LA Times Crossword 15 Aug 21, Sunday

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Constructed by: Dylan Schiff
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Just Desserts

Themed answers each include a type of CAKE, and those CAKES are LAYERED on top of each other in pairs in the grid:

  • 111A *Dessert literally represented in six pairs of answers to the starred clues : LAYER CAKE
  • 21A *Poet who influenced T.S. Eliot : EZRA POUND (pound cake)
  • 25A *Flattering words before a request : BE AN ANGEL (angel cake)
  • 26A *’90s nickname for pop’s Mel C : SPORTY SPICE (spice cake)
  • 31A *Pre-TV performance genre involving arias : RADIO OPERA (opera cake)
  • 50A *Pancake order : SHORT STACK (shortcake)
  • 60A *Fish that doesn’t taste like its name suggests : LEMON SOLE (lemon cake)
  • 72A *Killjoy, in modern lingo : FUN SPONGE (sponge cake)
  • 77A *Kraft offering, casually : MAC ‘N’ CHEESE (cheesecake)
  • 98A *Sushi fish : YELLOWTAIL (yellow cake)
  • 104A *Fruity fountain offering : BANANA SPLIT (banana cake)
  • 106A *Drywall material : SHEETROCK (sheet cake)
  • 111A *Dessert literally represented in six pairs of answers to the starred clues : LAYER CAKE
  • Read on, or jump to …
    … a complete list of answers

    Bill’s time: 18m 27s

    Bill’s errors: 0

    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    4 Miniature vehicle that uses a remote, briefly : RC CAR

    Radio-controlled (RC)

    9 1956 hot spot : SUEZ

    The Suez Crisis of 1956 came about when President Nasser of Egypt decided to nationalize the Suez Canal, a response to a withdrawal of funds by Britain and the US for the building of the Aswan Dam. Egypt then refused to allow any Israeli shipping the use the canal. With British and French support, Israel invaded the Sinai in October 1956, starting the military conflict. Combined British, French and Israeli forces eventually took control of the Suez Canal, which was viewed as a military success but a political disaster. The United Nations, led by the US, pressured the British, French and Israelis to withdraw.

    13 Seafarer’s direction : THAR

    “Thar she blows!” is a phrase that originated on whaling ships. A lookout spotting a whale surfacing to breathe might see the spray from the blowhole caused by the expulsion of carbon dioxide. Thar (there) she blows!

    17 Biker’s ride : HOG

    The Harley-Davidson motorcycle company was founded in the very early 1900s by two childhood friends, William Harley and Arthur Davidson, . Their first design was in effect an engine hooked up to a pedal bicycle, but the 116 cc cylinder capacity simply couldn’t generate enough power to get up the hills of their native city of Milwaukee. The pair came up with a redesigned model that had a cylinder capacity of 405 cc, which the partners built in a shed at the back of Davidson’s house. In 1906, the partners built their first factory, located where the company’s headquarters is to this day, on Juneau Avenue in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Famously, Harley motorcycles are nicknamed “hogs”.

    19 Cavalry weapon : LANCE

    Lancers (also “lancemen”) were a special type of cavalry soldier, ones who fought with lances!

    21 *Poet who influenced T.S. Eliot : EZRA POUND (pound cake)

    Ezra Pound was an American poet who spent much of his life wandering the world, and spending years in London, Paris, and Italy. In Italy, Pound’s work and sympathies for Mussolini’s regime led to his arrest at the end of the war. His major work was the epic, albeit incomplete, “The Cantos”. This epic poem is divided into 120 sections, each known as a canto.

    Pound cake is so called because the traditional recipe calls for a pound of each of four ingredients:

    • a pound of flour
    • a pound of butter
    • a pound of eggs
    • a pound of sugar

    I’d say that’s a lot of cake …

    23 Hold-up man? : ATLAS

    In Greek mythology, Atlas was a Titan who was tasked with holding up the celestial sphere on his shoulders. The Greeks observed the planets moving and the stars in fixed positions. They believed that the stars were on the surface of a single starry sphere, the celestial sphere that was supported by Atlas.

    24 Brought down : RAZED

    To raze (“rase”, in UK English) is to level to the ground. I’ve always thought it a little quirky that “raise”, a homophone of “raze”, means “build up”.

    25 *Flattering words before a request : BE AN ANGEL (angel cake)

    Angel food cake is an American creation, with the name being a reference to the sponge’s lightness, as if it is “food of angels”. The chocolate butter cake called Devil’s food cake came along later, and is considered to be a counterpart to the more angelic variety.

