LA Times Crossword 20 Dec 20, Sunday

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Constructed by: Ross Trudeau
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Pop Quiz

Themed answers are each a POP song with a question as a title:

  • 23A Question 1 (Baha Men, 2000) : WHO LET THE DOGS OUT?
  • 38A Question 2 (Third Eye Blind, 1997) : HOW’S IT GONNA BE?
  • 48A With 79-Across, Question 3 (War, 1975) : WHY CAN’T WE …
  • 79A See 48-Across : … BE FRIENDS?
  • 61A Question 4 (Jagged Edge featuring Nelly, 2001) : WHERE THE PARTY AT?
  • 85A Question 5 (Justin Bieber, 2015) : WHAT DO YOU MEAN?
  • 102A Question 6 (Linda Ronstadt, 1975) : WHEN WILL I BE LOVED?

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 21m 29s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8 Writ word : HABEAS

The Latin term “habeas corpus” translates literally as “you are to have the body”, and is a legal action (i.e. a writ) that is used to release a prisoner from unlawful detention.

18 Traveler’s app that can use crowdsourced data : WAZE

Waze is a navigation app that is similar to Google Maps and Apple Maps. Waze was developed in Israel, and was acquired by Google in 2013.

Crowdsourcing is mainly an online phenomenon, and is the solicitation of perhaps services, ideas or content from a large group of people. “Crowdsourcing” is a portmanteau of “crowd” and “outsourcing”. An example of crowdsourcing is crowdfunding, where an individual solicits many small contributions from a large number of people to fund a project.

21 “Little Miss Dynamite” Lee : BRENDA

Brenda Lee is a country and rockabilly singer who had 37 songs that made the charts in the sixties. Lee’s biggest hits are probably “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” from 1958, and “I’m Sorry” from 1960. Lee was only 13 years old when she recorded “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree”.

22 Gold rush animal : MULE

A hinny is the offspring of a male horse (the “h-” from h-orse) and a female donkey/ass (the “-nny” from je-nny). A mule is more common, and is the offspring of a female horse and male donkey/ass.

23 Question 1 (Baha Men, 2000) : WHO LET THE DOGS OUT?

The Baha Men are so called because they hail from the Bahamas. Their big hit was “Who Let the Dogs Out?” That song once ranked third in a list of the world’s most annoying songs!

26 Gainsborough’s “The Blue Boy” et al. : OILS

“The Blue Boy” is the most famous painting by English artist Thomas Gainsborough. The masterpiece can be seen in the Huntington Library in San Marino, California. When Henry Huntington purchased “The Blue Boy” in 1921, it fetched $728,800, which was a record price for any painting up till then.

28 Book of Mormon prophet : ENOS

According to the Book of Mormon, Enos was a son of Jacob, and the author of the Book of Enos.

31 Ability of Marvel’s Professor X : ESP

The X-Men are a team of superheroes created by Stan Lee for Marvel Comics. Nowadays, the X-Men are perhaps best known as the subject of a series of movies, with Hugh Jackman playing Wolverine and Patrick Stewart playing Professor Xavier (or simply “Professor X”). Some very respected actors have also played the villains whom the X-Men have to battle. For example, the enemy called Magneto is portrayed by veteran Shakespearean actor Sir Ian McKellen.

36 Like some river bottoms : SILTY

Today, we mostly think of silt as a deposit of sediment in a river. Back in the mid-1400s, silt was sediment deposited by seawater. It is thought that the word “silt” is related to “salt”, as found in seawater.

38 Question 2 (Third Eye Blind, 1997) : HOW’S IT GONNA BE?

“How’s It Going to Be” is a 1997 single released by the San Francisco rock band Third Eye Blind. The title questions the aftermath of relationship breakup, “how it’s going to be” transitioning from friends into acquaintances.

42 Smoothie berry : ACAI

Açaí (pronounced “ass-aye-ee”) is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

43 Like Cheerios : OATEN

Cheerios breakfast cereal has the distinction of being the first oat-based cereal introduced into the market, hitting the grocery store shelves in 1941. Back then, Cheerios were known as CheeriOats.

