LA Times Crossword 8 Nov 20, Sunday

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Constructed by: Daniel A. Finan & Brian Herrick
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Did You Get the Part?

Each themed clue is a PART of the corresponding answer, as referred to in that answer:

  • 23A PROP : “IMPROPER” FRACTION
  • 31A OUT : “MOUTH” PIECE
  • 48A VIE : “MOVIE” CLIP
  • 81A GET : “BUDGET” CUT
  • 98A ORE : “CORE” SAMPLE
  • 107A TEN : “SENTENCE” FRAGMENT
  • 12D ARE : “RARE” ELEMENT
  • 15D VAT : “PRIVATE” SECTOR
  • 55D HANG : CHUNK OF “CHANGE”
  • 66D CON : SLAB OF “BACON

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 14m 57s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Ones found on saucers, briefly? : ETS

Disc-shaped flying objects have been reported in the sky since the Middle Ages. In the modern era, the event that launched the term “flying saucer” was a UFO sighting in 1947, which was covered widely in the media. Kenneth Arnold reported seeing nine unidentified flying objects in formation near Mount Rainier in Washington. In describing the objects, he repeatedly used the words “saucer”, “disc” and “pie-plate”. Newspapers latched onto the terminology, and we’ve been seeing flying “saucers” ever since.

18 Oz creator : BAUM

L. Frank Baum (the “L” is for Lyman) is famous for writing “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”. Writing early in the 20th century, Baum actually described in his books things that had yet to be invented, like television, laptop computers and wireless telephones.

19 Corrupting atmosphere : MIASMA

The word “miasma” was first used for the poisonous atmosphere thought to arise from swamps and rotting matter, and which could cause disease. Nowadays, a miasma is just a thick cloud of gas or smoke.

20 Organized to a fault : ANAL

The use of the word “anal” to mean “stiffly conventional” is an abbreviated form of “anal-retentive”, a term derived from Freudian psychology. Regardless, I’m not a big fan of the term …

22 Florentine flower? : ARNO

The Arno is the principal river in the Tuscany region of Italy, and passes through the cities of Florence and Pisa. Famously the Arno flooded in 1966, the worst flood in the region for centuries. There were numerous deaths and extensive destruction of priceless art treasures, particularly in Florence.

Florence is the capital city of the Tuscany region in Italy. Something from or related to Florence is described as “Florentine”. The city is known as “Firenze” in Italian.

23 PROP : IMPROPER FRACTION

In mathematics, fractions can be classified as either proper or improper. Generally, we encounter proper fractions, fractions that have values of less than one, e.g. ½, ¾, etc. Improper fractions have values greater than one, e.g. 5/4, 3/2, etc.

26 2000s Cal.-based teen drama : THE OC

“The O.C.” is a teen drama that aired for four seasons on Fox finishing up in 2007. I never watched it, but I understand that it is set in Newport Beach in Southern California. And, “O.C.” stands for “Orange County”.

29 Longtime late-night host : LENO

Jay Leno was born James Leno in New Rochelle, New York. Jay’s father was the son of Italian immigrants, and his mother was from Scotland. Leno grew up in Andover, Massachusetts and actually dropped out of school on the advice of a high school guidance counsellor. However, years later he went to Emerson College and earned a Bachelor’s degree in speech therapy. Leno also started a comedy club at Emerson in 1973. Today Jay Leno is a car nut and owns about 200 vehicles of various types. You can check them out on his website: www.jaylenosgarage.com.

30 Iran has multiple ones: Abbr. : VPS

Following a 1979 constitutional referendum, Iran established itself as an Islamic republic with a constitution codified according to Shia Islam. The new constitution introduced direct elections for the President of Iran, and created a parliament with a single legislative assembly. The President of Iran appoints vice president to head up various organizations related to presidential affairs. The person holding the office of First Vice President of Iran acts in the absence of the president.

36 Big, strong swimmer : WHALE

Male whales are referred to as “bulls”, females are “cows”, and the young are “calves”.

