LA Times Crossword 27 Sep 20, Sunday

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Constructed by: Paul Coulter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Pet Flicks

Themed answers are well-known movie titles that have been altered slightly to refer to a PET:

  • 22A Film with a feline baseball ace? : PITCH PURRFECT (from “Pitch Perfect”)
  • 32A Biopic about Frank from “Men in Black”? : A PUG‘S LIFE (from “A Bug’s Life”)
  • 48A Comedy about a lost mutt? : DUDE, WHERE’S MY CUR? (from “Dude, Where’s My Car?”)
  • 67A Film about a composing pooch? : THE HOUND OF MUSIC (from “The Sound of Music”)
  • 87A Drama about organized disobedience at obedience school? : THE CANINE MUTINY (from “The Caine Mutiny”)
  • 102A Film romance starring Puss? : KISS ME, CAT (from “Kiss Me, Kate”)
  • 119A Film in which Fido wins a place at the Round Table? : THE BARK KNIGHT (from “The Dark Knight”)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 13m 56s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Like some stressed text : ITALIC

Italic type leans to the right, and is often used to provide emphasis in text. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

7 Perfect pass : SPIRAL

That would be football.

19 Rattler commonly used in pairs : MARACA

Maracas are percussion instruments that are native to Latin America. They are constructed from a dried shell, like that of a coconut, to which a handle is attached. The shell is filled with dried seeds or beans, and shaken.

20 University staying power? : TENURE

A job in a university that is described as “tenure-track” is one that can lead to a tenured position. A tenured position is a “job for life”. A person with tenure can only be dismissed for cause.

21 Mild, in Milan : GENTILE

Milan (“Milano” in Italian) is Italy’s second largest city, second only to Rome. Milan is a European fashion capital, the headquarters for the big Italian fashion houses of Valentino, Gucci, Versace, Armani, Prada and others. Mario Prada was even born in Milan, and helped establish the city’s reputation in the world of fashion.

22 Film with a feline baseball ace? : PITCH PURRFECT (from “Pitch Perfect”)

“Pitch Perfect” is an entertaining musical comedy film released in 2012. It’s all about an all-female college a cappella group competing to win a national competition.

25 Roy Rogers’ birth name : SLYE

Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers’ real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was “King of the Cowboys”. Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans’ nickname was “Queen of the West”.

26 Ninja Turtles’ ally April __ : O’NEIL

Actress Judith Hoag is perhaps best known for playing April O’Neil in the 1990 movie “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”. More recently, she was cast in the recurring role of Tandy Hampton on the show “Nashville”.

The “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” started out as a parody of comic book superheroes, first appearing in a self-published comic book in 1984. A couple of years later the characters were picked up by someone who built a whole line of toys around the characters, and then television and movies followed. Do you remember the names of all four of the Turtles? Their names were all taken from Renaissance artists:

  • Leonardo
  • Raphael
  • Michelangelo
  • Donatello

27 One end of the Chicago L’s Blue Line : O’HARE

Chicago’s Blue Line is a 27-mile long “L” line that connects the Forest Park suburb to O’Hare International Airport, passing through downtown. The Blue Line is one of only two routes in Chicago on which trains operate 24 hours a day.

29 Shattering grenade, to a GI : FRAG

Fragmentation grenade (frag).

Our word “grenade”, used for a small explosive missile, came via French from the word for the pomegranate fruit. The name reflects the similarity between the seed-filled fruit and the powder-filled, fragmentation bomb.

32 Biopic about Frank from “Men in Black”? : A PUG’S LIFE (from “A Bug’s Life”)

Frank the Pug is a recurring character in the “Men in Black” series of films. He is an alien, a Remoolian, who appears as a normal pug dog.

“A Bug’s Life” is a 1998 animated feature film from Pixar. The storyline is based on the film “The Seven Samurai” and the fable of “The Ant and the Grasshopper”.

41 Clicked ballot : E-VOTE

Today, a ballot is a piece of paper or equivalent used to cast a vote. Back in the 1500s, a “ballot” was a small “ball” used in the process of voting.

42 __ Martin: Bond’s car : ASTON

Aston Martin is a British car manufacturer founded in 1913 by Lionel Martin. The Aston part of the company name comes from Aston Hill, a famous site for hill-climbing cars that is nearby the original factory. Aston Martin cars are much loved by the British entertainment industry. James Bond was given one in “Goldfinger”, and Michael Caine drove one in the 1969 version of “The Italian Job”. Also, Roger Moore’s character drove a yellow Aston Martin in the seventies television show “The Persuaders!”.