    26 *’90s nickname for pop’s Mel C : SPORTY SPICE (spice cake)

    Melanie C is a member of the English girl band the Spice Girls, with whom she has the nickname “Sporty Spice”. “Mel C” got the gig with the Spice Girls by replying to an ad in “The Stage” magazine, and auditioning alongside about 40 women who responded to the same ad. Sporty Spice really is quite sporty, and has completed the London Triathlon … twice.

    31 *Pre-TV performance genre involving arias : RADIO OPERA (opera cake)

    Opera cake is a confection from French cuisine. A traditional recipe calls for layers of almond sponge cake soaked in coffee syrup, interleaved with ganache and a coffee-flavored buttercream, with the whole thing covered in a chocolate glaze. Wow!

    32 Of course, in Cannes : BIEN SUR!

    Cannes is a city on the French Riviera that is noted as host of the Cannes Film Festival. The decision to host an annual film festival was adopted by the city just before WWII. However, the festival had to wait for the end of the war for its launch in 1946.

    35 Swerved at sea : YAWED

    The word “yaw” means to deviate from the line of a course and is used mainly at sea and in the air. “Yaw” is derived from the Old Norse word “jaege” which means “to drive, chase”. As such, “yaw” is etymologically related to our word “yacht”.

    37 “Sister Act” role : NUN

    The 1992 comedy “Sister Act” stars Whoopi Goldberg as a lounge singer from Reno who hides out in a San Francisco convent disguised as a nun. It’s a funny, funny film.

    38 Fa follower : SOL

    The sol-fa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

    40 To boot : ALSO

    The noun “boot” was used once to describe something of advantage in trying to accomplish a goal. This obsolete term really only exists in the adverb “to boot” meaning “in addition, over and above”, literally “to advantage”.

    44 Packaging meas. : NT WT

    Net weight (nt. wt.)

    46 Santa Monica landmark : PIER

    Santa Monica, California lies on Santa Monica Bay and is in Los Angeles County. The city is home to the world-famous Santa Monica Pier, which opened in 1909.

    50 *Pancake order : SHORT STACK (shortcake)

    Shortening is a fat used in baking. It is the term “shortening” that gives us the words “shortbread” and “shortcake”.

    54 Baker’s dozen? : EGGS

    Our word “dozen” is used for a group of twelve. We imported it into English from Old French. The modern French word for “twelve” is “douze”, and for “dozen” is “douzaine”.

    56 ’50s TV innovation : CABLE

    Cable television uses coaxial and fiber-optic cable to deliver programming using radio-frequency signals. Cable TV technology was introduced commercially in the early 1950s.

    60 *Fish that doesn’t taste like its name suggests : LEMON SOLE (lemon cake)

    Lemon sole is also called English sole, and is native to Northern Europe. It is a flatfish, and a very popular food fish in the British Isles.

    61 Numbered work : OPUS

    The Latin for “work” is “opus”, with the plural being “opera”. We sometimes use the plural “opuses” in English, but that just annoys me …

    62 “Fantastic Four” villain, briefly : DR DOOM

    Doctor Doom is a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe, and is an archenemy of the Fantastic Four.

    “Fantastic Four” is a 2005 movie about the band of comic heroes made famous in Marvel Comics. The Fantastic Four are:

    • Mr. Fantastic (played by Ioan Gruffudd)
    • The Invisible Woman (played by Jessica Alba)
    • The Human Torch (played by Chris Evans)
    • Thing (played by Michael Chiklis)

    64 Row of seats : PEW

    A pew is a bench in a church, one usually with a high back. The original pews were raised and sometimes enclosed seats in the church used by women and important men or families. “Pew” comes from the Old French “puie” meaning “balcony, elevation”.

    65 Joltless joe? : DECAF

    It seems that no one really knows why we refer to coffee as “joe”, but we’ve been doing so since early in WWII.

    67 AFL-__ : CIO

    The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was founded in 1886, making it one of the first federations of unions in the country. Over time the AFL became dominated by craft unions, unions representing skilled workers of particular disciplines. In the early thirties, John L. Lewis led a movement within the AFL to organize workers by industry, believing this would be more effective for the members. But the craft unions refused to budge, so Lewis set up a rival federation of unions in 1932, the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). The two federations became bitter rivals for over two decades until finally merging in 1955 to form the AFL-CIO.

    68 GOP org. : RNC

    National leadership of the Republican Party is provided by the Republican National Committee (RNC). Only one former chairperson of the RNC has been elected to the office of US president, and that was George H. W. Bush.