38 Ricola ad instrument : ALPHORN

Not all brass instruments are made from brass, but all produce sound with the vibration of the lips. Alphorns and didgeridoos are classified as brass instruments, but are made from wood. On the other hand, saxophones are classified as woodwinds, and are made from brass.

Ricola is a Swiss brand of cough drops and breath mints.

39 Database systems giant : ORACLE

Oracle is a huge software company with headquarters in Redwood City, California. Oracle’s main product is enterprise software, software that meets the needs of an organization rather than an individual user. Oracle was co-founded in 1977 by Larry Ellison, who is now one of the richest business people in the world.

41 Pac-12 squad : UTES

The Utah Utes are the athletic teams of the University of Utah.

42 Nintendo’s Super __ : NES

The name “Super NES” (or “SNES”) stands for “Super Nintendo Entertainment System”.

43 Winter fuel units : CORDS

A cord of firewood has a volume of 128 cubic feet. More commonly it’s a neat stack measuring 4 feet high, 8 feet long and 4 feet deep.

50 Lewd material : SMUT

“Smut” means “dirt, smudge” and more recently “pornographic material”. The term comes from the Yiddish “schmutz”, which is a slang word used in English for dirt, as in “dirt on one’s face”.

54 Basic digital exercise : SCALE

That would be a musical reference.

56 Chile relleno stuffing : CHEESE

“Chile relleno” translates as “stuffed chile”.

58 Many readers of “Dreyer’s English,” for short : EDS

Editor (ed.)

“Dreyer’s English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style” is a reference book published in 2019 by Benjamin Dreyer, the chief copy editor at Random House. This is a book that I need to purchase, I think. It sounds like it’s a more contemporary and lighthearted version of Strunk & White, for example.

59 Brian of electronica : ENO

Brian Eno is a musician, composer and record producer from England who first achieved fame as the synthesizer player with Roxy Music. As a producer, Eno has worked with David Bowie, Devo, Talking Heads and U2.

60 Home of the Milad Tower : TEHRAN

Milad Tower in Tehran is the tallest tower in Iran. It is primarily a telecommunication tower and extends to a height of 1,427 feet, including the antenna mast. For comparison, the CN Tower in Toronto rises to 1,815 feet including its antenna.

61 Cone counterparts : RODS

The retina is the tissue that lines the inside of the eye, and is the tissue that is light-sensitive. There are (mainly) two types of cells in the retina that are sensitive to light, namely rods and cones. Rods are cells that best function in very dim light and only provide black-and-white vision. Cones on the other hand function in brighter light and can perceive color.

62 Corn bread : PONE

“Pone” is another name for corn bread, and comes from the Powhatan term “apan” meaning “something baked”.

64 Icy Hot target : ACHE

Icy Hot is a topical heat rub that is used to relieve muscular discomfort and pain from arthritis and rheumatism. The active ingredient doesn’t provide any heat or cold, but it does stimulate nerve receptors in the skin causing the user to experience a cool sensation followed by warmth.

66 Ward in Hollywood : SELA

Actress Sela Ward turns up in crosswords a lot. Ward played Teddy Reed in the TV show “Sisters” in the nineties, and was in “Once and Again” from 1999-2002. I don’t know either show, but I do know Ward from the medical drama “House” in which she played the hospital’s lawyer and Greg House’s ex-partner. That was a fun role, I thought. More recently, Ward played a lead role on “CSI: NY” and was a very welcome and much-needed addition to the cast. And, Ward played Dr. Richard Kimble’s murdered wife in the 1993 film version of “The Fugitive”.

68 Gyro holders : PITAS

A gyro is a traditional Greek dish of meat roasted on a tall vertical spit that is sliced from the spit as required. Gyros are usually served inside a lightly grilled piece of pita bread, along with tomato, onion and tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce).

70 Lab coat discovery? : FLEA

The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814. The breed comes in three registered colors: black, yellow and chocolate.

71 Subject of many Instagram posts : SELF

Instagram (often abbreviated to “Insta”) is a photo-sharing application, one that is extremely popular. Instagram started in San Francisco in 2010. Facebook purchased Instagram two years later, paying $1 billion. The billion-dollar Instagram company had just 13 employees at the time of the sale …

72 Snicket of kids’ books : LEMONY

“Lemony Snicket” is a pen name used by Daniel Handler, a novelist from San Francisco, California. Snicket also appears as the narrator of his books, including the best known of the works: “A Series of Unfortunate Events”. Count Olaf is the antagonist in “A Series of Unfortunate Events”.