44 AOL alternative : MSN

The Microsoft Network (MSN) used to be an Internet service provider (ISP). These days, MSN is mainly a web portal.

45 Flier to Oslo : SAS

SAS was formerly known as Scandinavian Airlines System and is the flag carrier of three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. SAS is based at Stockholm Arlanda Airport located just north of the Swedish capital.

Oslo, the capital of Norway, is an ancient city that was founded around 1048. The medieval city was destroyed by fire in 1624 and was rebuilt by the Danish-Norwegian king Christian IV and renamed to Christiana. In 1877 there was an official change of the spelling of the city’s name to “Kristiana”, and then more recently in 1925 the name was restored to the original Oslo. Things have almost gone full circle and now the center of Oslo, the area that would have been contained by the original medieval walls, has apparently been renamed to Christiana.

48 Comedy about a lost mutt? : DUDE, WHERE’S MY CUR? (from “Dude, Where’s My Car?”)

“Dude, Where’s My Car?” is a 2000 comedy film starring Ashton Kutcher and Seann William Scott. It’s a so-called “stoner” movie, and is about two friends who get wasted one night and can’t find their car the next day.

53 Sports channel that shows college games : ESPNU

ESPNU (short for “ESPN Universities”) is a sports channel focused on college athletics.

56 “Insecure” star Rae : ISSA

Issa Rae is a Stanford University graduate who created a YouTube web series called “The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl”. Rae also plays the title role in the series, a young lady named “J”. “Awkward Black Girl” was adapted into an HBO comedy-drama called “Insecure”, in which Issa Rae stars.

59 Mets’ slugger Alonso : PETE

Pete Alonso is a professional first baseman who made his Major League debut in 2019 with the New York Mets. Alonso’s nickname is “Polar Bear”.

62 Greek vacation isle : CORFU

Corfu is an island in the very northwest of Greece, and is located in the Ionian Sea. Corfu is a very, very popular vacation destination for European tourists, particularly those from the UK, Scandinavia and Germany.

67 Film about a composing pooch? : THE HOUND OF MUSIC (from “The Sound of Music”)

“The Sound of Music” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical that was made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on “The Story of the Trapp Family Singers”, a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war. One family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives in the same town in which I used to live in California.

71 Not alfresco : INDOOR

Our word “alfresco” means “outdoors, in the fresh air”. The term came into English from Italian.

78 Deli order : HERO

A hero is a submarine sandwich. The hero originated in New York City in the 1800s among Italian immigrants who wanted an Italian sandwich that reminded them of home. The name “hero” was coined in the 1930s, supposedly by a food critic in the “New York Herald Tribune” when he wrote that “one had to be a hero” to finish the gigantic sandwich. Hero is a prevalent term to this day in New York City, reserved for a submarine sandwich with an Italian flavor.

79 Org. monitoring possible alien signals : SETI

“SETI” is the name given to a number of projects that are searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves) reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

81 Gillian’s Emmy-winning role on “The X-Files” : DANA

The marvelous actress Gillian Anderson came to prominence playing FBI agent Dana Scully on TV’s “The X-Files” alongside David Duchovny. Anderson was born in Chicago, but grew up in London in the UK. After spending most of her adult life in the US, Anderson now lives in London.

85 Small egg : OVULE

As we all remember from botany class (don’t we?), an ovule is a small structure in many plants that develops into the seed after fertilization.

87 Drama about organized disobedience at obedience school? : THE CANINE MUTINY (from “The Caine Mutiny”)

“The Caine Mutiny” is a Pulitzer-winning, 1951 novel by Herman Wouk. The story involves mutiny and court-martial aboard a US Navy vessel and reflected, at least partly, the personal experiences of Wouk as he served in the Pacific in WWII aboard a destroyer-minesweeper. The novel was adapted into a marvelous film released in 1954 starring Humphrey Bogart as Philip Queeg, the harsh captain of the USS Caine.

92 Frying pan spray : PAM

PAM cooking oil was introduced in 1961 by Leon Rubin and Arthur Meyerhoff. The name “PAM” is an acronym … standing for “Product of Arthur Meyerhoff”. Who’d a thunk it …?

93 Mix masters, briefly? : DJS

The world’s first radio disc jockey (DJ) was one Ray Newby of Stockton, California who made his debut broadcast in 1909, would you believe? When he was 16 years old and a student, Newby started to play his records on a primitive radio located in the Herrold College of Engineering and Wireless in San Jose. The records played back then were mostly recordings of Enrico Caruso.