    69 Unidentified flying radar blips : BOGIES

    “Bogey” is WWII slang for an unidentified aircraft that is presumed to be hostile.

    71 Salsa order : MILD

    “Salsa” is simply Spanish for “sauce”.

    77 *Kraft offering, casually : MAC ‘N’ CHEESE (cheesecake)

    Thomas Jefferson’s name is associated with the dish we know today as “mac ‘n’ cheese”. The future president discovered baked macaroni with Parmesan cheese while in Paris and in northern Italy. He started serving the dish to guests in the US, and even had a machine imported to make the macaroni locally. Whether or not Jefferson was the first to bring mac ‘n’ cheese to America isn’t entirely clear, but it has been popular ever since.

    The Kraft brand name originated with Canadian James L. Kraft. It was James L. Kraft who first patented processed cheese

    78 Old Turkish title : PASHA

    A pasha was a high-ranking official in the Ottoman Empire, and was roughly equivalent to the English rank of lord.

    85 Common URL ending : COM

    The .com domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

    • .com (commercial enterprise)
    • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
    • .mil (US military)
    • .org (not-for-profit organization)
    • .gov (US federal government entity)
    • .edu (college-level educational institution)

    92 Here, in Jalisco : ACA

    Jalisco is a state on the central-west coast of Mexico. The capital city of Jalisco is Guadalajara.

    93 “As __ to breathe were life!”: Tennyson : THO’
    34D Tennyson work : ULYSSES

    “As tho’ to breathe were life!” is a quotation from the Tennyson poem “Ulysses”, written in 1833.

    96 “Encore!” : ONE MORE!

    “Encore” is French for “again, one more time”, and is a shout that an audience member will make here in North America to request perhaps another song. But, the term is not used this way in France. Rather, the audience will shout “Bis!”, which is the Italian for “twice!”

    98 *Sushi fish : YELLOWTAIL (yellow cake)

    The Japanese amberjack is also known as yellowtail in English, and “hamachi” or “buri” in Japanese. It might show up on a menu as “yellowtail tuna”, but it isn’t even in the same family as true tuna.

    103 Novelist Waugh : ALEC

    Alec Waugh was an older brother of the more famous Evelyn Waugh. Both were successful novelists (Evelyn of “Brideshead Revisited” fame), but what I like about Alec is that he supposedly invented the cocktail party. He invited his friends around “for tea” in the twenties, and served them all rum swizzles instead!

    104 *Fruity fountain offering : BANANA SPLIT (banana cake)

    The banana split was created in Latrobe, Pennsylvania in 1904. This particular sundae was the idea of David Stickler, a young apprentice pharmacist at the Tassel Pharmacy’s soda fountain.

    110 “101 Dalmatians” protagonist : PONGO

    “101 Dalmatians” is a 1996 Disney movie, a remake of the 1961 animated Disney feature “One Hundred and One Dalmatians”. The 1996 movie spawned a sequel titled “102 Dalmatians”, released in 2000, and a 2021 prequel called “Cruella”.

    114 “The Jungle Book” wolf : AKELA

    Akela is the wolf in “The Jungle Book” by Rudyard Kipling. The wolf gave his name to a cubmaster in the scouting movement, who is now known as “Akela”.

    115 “M*A*S*H” set piece : COT

    “M*A*S*H” has only three stars (three asterisks, that is). These asterisks first appeared on the poster for the 1970 movie, but they were omitted in the opening titles. The TV series went on to use the asterisks from the poster.

    116 Highlands miss : LASS

    The Scottish Highlands are that part of the country not classified as the Lowlands(!). The Highlands make up the north and west of Scotland.

    119 Blast cause : TNT

    “TNT” is an abbreviation for “trinitrotoluene”. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

    Down

    1 1992 baseball biopic : THE BABE

    “The Babe” is a 1992 movie about the life of baseball legend Babe Ruth. Actor John Goodman plays the title character, and Kelly McGillis plays Ruth’s second wife Helen Woodford Ruth.

    3 Like many Pixar movies : PG-RATED

    Pixar Animation Studios started out as part of Lucasfilm in 1979, George Lucas’s production company. Lucas sold what was to become Pixar to Apple CEO Steve Jobs in 1986. Pixar produced its first feature film in 1995, the fabulous “Toy Story”, and followed up with a string of hits. The company was then sold to Walt Disney in 2006, when valued at $7.4 billion. That transaction resulted in Steve Jobs becoming the biggest shareholder in Walt Disney.