74 Culinary lead-in to king : A LA

A dish prepared “à la king” (usually chicken or turkey), is prepared in a cream sauce with mushrooms, pimentos, green peppers and sherry.

77 Hallmark of a procrastinator? : E-CARD

Hallmark produces more greeting cards in the US than any other company. The company was started by Joyce Clyde Hall in 1910, and by 1915 was known as Hall Brothers after his brother Rollie joined the enterprise. Rollie invented what we know today as “wrapping paper”, displacing the traditional use of colored tissue paper for wrapping gifts. The company took on the name “Hallmark” in 1928, taking the term for the symbol used by goldsmiths in London in the 1500s.

79 Adds a soundtrack to : DUBS

If voices needed to be altered on the soundtrack of a film, that means double the work as there needs to be a re-recording. “Dub” is short for “double”, and is a term we’ve been using since the late 1920s. The term has been extended to describe the adding of sound to an otherwise silent film or tape.

81 GET : BUDGET CUT

We started using the word “budget” in a financial sense in the mid-1700s. The term comes from the Latin “bulga” meaning “leather bag”. The idea was that a minister of the treasury would keep fiscal plans (budgets) in a wallet or leather bag.

86 Longtime “60 Minutes” reporter : STAHL

Television journalist Lesley Stahl first appeared on “60 Minutes” in 1991, after serving as moderator of “Face the Nation” for almost 8 years starting in 1983. Stahl is married to author and journalist Aaron Latham. One of Latham’s claims to fame is that he wrote the article that inspired the movie “Urban Cowboy”.

The marvelous news magazine program “60 Minutes” has been on the air since 1968. The show is unique among all other regularly-scheduled shows in that it has never used theme music. There is just the ticking of that Aristo stopwatch.

87 Hoppy brew, for short : IPA

India pale ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

93 Like activity that can move mountains : SEISMIC

The combining form “seismo-” means “earthquake”, and comes from “seismos”, the Greek for “earthquake”.

101 Early TV maker : RCA

RCA was founded in 1919 as the Radio Corporation of America, and as a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Electric (GE). GE divested RCA in 1932, and then reacquired the company in 1986. Today, RCA is just a brand name.

102 Builder concerned with pairs : NOAH

Genesis 6:19-20 states that Noah was instructed to take two animals of every kind into the ark. Later, in Genesis 7:2-3 Noah was instructed to take on board “every clean animal by sevens … male and female, to keep offspring alive on the face of all the earth”. Apparently, “extras” (7 rather than 2) were needed for ritual sacrifice.

104 Midway alternative : O’HARE

Midway Airport (MDW) started off with just one cinder runway in 1923, and was called Chicago Air Park. By 1927 the airport had expanded and earned the name Chicago Municipal Airport. In 1932 Midway was the world’s busiest airport, a title it held for thirty years. In 1949, in honor of the WWII Battle of Midway, the airport was renamed again to Chicago Midway Airport. Then in 1955, along came Chicago International Airport and all the major airlines started moving their operations over to the newer facility. Today, Midway is a major hub for Southwest.

112 Creedence song named for a California city : LODI

Lodi, California may not be as well known as a wine producer as Sonoma and Napa counties, but it has been given the moniker “Zinfandel Capital of the World”.

Creedence Clearwater Revival (CCR) was a rock band from San Francisco that played in a Southern rock style, with hits such as “Proud Mary”, “Bad Moon Rising”, “Down on the Corner” and “Who’ll Stop the Rain”.