48 With 79-Across, Question 3 (War, 1975) : WHY CAN’T WE …
79 See 48-Across : … BE FRIENDS?

“Why Can’t We Be Friends?” is the title track of a 1975 album released by the funk band War. The song gained a little airtime (space-time?) when it was played by NASA that year as a US Apollo module docked with a USSR Soyuz capsule, effectively marking the end of the Space Race.

50 Hall of Famer Reese : PEE WEE

Pee Wee Reese was a shortstop who played his professional career with the Brooklyn and LA Dodgers. Reese is remembered not only for his skill on the field, but for his very visible support for teammate Jackie Robinson, who famously struggled to be accepted as the first African-American player in the majors. As he was an outstanding marbles player as a child, Reese was given the nickname “pee wee” after the name for a small marble.

54 Goldberg who drew complex “machines” : RUBE

Rube Goldberg was a cartoonist, engineer and inventor who became famous for designing overly-complicated gadgets to perform the simplest of tasks. Goldberg produced a famous series of cartoons depicting such designs. Such was the success of his work, the Merriam-Webster dictionary accepted the phrase “Rube Goldberg” as an adjective in 1931, an adjective meaning “accomplishing something simple through complex means”.

55 Petrol measures : LITRES

On the other side of the Atlantic we use the French spelling for measurements that originated in French, so “metre” for “meter” and “litre” for “liter”.

Petrol is the same thing as gasoline. “Petrol” comes via French from the Latin “petroleum”, itself derived from “petra” meaning “rock” and “oleum” meaning “oil”.

56 Buenos __ : AIRES

Buenos Aires is the capital of Argentina, and is located on the estuary of the Ria de la Plata. As it is a port city, the people of Buenos Aires are known as porteños (“people of the port”). The name “Buenos Aires” can be translated from Spanish as “fair winds”.

57 Bobby on ice : ORR

Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking. While still 31 years old, in 1979, Orr became the youngest person inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Prior to that, in 1967, Orr became the youngest person named the NHL’s Rookie of the Year.

58 Romanov title : TSAR

The House of Romanov was the second and last imperial dynasty to rule over Russia, after the Rurik dynasty. The reign of the Romanovs ended when Emperor Nicholas II abdicated following the February Revolution of 1917. Famously, Nicholas II and his immediate family were murdered soon after he stepped down, and other members of the Romanov Dynasty were sent into exile by the Bolsheviks.

59 End of a ball game? : … ALAI

Jai alai is a game that derives from Basque pelota, and is known as “cesta-punta” in the Basque language. The name “jai alai” translates from the original Basque as “merry festival”.

60 “Despicable Me” orphan : AGNES

“Despicable Me” is a 2010 animated comedy film. The main voice actor in the movie is the very funny Steve Carell. “Despicable Me” is a Universal Pictures production, although all of the animation was done in France. The 2010 film was followed by a sequel “Despicable Me 2” released in 2013, with a prequel/spin-off film called “Minions” released in 2015.

61 Question 4 (Jagged Edge featuring Nelly, 2001) : WHERE THE PARTY AT?

“Where the Party At” is a 2001 song released by Jagged Edge, and featuring rapper Nelly.

68 Electrical units : OHMS

The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm’s Law.

69 __ es Salaam : DAR

Dar es Salaam is the largest city in Tanzania, and sits right on the east coast of Africa. The city’s name is usually translated from Arabic as “Haven of Peace”.

72 Housing choice : CONDO

The terms “condominium” and “apartment” tend to describe the same type of residential property, namely a private living space with facilities shared with others residing in the same building or complex. The difference is that a condominium is usually owned, and an apartment is rented. At least that’s how it is in the US. The word “condominium” comes from the Latin “com-” (together) and “dominum” (right of ownership).

73 Sign of spring : TAURUS

Taurus is the birth sign for those born between April 21st and May 20th. “Taurus” is Latin for “bull”.

