOU AND I
  • 16A Citrus drink in a sea breeze cocktail : GRAPEFRUIT JUICE
  • 27A Frivolous legal entanglement : NUISANCE SUIT
  • 47A French luxury retailer since 1854 : LOUIS VUITTON

Bill’s time: 6m 37s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 Samantha Bee’s network : TBS

Samantha Bee is a comedian from Toronto who found fame as a correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” starting way back in 2003. Bee left “The Daily Show” in 2015 to host her own late-night talk show “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee” on TBS.

16 Citrus drink in a sea breeze cocktail : GRAPEFRUIT JUICE

The sea breeze cocktail has been around in some form since the 1920s. The most common recipe today calls for vodka, cranberry juice and grapefruit juice. The variant called a bay breeze substitutes pineapple juice for the grapefruit juice.

19 Philosopher Kierkegaard : SOREN

Soren Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher and theologian, and I’ve never really understood anything that he wrote!

20 Dawn goddess : EOS

In Greek mythology, Eos was the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos was Aurora. Rather delightfully, Homer referred to Eos as “rosy-fingered dawn” in both “Iliad” and “Odyssey”.

29 Prez on a fiver : ABE

The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Abraham Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

37 Part of rpm : PER

Revolutions per minute (rpm)

39 Actress Russo : RENE

The talented actress Rene Russo is a native of Burbank, California. Russo went to high school (with actor/director Ron Howard), but dropped out in tenth grade. At seventeen, she was given the opportunity to train as a model and within a very short time appeared on the cover of “Vogue”. As her modelling jobs slowed down in her early thirties, Russo made a career change and studied theater and acting.

43 Frontier lawman Wyatt : EARP

Wyatt Earp is famous as one of the participants in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Earp was a city policeman in Wichita, Kansas and also in Dodge City, Kansas. Earp was also deputy sheriff in Tombstone, Arizona where the O.K. Corral gunfight took place. Years later, Earp joined the Alaska Gold Rush and with a partner built and operated the Dexter Saloon in Nome.

46 HBO rival, briefly : SHO

Showtime (SHO) is a competitor of The Movie Channel (TMC) in terms of program lineup, although both channels are in fact owned by CBS.

47 French luxury retailer since 1854 : LOUIS VUITTON

Louis Vuitton founded his fashion house in Paris in 1854. His first product was a trunk, a piece of traveling luggage.

53 Celebrity socialite : IT GIRL

Clara Bow was a fabulous star of silent film, with her most famous movie being “It” from 1927. Clara Bow’s performance was so celebrated in the movie that she was forever to be known as the “It girl”. The term “it” was a euphemism for “sex appeal”, and that is what Clara Bow was known to “exude”. Bow applied her red lipstick in the shape of a heart, and women who copied this style were said to put on a “Clara Bow”.

55 Former flier : TWA

Back in 1930, when TWA was known as Transcontinental & Western Air (T&WA), the airline introduced one of the first passenger services between the east and west coasts of the US. Known as the Lindbergh Line, travel took about 36 hours and involved an overnight stay in Kansas City.

59 2011 Dolly Parton single, and what homophonically happens twice in 16-, 27- and 47-Across : TOGETHER YOU AND I

Dolly Parton is a country music singer-songwriter, as well as an actress. Parton has written over 3,000 songs, my favorite of which is “I Will Always Love You”, a huge hit for herself and for Whitney Houston.

66 “Lust for Life” singer Lana __ Rey : DEL

“Lana Del Rey” is the stage name of singer/songwriter Elizabeth Grant. Del Rey calls herself a “self-styled gangsta Nancy Sinatra”. Nice …

68 Hurricane center : EYE

A severe tropical storm is called a hurricane when it occurs in the Atlantic and Northeast Pacific, a typhoon in the Northwest Pacific, and a cyclone in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean. Tropical storms form over warm water, picking up energy from the evaporation from the ocean surface.

Down

1 Keeps to oneself : HOGS

To hog is to take more than one is due. Apparently, the first use of the verb “to hog” in this sense was in Mark Twain’s “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”.

