LA Times Crossword 29 Aug 21, Sunday

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Constructed by: Mark McClain
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Begone

Themed answers are common phrases with a letter B GONE from the start of one word:

  • 22A Sports venue where the home team hasn’t won in years? : RINK OF DISASTER (from “brink of disaster”)
  • 44A Cattle farm run by bigwigs? : EXECUTIVE RANCH (from “executive branch”)
  • 71A Epithet for Henry Ford? : FATHER OF THE RIDE (from “father of the bride”)
  • 100A Advice for runners’ practice sessions? : RACE YOURSELVES (from “brace yourselves”)
  • 128A Powerful fall cleanup tools? : HYDRAULIC RAKES (from “hydraulic brakes”)
  • 16D TV weather promo about a storm threat? : RAIN TEASER (from “brain teaser”)
  • 78D Quarters for a spell caster? : WITCH’S ROOM (from “witch’s broom”)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 14m 38s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8 Fendi rival : PRADA

Prada started out in 1913 as a leather-goods shop in Milan, one established by the two Prada brothers. One of the brothers, Mario Prada, prevented the female members of his family from participating in the running of the company as he didn’t believe women should be involved in business (!). When the sexist brother died, his son had no interest in the business so it was his daughter who took over and ran the company for about twenty years, handing it over to her own daughter. I’d say the devil loved that …

Fendi is an Italian fashion house that was founded in 1925 by Adele Casagrande. Fendi started out as a fur and leather shop in Rome, and these days is famous for its line of handbags.

13 Paved : TARRED

The terms “tarmac” and “macadam” are short for “tarmacadam”. In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a style of road known as “macadam”. Macadam had a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones. The macadam also had a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar into the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The “tar-penetration macadam” is the basis of what we now call “tarmac”.

19 Victim of river diversion in Asia : ARAL SEA

The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

25 Invoice no. : AMT

An invoice is an itemized bill. The term comes from the Middle French “envois” meaning “dispatch (of goods)”. The root verb is “envoyer”, which translates as “to send”.

27 Dreyfus defender : ZOLA

The most famous work by French writer Émile Zola is his 1898 open letter “J’Accuse!” written to French president Félix Faure. The letter was published on the front page of a leading Paris newspaper, and accused the government of anti-Semitism in its handling of the trial of Captain Alfred Dreyfus. Dreyfus was a Jewish military officer in the French army, falsely accused and convicted of spying for Germany. Even after the error was discovered, the government refused to back down and let Dreyfus rot away on Devil’s Island rather than admit to the mistake. It wasn’t until 1906, 12 years after the wrongful conviction, that Dreyfus was freed and reinstated, largely due to the advocacy of Emile Zola.

30 Hubbub : HOOPLA

The word “hoopla” means “boisterous excitement”. The term probably comes from “houp-là”, something the French say instead of “upsy-daisy”. Then again, “upsy-daisy” probably isn’t something said very often here in the US …

51 __ Stephens: 2017 US Open Women’s Singles champ : SLOANE

Sloane Stephens is an American tennis player and former US Open champion. Stephens has a great sporting pedigree. Her mother is regarded as the greatest swimmer in the history of Boston University, and her father was a Pro Bowl player for the New England Patriots.

52 Tennis feature : NET

Our modern sport of tennis evolved from the much older racquet sport known as real tennis. Originally just called “tennis”, the older game was labeled “real tennis” when the modern version began to hold sway. Real tennis is played in a closed court, with the ball frequently bounced off the walls.

54 Bone near a calf : SHIN

The tibia is the shinbone, and is the larger of the two bones right below the knee. It is the strongest weight-bearing bone in the human body. “Tibia” is the Roman name for a Greek flute and it is thought that the shinbone was given the same name because flutes were often fashioned out of the shinbones of animals.

56 Belgian artist James : ENSOR

James Ensor was a Belgian painter who was active in the first half of the twentieth century. He lived in Ostend for almost all of his life. In fact, Ensor only made three brief trips abroad, to Paris, London and Holland.

57 Chews like beavers : GNAWS

Beavers build dams so that they can live in and around the slower and deeper water that builds up above the dam. This deeper water provides more protection for the beavers from predators such as bears. Beavers are nocturnal animals and do all their construction work at night.

65 Bird rarely on the wing : RATITE

Ratites are species of birds that cannot fly. Ratites are different physiologically than other birds in that they have nowhere on their sternum to attach the muscles needed for flight.