76 Legal org. : ABA

American Bar Association (ABA)

82 “Pearly Shells” singer : DON HO

Singer and entertainer Don Ho apparently had a pretty liberal arrangement with his wife. When Ho was touring with his two backing singers, Patti Swallie and Elizabeth Guevara, all three of them shared a room together. He had two children with each of his roommates, giving a total of ten kids, including the six he had with his wife. The arrangement was quite open, it seems, with all ten kids visiting each other regularly. To each his own …

84 Victoria’s Secret spec : C-CUP

Victoria’s Secret was founded in 1977 in San Francisco, California. The founder wanted to create an environment where men were comfortable buying lingerie for their wives or girlfriends, an alternative to a department store.

85 Question 5 (Justin Bieber, 2015) : WHAT DO YOU MEAN?

“What Do You Mean?” is a 2015 song released by Justin Bieber. According to Bieber, the song refers to his relationship with singer and actress Selena Gomez.

90 Lassos : RIATAS

A riata is a lariat or a lasso. “Riata” comes from “reata”, the Spanish word for “lasso”.

91 “The Communist Manifesto” co-author : ENGELS

Friedrich Engels was a German political theorist who worked closely with Karl Marx to develop what became known as Marxist Theory. Along with Marx, he also co-authored the “Communist Manifesto” in 1848, and later he supported Marx as he worked to publish “Das Kapital”.

The “Communist Manifesto” written in 1848 by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels contains the phrase “Proletarians of all countries, unite!” (“Proletarier aller Länder vereinigt Euch!” in German). This evolved into the English saying “Workers of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but your chains!” The words “Workers of all lands, unite“ are written on Karl Marx’s headstone in Highgate Cemetery in London.

94 “O, __ fortune’s fool!”: Romeo : I AM

“O, I am Fortune’s fool” is a line from William Shakespeare’s play “Romeo and Juliet”. The words are uttered by Romeo after he kills Tybalt, Juliet’s cousin, in a duel. Romeo knows that he has made a bad mistake, and tells everyone so. Sure enough, things go downhill for him and Juliet for the remainder of the play.

95 Beatnik address : DADDY-O

The term “beatnik” was coined by journalist Herb Caen in 1958 when he used it to describe the stereotypical young person of the “beat generation”, which is oft associated with the writer Jack Kerouac. That stereotypical beatnik would be playing the bongos, rolling his or her own cigarettes. Male beatniks tended to sport goatees and wear berets.

97 Little bit : IOTA

Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet, and one that gave rise to our letters I and J. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small, as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

98 Noble realm : EARLDOM

In the ranking of nobles, an earl comes above a viscount and below a marquis. The rank of earl is used in the British peerage system and is equivalent to the rank of count in other countries. Other British ranks have female forms (e.g. marquis and marchioness, viscount and viscountess), but there isn’t a female word for the rank of earl. A female given the same rank as an earl is known as a countess.

101 Et __ : ALII

“Et alii” (et al.) is the equivalent of “et cetera” (etc.), with “et cetera” being used in place of a list of objects, and “et alii” used for a list of names.

102 Question 6 (Linda Ronstadt, 1975) : WHEN WILL I BE LOVED?

The song “When Will I Be Loved” was written by Phil Everly, and was a hit for the Everly Brothers in 1960. In 1975, Linda Ronstadt released a cover version that was an even bigger hit.

Linda Ronstadt is a singer-songwriter from Tucson, Arizona. Ronstadt really does have a lovely voice, and is someone who can make any song her own. In the late seventies, she was the highest-paid woman in the world of rock music.

107 Philosopher Descartes : RENE

The great French philosopher Rene Descartes made the famous statement in Latin, “Cogito ergo sum”. This translates into French as “Je pense, donc je suis” and into English as “I think, therefore I am”. Anything pertaining to the philosophy of Descartes can be described by the adjective “Cartesian”.

110 “Biggest Little City in the World” : RENO

Reno, Nevada was named in honor of Major General Jesse Lee Reno, a Union officer killed in the Civil War. The city has a famous “Reno Arch”, a structure that stands over the main street. The arch was erected in 1926 to promote an exposition planned for the following year. After the expo, the city council decided to keep the arch and held a competition to decide what wording should be displayed, and the winner was “The Biggest Little City in the World”.