    4 Kelly of morning TV : RIPA

    When Kelly Ripa secured the co-host spot on morning television with Regis Philbin, she was still acting in “All My Children” in a role she had been playing for over ten years. After a year of holding down two jobs, she eventually gave up the acting gig. Ripa has acted as spokeswoman for several brands over the years, including Electrolux and Rykä.

    6 BYU team nickname : COUGARS

    Brigham Young University (BYU) in Provo, Utah has about 34.000 students on campus making it the largest religious university in the country. The school was founded in 1875 by Brigham Young, then President of the Mormon Church.

    8 “To Kill a Mockingbird” recluse Boo __ : RADLEY

    In Harper Lee’s classic novel “To Kill a Mockingbird”, Boo Radley is the reclusive neighbor living next door to the children Jem and Scout. The kids are both afraid of, and at the same time fascinated, by Boo.

    9 Course for H.S. exam takers : SAT PREP

    Today, the standardized test for admission to colleges is known as the SAT Reasoning Test, but it used to be called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, which led to the abbreviation “SAT”.

    10 Empty, as a U-Haul : UNLOAD

    The U-Haul company was started by married couple Leonard Shoen and Anna Mary Carty in Ridgefield, Washington in 1945. The Shoens used $5,000 of seed money to build trailers in their garage, and then cleverly recruited gas station owners as franchisees with whom they would split the rental revenue. There are now about 15,000 U-Haul dealers across the country.

    13 “The Sound of Music” name : TRAPP

    “The Sound of Music” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical that was made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on “The Story of the Trapp Family Singers”, a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war. One family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives in the same town in which I used to live in California.

    15 Was humiliated : ATE CROW

    The phrase “eat crow”, an alternative to “eat humble pie”, perhaps refers to the fact that cooked crow may be edible, but is not a great food choice.

    19 Head for Vegas? : LAS …

    Back in the 1800s, the Las Vegas Valley was given its name from the extensive meadows (“las vegas” is Spanish for “the meadows”) present in the area courtesy of the artesian wells drilled by local farmers. Las Vegas was incorporated as a city in 1905, in the days when it was a stopping-off point for pioneers travelling west. It eventually became a railroad town, although with the coming of the railroad growth halted as travelers began to bypass Las Vegas. The city’s tourism industry took off in 1935 with the completion of the nearby Hoover Dam, which is still a popular attraction. Then gambling was legalized, and things really started to move. Vegas was picked, largely by celebrated figures in “the mob”, as a convenient location across the California/Nevada state line that could service the vast population of Los Angeles. As a result, Las Vegas is the most populous US city founded in the 20th century (Chicago is the most populous city founded in the 19th century, just in case you were wondering).

    20 Director Welles : ORSON

    Orson Welles is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for directing and narrating 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

    22 Presently, quaintly : ANON

    “Anon” originally meant “at once”, but the term’s meaning evolved into “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

    30 Destructive “Doctor Who” creature : DALEK

    The Daleks are cyborg aliens and the most infamous of the enemies of “the Doctor” in the BBC sci-fi series “Doctor Who”. When I was a youngster, I remember being pushed around a hall inside one of the Dalek shells used in the TV show. A big thrill …

    33 “Push It” hip-hop trio : SALT-N-PEPA

    Salt-N-Pepa are an all-female hip-hop trio from New York made up of “Salt” (Cheryl James), “Pepa” (Sandra Denton) and “DJ Spinderella” (Deidra Roper). The group’s 1991 song “Let’s Talk Sex” created quite a fuss as the lyrics explored the subject of sex, and safe sex in particular. A later version addressed the dangers of AIDS.

    36 Target of some Bob Dylan songs : WAR

    President Obama used the words “There is not a bigger giant in the history of American music” when awarding musician Bob Dylan the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012. Dylan was in good company. On the same day, the president awarded the medal to former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Justice John Paul Stevens, former Israeli President Shimon Peres and astronaut John Glenn. In 2016, Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”.

    41 Birthstone after sapphire : OPAL

    Here is the “official” list of birthstones, by month, that we tend to use today:

    • January: Garnet
    • February: Amethyst
    • March: Bloodstone or Aquamarine
    • April: Diamond
    • May: Emerald
    • June: Pearl or Moonstone
    • July: Ruby
    • August: Sardonyx or Peridot
    • September: Sapphire or Lapis Lazuli
    • October: Opal or Pink Tourmaline
    • November: Topaz or Citrine
    • December: Turquoise or Zircon (also now, Tanzanite)

    43 Cribbage pieces : PEGS

    Cribbage is a great card game that originated in 17th-century England. It was a creation of the poet Sir John Suckling. One of the unique features of the game is that a cribbage board with pegs is used to keep score. Here in the US, cribbage is very much associated with the submarine service, as it is a favorite game of submariners of all ranks.