67 Pitt URL ending : EDU

The University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) was founded back in 1787 as the Pittsburgh Academy. Pitt was a private school until 1966, but is now one of four universities receiving state funding.

68 Toys”R”Us giraffe mascot : GEOFFREY

Geoffrey the Giraffe (formerly “Dr. G. Raffe”) is the mascot of the Toys“R”Us store. Dr. G. Raffe made his debut in 1957 in an advertising campaign for Children’s Bargain Town. Raffe’s catchphrase was ‘Toys“R”us’. The catchphrase became so popular that Children’s Bargain Town changed its name in 1969.

71 Epithet for Henry Ford? : FATHER OF THE RIDE (from “father of the bride”)

Industrialist Henry Ford was born in Michigan, and was the son of an Irish immigrant from County Cork. Ford’s most famous vehicle was the one that revolutionized the industry: the Model T. Ford’s goal with the Model T was to build a car that was simple to drive, and cheap to purchase and repair. The Model T cost $825 in 1908, which isn’t much over $20,000 in today’s money.

84 Sushi bar order : AHI

Yellowfin and bigeye tuna are usually marketed as “ahi”, the Hawaiian name. They are both big fish, with yellowfish tuna often weighing over 300 pounds, and bigeye tuna getting up to 400 pounds.

85 Company named for the exaggerated height of its tallish bottles : NEHI

The Nehi cola brand has a name that sounds like “knee-high”, a measure of a small stature. Back in the mid-1900’s the Chero-Cola company, which owned the brand, went for a slightly different twist on “knee-high” in advertising. The logo for Nehi was an image of a seated woman’s stockinged legs, with her skirt pulled up to her knees to hint at “knee-high”.

87 Bowling headache : SPLIT

In ten-pin bowling, a split takes place when the number-one pin (headpin) is knocked down with the first ball and two or more non-adjacent pins are left standing. The most difficult split to deal with is the infamous 7-10 split, where just the rear pins at the extreme right and left remain standing.

90 “Crazy” vocalist : CLINE

Patsy Cline was a country music singer who managed to cross over into the world of pop music where she enjoyed great success. Cline is one of a long list of musical legends who died in plane crashes. Cline was 30 years old when she was killed in 1963 in a Piper Comanche plane piloted by her manager, Randy Hughes. Hughes and Cline decided to make that last flight despite warnings of inclement weather, and it was a severe storm that brought down the plane in a forest outside Camden, Tennessee.

“Crazy” is a Willie Nelson ballad that was most famously recorded by Patsy Cline in 1961. Nelson recorded the song himself, soon after. It was “Crazy” that launched career as a songwriter and performer. Nelson tells us that the lyrics originally used the word “stupid” instead of “crazy”. I prefer “crazy” …

94 Blood bank fluids : SERA

Blood serum (plural “sera”) is the clear, yellowish part of blood i.e. that part which is neither a blood cell nor a clotting factor. Included in blood serum are antibodies, the proteins that are central to our immune system. Blood serum from animals that have immunity to a particular disease can be transferred to another individual, hence providing that second individual with some level of immunity. Blood serum used to pass on immunity can be called “antiserum”.

96 Blackthorn fruit : SLOE

The sloe is the fruit of the blackthorn bush, and the main flavoring ingredient in sloe gin. A sloe looks like a small plum, but is usually much more tart in taste.

97 FD employee : EMT

An emergency medical technician (EMT) often works for a fire department (FD).

98 Magnate : TYCOON

Our term “tycoon” meaning powerful business person was originally used by foreigners to describe the shogun of Japan. “Tycoon” is an anglicization of the Japanese “taikun” meaning “great lord or prince”.

107 Ducks org. : NHL

The Walt Disney Company founded the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim hockey team in 1993, with the franchise’s name being a nod to the 1992 Disney movie called “The Mighty Ducks”. The name was changed to the Anaheim Ducks when Disney sold the team before the 2006-2007 season.

108 Frozen Four org. : NCAA

The semi-finals and finals of the NCAA Men’s Ice Hockey Championship tournaments are collectively referred to as the “Frozen Four”. This term is a play on “Final Four”, which is the name given to the final round of the NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Championship tournament.

114 Swan dive revelation : ARMPIT

A swan dive is one in which the diver holds the arms outspread until just before hitting the water. Over on the other side of the Atlantic, the same dive is often called a swallow dive. Sometimes we use the verb “to swan-dive” to describe something that plummets, suddenly decreases. The stock markets swan-dives every so often …

125 Smeltery input : ORE

Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and, a greenhouse gas).