95 Vols’ school : UTENN

The Tennessee Volunteers (the Vols) is the name given to the men’s sports teams at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. The women’s teams are called the Lady Volunteers.

96 Golf caddie, e.g. : TOTER

“Caddie” is a Scottish word, as one might expect given the history of the game of golf. “Caddie” is a local word derived from the French “cadet”, meaning a younger son or brother, and also a student officer in the military. The variant spelling “caddy” is quite common.

97 Help-wanted ad abbr. : EOE

Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE)

100 Maria __, the last House of Habsburg ruler : THERESA

Maria Theresa was the last ruler of the House of Habsburg, also known as the House of Austria. She was also the House’s only female ruler. Maria Theresa was married to Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor. The couple had sixteen children together, including Queen Marie Antoinette of France.

106 Like volcanic rock : IGNEOUS

Magma is the molten material below the Earth’s surface. When magma cools, it forms igneous rock. “Magma” is a Greek term that describes a thick ointment.

109 “By yesterday!” : ASAP!

As soon as possible (ASAP)

112 Long-legged wader : HERON

Herons are birds with long legs that inhabit freshwater and coastal locales. Some herons are routinely referred to as egrets, and others as bitterns. Herons look a lot like storks and cranes, but differ in their appearance in flight. Herons fly with their necks retracted in an S-shape, whereas storks and cranes have their necks extended.

119 Film in which Fido wins a place at the Round Table? : THE BARK KNIGHT (from “The Dark Knight”)

King Arthur (and his Round Table) probably never really existed, but his legend is very persistent. Arthur was supposedly a leader of the Romano-British as they tried to resist the invasion of the Anglo-Saxons in the late 5th and early 6th centuries.

“The Dark Knight” is a 2008 film featuring Christian Bale as Batman, the title character. The movie is the second in what’s now known as “The Dark Knight Trilogy” (after “Batman Begins” and before “The Dark Knight Rises”. Christopher Nolan directed all three films in the trilogy.

123 Pump part : INSOLE

A pump is a woman’s shoe that doesn’t have a strap. Such shoes are probably called “pumps” because of the sound they make while walking in them.

Down

5 “__ bin ein Berliner”: JFK : ICH

“Ich” is the German for “I”, as in “Ich bin ein Berliner” (I am a Berliner), the famous words of support uttered by President John F. Kennedy in 1963 in a speech in West Berlin. The supposed translation of “Ich bin ein Berliner” as “I am a jelly doughnut” … that’s just an urban myth. President Kennedy’s use of German was perfectly correct.

6 Holly Golightly’s creator : CAPOTE

“Breakfast at Tiffany’s” is a 1958 novella written by Truman Capote. Truman’s colorful protagonist in the story is Holiday “Holly” Golightly, who was played so very, very ably by Audrey Hepburn in the marvelous 1961 movie adaptation. It must be said that the film is a rather loose interpretation of Capote’s novella.

7 __ throat : STREP

Streptococcus bacteria multiply and divide along a single axis so that they form linked chains. That behavior gives the genus of bacteria its name, as “streptos” is Greek for “easily twisted, like a chain”. I had to battle with streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) twice in the past few years and it was not at all pleasant, I must say. Another species of streptococcus is responsible for that terrible “flesh-eating” infection that makes the news from time to time.

10 Québec street : RUE

Québec is the largest province in Canada, and the only one with French as its sole official language. The name “Québec” comes from an Algonquin word “kebec” meaning “where the river narrows”. This refers to the area around Quebec City where the St. Lawrence River narrows as it flows through a gap lined by steep cliffs. The province has voted twice in referenda asking whether or not Quebec should become an independent country, once in 1980, and again in 1995. The 1995 result was 49% in favor of sovereignty, up from 40% in 1980.

11 With a bow, to Anne-Sophie Mutter : ARCO

“Arco” is a musical direction instructing a string player to return to normal bowing technique after a passage played using some other technique (perhaps pizzicato).

13 Goes back on one’s word : RENEGES

To renege on something is to back out of it. It’s a verb commonly used in card games like bridge and whist. A renege is when a player doesn’t follow suit, even though there may be a card of the suit led in his/her hand.

14 Gasteyer of “Mean Girls” : ANA

Ana Gasteyer is an actress best known for being a cast member of “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) from 1996 to 2002. Gasteyer was famous on SNL for playing Martha Stewart … topless!