114 Common doo-wop solo instrument : SAX

The saxophone was invented by Belgian musician Adolphe Sax, hence the name. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if his affliction was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax’s grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

Down

2 Half a menu fish : MAHI

“Mahi-mahi” (meaning “very strong”) is the Hawaiian name for the dolphinfish, which is also called the dorado. The mahi-mahi is an ugly looking creature if ever I saw one …

3 Stratospheric shield : OZONE LAYER

Ozone gets its name from the Greek word “ozein” meaning “to smell”. It was given this name as ozone’s formation during lightning storms was detected by the gas’s distinctive smell. Famously, there is a relatively high concentration of the gas in the “ozone layer” in the Earth’s stratosphere. This ozone layer provides a vital function for animal life on the planet as it absorbs most of the sun’s UV radiation. A molecule of ozone is made up of three oxygen atoms (O3), whereas a “normal” oxygen (O2) has just two atoms.

4 Brad of “12 Monkeys” : PITT

Brad Pitt’s first major role was the cowboy hitchhiker in the 1991’s “Thelma and Louise”. Pitt’s life offscreen garners as much attention as his work onscreen, it seems. The tabloids revel in the series of high-profile relationships in which he has been involved. He was engaged to Gwyneth Paltrow for a while, married to Jennifer Aniston and then to Angelina Jolie.

“12 Monkeys” is a 1995 sci-fi movie starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe and Brad Pitt. It is a remake of 1962 French short film “La Jetée”. “12 Monkeys” was directed by Terry Gilliam, who was a key member of the “Monty Python” team.

6 Unstressed vowel sound : SCHWA

A schwa is an unstressed and toneless vowel found in a number of languages including English. Examples from our language are the “a” in “about”, the “e” in “taken” and the “i” in pencil.

9 Gases in some bulbs : ARGONS

The chemical element argon has the symbol Ar. Argon is a noble gas, and so by definition is relatively nonreactive. The name “argon” comes from the Greek word for “lazy, inactive”. There’s a lot of argon around, as it is the third-most abundant gas in our atmosphere.

10 Porgy’s beloved : BESS

“Porgy and Bess” is an opera with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and libretto by DuBose Heyward. The storyline of the opera is based on the novel “Porgy” written by DuBose Heyward and his wife Dorothy. “Porgy and Bess” was first performed in 1935, in New York City, but really wasn’t accepted as legitimate opera until 1976 after a landmark production by the Houston Grand Opera. The most famous song from the piece is probably the wonderful aria “Summertime”.

11 Musician Brian : ENO

Brian Eno is a musician, composer and record producer from England who first achieved fame as the synthesizer player with Roxy Music. As a producer, Eno has worked with David Bowie, Devo, Talking Heads and U2.

12 Ghanian-born soccer great : ADU

Freddy Adu is an American soccer player who grew up in Ghana. Adu signed for D.C. United in 2004 when he was only 14 years old. That made him the youngest athlete ever to sign a professional contract in the US.

15 Jack London classic, with “To” : … BUILD A FIRE

“To Build a Fire” is a 1908 Jack London short story. It is about a man and husky dog hiking through forests in the Yukon Territory in very low temperatures. The man accidentally breaks through ice and soaks himself, forcing him to stop to build a fire to dry off. His attempts to dry off are thwarted by snow falling from the trees above. Eventually, he tries unsuccessfully to kill his canine companion, in order to avail of its body heat. He is unable to do so, and succumbs to hypothermia.

16 Fashion monthly : ELLE

“Elle” magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. “Elle” is the French word for “she”. “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

17 Hardy heroine : TESS

In Thomas Hardy’s novel “Tess of the d’Urbervilles”, the heroine and title character is Tess Durbeyfield. Her father is an uneducated peasant and when he hears that his name is a corruption of the noble name of “D’Urberville”, the news goes to his head.