128 Powerful fall cleanup tools? : HYDRAULIC RAKES (from “hydraulic brakes”)

Automobiles tend to use hydraulic brakes, a system in which hydraulic fluid transfers pressure from the brake pedal to the brake shoes. Heavy vehicles, like trucks and buses, typically use air brakes, a system in which the braking pressure is transferred by compressed air.

133 Bug, for one : INSECT

Although we often use the term “bug” very broadly, describing almost any insect or even microorganisms, “true bugs” belong to the hemiptera order of insects. To further complicate things, species belonging to the suborder heteroptera are also often referred to as “true bugs”. To complicate things even further, the familiar lovebug and ladybug aren’t bugs at all. The lovebug is a fly, and the ladybug is a beetle.

136 Free-for-all : MELEE

Our term “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means “confused fight”.

137 Red Sea land : ERITREA

Eritrea is a country located in the Horn of Africa, and surrounded by Sudan, Ethiopia, Djibouti and the Red Sea. Some scientists believe that the area now known as Eritrea was the departure point for anatomically modern humans who first left Africa to populate the rest of the world.

Down

1 Mother of Isaac : SARAH

According to the Bible, Abraham’s son Isaac was born to Abraham’s wife Sarah when she was beyond her childbearing years and when Abraham was 100 years old. Isaac himself lived until he was 180 years old. When Isaac was just a youth, Abraham was tested by Yahweh (God) and told to build an altar on which he was to sacrifice his only son. At the last minute, an angel appeared and stopped Abraham, telling him to sacrifice a ram instead.

4 Reindeer cousin : ELK

Male elks are called bulls, and females are known as cows. Bull elks are known for their very loud screaming, which is called bugling. Cow elks are attracted to bulls that bugle more often and most loudly.

The reindeer species of deer is also known as the caribou in North America.

5 Japan’s Mount __ : ASO

Mount Aso is the largest active volcano in Japan and is found on the island of Kyushu.

7 Org. concerned with youth substance abuse : SADD

Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) was founded in Massachusetts in 1981. SADD’s aim is to prevent road traffic accidents by urging students to avoid potentially destructive decisions (such as driving under the influence of alcohol).

9 Egyptian site of a historic 1799 discovery : ROSETTA

Rosetta is a coastal city and port on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt. The Rosetta Stone is an ancient Egyptian artifact of tremendous importance in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphics. Carvings on the stone are actually three translations of the same passage of prose, one in Egyptian hieroglyphics, one in Egyptian Demotic language, and one in classical Greek. The stone was discovered by the French military during Napoleon’s 1798-99 campaign in Egypt. Before the French could get it back to France, the stone somehow ended up in enemy hands (the British), so it is now on display in the British Museum. Ownership of the stone is very much in dispute. The French want it and, understandably, the Egyptians would like it back.

10 NFL passing stat : ATT

In football, one statistic (stat) used to track the performance of a quarterback (QB) is attempts (ATT).

11 Nuevo y uno : DIEZ

In Spanish, “nuevo y uno” (nine and one) add up to “diez” (ten).

12 Bat prefix : ACRO-

An acrobat is someone who performs gymnastic feats. The term “acrobat“ comes into English via French from the Greek “akrobatos” meaning “going on tip-toe, climbing up high”.

13 Spicy food truck items : TAMALES

A tamale is a traditional dish from Central America composed of a starchy dough that is steamed or boiled in a wrapper made from a corn husk or banana leaf. The dough is called masa, and can include many different ingredients including meat, cheese, fruit and vegetables. A hot tamale is a kind of tamale that originated in the Mississippi Delta. It is particularly spicy, and the masa is replaced with corn meal.

17 Biblical twin : ESAU

Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins “the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)”. As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father’s wealth (it was his “birthright”). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a “mess of pottage” (a meal of lentils).

20 Actor Morales : ESAI

Actor Esai Morales is best known in the world of film for the 1987 movie “La Bamba”, which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai). On the small screen, Morales plays Lt. Tony Rodriguez on “NYPD Blue” and Joseph Adama on “Caprica”.

23 Iraq War weapon: Abbr. : IED

Improvised explosive device (IED)

28 Vinyl revival items: Abbr. : LPS

The first vinyl records designed to play at 33⅓ rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first long play (LP) 33⅓ rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm “single” the following year, in 1949.