“Mean Girls” is a teen comedy movie released in 2004 starring Lindsay Lohan. Tina Fey also puts in an appearance, which really isn’t surprising as Fey wrote the screenplay.

15 Put the kibosh on : STIFLE

A kibosh is something that constrains or checks. “Kibosh” looks like a Yiddish word but it isn’t, and is more likely English slang from the early 1800s.

16 Wispy clouds : CIRRI

Cirrus (plural “cirri”) clouds are those lovely wispy, white strands that are often called “mare’s tails”.

18 Pigeon’s perch : LEDGE

Taxonomically, doves and pigeons are the only members of the order Columbidae. The terms “dove” and “pigeon” are often used interchangeably. Scientifically speaking, dove species tend to be smaller than pigeon species. Colloquially though, many refer to doves as the white or nearly white species in the family.

21 Trusted adviser : GURU

“Guru” is a Hindi word meaning “teacher” or “priest”.

23 Some, in San Salvador : UNAS

San Salvador is the capital of El Salvador. The city was founded by the Spanish 1525, although it was moved on two occasions early on, in 1528 and 1545. The name “San Salvador” translates as “Holy Savior”.

28 Courses for coll. credit : APS

The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school (HS). After being tested at the end of an AP course, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

30 Load : SLEW

Our usage of “slew” to mean “large number” has nothing to do with the verb “to slew” meaning “to turn, skid”. The noun “slew” came into English in the early 1800s from the Irish word “sluagh” meaning “host, crowd, multitude”.

33 Since, in a seasonal song : SYNE

The song “Auld Lang Syne” is a staple at New Year’s Eve (well, actually in the opening minutes of New Year’s Day). The words were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

34 “Bill & __ Excellent Adventure” : TED’S

“Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” is a 1989 comedy sci-fi film, starring Alex Winter as Bill and Keanu Reeves as Ted. It’s about two lazy students traveling through time in preparation for a history assignment, with a lot of “Dude!” and “Excellent!” scattered throughout the dialog. Reading the plot, this isn’t a movie that I’d normally go for, but somehow, I enjoyed it …

35 Throat dangler : UVULA

The uvula is that conical fleshy projection hanging down at the back of the soft palate. The uvula plays an important role in human speech, particularly in the making of “guttural” sounds. The Latin word for “grape” is “uva”, so “uvula” is a “little grape”.

42 Horace’s “__ Poetica” : ARS

The full name of Horace’s work is “Ars Poetica, Epistula ad Pisones” (The Art of Poetry, Letters to the Pisos). The work describes the technical aspects of poetry in ancient Rome, and the term “ars poetica” has come to mean the poetry of that period.

43 Last word of the most recent version of “America the Beautiful” : SEA

When she was 33 years old, Katharine Lee Bates took a train ride from Massachusetts to Colorado Springs. She was so inspired by many of the beautiful sights she saw on her journey that she wrote a poem she called “Pikes Peak”. Upon publication the poem became quite a hit, and several musical works were adapted to the words of the poem, the most popular being a hymn tune composed by Samuel Ward. Bates’s poem and Ward’s tune were published together for the first time in 1910, and given the title “America the Beautiful”.

44 “The A-Team” actor : MR T

Mr. T’s real name is Laurence Tero Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a nightclub so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catch phrase comes from the movie “Rocky III”. In the film, before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, “No, I don’t hate Balboa, but I pity the fool”. He parlayed that line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called “I Pity the Fool”, and produced a motivational video called “Be Somebody … or Be Somebody’s Fool!”.

“The A-Team” is an action television series that originally ran in the eighties. The A-Team was a group of ex-US special forces personnel who became mercenaries. Star of the show was Hollywood actor George Peppard (as “Hannibal” Smith), ably assisted by Mr. T (as “B.A.” Baracus) and Robert Vaughn (as Hunt Stockwell).

45 Didn’t dillydally : SPED

To dillydally is to loiter, delay. The verb “to dally” also means “to linger, dawdle”, and so “dillydally” is simply a duplication of “dally”, one that dates back to the mid-1700s.

50 O.T. book after Neh. : ESTH

Esther was a Jewish queen, wife of the Persian king Ahasuerus and the heroine of the Book of Esther in the Bible. By the way, Esther is the only book in the Bible that doesn’t mention the word “God”.

51 Brit’s informal eatery : CAFF

“Caff” is an informal term used in Britain and Ireland for “café”.