114 Slinky shape : COIL

The marvelous Slinky toy was invented in the early forties by a naval engineer named Richard James. James was developing springs for the navy that could stabilize sensitive instruments in rough seas. One day he accidentally knocked one of his experimental coils off a shelf and watched it “step” onto a stack of books, then onto a table and from there onto the floor where it recoiled itself very neatly. The Slinky was born …

118 Professor ‘iggins : ‘ENRY

George Bernard Shaw’s play “Pygmalion” was adapted by Lerner and Loewe to become the Broadway musical “My Fair Lady”. The musical spun off the wonderful 1964 film of the same name starring Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison. To cockney Eliza Doolittle, Professor Henry Higgins was “‘Enry ‘Iggins”.

119 Will of “BoJack Horseman” : ARNETT

Will Arnett is a Canadian actor who got his big break in the Fox show “Arrested Development”. Arnett’s father was the president and CEO of Molson Breweries, and Will was married to actress Penelope Ann Miller and actress/comedian Amy Poehler.

120 Craving : YEN

The word “yen”, meaning “urge”, has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word “yin” imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium.

Down

2 Jobs in which plugs are replaced : TUNE-UPS

There are two main types of internal combustion engine. Most cars in the US use spark injection engines (gasoline engines) in which a spark plug sparks in order to ignite the fuel-air mixture. A diesel engine, on the other hand, has no spark plug per se, and uses the heat generated by compressing the air-fuel mixture to cause ignition.

4 Pal in Provence : AMI

Provence is a geographical region in France, in the south of the country. The region was once a Roman province called Provincia Romana, and was the first Roman province beyond the Alps. It is this Roman name “Provincia Romana” that gives Provence its name.

5 “The Things They Carried” author O’Brien : TIM

“The Things They Carried” is a 1990 collection of related short stories based on the experiences of author Tim O’Brien as a soldier during the Vietnam War.

6 Syrup source : MAPLE

Maple syrup comes in three grades:

  • Grade A
  • Processing grade
  • Substandard

7 “Hamlet” courtier : OSRIC

In William Shakespeare’s play “Hamlet”, Osric is the courtier that Claudius dispatches to invite Hamlet to participate in a duel.

The full title of William Shakespeare’s play that we tend to call “Hamlet” is “The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark”. It is the most performed of all Shakespeare’s plays and it is also his longest, the only one of his works comprising over 4,000 lines. That’s about a 4-hour sitting in a theater …

13 Flair : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style, flair”.

18 Member of the Justice League : BATMAN

The Justice League is a team of superheroes in the DC Comics universe. The team first appeared in 1960, as the Justice league of America. Membership of the league changed over the years, but the original lineup was:

  • Aquaman
  • Batman
  • The Flash
  • Green Lantern
  • Martian Manhunter
  • Superman
  • Wonder Woman

27 2000 film set in a French confectionery : CHOCOLAT

The movie “Chocolat” released in 2000 is a big screen adaption of the novel of the same name by Joanne Harris. “Chocolat” tells the story of a young mother with a six-year-old daughter who opens up a chocolate shop in a French village. The mother is played by the talented Juliette Binoche.

33 Cross inscription : INRI

The letters written on the cross on which Jesus died were INRI. “INRI” is an initialism standing for the Latin “Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum”, which translates into English as “Jesus the Nazarene, King of the Jews”.

40 Usually challenging piece : ETUDE

An étude is a short instrumental composition that is usually quite hard to play and is intended to help the performer master a particular technique. “Étude” is the French word for “study”. Études are commonly performed on the piano.

48 Tussaud of wax museum fame : MARIE

Marie Tussaud was a wax sculptor from France. Some of her early work was very gruesome as she lived through the French Revolution. She would take the decapitated heads of executed citizens and use them to make death masks which were then paraded through the streets. She eventually moved to London, taking with her a vast collection of wax models made by her and her father. She opened a museum to display the works, and Madame Tussauds wax museum is a major attraction in the city to this day.

49 Spartan queen of Greek myth : LEDA

In Greek mythology, Leda was the beautiful Queen of Sparta who was seduced by Zeus when he took the form of a swan. Leda produced two eggs from the union. One egg hatched into Clytemnestra and the beautiful Helen of Troy, over whom was fought the Trojan War. The other egg hatched into the twins Castor and Pollux. Castor and Pollux had different fathers according to the myth. Pollux was the son of Zeus and was immortal, while Castor was the son of Leda’s earthly husband, and so he was a mortal. In the world of the arts, William Butler Yeats wrote a famous sonnet called “Leda and the Swan” in 1924, and Peter Paul Rubens made a copy of a now-lost painting called “Leda and the Swan” by Michelangelo.