31 Low USMC rank : PFC

Private first class (PFC)

32 MLB Hall of Famer Brock : LOU

Lou Brock was a professional baseball player who played most of his career with the St. Louis Cardinals. Brock broke Ty Cobb’s all-time stolen base record (938) in 1977, and held that record until 1982.

43 Absorbent fabric : TERRY

Terry cloth is a fabric designed to absorb lots of liquid. The fabric has relatively large loops of thread that improve the absorption properties. The larger the loop, the more thread, the better the absorption.

44 Many an MIT grad : ENGR

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was founded in 1861 and first offered classes in 1865, in the Mercantile building in Boston. Today’s magnificent campus on the banks of the Charles River in Cambridge opened in 1916.

45 Lawless role : XENA

The Xena character, played by New Zealander Lucy Lawless, was introduced in a made-for-TV movie called “Hercules and the Amazon Women”. Lawless reprised the role in a series called “Hercules: The Legendary Journeys”. Xena became so popular that a series was built around her character, with Lawless retained for the title role. The fictional Xena supposedly came from the “non-fictional” Greek city of Amphipolis.

46 Coup d’__ : ETAT

A coup d’état (often just “coup”) is the sudden overthrow of a government, and comes from the French for “stroke of state”. The Swiss-German word “putsch” is sometimes used instead of “coup”, with “Putsch” translating literally as “sudden blow”. We also use the abbreviated “coup” to mean “sudden, brilliant and successful act”.

49 Concerto finale, perhaps : RONDO

A rondo was often chosen by composers in the classical period for the last movement of a sonata (or symphony or concerto, for that matter). In rondo form there is a principal theme that alternates with a contrasting theme(s). So, the original theme anchors the whole piece in between secondary digressions.

58 Hot spot service : WI-FI

“Wi-Fi” is nothing more than a trademark, a trademark registered by an association of manufacturers of equipment that use wireless LAN (Local Area Network) technology. A device labeled with “Wi-Fi” has to meet certain defined technical standards, basically meaning that the devices can talk to each other. The name “Wi-Fi” suggests “Wireless Fidelity”, although apparently the term was never intended to mean anything at all.

59 ER demand : STAT!

The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turn-around time”.

61 Research university with a Boston campus : TUFTS

Tufts University is a private school based in the city of Medford, near Boston. The school was built in 1852 on land donated by Charles Tuft, a local businessman. One of the early benefactors of the school was P. T. Barnum who funded the Barnum Museum of Natural History located on the college grounds. This museum is home to the stuffed hide of Jumbo, the famous elephant. Jumbo is also the school’s mascot.

63 Agronomist’s concern : SOIL

Agronomy is a branch of agriculture that primarily deals with crop and soil science.

66 School near Windsor : ETON

The world-famous Eton College is just a brisk walk from Windsor Castle, which itself is just outside London. Eton is noted for producing many British leaders including David Cameron who was British prime minister from 2010 to 2016. The list of Old Etonians also includes Princes William and Harry, the Duke of Wellington and George Orwell. Author Ian Fleming was also an Eton alumnus, as was Fleming’s iconic character James Bond, although 007 was expelled by the school.

69 Org. created by the 1933 Banking Act : FDIC

During the Great Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law the Banking Act of 1933. The legislation established the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), intended to be a temporary government corporation that provided insurance on deposits made by customers of qualified financial institutions. The first accounts to be covered, in 1934, had an insurance limit of $2,500. Since the financial crisis of 2008, that limit is $250,000.

73 Early number? : ETHER

Ether is a number, something that “numbs”.

Ethers are a whole class of organic compounds, but in the vernacular “ether” is specifically diethyl ether. Diethyl ether was once very popular as a general anesthetic.

74 Buzzed : TIPSY

The term “tipsy” comes from the verb “to tip” meaning “to overturn, knock over”, and has been meaning “drunk” since the late 1500s.

77 Ship-to-ship greetings : AHOYS

“Ahoy!” is a nautical term used to signal a vessel. When the telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell, he suggested that “ahoy” be used as a standard greeting when answering a call. However, Thomas Edison came up with “hello”, and we’ve been using that ever since.

81 Actor Schreiber : LIEV

Liev Schreiber is highly regarded as a stage actor, and has many classical roles under his belt. He won a Tony in 2005 for his Broadway performance in “Glengarry Glen Ross”, and earned excellent reviews for his performance in Shakespeare’s “Cymbeline”.