52 One, on a one : UNUM

From 1776, “E pluribus unum” was the unofficial motto of the United States. The phrase translates from Latin as “Out of many, one”. It was pushed aside in 1956 when an Act of Congress designated “In God We Trust” as the country’s official motto. “In God We Trust” had appeared on US coins since 1864, but was only introduced on paper currency in 1957.

62 “Anderson Cooper 360°” channel : CNN

“Anderson Cooper 360°” is a CNN news show that is often referred to simply as “AC360”.

64 Landmark ’70s case anonym : ROE

Roe v. Wade was decided in a US District Court in Texas in 1970, and reached the Supreme Court on appeal. The basic decision by the Supreme Court was that a woman’s constitutional right to privacy applied to an abortion, but that this right had to be balanced with a state’s interest in protecting an unborn child and a mother’s health. The Court further defined that the state’s interest became stronger with each trimester of a pregnancy. So, in the first trimester the woman’s right to privacy outweighed any state interest. In the second trimester the state’s interest in maternal health was deemed to be strong enough to allow state regulation of abortion for the sake of the mother. In the third trimester the viability of the fetus dictated that the state’s interest in the unborn child came into play, so states could regulate or prohibit abortions, except in cases where the mother’s life was in danger. I’m no lawyer, but that’s my understanding of the initial Supreme Court decision …

66 Autobahn hazard : EIS

In German, “Eis” (ice) is frozen “Wasser” (water).

68 Censor’s target : OATH

The original “censor” was an officer in ancient Rome who had responsibility for taking the “census”, as well as supervising public morality.

69 Together, in Toulon : UNIE

As well as being a town on the southern coast of France, Toulon is a military port and home to the French Mediterranean Fleet. In particular, it is the home port of the French Navy’s sole aircraft carrier, the Charles de Gaulle.

70 Eclectic magazine : UTNE

The “Utne Reader” is known for aggregation and republishing of articles on politics, culture and the environment from other sources in the media. It was founded in 1984 by Eric Utne, with management taken over by Eric’s wife Nina Rothschild Utne in 1990.

71 Chain with links : IHOP

The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn’t do too well in marketing tests.

Link sausages are so called as they can come in chains, with each sausage being a link in that chain.

72 St. Petersburg’s river : NEVA

The Neva is a very large river that empties into the Gulf of Finland at the beautiful city of St. Petersburg. The river forms an expansive delta as it reaches the Baltic Sea, and the delta gives rise to numerous islands, with the number of islands further increased by a network of canals. The historic part of the city is built on these islands, giving St. Petersburg a very Venetian feel. I had the privilege of visiting the city some years ago, and I can attest that it is indeed spectacular …

St. Petersburg in Russia is an absolutely beautiful city to visit. The city was renamed to Petrograd in 1914, Leningrad in 1924 and back to St. Petersburg in 1991.

73 Originate, with “up” : DRUM …

To drum up is to bring about using effort, as in “drumming up business”. The use of “drum up” dates back to the days when drums were used to attract a crowd or perhaps to encourage military recruits. More recently, the term “to drum up” has evolved to mean “to invent”, as in “drumming up a new process”.

80 Theoretical visitors : ETS

Extraterrestrial (ET)

81 Cacophony : DIN

“Cacophony” is such a lovely word, a word used to describe a harsh or jarring sound. The term arises from the Greek “kakos” (bad) and “phone” (voice).

82 Landers of letters : ANN

“Ask Ann Landers” was an advice column written by Eppie Lederer from 1955 to 2002. Eppie was the twin sister to Pauline Phillips, the person behind “Dear Abby”. Eppie took over the “Ask Ann Landers” column from Ruth Crowley who started it in 1943.

84 Banks of “America’s Got Talent” : TYRA

Tyra Banks is a tremendously successful model and businesswoman. Banks created and hosted the hit show “America’s Next Top Model “, and also had her own talk show. She was also the first African-American woman to make the cover of the “Sports Illustrated” swimsuit issue.

NBC’s “America’s Got Talent” is part of a global franchise based in the UK. The original show is called “Britain’s Got Talent”, and the whole franchise is owned by Simon Cowell. The first host of “America’s Got Talent” was Regis Philbin (2006), followed by Jerry Springer, Nick Cannon, Tyra Banks and Terry Crews.

86 Ancient Dead Sea kingdom : EDOM

Edom was an ancient Iron Age kingdom located in the south of modern-day Jordan. The area is known for its red-colored sandstone, which gave the kingdom its name. According to the Bible, the Edomites were the descendants of Esau. “Edom” translates from Hebrew as “red”, and was the name given to Esau when he ate the “red pottage”.