4 Boxing official : REF

Back in the early 17th century, a referee was someone who examined patent applications. We started using the same term for a person presiding over a sporting event in the 1820s. “Referee” is a derivative of the verb “to refer”, and literally describes someone who has the authority to make a decision by “referring to” a book, archive etc.

7 They might bring you to tears : ONIONS

When an onion is sliced, cells are broken. Enzymatic reactions take place that result in the generation of a volatile gas, syn-propanethial-S-oxide. The gas irritates the eyes and tears are produced in order to clear them.

9 Basketball’s Erving, familiarly : DR J

Julius Erving is a retired professional basketball player who was known as “Dr. J”, a nickname he picked up in high school. Dr. J was a trailblazer in many ways, being the first player associated with slam dunking and other moves above the rim.

11 Italian lawn bowling game : BOCCI

The Italian bowling game of “bocce” (often anglicized as “bocci” or “boccie”) is based on a game played in ancient Rome. “Bocce” is the plural of the Italian word “boccia” meaning “bowl”.

14 Gossipy sorts : YENTAS

“Yenta” (also “Yente”) is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater “yenta” came to mean a busybody, a gossip.

18 Coat named for an Irish province : ULSTER

If you’ve watched Victorian dramas, you might have seen the original Ulster coat, which is very distinctive. It is a full-length, heavy coat, with an attached cape made from the same material that hangs down as far as the waist. The cape was dropped in the 20th century, and now an Ulster a relatively simple, hard-wearing, double-breasted overcoat.

Ireland is divided into four provinces: Leinster, Munster, Connacht and Ulster. “Ulster” is sometimes used as a synonym for Northern Ireland, but in fact Ulster is comprised of the six counties of Northern Ireland and three more, namely Donegal, Cavan and Monaghan.

23 “Music for Airports” producer Brian : ENO

Brian Eno was one of the pioneers of the ambient genre of music. Eno composed an album in 1978 called “Ambient 1: Music for Airports”, which was the first in a series of four albums with an ambient theme. Eno named the tracks, somewhat inventively, 1/1, 1/2, 2/1 and 2/2.

24 Bra spec : D-CUP

The word “brassière” is French in origin, but it isn’t the word that the French use for a “bra”. In France, what we call a bra is known as a “soutien-gorge”, translating to “held under the neck”. The word “brassière” is indeed used in France but there it describes a baby’s undershirt, a lifebelt or a harness. “Brassière” comes from the Old French word for an “arm protector” in a military uniform (“bras” is the French for “arm”). Later “brassière” came to mean “breastplate” and from there the word was used for a type of woman’s corset. The word jumped into English around 1900.

26 Med. research agency : NIH

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) organization is made up of 27 different institutes that coordinate their research and services. Examples of member institutes are the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute on Aging.

28 Olympic swords : EPEES

There are three fencing events in the modern Olympics, with each distinguished by the weapon used:

  • Foil
  • Épée
  • Sabre

34 Lowly worker : PEON

A peon is a lowly worker who has no real control over his/her working conditions. The word “peon” comes into English from Spanish, in which language it has the same meaning.

36 English “L’chaim!” : TO LIFE!

“L’Chaim!” is a Hebrew toast meaning “To life!”, with “chai” being the Hebrew word for “life”.

38 Sitar master Shankar : RAVI

Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous virtuoso (to us Westerners) from the world of Indian classical music, and was noted for his sitar playing. Shankar was the father of the pop singer Norah Jones.

41 Jan. and Feb. : MOS

The original Roman calendar had only ten months, starting with “Mars” (March). The months of “Ianuarius” and “Februarius” were added to the end of the year, supposedly by Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome. Julius Caesar decided in 46 BC that the year should start at the beginning of “Ianuarius” instead of “Mars”, which moved our January and February to the beginning of the year.

45 Hit the buffet in a major way, say : PIG OUT

Our word “buffet” comes from the French “bufet” meaning “bench, sideboard”. So, a buffet is a meal served from a “bufet”.