86 Country whose name ends in the same three letters as its capital : IRAN

Tehran is the capital of Iran and is the largest city in the Middle East, with a population of about 8.5 million. Iran has been around a really long time and Tehran is actually the country’s 31st national capital.

89 Gull relative : TERN

Terns are seabirds that are found all over the world. The Arctic Tern makes a very long-distance migration. One Arctic Tern that was tagged as a chick in Great Britain in the summer of 1982, was spotted in Melbourne, Australia just three months later. The bird had traveled over 14,000 miles in over those three months, an average of about 150 miles a day. Remarkable …

Gulls are a family of seabirds that is most closely related to terns. Some species of gull can be quite clever. For example, they can reportedly use pieces of bread as bait to catch goldfish in ponds. Others can be quite fearless, and have been known to land on the backs of whales and peck out pieces of flesh.

92 Lynn’s father worked in one : COAL MINE

Singer Loretta Lynn is sometimes referred to as the First Lady of Country Music. Lynn was born in 1932 in Butcher Hollow, Kentucky to a coal miner and his wife, and so famously is also referred to as “the Coal Miner’s Daughter”. Her much younger sister (by 19 years) is the singer Crystal Gayle.

93 Primate genus : HOMO

The literal translation of “Homo sapiens” from Latin is “wise or knowing man”. The Homo genus includes the species Homo sapiens (modern humans), but we’re the only species left in that genus. The last known species related to humans was Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthal Man) which died off about 24,000 years ago. However, another species was discovered in Indonesia in 2003 that has been dubbed Homo floresiensis (Flores Man … sometimes called “hobbit”), and it may possibly have lived as recently as 12,000 years ago. Watch this space …

Primates are mammals, many of whom are omnivorous and make good use of their hands. They also have larger brains relative to their body size, compared to other animals. The order Primates includes apes, lemurs, baboons and humans.

104 Fast flight : LAM

To be on the lam is to be in flight, to have escaped from prison. “On the lam” is American slang that originated at the end of the 19th century. The word “lam” also means “beat” or “thrash”, as in “lambaste”. So “on the lam” might derive from the phrase “to beat it, to scram”.

106 U.K. military award : DSO

The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a British military award that is usually presented to officers with the rank of major or higher.

112 Flanged fastener : T-NUT

A T-nut is so called because it has a t-shape when viewed from the side.

113 Fashion initials : YSL

Yves Saint Laurent (YSL)

116 Peace goddess : IRENE

Eirene (also “Irene”) was the Greek goddess of peace, with “eirene” being the Greek word for “peace”. The Roman equivalent to Eirene was the goddess Pax.

117 “The Gondoliers” bride : TESSA

“The Gondoliers” is a delightful operetta by Gilbert & Sullivan, first performed in 1889 at the Savoy Theatre in London. Tessa is a maiden selected as a bride in a “line up” by one of the gondoliers. I last saw “The Gondoliers” decades ago, an amateur production in the small town where I was living at the time in Ireland. Great fun!

118 Playwright Simon : NEIL

Neil Simon was one of my favorite playwrights. He wrote over thirty plays and about thirty screenplays. My favorite play penned by Simon has to be “Brighton Beach Memoirs”, but the list of his great stage works seems endless and includes “Barefoot in the Park”, “The Odd Couple”, “Sweet Charity”, “Plaza Suite”, “California Suite”, “Biloxi Blues” and “The Goodbye Girl”.

122 “Auld Lang __” : SYNE

The song “Auld Lang Syne” is a staple at New Year’s Eve (well, actually in the opening minutes of New Year’s Day). The words were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

124 Cork’s home : EIRE

Cork is the largest and most southerly county in Ireland. The county is named for the city of Cork, which is the second largest in the country. It is sometimes referred to as “the Rebel County”, which alludes to the region’s resistance to British rule. Tourists flock to Cork for several reasons, not least as it is home to the famous Blarney Stone as well as Cobh, the port from which so many Irish emigrants left for countries like Australia, Canada and the United States.

127 Maya __, Vietnam Veterans Memorial designer : LIN

Maya Lin is a Chinese-American artist and architect from Athens, Ohio. Her most famous work is the moving Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Lin was only 21-years-old when she won a public design competition in 1981 to create the memorial. Although her design is very fitting, sadly Lin was not a popular choice for the work given her Asian heritage. As she said herself, she probably would not have been picked had the competition been judged with the knowledge of who was behind each submission.