25 Two-sport Sanders : DEION

Deion Sanders is a former NFL footballer, and a former Major League Baseball player. He is the only person to play in a Super Bowl and in a World Series. And, in the 1989 season Sanders became the only person to hit a major league home run and score an NFL touchdown in the same week. While playing, he earned the nicknames “Neon Deion” and “Prime Time Sanders”.

30 Bread in a skillet : PONE

“Pone” is another name for corn bread, and comes from the Powhatan term “apan” meaning “something baked”.

34 Vermont ski resort : STOWE

Stowe ski resort is located on the slopes of Mount Mansfield and Spruce Peak, near the town of Stowe, Vermont. Alpine skiing was brought first to Mount Mansfield, after the Civilian Conservation Corps cut trails back in 1933. The following year, Mount Mansfield was home to the first ski patrol in the nation, which became the model for the National Ski Patrol.

35 Scary beasts : OGRES

An ogre is a monster of mythology and folktales that has the appearance of a man, and which eats human beings. The term “ogre” comes to us via French from the name of the Etruscan god Orcus, who feasted on the flesh of humans.

37 Blood of the Greek gods : ICHOR

Ichor is a golden fluid that is the blood of the gods in Greek mythology.

39 Madrid’s peninsula : IBERIA

The Ebro is the longest river in Spain. The river was known by the Romans as the Iber, and it is the “Iber” river that gives the “Iberian” Peninsula its name.

Madrid is the most populous city in Spain, and is the nation’s capital. It is located very close to the geographical center of the country. Madrid is the second-largest city in the European Union by population, after Berlin. People from Madrid called themselves Madrileños.

45 Poetic contraction : ‘TWERE

“‘Twere” is a quaint contraction for “it were”.

49 Prefix with pod or scope : ARTHRO-

Arthropods are invertebrates with external skeletons, segmented bodies and jointed appendages. The list of arthropods includes animals such as insects, spiders, centipedes and crabs. Over 80% of the animal species on the planet are arthropod species.

Arthroscopy is surgery that is minimally invasive and is performed on a joint, often the knee, hip or shoulder.

51 Military camps : ETAPES

“Étape” is the French word for stage, as in a “stage” in the Tour de France. The term is used in English military circles to describe where troops halt overnight, but can also describe the section of the march itself. So, a march can be divided into stages, into étapes.

55 “Interpreter of Maladies” Pulitzer author Jhumpa __ : LAHIRI

Jhumpa Lahiri is an English-born American author of Indian descent. Many of her works explore the experiences of Indians who immigrate to the United States. In 2011, Lahiri moved to Italy. There she learned the nativie language, and has written several published works in Italian.

56 Tennis legend Andre : AGASSI

Retired tennis professional Andre Agassi has been married to fellow player Steffi Graf since 2001. Agassi wrote an autobiography called “Open”, published in 2009. An amazing revelation in the book is that Agassi’s famous head of hair was actually a wig for much of his playing career. Can you imagine how hard it must have been to play tennis at his level with a rug stuck on?

60 Language or people of the central Andes : AYMARA

The Aymara people are indigenous to the Andes and Andean Plateau of South America, with most living in Bolivia, Peru and Chile.

62 “Amélie” star Audrey : TAUTOU

Franch actress Audrey Tautou is perhaps most famous in North America for playing the title role in 2001’s “Amélie”, and the female lead in 2006’s “The Da Vinci Code”. In 2009, Tuatou replaced Nicole Kidman as spokesmodel for Chanel No. 5.

“Amélie” is a 2001 French film, a romantic comedy about a shy waitress in Montmartre, Paris played by Audrey Tautou (who also played the female lead in “The Da Vinci Code”). The movie was originally released under the French title, “Le Fabuleux Destin d’Amélie Poulain” (“The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain”).

63 Rodeo competitor : ROPER

“Rodeo” is a Spanish word that is usually translated into English as “round up”.

70 Singer Paula : ABDUL

Paula Abdul is primarily a singer and dancer, and someone who endeared herself even more to the American public in recent years as a judge on “American Idol”. Abdul had a famous husband for a couple of years, as she was married to actor Emilio Estevez from 1992-94.