The Middle East’s Dead Sea lies more than 1,400 feet below sea level, making it the lowest point on the Earth’s landmass. It is also one of the saltiest bodies of water in the world, with a salt content that is almost ten times that of most oceans.

88 Something to chew : CUD

Ruminants are animals that “chew the cud”. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work. We also use the verb “to ruminate” in a figurative sense, to mean “to muse, ponder, chew over”.

90 Kramer, to Jerry : NEIGHBOR

Cosmo Kramer is the outrageous character played by Michael Richards on “Seinfeld”. “Seinfeld” co-creator, Larry David, introduced Kramer into the story, basing the character on real-life comedian Kenny Kramer who used to live across the hall from him.

91 Sun Devils’ rival : UTES

The Utah Utes are the athletic teams of the University of Utah.

Arizona State University (ASU) has a long history, and was founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885. The athletic teams of ASU used to be known as the Normals, then the Bulldogs, and since 1946 they’ve been called the Sun Devils.

99 Ear malady : OTITIS

The suffix “-itis” is used to denote inflammation, as in laryngitis (inflammation of the larynx), otitis (inflammation of the ear), tendinitis (inflammation of a tendon), tonsillitis (inflammation of the tonsils) and sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses).

102 Fort Knox unit : KARAT

A karat (also “carat”, the spelling outside of North America) is a measure of the purity of gold alloys, with 24-karat representing pure gold.

Fort Knox is actually a US Army base, but it lends its name to the adjacent facility that is more correctly called the United States Bullion Depository. Most of the US gold reserves are in “Fort Knox”, although it isn’t the biggest gold repository in the US. That honor goes to the vault under the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in Manhattan. Most of the gold stored in the New York vault belongs to foreign nations and banks.

103 Rhone tributary : ISERE

The Isère river gives its name to the French Department of Isère, located partly in the French Alps. In turn, Isère gave its name to a somewhat famous ship called the Isère, which in 1885 delivered the Statue of Liberty from France to America in 214 shipping crates.

104 Pelvic bones : SACRA

The sacrum and the two ilia are three bones in the human pelvis.

105 Bounders : CADS

Our word “cad”, meaning “person lacking in finer feelings”, is a shortening of the word “cadet”. “Cad” was first used for a servant, and then students at British universities used “cad” as a term for a boy from the local town. “Cad” took on its current meaning in the 1830s.

A bounder is a man deemed to be ill-bred and obtrusive. The term “bounder” was originally slang in England, and probably came from the sense of someone acting outside the bounds of acceptable behavior.

107 Author Zora __ Hurston : NEALE

Zora Neale Hurston was an American author who was most famous for her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God”.

113 Greeting from Kermit : HI-HO

Kermit has to be the most readily recognized puppet character created by the late great Jim Henson. Henson came up with Kermit way back in 1955 when he appeared on a puppet show called “Sam and Friends” that aired in Washington, D.C. Kermit is loved so much that he even has his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

115 Put an edge on : WHET

The words “whet” and “pique” can both be used in the sense of sharpening or awaking one’s interest or desire.

116 Benchmarks: Abbr. : STDS

A benchmark is something that serves as a standard used to measure others. The original benchmark was a point of reference used by surveyors. Literally, a benchmark was an angle-iron driven into the ground as a support (or “bench”) for a levelling instrument.

118 __ kwon do : TAE

Tae kwon do is the national sport of Korea. “Tae” means “to strike or break with foot”; “kwon” means “to strike or break with fist”; “do” means “way” or “art”. Along with judo, tae kwon do is one of only two martial arts included in the Olympic Games.