52 “__ me, you cad!” : UNHAND

Our word “cad”, meaning “person lacking in finer feelings”, is a shortening of the word “cadet”. “Cad” was first used for a servant, and then students at British universities used “cad” as a term for a boy from the local town. “Cad” took on its current meaning in the 1830s.

53 Neruda’s oeuvre : POESY

“Poesy” is an alternative name for poetry, and is often used to mean the “art of poetry”.

“Pablo Neruda” was the pen name, and eventually the legal name, used by Chilean writer Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. Basoalto chose the name as an homage to Czech poet Jan Neruda.

The sum of an artist’s work in his or her lifetime is known as his or her “oeuvre”.

54 “Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo,” for example : SEQUEL

“Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo” is a 1984 film, and a sequel to the break-dancing movie “Breakin’”. Unusually, “Breakin’ 2” came out just months after the original.

57 Concluding sections : EPILOGS

Our word “epilog” (also “epilogue”) applies to an addition at the end of a play or other literary work. The term ultimately comes from the Greek “epi-” signifying “in addition”, and “logos” meaning “speech”.

60 Oceans’ motions : TIDES

Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon’s effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon’s gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

66 CON : SLAB OF BACON

“Bacon” is an Old French word that we imported into English. The term ultimately comes from the Proto-Germanic “bakkon” meaning “back meat”.

67 Chiefs coach Andy : REID

Andy Reid was head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles football team for 13 years before taking up the head coaching position with the Kansas City Chiefs in 2013.

70 One may be raised at a wedding : FLUTE

The narrow bowl of a champagne flute is usually preferred over the wide bowl of a champagne coupe as the smaller surface area of the wine helps retain its carbonation.

72 Tres __ cake: dessert soaked in dairy liquids : LECHES

A tres leches cake is a type of sponge cake that has been soaked in three kinds of milk, in heavy cream, condensed milk and evaporated milk.

76 Driver in a heist, say : ABETTOR

The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (literally “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

80 Lisa Marie, vis-à-vis Elvis : SOLE HEIR

Lisa Marie Presley is the only daughter of Elvis and Priscilla Presley, and the sole heir to her father’s estate. Lisa Marie has been married four times, including to Michael Jackson and Nicolas Cage.

82 Shock, as a perp : TASE

To tase is to use a taser, a stun gun.

Perpetrator (perp)

84 Ike’s WWII command : ETO

General Dwight D. Eisenhower (“Ike”) was in command of the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during WWII. If you’re a WWII buff like me, then I recommend you take a look at a great, made-for-TV movie starring Tom Selleck as Eisenhower called “Ike: Countdown to D-Day” that came out in 2004.

85 “Illmatic” rapper : NAS

Rapper Nas used to go by an earlier stage name “Nasty Nas”, and before that by his real name “Nasir bin Olu Dara Jones”. Nas released his first album “Illmatic” in 1994, and inventively titled his fifth studio album “Stillmatic”, released in 2001.

90 Analyzed in English class : PARSED

The verb “to parse” means “to state the parts of speech in a sentence”. “Parse” comes from the Latin word “pars” meaning “part”.

96 Air Force __ : ONE

We usually use the term “Air Force One” for the purpose-built military aircraft that transports the president, although any plane can use the call sign provided the president is aboard. There was an incident in 1953 in which a flight carrying President Eisenhower (flight no. Air Force 8610) flew close to a commercial airliner (flight no. Eastern 8610). The special call sign “Air Force One” was created soon after in order to avoid confusion of flight numbers in the future.

98 Heat player, say : CAGER

In the early days of basketball, when a ball went out of bounds possession was awarded to the player who first retrieved the ball. This led to mad scuffles off the court, often involving spectators. As the game became more organized, courts were routinely “caged”, largely because of this out of bounds rule, to limit interaction with the crowd. It’s because of these cages that basketball players are sometimes referred to today as “cagers”.