129 ISP option : DSL

An Internet service provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP’s network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Impressive sights at affairs : SPREADS
8 Fendi rival : PRADA
13 Paved : TARRED
19 Victim of river diversion in Asia : ARAL SEA
20 Like some R-rated films : EROTIC
21 Comfortable : AT EASE
22 Sports venue where the home team hasn’t won in years? : RINK OF DISASTER (from “brink of disaster”)
24 Boulevard feature : MEDIAN
25 Invoice no. : AMT
26 Brainstorm : IDEATE
27 Dreyfus defender : ZOLA
29 Heavy weight : ONUS
30 Hubbub : HOOPLA
33 Trimming plans : DIETS
35 Industrial site : PLANT
37 Like memories to smile about : FOND
39 Sock part : TOE
41 Hottest, in a way : SEXIEST
44 Cattle farm run by bigwigs? : EXECUTIVE RANCH (from “executive branch”)
51 __ Stephens: 2017 US Open Women’s Singles champ : SLOANE
52 Tennis feature : NET
53 Isolated work group that hinders corporate efficiency : SILO
54 Bone near a calf : SHIN
56 Belgian artist James : ENSOR
57 Chews like beavers : GNAWS
60 “I __ noticed” : HADN’T
62 Change for a ten : ONES
64 Drop the ball : ERR
65 Bird rarely on the wing : RATITE
67 Pitt URL ending : EDU
68 Toys”R”Us giraffe mascot : GEOFFREY
71 Epithet for Henry Ford? : FATHER OF THE RIDE (from “father of the bride”)
76 Stayed to the bitter end : SAW IT OUT
79 NBA impossibility : TIE
80 Hide out : LIE LOW
84 Sushi bar order : AHI
85 Company named for the exaggerated height of its tallish bottles : NEHI
87 Bowling headache : SPLIT
90 “Crazy” vocalist : CLINE
91 Mountain gap : NOTCH
94 Blood bank fluids : SERA
96 Blackthorn fruit : SLOE
97 FD employee : EMT
98 Magnate : TYCOON
100 Advice for runners’ practice sessions? : RACE YOURSELVES (from “brace yourselves”)
105 Feeling guilty : ASHAMED
107 Ducks org. : NHL
108 Frozen Four org. : NCAA
109 Tough goings : SLOGS
110 Like some promises : EMPTY
114 Swan dive revelation : ARMPIT
118 Expected result : NORM
120 Cause for a claim : LOSS
123 Not as relaxed : TENSER
125 Smeltery input : ORE
126 French star : ETOILE
128 Powerful fall cleanup tools? : HYDRAULIC RAKES (from “hydraulic brakes”)
132 Having a twist : IRONIC
133 Bug, for one : INSECT
134 Gets back to business : REOPENS
135 Sorrowful tune : LAMENT
136 Free-for-all : MELEE
137 Red Sea land : ERITREA