    44 Long-distance swimmer Diana : NYAD

    Diana Nyad is a long-distance swimmer. She holds the distance record for a non-stop swim without a wetsuit, a record that she set in 1979 by swimming from Bimini to Florida. In 1975, Nyad became the fastest person to circle Manhattan in a swim that lasted 7 hours 57 minutes. More recently, in 2013, she became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without the protection of a shark cage. She was 64 years old when she made that swim!

    49 Scottie in Hitchcock’s “Vertigo,” for example : ACROPHOBE

    Our prefix “acro-” comes from the Greek “akros” meaning “at the top”. Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

    “Vertigo” is a 1958 Alfred Hitchcock film that’s based on a 1954 novel “D’entre les morts” (“From Among the Dead”) by Boileau-Narcejac. Jimmy Stewart stars as a retired San Francisco police detective who has developed an extreme fear of heights. Stewart’s character is hired to trail someone’ wife, played by Kim Novak.

    50 Concrete hunks : SLABS

    The terms “cement”, “mortar” and ”concrete” are related, and tend to get confused at times. Cement is a binder that hardens over time and binds other materials together. Cement mixed with a fine aggregate forms mortar, a workable paste used to bind building blocks together. Cement mixed with sand and gravel forms concrete, a pourable slurry that hardens into an extremely robust building material.

    51 Spartan serf : HELOT

    The helots were a population of poorly-treated slaves who served the citizens of Sparta. The helots were primarily used to work the land. It is thought that the helots actually outnumbered the Spartans by about seven to one. Despite the numerical advantage, the several rebellions that took place were unsuccessful at freeing them from servitude..

    52 __-3 fatty acids : OMEGA

    Fish oils are noted for containing omega-3 fatty acids, which have many health benefits including the reduction of inflammation. Like so many essential nutrients that we get from animals, the only reason the animal has them is that it feeds on plants. In this case, fish cannot manufacture omega-3 fatty acids, and instead absorb them from algae. Omega-3 fatty acids are also readily found in other plant oils such as flaxseed oil.

    54 Greener Living org. : EPA

    Greener Living is an initiative of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

    59 Run from a stage? : EMCEE

    The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism used for a Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

    61 Med. condition with repetitive behavior : OCD

    Apparently, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed mental disorder, making it about as prevalent as asthma.

    62 Old Sony CD player : DISCMAN

    The Discman was Sony’s first portable CD player and was introduced in 1984. The Discman was a follow-up to the incredibly successful Walkman portable audio cassette players. Eventually, the Discman name was dropped and today’s Sony portable CD players are called Walkmans.

    66 Lodge member : ELK

    The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) was founded in 1868, and is a social club that has about a million members today. It started out as a group of men getting together in a “club” in order to get around the legal opening hours of taverns in New York City. The club took on a new role as it started to look out for poor families of members who passed away. The club now accepts African Americans as members (since the seventies) and women (since the nineties), but atheists still aren’t welcome. The list of US presidents that have been members of the BPOE includes Presidents Eisenhower, Harding, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy and Ford.

    67 Anderson Cooper’s network : CNN

    Anderson Cooper is a respected news personality on CNN and on various shows around the dial. Among my favorite appearances of his, although he would call them trivial I am sure, was as host of a great reality game show called “The Mole” that aired in 2001. Cooper’s mother was fashion designer Gloria Vanderbilt.

    73 Mayim Bialik alma mater : UCLA

    The wonderful Mayim Bialik is an actress best known for playing Dr. Amy Farrah Fowler on TV’s “The Big Bang Theory”. Bialik also played the title role in the NBC sitcom “Blossom”. There’s a line in one of “The Big Bang Theory” episodes in which Sheldon talks about “the girl who played TV’s ‘Blossom’”. He notes that the “Blossom” actress has “a PhD in neuroscience or something”. And that is true, actress Mayim Bialik has indeed got a doctorate in neuroscience.