The Miami Heat basketball team debuted in the NBA in the 1988-89 season. The franchise name was chosen in a competitive survey, with “Miami Heat” beating out “Miami Vice”.

99 Finance guru Suze : ORMAN

Suze Orman is a financial advisor who has gotten her message out on television, in books and on the speaking circuit. She often appears on PBS, and indeed is the most successful fundraiser public television has ever had.

100 “The Canterbury Tales” pilgrim : REEVE

A reeve was a senior official in the days of Anglo-Saxon England, and might perhaps have been a chief magistrate of a town. Famously, a reeve appears in Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales”. “The Reeve’s Tale” is the third tale in the book.

“The Canterbury Tales” is a collection of stories penned by Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century. Written in MIddle English, the tales are presented as a storytelling contest held by a group of pilgrims as they travel from London to the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral. “The Canterbury Tales” is often cited as a landmark piece of English literature as it popularized the use of vernacular English, as opposed to the French or Latin works that were commonly published up to that time.

108 “Chopped” host Allen : TED

Ted Allen is a TV personality who found fame as the food and wine expert on the Bravo show “Queer Eye”. He started as host of the cooking competition show “Chopped” in 2009.

109 Sac __ : FLY

That would be baseball.

111 Where to see a Heat player : TNT

“TNT” stands for Turner Network Television. The TNT cable channel made a big splash in the eighties when it started to broadcast old MGM movies that had been “colorized”, not something that was a big hit with the public. In recent years, the TNT programming lineup is touted with the tagline “We Know Drama”, and includes shows like “Judging Amy”, “ER” and “Cold Case”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Ones found on saucers, briefly? : ETS
4 Max : AT MOST
10 Undercover agent’s device : WIRE
14 Many downloads : APPS
18 Oz creator : BAUM
19 Corrupting atmosphere : MIASMA
20 Organized to a fault : ANAL
21 Having no meetings, say : FREE
22 Florentine flower? : ARNO
23 PROP : IMPROPER FRACTION
26 2000s Cal.-based teen drama : THE OC
28 Equate : LIKEN
29 Longtime late-night host : LENO
30 Iran has multiple ones: Abbr. : VPS
31 OUT : MOUTHPIECE
34 You, once : THEE
36 Big, strong swimmer : WHALE
38 Ricola ad instrument : ALPHORN
39 Database systems giant : ORACLE
41 Pac-12 squad : UTES
42 Nintendo’s Super __ : NES
43 Winter fuel units : CORDS
46 Dawdle : WASTE TIME
48 VIE : MOVIE CLIP
50 Lewd material : SMUT
51 “How you doin’?” : ‘SUP
54 Basic digital exercise : SCALE
56 Chile relleno stuffing : CHEESE
58 Many readers of “Dreyer’s English,” for short : EDS
59 Brian of electronica : ENO
60 Home of the Milad Tower : TEHRAN
61 Cone counterparts : RODS
62 Corn bread : PONE
64 Icy Hot target : ACHE
65 Short notice? : I QUIT
66 Ward in Hollywood : SELA
67 Big break : RIFT
68 Gyro holders : PITAS
69 Desert formation : DUNE
70 Lab coat discovery? : FLEA
71 Subject of many Instagram posts : SELF
72 Snicket of kids’ books : LEMONY
73 Shocked cry : EEK!
74 Culinary lead-in to king : A LA
75 Odds, etc. : RATIOS
77 Hallmark of a procrastinator? : E-CARD
78 __-mo : SLO
79 Adds a soundtrack to : DUBS
81 GET : BUDGET CUT
83 Decorated : FESTOONED
86 Longtime “60 Minutes” reporter : STAHL
87 Hoppy brew, for short : IPA
90 Disagreement ender : PACT
92 Notes in C minor scales : E-FLATS
93 Like activity that can move mountains : SEISMIC
95 Allergic reaction : ACHOO!
97 Outdo : BEST
98 ORE : CORE SAMPLE
101 Early TV maker : RCA
102 Builder concerned with pairs : NOAH
104 Midway alternative : O’HARE
106 Bugs : RILES
107 TEN : SENTENCE FRAGMENT
112 Creedence song named for a California city : LODI
113 Beat by a run, say : EDGE
114 Slinky shape : COIL
115 Metaphor for extreme pleasure : HEAVEN
116 Make read better : EDIT
117 No good one goes unpunished, it’s said : DEED
118 Professor ‘iggins : ‘ENRY
119 Will of “BoJack Horseman” : ARNETT
120 Craving : YEN