49 Singer Turner : TINA

“Tina Turner” is the stage name used by Anna Mae Bullock, the “Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll”. Turner has always loved Europe and moved there in the eighties. She now splits her time between her homes in England, France and Switzerland.

52 Jason of “How I Met Your Mother” : SEGEL

Actor Jason Segel is best known for playing Marshall on the sitcom “How I Met Your Mother”. Segel is an ordained minister with the Universal Life Church and performed a wedding ceremony on “The Tonight Show” in 2010.

“How I Met Your Mother” is a sitcom that CBS has been airing since 2005. The main character is Ted Mosby, played by Josh Radnor. Mosby is also the narrator for the show looking back from the year 2030 (the live action is set in the present). As narrator, the older Mosby character is voiced by Bob Saget.

56 Guthrie of folk : ARLO

Singer Arlo Guthrie is known for his protest songs, just like his father Woody Guthrie. The younger Guthrie only ever had one song in the top 40: a cover version of “City of New Orleans”. He has lived for years in the town of Washington, just outside Pittsfield, Massachusetts. His 1976 song “Massachusetts” has been the official folk song of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1981.

58 Like avocados ready for guacamole : RIPE

Guacamole is one of my favorite dishes. It is prepared by mashing avocados and perhaps adding the likes of tomato, onion and lime juice. The guacamole recipe dates back as early as the 16th century, to the time of the Aztecs. “Guacamole” translates as “avocado sauce”.

61 Tree with elastic wood : YEW

Yew is the wood of choice for the longbow, a valued weapon in the history of England. The longbow is constructed with a core of yew heartwood (as the heartwood resists compression) that has a sheath of yew sapwood (as the sapwood resists stretching). The yew was in such demand for longbows that for centuries yew trees were in short supply in Britain and the wood had to be imported from all over Europe.

62 WWII spy gp. : OSS

The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was formed during WWII in order to carry out espionage behind enemy lines. A few years after the end of the war the OSS functions were taken up by a new group, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) that was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 __-been: washed-up celeb : HAS
4 Shared again, as a story : RETOLD
10 Samantha Bee’s network : TBS
13 Frequently found in poetry? : OFT
14 One with a hunger : YEARNER
15 Go bad : ROT
16 Citrus drink in a sea breeze cocktail : GRAPEFRUIT JUICE
19 Philosopher Kierkegaard : SOREN
20 Dawn goddess : EOS
21 Bridal veil trim : LACE
22 Packed in a slatted box : CRATED
25 Like bath mats : NONSLIP
27 Frivolous legal entanglement : NUISANCE SUIT
29 Prez on a fiver : ABE
30 “Cream of” concoction : SOUP
31 Lonely place, so they say : THE TOP
35 Former : PAST
37 Part of rpm : PER
39 Actress Russo : RENE
40 Bury : ENTOMB
43 Frontier lawman Wyatt : EARP
46 HBO rival, briefly : SHO
47 French luxury retailer since 1854 : LOUIS VUITTON
50 Gives a hand : ASSISTS
53 Celebrity socialite : IT GIRL
54 One who stirs the pot : CHEF
55 Former flier : TWA
57 “Live” sign : ON AIR
59 2011 Dolly Parton single, and what homophonically happens twice in 16-, 27- and 47-Across : TOGETHER YOU AND I
63 Night before : EVE
64 Most authentic : REALEST
65 Generation __ : GAP
66 “Lust for Life” singer Lana __ Rey : DEL
67 How theater seating is arranged : IN ROWS
68 Hurricane center : EYE