    74 Voluminous ref. : OED

    Work started on what was to become the first “Oxford English Dictionary” (OED) in 1857. Several interim versions of the dictionary were published in the coming years with the first full version appearing, in ten bound volumes, in 1928. The second edition of the OED appeared in 1989 and is made up of twenty volumes. The OED was first published in electronic form in 1988 and went online in 2000. Given the modern use of computers, the publishing house responsible feels that there will never be a third print version of the famous dictionary.

    77 Copperfield field : MAGIC

    “David Copperfield” is the stage name used by illusionist David Kotkin. Copperfield is incredibly successful as a magician. He has grossed over $3 billion in ticket sales in his career, which is more than any other solo entertainer in any field. Copperfield actually owns his own chain of islands in the Bahamas.

    79 Neutral vowel symbol : SCHWA

    A schwa is an unstressed and toneless vowel found in a number of languages including English. Examples from our language are the “a” in “about”, the “e” in “taken” and the “i” in pencil.

    80 Tampa Bay NFLer : BUC

    The Tampa Bay Buccaneers (the Bucs) joined the NFL in 1976, along with the Seattle Seahawks, as an expansion team. The Bucs had a tough start in the NFL, losing their first 26 games. Things went better in the early eighties, but then the team went through 14 consecutive losing seasons. Their luck changed again though, and they won the Super Bowl at the end of the 2002 season.

    82 Shipping document : WAYBILL

    A waybill is a document accompanying a shipment that contains essential shipping information. Such information usually includes who sent the shipment, the name and address of the intended recipient, and perhaps details of the route.

    83 South Pacific region : OCEANIA

    The part of the Pacific Ocean known as “Oceania” is roughly equivalent to the tropical islands of the South Pacific. Oceania can be divided into the regions of Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia.

    84 Waldorf salad morsels : WALNUTS

    As one might expect, the Waldorf salad was created at the Waldorf Hotel in New York City (now the Waldorf=Astoria), back in the 1890s. The classic version of the Waldorf salad is made from apples, celery and walnuts dressed in mayonnaise and served on a bed of lettuce. Anyone who is a fan of the BBC sitcom “Fawlty Towers” will remember how much trouble Basil Fawlty had coming up with a Waldorf salad for an American guest, as the kitchen was “out of Waldorfs” …

    88 Stereotypical ingenue facial feature : DOE EYES

    So often in literature, the movies and on stage, there is an innocent woman at the center of the story. Such stock characters came to be known as “ingénues”, a term derived from the French adjective “ingénu” meaning innocent, virtuous, candid and “ingenuous”.

    89 Beyoncé, since 2002 : SOLO ACT

    Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny’s Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2002, after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical “Dreamgirls”. Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as “Queen Bey”, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”. Her fan base goes by the name “Beyhive”.

    91 “Waiting for Godot” playwright : BECKETT

    “Waiting for Godot” is a play by novelist and playwright Samuel Beckett that premiered in 1953. Irishman Beckett actually wrote the piece in French, under the title “En attendant Godot”. He then translated the play into English himself.

    95 Model 3 autos : TESLAS

    Tesla’s Model 3 was introduced in 2017. Within three years, Tesla sold more than half a million Model 3 units, making it the best-selling electric car of all time.

    97 “Walking in Memphis” singer Cohn : MARC

    Marc Cohn is an American country singer, who is best known for his 1991 hit “Walking in Memphis”. A few years ago, someone tried to carjack Cohn in Denver, Colorado and left him shot in the head. Fortunately, the bullet did not penetrate the skull, and his injury was relatively minor.

    99 Cuts with a beam : LASES

    The term “laser” is an acronym standing for “light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation”. It has been pointed out that a more precise name for laser technology is “light oscillation by stimulated emission of radiation”, but the resulting acronym isn’t quite so appealing, namely “loser”.

    100 Ohno on skates : APOLO

    Speed-skater Apolo Ohno has won more Winter Olympics medals than any other American. Ohno also did a great job winning the 2007 season of television’s “Dancing with the Stars”.

    102 Bangladesh capital : DHAKA

    Dhaka (once “Dacca”) is the capital city of Bangladesh. Dhaka is known for many things, including production of the finest muslin in the world. It’s also the rickshaw capital of the world, with about 400,000 rickshaws running each day.

    108 Cafeteria fixture : TRAY

    “Cafeteria” is a Mexican-Spanish word meaning “coffee store” that we imported into American English around 1840. Somehow, that coffee store became a self-service dining establishment in the 1890s.