121 Cpl., e.g. : NCO

A non-commissioned officer (NCO) might be a sergeant (sgt.) or a corporal (cpl.).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Like some stressed text : ITALIC
7 Perfect pass : SPIRAL
13 Imp : RASCAL
19 Rattler commonly used in pairs : MARACA
20 University staying power? : TENURE
21 Mild, in Milan : GENTILE
22 Film with a feline baseball ace? : PITCH PURRFECT (from “Pitch Perfect”)
24 Not on TV yet : UNAIRED
25 Roy Rogers’ birth name : SLYE
26 Ninja Turtles’ ally April __ : O’NEIL
27 One end of the Chicago L’s Blue Line : O’HARE
29 Shattering grenade, to a GI : FRAG
30 Shunned the paper clip : STAPLED
32 Biopic about Frank from “Men in Black”? : A PUG’S LIFE (from “A Bug’s Life”)
34 Scraps : TUSSLES
38 Cookout glowers : COALS
40 Artist’s asset : EYE
41 Clicked ballot : E-VOTE
42 __ Martin: Bond’s car : ASTON
44 AOL alternative : MSN
45 Flier to Oslo : SAS
48 Comedy about a lost mutt? : DUDE, WHERE’S MY CUR? (from “Dude, Where’s My Car?”)
53 Sports channel that shows college games : ESPNU
55 High-five, e.g. : SLAP
56 “Insecure” star Rae : ISSA
57 Not supporting : ANTI
59 Mets’ slugger Alonso : PETE
60 Catalog : ASSORT
62 Greek vacation isle : CORFU
65 Essential : NEEDED
67 Film about a composing pooch? : THE HOUND OF MUSIC (from “The Sound of Music”)
71 Not alfresco : INDOOR
74 Year, to Yves : ANNEE
75 Sampled : TESTED
78 Deli order : HERO
79 Org. monitoring possible alien signals : SETI
81 Gillian’s Emmy-winning role on “The X-Files” : DANA
83 Settled : ALIT
85 Small egg : OVULE
87 Drama about organized disobedience at obedience school? : THE CANINE MUTINY (from “The Caine Mutiny”)
92 Frying pan spray : PAM
93 Mix masters, briefly? : DJS
95 Vols’ school : UTENN
96 Golf caddie, e.g. : TOTER
97 Help-wanted ad abbr. : EOE
98 “Me too” : SO DO I
100 Maria __, the last House of Habsburg ruler : THERESA
102 Film romance starring Puss? : KISS ME, CAT (from “Kiss Me, Kate”)
106 Like volcanic rock : IGNEOUS
109 “By yesterday!” : ASAP!
110 Clock __ : RADIO
112 Long-legged wader : HERON
113 Chops : HEWS
117 Reeled off : RECITED
119 Film in which Fido wins a place at the Round Table? : THE BARK KNIGHT (from “The Dark Knight”)
122 Unpaid debt : ARREARS
123 Pump part : INSOLE
124 Imitated : ECHOED
125 Flirts with : TEASES
126 Rose to great heights : SOARED
127 Hen holders : ROOSTS

Down

1 Little devils : IMPS
2 Detective, at times : TAIL
3 Affectedly creative : ARTY
4 Shoestring : LACE
5 “__ bin ein Berliner”: JFK : ICH
6 Holly Golightly’s creator : CAPOTE
7 __ throat : STREP
8 Danger : PERIL
9 Changes one’s tone of voice : INFLECTS
10 Québec street : RUE
11 With a bow, to Anne-Sophie Mutter : ARCO
12 Beyond harmful : LETHAL
13 Goes back on one’s word : RENEGES
14 Gasteyer of “Mean Girls” : ANA
15 Put the kibosh on : STIFLE
16 Wispy clouds : CIRRI
17 Shaking like __ : A LEAF
18 Pigeon’s perch : LEDGE
21 Trusted adviser : GURU
23 Some, in San Salvador : UNAS
28 Courses for coll. credit : APS
30 Load : SLEW
31 Assure the failure of : DOOM
33 Since, in a seasonal song : SYNE
34 “Bill & __ Excellent Adventure” : TED’S
35 Throat dangler : UVULA
36 Beverage aisle options : SODAS
37 It helps you get up : STEP STOOL
39 “__ objections?” : ANY
42 Horace’s “__ Poetica” : ARS
43 Last word of the most recent version of “America the Beautiful” : SEA
44 “The A-Team” actor : MR T
45 Didn’t dillydally : SPED
46 One chip, maybe : ANTE
47 Sought damages : SUED
49 Personnel staff : HIRERS
50 O.T. book after Neh. : ESTH
51 Brit’s informal eatery : CAFF
52 One, on a one : UNUM
54 Fan at the game : SPECTATOR
58 Clothes line : INSEAM
61 “Lookee here!” : OHO!
62 “Anderson Cooper 360°” channel : CNN
63 Poetic tribute : ODE
64 Landmark ’70s case anonym : ROE
66 Autobahn hazard : EIS
68 Censor’s target : OATH
69 Together, in Toulon : UNIE
70 Eclectic magazine : UTNE
71 Chain with links : IHOP
72 St. Petersburg’s river : NEVA
73 Originate, with “up” : DRUM …
76 A-listers : ELITE
77 Eats well : DINES
80 Theoretical visitors : ETS
81 Cacophony : DIN
82 Landers of letters : ANN
84 Banks of “America’s Got Talent” : TYRA
86 Ancient Dead Sea kingdom : EDOM
88 Something to chew : CUD
89 Yours, to Yvette : A TOI
90 Kramer, to Jerry : NEIGHBOR
91 Sun Devils’ rival : UTES
94 Angry 54-Downs : JEERERS
97 Catches sight of : ESPIES
98 Down : SAD
99 Ear malady : OTITIS
100 Captured : TOOK
101 Take shelter, with “down” : HUNKER …
102 Fort Knox unit : KARAT
103 Rhone tributary : ISERE
104 Pelvic bones : SACRA
105 Bounders : CADS
107 Author Zora __ Hurston : NEALE
108 Went astray : ERRED
111 “Horrors!” : OH NO!
113 Greeting from Kermit : HI-HO
114 Star features : EGOS
115 Put an edge on : WHET
116 Benchmarks: Abbr. : STDS
118 __ kwon do : TAE
120 Spanish “that” : ESA
121 Cpl., e.g. : NCO