Down

1 Keeps to oneself : HOGS
2 Early form of Latin jazz : AFRO-CUBAN
3 Like the most twinkly sky : STARRIEST
4 Boxing official : REF
5 Musician’s asset : EAR
6 “Can’t deny that” : TRUE
7 They might bring you to tears : ONIONS
8 Releases from a cage : LETS OUT
9 Basketball’s Erving, familiarly : DR J
10 Dry run : TRIAL
11 Italian lawn bowling game : BOCCI
12 Pricey : STEEP
14 Gossipy sorts : YENTAS
17 Podded plants : PEAS
18 Coat named for an Irish province : ULSTER
23 “Music for Airports” producer Brian : ENO
24 Bra spec : D-CUP
26 Med. research agency : NIH
27 Tough spot to self-trim hair : NAPE
28 Olympic swords : EPEES
32 Simulated launch site : TEST RANGE
33 Taking a vacation, Brit-style : ON HOLIDAY
34 Lowly worker : PEON
36 English “L’chaim!” : TO LIFE!
38 Sitar master Shankar : RAVI
41 Jan. and Feb. : MOS
42 Words introducing a plot twist : BUT THEN …
44 Road groove : RUT
45 Hit the buffet in a major way, say : PIG OUT
48 “Scout’s honor!” : I SWEAR
49 Singer Turner : TINA
50 Played a part : ACTED
51 Push roughly : SHOVE
52 Jason of “How I Met Your Mother” : SEGEL
56 Guthrie of folk : ARLO
58 Like avocados ready for guacamole : RIPE
60 Bi- plus one : TRI-
61 Tree with elastic wood : YEW
62 WWII spy gp. : OSS

13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 10 Mar 20, Tuesday”

  1. I’m here. Slept late today. Kind of a cute puzzle, though I didn’t know the Dolly Parton song. Of course I had bocce instead of bocci. I’ve often cut my own hair, so I knew nape right away. 🙂

  2. 8:00, no errors. I had BOCCE before changing it to BOCCI because of the crossing entry ; I assumed the latter was an alternate spelling, but forgot to look it up.

    Also, @Wayne … The last time my hair was cut by someone besides myself was in a barber shop in Oslo, Norway, in January, 1969, during a Wanderung through Europe. When I got back to the US a few months later, I found that my favorite (i.e., cheap 😜) barber shop had closed, so I did the job myself and have been doing it ever since. (Of course, the process is a lot easier now than it was 51 years ago … 😜.)

  3. Worst Tues ever for me. I didn’t get AFROCUBAN or STARIEST because I didn’t get all of the crosses. I should have gotten OFT, but I didn’t.
    I also started out with BOCCE, and have never had to spell VUITTON before. It all seemed very un-Tuesday-ish to me.

  4. It took me awhile to get into this one. Finally finished however. Was hung up on 1D. “Keeps to oneself” had me thinking loner, recluse, etc. “Hog” of course! It must be the LA rain today that has dampened my brain.

  5. I do not understand HOGS. One hogging himself or herself and his or her activities from everyone else? Too deep for me.

    I usually like to report the per cent achieved (letter basis) instead of a DNF because it sounds
    a lot better if you read 88% instead of saying we did not finish. Compromise – today, we got 88% in our DNF. Did not have a lot of fun with it because I never had a lot of hope that we were going to solve it. Just not there, but really needed only a few more letters to put it together.

    An average day for Bill, slightly high for Glenn. Still very good and two to three times
    faster than I could ever do one. Cograts, guys.

    Maybe Wed. will be better.

    Kudos to all.

  6. No Googles, no errors, but didn’t know SEGEL. I agree that HOGS was poorly clued. Should have been keeps “for” oneself, since keeps to oneself would refer to a private person. Also, TWA should be indicated as an abbrev.

    Per yesterday, I agree that ERR should be pronounced “uhr.” My husband goes nutz over mispronunciations; moreso over bad grammar.

  7. Congrats to all of you who are older but still get to cut their hair. Looking at my mom’s side of the family, I was doomed. When you go bald early, you don’t have much to worry about. Makes getting ready in the mornings nice but sunny days difficult.

  8. 6:00 even, with an error… the crossing of HARRY LIME and BREN, neither of which I knew. I had STEN at first for the gun which still left me clueless with the Orson Welles character. STABILITY proved that wrong, but then I was pretty stuck.

    I agree with Glenn, this is more of a later-week grid with all the long proper names. At least the theme was a decent one, I thought.

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