Down

1 Batting helmet feature : EARHOLE
2 Jobs in which plugs are replaced : TUNE-UPS
3 Slick : SMOOTH
4 Pal in Provence : AMI
5 “The Things They Carried” author O’Brien : TIM
6 Syrup source : MAPLE
7 “Hamlet” courtier : OSRIC
8 Cook, in a way : SMOKE
9 Compelling evidence : TAPE
10 __ on Drugs : WAR
11 Changes tonally : INFLECTS
12 ARE : RARE ELEMENT
13 Flair : ELAN
14 To the rear, at sea : AFT
15 VAT : PRIVATE SECTOR
16 Kind of person? : PEOPLE
17 Taste and touch : SENSES
18 Member of the Justice League : BATMAN
24 Snares : ENTRAPS
25 Female 36-Across : COW
27 2000 film set in a French confectionery : CHOCOLAT
32 Verified : PROVEN
33 Cross inscription : INRI
35 Possesses : HAS
37 Fire on all cylinders : HUM
39 Boo-boos : OWIES
40 Usually challenging piece : ETUDE
44 Official order : DECREE
45 Authority : SCHOLAR
47 “__ alive!” : IT’S
48 Tussaud of wax museum fame : MARIE
49 Spartan queen of Greek myth : LEDA
52 “__ me, you cad!” : UNHAND
53 Neruda’s oeuvre : POESY
54 “Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo,” for example : SEQUEL
55 HANG : CHUNK OF CHANGE
57 Concluding sections : EPILOGS
60 Oceans’ motions : TIDES
63 Compensate for : OFFSET
64 Get in the crosshairs : AIM AT
66 CON : SLAB OF BACON
67 Chiefs coach Andy : REID
68 Odd : PECULIAR
70 One may be raised at a wedding : FLUTE
71 Ear ornaments : STUDS
72 Tres __ cake: dessert soaked in dairy liquids : LECHES
74 Billboard displays : ADS
76 Driver in a heist, say : ABETTOR
80 Lisa Marie, vis-à-vis Elvis : SOLE HEIR
82 Shock, as a perp : TASE
84 Ike’s WWII command : ETO
85 “Illmatic” rapper : NAS
87 Self-destruct : IMPLODE
88 Boarded, like clowns entering a clown car : PILED IN
89 Nails that test : ACES IT
90 Analyzed in English class : PARSED
91 Say yes (to) : ACCEDE
94 🙂 : SMILEY
96 Air Force __ : ONE
98 Heat player, say : CAGER
99 Finance guru Suze : ORMAN
100 “The Canterbury Tales” pilgrim : REEVE
103 In the old days : ONCE
105 “That’s hilarious … not” : HA HA!
108 “Chopped” host Allen : TED
109 Sac __ : FLY
110 Take home : NET
111 Where to see a Heat player : TNT

28 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 8 Nov 20, Sunday”

  1. 22:44, 2 dumb errors (the kind from misreading clues that you see immediately when you check the grid and can fill in immediately).

    @A Nonny Muss
    “Black and Decker” (a brand of saw) and “triple bypass” refer to performing heart surgery.

    One reason I’m on this blog is the general absence of politics, as opposed to the constant exposure to it in the rest of the crosswording sites. Sadly, this place went there too yesterday.

    1. @Glenn … Yeah, I figured out the “Black and Decker / triple bypass“ thing immediately after getting out of bed to post my question and would have gotten out of bed to delete it if I’d had the option. (Do surgeons really use Black and Decker saws? Yuuucchhh! … 😜)

    2. Oops. “… ly after getting back into bed after posting my qu …“. It would appear that, in the end, I didn’t get enough sleep … 😳😜🤪.