Down

1 Mother of Isaac : SARAH
2 First-class : PRIMO
3 Totaled : RAN TO
4 Reindeer cousin : ELK
5 Japan’s Mount __ : ASO
6 Disobedient : DEFIANT
7 Org. concerned with youth substance abuse : SADD
8 Ramble on : PRATE
9 Egyptian site of a historic 1799 discovery : ROSETTA
10 NFL passing stat : ATT
11 Nuevo y uno : DIEZ
12 Bat prefix : ACRO-
13 Spicy food truck items : TAMALES
14 Had some 13-Down : ATE
15 Purplish veggie : RED ONION
16 TV weather promo about a storm threat? : RAIN TEASER (from “brain teaser”)
17 Biblical twin : ESAU
18 Entertainment center sites : DENS
20 Actor Morales : ESAI
23 Iraq War weapon: Abbr. : IED
28 Vinyl revival items: Abbr. : LPS
31 Low USMC rank : PFC
32 MLB Hall of Famer Brock : LOU
34 Family guys : SONS
36 Bar on a truck : AXLE
38 Chef’s creation : DISH
40 Cavern phenomenon : ECHO
42 [Bo-ring!] : [SNORE!]
43 Absorbent fabric : TERRY
44 Many an MIT grad : ENGR
45 Lawless role : XENA
46 Coup d’__ : ETAT
47 Routing word : VIA
48 Respected figure : ELDER
49 Concerto finale, perhaps : RONDO
50 Depend : HINGE
55 Poetic contraction : NE’ER
58 Hot spot service : WI-FI
59 ER demand : STAT!
61 Research university with a Boston campus : TUFTS
63 Agronomist’s concern : SOIL
66 School near Windsor : ETON
69 Org. created by the 1933 Banking Act : FDIC
70 Sense : FEEL
72 Shades : HUES
73 Early number? : ETHER
74 Buzzed : TIPSY
75 Familiar greeting : HELLO
76 Fall mall hiree : SANTA
77 Ship-to-ship greetings : AHOYS
78 Quarters for a spell caster? : WITCH’S ROOM (from “witch’s broom”)
81 Actor Schreiber : LIEV
82 “I’m buying!” : ON ME!
83 Moistens : WETS
86 Country whose name ends in the same three letters as its capital : IRAN
88 Debtor’s note : IOU
89 Gull relative : TERN
92 Lynn’s father worked in one : COAL MINE
93 Primate genus : HOMO
95 Pain pill target : ACHE
99 Ignore : NEGLECT
101 Provider of shade : ELM TREE
102 Harder to get : SCARCER
103 Corn unit : EAR
104 Fast flight : LAM
106 U.K. military award : DSO
111 Goal of an accord : PEACE
112 Flanged fastener : T-NUT
113 Fashion initials : YSL
115 __ face : POKER
116 Peace goddess : IRENE
117 “The Gondoliers” bride : TESSA
118 Playwright Simon : NEIL
119 Sierra’s “other” : OTRA
121 Carpenter’s wedge : SHIM
122 “Auld Lang __” : SYNE
124 Cork’s home : EIRE
127 Maya __, Vietnam Veterans Memorial designer : LIN
129 ISP option : DSL
130 French king : ROI
131 Just right : APT

13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 29 Aug 21, Sunday”

  1. Quick run today. Got the theme early and that made it quicker.

    Still don’t get ARMPIT for Swan dive revelation??

    1. @Anon Mike
      Presumably, when you do a swan dive into a pool, you would raise your arms, therefore revealing your arm pits.

  2. 29:45 2 errors at the end

    Finally a theme that’s fun and helpful!

    I had a lot of trouble in the NE until I changed EGGPLANT to REDONION, and there were still a lot of names I didn’t know. Though I was torn between KLINE vs KLYNE / LIEV vs LYEV, I managed to pick the right letter. In the end, Check Grid the two wrong squares I couldn’t find in the top center. ORADA/ORATE -> PRADO/PRATE and DIES/DIEZ -> SOLA/ZOLA. So today I learned about the origin of Prada and the defense of Dreyfus.

    It felt odd to see ESAU and ESAI so close to each other.

    @Anon Mike, it’s kind of hard to hide your armpits when raising your arms for a swan dive.

    @Earl and Annoy Muss – I stand corrected about pandas. I mean panda bears. I didn’t know that question had been settled. Thanks!

    1. Annoy Muss? Is that a sly way of saying, “nobody likes a fact checker”?

      In any case, thanks for standing corrected … 😜!

      Maybe I should go back to using my real name … long story … 🤨.

  3. Just under an hour…no errors…can someone please explain 53A SILO?
    Someone has most likely already responded to you @Anon Mike but just in case…when you do a swan dive your arms are spread wide open revealing your ARM PITS
    Stay safe😀

  4. In a swan dive your arms are out stretched.

    Once I got the theme it was pretty much clear sailing. Quite easy for a Sunday.

  5. @30 mins, DNF, at least 20 unfilled, mostly in the top half.

    Just didn’t have it for this puzzle. Got the “missing B” gimmick, but it didn’t help in enough places.

  6. Got started late today so just finished. No errors, but I had to
    look up the Stephens tennis champ. There were other things
    I wasn’t sure about but made lucky guesses. I didn’t understand the
    53A answer “silo” either but that’s what it was. The theme did help
    to put everything all together. “slogs” was an apt answer for the
    way this puzzle felt quite a bit of the time.

  7. A nice puzzle – not too difficult, and a relateable theme. 28:12 with no errors or lookups.

    New words were RATITE, ENSOR, TESSA.

    On 53A, a SILOed work group is a business situation where the group or department works without coordinating or communicating with other groups that could help or support them (working “in a silo”). It can create redundancy and errors as well as inefficiency.

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