16 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 27 Sep 20, Sunday”

  1. 31:01. Did this late Sat night and then thought of other possible pet themed movies lying in bed. Kept me awake for a bit and now I can remember only a couple

    Sci-fi flick about a happy dog in space – STAR WAGS

    Sequel to “We’re gonna need a bigger Kennel” – PAWS II

    I know I had a few more, but this is probably two groaners too many from me.

  2. Enjoyable puzzle. Clever theme. I had roost for 18D and lo and behold roosts was the answer to 127A. Something had to give. On the flip side, it seemed like there was an overabundance of words from across the pond. Never heard of Caff. Fill that grid!

  3. 1:06:50 with no errors despite 11 foreign clues…why not do an entire puzzle in French, Spanish, Italian and Latin?
    Stay safe and go Ravens.

  4. 20:24, no errors, no complaints. Cute idea.

    @Dirk (from yesterday, concerning the houses of Congress) …

    Yeah, I guess it was pretty pathetic to appeal to a minor source like the Britannica. (I mean, they’re foreigners, for God’s sake!) I probably should have cited some of the good American sources I found (though, of course, I would have avoided Merriam-Webster, since we know how that would be received here) … 😜.

    Anyway, just to show that I’m not resentful, I shall kindly refrain from pointing out the misspelling of the past tense of “pay” in your post … (second paragraph, second word … but who’s counting?) … 🙂🙂🙂.

    And I certainly agree with you about the state of English “cuisine” a few decades ago. My first trip there was in early 1969, when I was 26, and it took me a while to realize that I was going to have to frequent Chinese restaurants in order to survive the experience. (Later, though, I found that fish-and-chips places were another possibility.)

    1. Yikes! paid, paid, paid… My bad.

      My trip was in 1975 or 1976 and it hadn’t got better. I had come from Germany, where you can go into any restaurant and get a decent meal, and was visiting London with my uncle and aunt for my birthday weekend. I barely made it back to Frankfurt and went to an airport restaurant, while my relatives drove on to Scotland.

      After hanging out at British and Irish pubs, and learning how to play pretty good darts, I learned about fish & chips, shepherd’s pie and maybe bangers & mash. Friends also told me about Indian and Chinese restaurants.

      So my second visit was much more enjoyable, although they put weird stuff on pizzas…just like in Germany.

  5. The other half of the word “streptococcus” is also derived from its form. From wikipedia:
    Bacteria are categorized based on their shapes into three classes: cocci (spherical-shaped), bacillus (rod-shaped) and spirochetes (spiral-shaped) cells.

  6. 26 mins 54 sec, no errors. The dumb dog puns just got to me today, I don’t know why. It’s just getting to be too much.

  7. No errors today in spite of some guesses, i.e. I was familiar with “caff” and I
    wavered between “as do I” and “so do I” for a time. Had fun with this one.

  8. No real difficulties. Once again I’m in awe of Bill’s solve time. Unreal! I would make a comment about the answer to 102 Across “Kiss me cat” but it would only land me in more hot water so I’ll refrain… ;-D>

  9. 26:08 1 error, 1 lookup

    This one was fun, from the moment I got PITCHPURRFECT.

    I’ve had some of the best Chinese and Indian food I’ve ever eaten in England. I learned very quickly not to eat in pubs, though, no matter how lovely the beer.

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