73 Skater Harding : TONYA

Tonya Harding won the US Figure Skating Championships in 1991. Harding’s reputation was greatly tarnished in the run up to the 1994 Olympics, when her former husband and her bodyguard contracted someone to attack Harding’s main competitor, Nancy Kerrigan. During a practice session for the US Championship, a hired thug assaulted Kerrigan with police baton, attempting to break her leg. Kerrigan was forced to withdraw, and Harding won the championship. Both Harding and Kerrigan were selected for the Olympic team, and despite attempts to get Harding removed, both skated at the Games in Lillehammer. Harding finished in eighth place, and Kerrigan won the silver medal. Harding admitted that she helped cover up the attack when she found out about it, and was stripped of her US Championship title.

74 Dumas’ Count de la Fère : ATHOS

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is the trio’s young protégé D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

78 Nocturnal hunters : HOOT OWLS

“Hoot owl” is an informal name for the barred owl. Barred owls have dark stripes running up and down the underside of their bodies, hence the name “barred”. They also have a very distinctive two-phrase vocalization, hence the name “hoot”.

79 Radius, for one : BONE

The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinky-side”.

80 Galápagos Islands’ country : ECUADOR

“Ecuador” is the Spanish word for “equator”, which gives the country its name.

The Galápagos Islands lie over 500 miles west of Ecuador. The Galápagos owe their celebrity to the voyage of HMS Beagle which landed there in 1835, with Charles Darwin on board. It was Darwin’s study of various species on the islands that inspired him to postulate his Theory of Evolution.

82 Time for action : D-DAY

The most famous D-Day in history was June 6, 1944, the date of the Normandy landings in WWII. The term “D-Day” is used by the military to designate the day on which a combat operation is to be launched, especially when the actual date has yet to be determined. What D stands for seems to have been lost in the mists of time although the tradition is that D just stands for “Day”. In fact, the French have a similar term, “Jour J” (Day J), with a similar meaning. We also use H-Hour to denote the hour the attack is to commence.

83 Katey of “Sons of Anarchy” : SAGAL

Katey Sagal played Peggy Bundy on “Married … with Children”. Later she took over as star of the show “8 Simple Rules” in the middle of its run, when John Ritter passed away unexpectedly in 2003. Sagal then appeared on the FX drama “Sons of Anarchy”. In 2004, she married Kurt Sutter who created the “Sons of Anarchy” series.

“Sons of Anarchy” is a popular FX crime series about an outlaw motorcycle club in California’s Central Valley. Apparently, it is the most successful FX show ever.

86 Spruces (up) : TIDIES

Our verb “to spruce up” means “to make trim or neat”. The term comes from the adjective “spruce”, meaning “smart, neat”. In turn, the adjective comes from “spruce leather”, which was a Prussian leather that was used in England in the 15th and 16th centuries to make a popular style of jerkin that was widely considered to look quite smart.

89 Pickle flavoring : DILL

Dill is a herb in the celery family. Dill seeds can be used for flavoring food, as can dill leaves. In this sense, dill “leaves” are sometimes referred to as dill “weed”.

92 High-end camera : LEICA

Leica is a German optics company that is famous for production of lenses and cameras. The 1913 Leica was the first practical camera that could use 35mm film, a size chosen because it was already the standard for film used in motion pictures.

93 Cavalry blade : SABER

A saber (sometimes “sabre”) is a sword with a curved blade and a relatively large hand guard. It is thought that the term originated with the Hungarian verb “szabni” meaning “to cut”.

96 Sheltered, at sea : ALEE

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

97 Chinese leader? : INDO-

In the strict sense of the term, “Indochina” is a region in Southeast Asia that corresponds to the former French territory known as French Indochina. Today this region is made up of the countries of Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. However, the term “Indochina” is more generally used to describe Mainland Southeast Asia, and in this usage it also encompasses Myanmar, Singapore and Thailand.

99 Chianti and Bordeaux : REDS

Chianti is a red wine from the Chianti region of central Tuscany in Italy. Historically, Chianti was stored in a characteristically bulbous bottle wrapped in a straw basket. However, the pragmatists have won the day and regular wine bottles tend to be used nowadays.