    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1 Defeat : TOP
    4 Miniature vehicle that uses a remote, briefly : RC CAR
    9 1956 hot spot : SUEZ
    13 Seafarer’s direction : THAR
    17 Biker’s ride : HOG
    18 “__ roll!” : I’M ON A
    19 Cavalry weapon : LANCE
    20 Provide an address : ORATE
    21 *Poet who influenced T.S. Eliot : EZRA POUND (pound cake)
    23 Hold-up man? : ATLAS
    24 Brought down : RAZED
    25 *Flattering words before a request : BE AN ANGEL (angel cake)
    26 *’90s nickname for pop’s Mel C : SPORTY SPICE (spice cake)
    28 Regarding : AS TO
    29 Cut : AXED
    31 *Pre-TV performance genre involving arias : RADIO OPERA (opera cake)
    32 Of course, in Cannes : BIEN SUR!
    35 Swerved at sea : YAWED
    37 “Sister Act” role : NUN
    38 Fa follower : SOL
    39 Terminus : END
    40 To boot : ALSO
    42 Seriously outrun on the track : LAP
    43 Price-qualifying word : PER
    44 Packaging meas. : NT WT
    45 Bath tissue packaging word : PLY
    46 Santa Monica landmark : PIER
    48 Class assignment : ESSAY
    50 *Pancake order : SHORT STACK (shortcake)
    54 Baker’s dozen? : EGGS
    56 ’50s TV innovation : CABLE
    60 *Fish that doesn’t taste like its name suggests : LEMON SOLE (lemon cake)
    61 Numbered work : OPUS
    62 “Fantastic Four” villain, briefly : DR DOOM
    63 Brown brew : ALE
    64 Row of seats : PEW
    65 Joltless joe? : DECAF
    67 AFL-__ : CIO
    68 GOP org. : RNC
    69 Unidentified flying radar blips : BOGIES
    71 Salsa order : MILD
    72 *Killjoy, in modern lingo : FUN SPONGE (sponge cake)
    75 It may take a licking : STAMP
    76 Went down : SANK
    77 *Kraft offering, casually : MAC ‘N’ CHEESE (cheesecake)
    78 Old Turkish title : PASHA
    80 Blubber : BAWL
    81 Hip : MOD
    82 Stuns : WOWS
    85 Common URL ending : COM
    86 Spot for suds : MUG
    87 Very little : A DAB
    89 Twin, say : SIB
    92 Here, in Jalisco : ACA
    93 “As __ to breathe were life!”: Tennyson : THO’
    94 Silently understood : TACIT
    96 “Encore!” : ONE MORE!
    98 *Sushi fish : YELLOWTAIL (yellow cake)
    101 Formally surrender : CEDE
    103 Novelist Waugh : ALEC
    104 *Fruity fountain offering : BANANA SPLIT (banana cake)
    106 *Drywall material : SHEETROCK (sheet cake)
    109 Busy : IN USE
    110 “101 Dalmatians” protagonist : PONGO
    111 *Dessert literally represented in six pairs of answers to the starred clues : LAYER CAKE
    112 Soda measure : LITER
    113 Solo : ALONE
    114 “The Jungle Book” wolf : AKELA
    115 “M*A*S*H” set piece : COT
    116 Highlands miss : LASS
    117 Arguments : ROWS
    118 Fresh : SASSY
    119 Blast cause : TNT