    3. I’m afraid some political snark was inevitable with so many people asking what _hate watch_ is right after such a bitterly contested election!

  2. It took forever to figure out what they were doing. Mostly because I thought there was some logic to it. Just telling us a few of the letters that are in the answer somewhere seems so dumb or meaningless or something to me. Over an hour.

    1. @Corky … I initially had somewhat the same reaction to the theme as you did, but, to be fair: Each of the theme entries consists of a word containing the smaller word given by its clue, together with a synonym of “PART”. Once I fully grasped the pattern, I found it quite helpful.

  3. 57:26 I had utmost for 4A…I got the theme and it helped solve the long clues only to be done in by AMI…go figure.
    Stay safe😀

  4. I had to look up a few things. My brain was stiff, this morning! I give myself permission to look up names, first – I don’t want to make space in my memory for the names of people in sports, especially management. I hadn’t heard of a sag fly. I so appreciate this blog.

    Which reminds me of the explanation of the beautiful song “Adia”: how the heck does one “steal” someone else’s ex? 😉 I say humans must be free to form connections with one another.

  5. Bill – No contact for a l-o-n-g time. Hope you are well. I agree with Corky that this is one of the dumbest puzzles in a long time. To have clues that are clueless may seem clever, but I think it strains what crosswords are about.

  6. I’m sorry… I have to disagree with all those posters that thought the “theme” was clueless, dumb and meaningless. I think Finan and Herrick did a fantastic job! When I saw “PROP” as a fraction of imPROPer I knew I was if for a great solve.

    @Rebecca Johnson — there is “space in your memory” for EVERYTHING. The brain will hold whatever you put in it, getting it back out is the problem (especially with us old codgers).

    1. @Fred …

      Don’t apologize! After an initial bit of head-scratching, I saw the gimmick and I fully agree with your assessment of the puzzle! … 😜

    2. Fred, I’m sure that the information you are seeking is in your brain and you’ll get it out eventually but brains definitely forget things. Memory deletion is an important function of the brain that keeps us sane. The rare exceptions are those people whose garbage collection, to use a Java metaphor, is broken so they can tell you exactly what the weather was like on February 19th, 1983 – and they’re not functioning all that well overall. Actually I know about only one guy who does that.

  7. I’m with all of you who thought the theme was ridiculous. I figured out that the clue was part of the answer but so what? All it did was enable me to put the clue in the answer wherever it fit. A themeless theme. Not clever at all. For a Sunday puzzle it was a big disappointment.

  8. Couple of errors up in the “ATMOST” section. Had MIATTA instead of MIASMA and it went downhill from there. I got all the theme phrases but I didn’t get the theme other than it was part of the phrase. I completely had a brain lock on alternative to MIDWAY.. Got OHARE through all the crosses… That lead me to ARNETT.. did not know he was married to POEHLER. They broke up in 2016.

  9. 31 minutes, 20 seconds, no errors. And NO, I never DID “get” the theme in any meaningful way. When I do the puzzle online, the puzzle’s name (often it’s theme) only appears once, as I enter it. I can’t refer back to it to get some “clue” as to what’s going on with the gags in the puzzle. This really put me at a disadvantage with this one.

    Thoroughly unenjoyable.

  10. 23:03 no errors, but it felt like an hour.

    I saw the OUT in MOUTHPIECE, and figured the clue was part of the answer. Filling them in felt odd, like guessing at the names of people I didn’t know about, and feeling relieved when it works. I was wondering if there would be a meta answer to bind them all together, but I guess not.

    Best wishes to all.

  11. Kind of a tough Sunday for me; took 56:56 with several “check grids” to help things along. I eventually got the “theme” and it did help a bit, but all-in-all in was a lackluster solve today.

    I did a great job on my KenKen though!!

  12. NOW I get it – they all include a ‘part’, as Nonny pointed out. From comments, I think most still missed this:
    Fraction, chunk, clip, fragment, sector, element, piece, cut, …

    1. Your comment is the best one so far.
      Looks like Bill had it also, but he was so terse in his description that me, and many others glossed over his answer

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