Bordeaux is perhaps the wine-production capital of the world. Wine has been produced in the area since the eighth century. Bordeaux has an administrative history too. During WWII, the French government relocated from Paris to the port city of Bordeaux when it became clear that Paris was soon to fall to the Germans. After the Germans took France, the capital was famously moved to Vichy.

100 Actress Suvari : MENA

Mena Suvari’s most famous role to date is probably “the beauty” in the 1999 movie “American Beauty”. She played the teenage girl with whom the Kevin Spacey character becomes infatuated. Suvari also plays Heather in the “American Pie” films.

103 Worked (up) : HET

Someone who is het up is worked up, or angry. “Het” is an archaic word meaning “heated”.

106 Publish identifying material about on the Web : DOX

Doxing (also “doxxing”) is the publishing of private information about someone on the Internet with the intention of doing harm or causing embarrassment. The term “doxing” is slang, and come from “dox”, an accepted abbreviation for “documents”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Broody genre : EMO
4 Bothersome sort : PEST
8 Writ word : HABEAS
14 “Yeah, right!” : I BET!
18 Traveler’s app that can use crowdsourced data : WAZE
20 Creep (along) : INCH
21 “Little Miss Dynamite” Lee : BRENDA
22 Gold rush animal : MULE
23 Question 1 (Baha Men, 2000) : WHO LET THE DOGS OUT?
26 Gainsborough’s “The Blue Boy” et al. : OILS
27 Flustered : IN A STEW
28 Book of Mormon prophet : ENOS
29 iPod and iPad : APPLES
31 Ability of Marvel’s Professor X : ESP
32 Use sparingly : RATION
34 Did an aria, say : SOLOED
36 Like some river bottoms : SILTY
38 Question 2 (Third Eye Blind, 1997) : HOW’S IT GONNA BE?
42 Smoothie berry : ACAI
43 Like Cheerios : OATEN
46 Shouldered : BORNE
47 Crafty sort : FOX
48 With 79-Across, Question 3 (War, 1975) : WHY CAN’T WE …
50 Hall of Famer Reese : PEE WEE
52 Get behind something, maybe : HIDE
53 Golf club part : TOE
54 Goldberg who drew complex “machines” : RUBE
55 Petrol measures : LITRES
56 Buenos __ : AIRES
57 Bobby on ice : ORR
58 Romanov title : TSAR
59 End of a ball game? : … ALAI
60 “Despicable Me” orphan : AGNES
61 Question 4 (Jagged Edge featuring Nelly, 2001) : WHERE THE PARTY AT?
65 Thunders : ROARS
67 Assistant : AIDE
68 Electrical units : OHMS
69 __ es Salaam : DAR
72 Housing choice : CONDO
73 Sign of spring : TAURUS
75 Pod contents : PEAS
76 Legal org. : ABA
77 Activity centers : HUBS
78 Temptation for a gambler : HOT TIP
79 See 48-Across : … BE FRIENDS?
81 In the past : AGO
82 “Pearly Shells” singer : DON HO
83 Ish : SORTA
84 Victoria’s Secret spec : C-CUP
85 Question 5 (Justin Bieber, 2015) : WHAT DO YOU MEAN?
89 Contests that take seconds? : DUELS
90 Lassos : RIATAS
91 “The Communist Manifesto” co-author : ENGELS
94 “O, __ fortune’s fool!”: Romeo : I AM
95 Beatnik address : DADDY-O
97 Little bit : IOTA
98 Noble realm : EARLDOM
101 Et __ : ALII
102 Question 6 (Linda Ronstadt, 1975) : WHEN WILL I BE LOVED?
107 Philosopher Descartes : RENE
108 Chief : LEADER
109 Zipped through : ACED
110 “Biggest Little City in the World” : RENO
111 Brewery units : KEGS
112 Walked proudly : STRODE
113 What many players shoot for : PARS
114 Common doo-wop solo instrument : SAX