    Down

    1 1992 baseball biopic : THE BABE
    2 Enters slowly : OOZES IN
    3 Like many Pixar movies : PG-RATED
    4 Kelly of morning TV : RIPA
    5 “Let’s go!” : C’MON!
    6 BYU team nickname : COUGARS
    7 Make part of a larger state : ANNEX
    8 “To Kill a Mockingbird” recluse Boo __ : RADLEY
    9 Course for H.S. exam takers : SAT PREP
    10 Empty, as a U-Haul : UNLOAD
    11 Digital greeting : E-CARD
    12 Zing : ZESTINESS
    13 “The Sound of Music” name : TRAPP
    14 Least distinct : HAZIEST
    15 Was humiliated : ATE CROW
    16 Handed out fresh cards : REDEALT
    19 Head for Vegas? : LAS …
    20 Director Welles : ORSON
    22 Presently, quaintly : ANON
    27 Letter closer : YOURS
    30 Destructive “Doctor Who” creature : DALEK
    33 “Push It” hip-hop trio : SALT-N-PEPA
    34 Tennyson work : ULYSSES
    36 Target of some Bob Dylan songs : WAR
    41 Birthstone after sapphire : OPAL
    43 Cribbage pieces : PEGS
    44 Long-distance swimmer Diana : NYAD
    45 MLB player, e.g. : PRO
    47 Trapped, in a way : ICED IN
    49 Scottie in Hitchcock’s “Vertigo,” for example : ACROPHOBE
    50 Concrete hunks : SLABS
    51 Spartan serf : HELOT
    52 __-3 fatty acids : OMEGA
    53 Pull behind : TOW
    54 Greener Living org. : EPA
    55 Hearty laugh : GUFFAW
    57 Conveyed : BORNE
    58 Yearns (for) : LONGS
    59 Run from a stage? : EMCEE
    61 Med. condition with repetitive behavior : OCD
    62 Old Sony CD player : DISCMAN
    66 Lodge member : ELK
    67 Anderson Cooper’s network : CNN
    70 Little devils : IMPS
    71 Polite address : MA’AM
    73 Mayim Bialik alma mater : UCLA
    74 Voluminous ref. : OED
    76 Has a mediocre round … for a pro : SHOOTS PAR
    77 Copperfield field : MAGIC
    79 Neutral vowel symbol : SCHWA
    80 Tampa Bay NFLer : BUC
    82 Shipping document : WAYBILL
    83 South Pacific region : OCEANIA
    84 Waldorf salad morsels : WALNUTS
    86 Speaks badly of : MALIGNS
    88 Stereotypical ingenue facial feature : DOE EYES
    89 Beyoncé, since 2002 : SOLO ACT
    90 “S’pose so” : I RECKON
    91 “Waiting for Godot” playwright : BECKETT
    93 Cosmetics liquid : TONER
    94 Up to this point, informally : ‘TIL NOW
    95 Model 3 autos : TESLAS
    97 “Walking in Memphis” singer Cohn : MARC
    99 Cuts with a beam : LASES
    100 Ohno on skates : APOLO
    102 Bangladesh capital : DHAKA
    105 Low digit : TOE
    107 Snaky swimmers : EELS
    108 Cafeteria fixture : TRAY

    12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 15 Aug 21, Sunday”

    1. No errors today.. guess I don’t follow Dr Who and so didn’t know what a DALEK was.
      My wife made a peach cobbler cheese cake last night. I don’t care for peaches but I ate a Huge slice of it.. good stuff. The peaches were so buried in layers of cheese cake I forgot about the peaches.

    2. Many Internet sources are consistent on the reason for “cup of joe.”
      During WWI, Secretary of the Navy Josephus “Joe” Daniels banned alcohol from all U.S. Navy ships. Readers of this erudite blog can figure this out from here …

    3. Well over an hour and then I had to cheat. I really wanted the 50’s TV innovation to be color, but Diana Nyad wouldn’t let me. Plenty of other things I just didn’t know.
      I was just thinking about making a peach crisp, if there is such a thing. Off to the grocery store I go.

    4. No errors, but never heard the term “Funsponge” before. Is it just an invention for this puzzle to fit the cake theme?

      Took me awhile to realize that the Scottie clue about the Vertigo movie was not about an animal.

    5. An hour and 40 min. with 2 errors and a ton of lucky guesses and crosses.
      When was the last time you licked a stamp?
      Stay safe😀

    6. This one took a long time, but finally, after looking up the “killjoy”
      clue, I got it all without error. Never heard the term “sunsponge”
      The rest sort of got filled in slowly bit by bit.

      I, too, was tempted to put “color” as the TV innovation, but that didn’t
      work. “Run from a stage” had me baffled until I had the last three letters
      cee.

    7. 28: 54 and DNF: 6 grouped fills on the E side just wouldn’t come together for me. To be honest, “Runs from a stage” and “Conveyed” were not the best of clues to illicit any kind of answer, let alone the correct one. And FUNSPONGE is completely alien to me. So, that fill was prophetic.

    8. 29:29

      I kept thinking the theme had something to do with the double letters I saw early on, or letters on each other. Then I came here and saw “type of cake” and before I even finished reading the sentence, I understood and flipped back the crossword tab to see all the cakes in stacks.

    9. Did this one 4 min. quicker than Saturday’s, but had 1 letter error in THEBAsE/sIENSUR since I didn’t know either one and “base” seemed like a good baseball word (however, I should’ve picked up that it was about a person and that the answer would not include a word from the clue).

      So, 27:17 with the one error above.

      Along the way, had to change SABER>LANCE, NET>PER, ATAD>ADAB, YELLOWTUNA>YELLOWTAIL, DAKAR>DHAKA (regularly confuse those two).

      New to me were: HELOT, BIENSUR, FUNSPONGE.

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