Down

1 “Ick” : EWW
2 Half a menu fish : MAHI
3 Stratospheric shield : OZONE LAYER
4 Brad of “12 Monkeys” : PITT
5 Formal “Door’s open” : ENTER
6 Unstressed vowel sound : SCHWA
7 Not just any : THE
8 Netflix competitor : HBO NOW
9 Gases in some bulbs : ARGONS
10 Porgy’s beloved : BESS
11 Musician Brian : ENO
12 Ghanian-born soccer great : ADU
13 Got stood up at the café, say : SAT ALONE
14 Words while checking one’s calendar : I’M OPEN
15 Jack London classic, with “To” : … BUILD A FIRE
16 Fashion monthly : ELLE
17 Hardy heroine : TESS
19 Springy : ELASTIC
24 Spot : ESPY
25 Two-sport Sanders : DEION
30 Bread in a skillet : PONE
33 You, biblically : THEE
34 Vermont ski resort : STOWE
35 Scary beasts : OGRES
36 Handled : SAW TO
37 Blood of the Greek gods : ICHOR
39 Madrid’s peninsula : IBERIA
40 Portends : BODES
41 Subjects of split decisions? : EXES
43 Disagreeable necessities : ONUSES
44 Being litigated : AT BAR
45 Poetic contraction : ‘TWERE
49 Prefix with pod or scope : ARTHRO-
50 Accumulated : PILED UP
51 Military camps : ETAPES
52 Crossword title, often : HINT
55 “Interpreter of Maladies” Pulitzer author Jhumpa __ : LAHIRI
56 Tennis legend Andre : AGASSI
60 Language or people of the central Andes : AYMARA
61 Rolls of money : WADS
62 “Amélie” star Audrey : TAUTOU
63 Rodeo competitor : ROPER
64 Lifting, maybe : THEFT
65 Golfer’s “tall stuff” : ROUGH
66 Orientation procedure : ONBOARDING
69 Steps on the floor? : DANCE MOVES
70 Singer Paula : ABDUL
71 Talks hoarsely : RASPS
72 Wad of tobacco : CHAW
73 Skater Harding : TONYA
74 Dumas’ Count de la Fère : ATHOS
78 Nocturnal hunters : HOOT OWLS
79 Radius, for one : BONE
80 Galápagos Islands’ country : ECUADOR
82 Time for action : D-DAY
83 Katey of “Sons of Anarchy” : SAGAL
86 Spruces (up) : TIDIES
87 Asked for a tuna treat, maybe : MEOWED
88 Whole : ENTIRE
89 Pickle flavoring : DILL
92 High-end camera : LEICA
93 Cavalry blade : SABER
95 Like grim humor : DARK
96 Sheltered, at sea : ALEE
97 Chinese leader? : INDO-
99 Chianti and Bordeaux : REDS
100 Actress Suvari : MENA
103 Worked (up) : HET
104 Canal site : EAR
105 Cozy cat seat : LAP
106 Publish identifying material about on the Web : DOX

14 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 20 Dec 20, Sunday”

  1. Unlike the pros, after an hour and ten minutes I gave up. Did not know “where the party at” and didn’t know about five of the things crossing it. I spent four years in the army and never heard of etapes. Bah Humbug!

  2. 90% of this puzzles clues were Monday or Tuesday type…the other10% were off the wall, never heard ofs that made this one a very tough finish.
    Thank you Mr Trudeau (for nothing)
    Stay safe 😀
    Go Ravens 🙏

  3. Taurus is NOT the birth sign for those born between April 21st and June 16th.
    Taurus April 19 – May 20
    Gemini May 20 – June 20

  4. No errors but this one had too many proper names that I’ve not heard
    of, so did a little googling. The rest was okay but took me a long time.
    Not my favorite Sunday puzzle for sure!

  5. 27:27 6 errors 2 lookups

    Tough one! Once I understood the theme, I knew I was sunk, as I was lucky to know even half the theme songs. And there was lots more I didn’t know. So today I learned about Freddy Adu and the Aymara.

  6. Messed up on odd names with all the OU’s and ADU and AU’s but it was fun. Never heard of DOXing.. oh and throw in a HET.. For good measure.

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