LA Times Crossword 30 Aug 21, Monday

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Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Price Cuts

Themed answers each give the word “PRICE” when the central letters are CUT out:

  • 51A Markdowns, and what 17-, 23- and 46-Across all exhibit : PRICE CUTS
  • 17A Special access for celebrities : PRIVATE ENTRANCE
  • 23A Mass communication? : PRAYER SERVICE
  • 46A Popular Chinese takeout dish : PORK FRIED RICE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 5m 07s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 Largely seasonal Golden Arches sandwich : MCRIB

The McDonald’s McRib sandwich is based on a pork patty. There isn’t any pork rib in the patty though. It is primarily made up of pork shoulder meat reconstituted with tripe, heart and stomach tissue. Enjoy …

The McDonald’s fast-food chain uses a stylized letter M as a logo, with the logo going by the name “Golden Arches”. Those Golden Arches are commonly integrated into the architecture of purpose-built McDonald’s restaurants.

15 “The Vampire Diaries” protagonist : ELENA

“The Vampire Diaries” is a series of horror novels by L. J. Smith that is aimed at teens. There is a spin-off television series of the same name. I don’t do vampires …

16 Sleeveless top, briefly : CAMI

A camisole (also “cami”) is a sleeveless undergarment worn by women that extends down to the waist. “Camisole” is a French word that we imported into English that ultimately derives from the Latin “camisia” meaning “shirt, nightgown”.

21 Boxer Laila : ALI

Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali, and a very capable boxer in her own right. Laila’s professional record is an impressive 24 wins, including 21 knockouts. Now retired, she never lost a fight, and nor did she ever draw. One of those victories was against Jackie Frazier-Lyde, daughter of her father’s nemesis Joe Frazier. Laila is not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of “Dancing with the Stars”.

22 Garfield’s dog frenemy : ODIE

Jon Arbuckle is a fictional character, and the owner of Odie from Jim Davis’s comic strip “Garfield”. Garfield is Arbuckle’s orange tabby cat. Odie is his less-than-smart beagle.

A frenemy is someone who feigns friendship but who is actually an enemy or competitor.

23 Mass communication? : PRAYER SERVICE

The principal act of worship in the Roman Catholic tradition is the Mass. The term “Mass” comes from the Late Latin word “missa” meaning “dismissal”. This word is used at the end of the Latin Mass in “Ite, missa est” which translates literally as “Go, it is the dismissal”.

28 Superman foe Luthor : LEX

Lex Luthor is the nemesis of Superman in comics. Luthor has been portrayed in a number of guises in the comic world as well in movies and on the small screen. For example, he appeared as Atom Man in the 1950 film series “Atom Man vs. Superman”, and was played by actor Lyle Talbot, opposite Kirk Alyn’s Superman.

35 Navigational aid letters : GPS

A global positioning system (GPS) is known as a satellite navigation system (Sat Nav) in Britain and Ireland.

42 Presidential biographer __ Kearns Goodwin : DORIS

Doris Kearns Goodwin is a noted biographer and historian. She has authored biographies of several US presidents, and won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1995 for “Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt”. Her most recent book is “Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln”, which was adapted into the marvelous 2012 film “Lincoln” directed by Steven Spielberg.

44 Ctrl-__-Del : ALT

Ctrl-Alt-Delete is a keyboard command on IBM PC compatible systems used for a soft reboot, or more recently to bring up the task manager in the Windows operating system. Bill Gates tells us that the command was originally just a device to be used during development and was never meant to “go live”. He once said that “Ctrl+Alt+Delete” was a mistake, and that he would have preferred a dedicated key on the keyboard that carried out the same function.

49 Praise highly : EXTOL

To extol something is to praise it loudly. The term comes from the Latin “extollere” meaning “to raise up, elevate”.

55 Modern hotel amenity : WI-FI

“Wi-Fi” is nothing more than a trademark, a trademark registered by an association of manufacturers of equipment that use wireless LAN (Local Area Network) technology. A device labeled with “Wi-Fi” has to meet certain defined technical standards, basically meaning that the devices can talk to each other. The name “Wi-Fi” suggests “Wireless Fidelity”, although apparently the term was never intended to mean anything at all.

58 Word from the Yiddish for “expert” : MAVEN

I’ve always loved the term “maven”, which is another word for “expert”. Maven comes into English from the Yiddish “meyvn” describing someone who appreciates and is a connoisseur.

63 Fencing sword : EPEE

There are three fencing events in the modern Olympics, with each distinguished by the weapon used:

  • Foil
  • Épée
  • Sabre

65 Nabisco cookie : OREO

If you take a close look at the embossed design on the front and back of an Oreo cookie, you’ll spot the main elements of the Nabisco logo. Those elements are an oval with a cross on top, a cross with two bars. Usually the company name “Nabisco” is inside the oval, but for the cookie it’s the brand name “Oreo”. The current embossed design was introduced in 1952.

Down

2 Madison Ave. figure : AD REP

Madison Avenue became the center of advertising in the US in the twenties, and serves as the backdrop to the great TV drama “Mad Men”. There aren’t many advertising agencies left on Madison Avenue these days though, as most have moved to other parts of New York City. The street takes its name from Madison Square, which is bounded on one side by Madison Avenue. The square in turn takes its name from James Madison, the fourth President of the United States.

4 Body armor fiber : KEVLAR

Kevlar is a remarkably strong synthetic fiber that was introduced by DuPont in 1965. The material was developed as a lightweight substitute for steel. Kevlar fits the bill, as an equal weight of the synthetic fiber is five times stronger than the alloy. One of the downsides of Kevlar is that its strength degrades when exposed to sunlight.

8 Concave navel : INNIE

The navel is basically the scar left behind when the umbilical cord is removed from a newborn baby. One interesting use of the umbilicus (navel, belly button) is to differentiate between identical twins, especially when they are very young.

9 Softball club : BAT

The sport we know today as softball was created as an indoor version of baseball. The first game was played on Thanksgiving Day in Chicago. Back then, a “soft” ball was indeed used, but the name “softball” wasn’t adopted until 1926.

10 Northeasternmost U.S. national park : ACADIA

Acadia National Park in Maine was created in 1919, although back then it was called Lafayette National Park in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette who famously supported the American Revolution. The park was renamed to Acadia in 1929.

11 Terrified reaction : PANIC

In Greek mythology, Pan was a lecherous god, one who fell in love with Echo the mountain nymph. Echo refused Pan’s advances so that he became very angry. Pan’s anger created a “panic” (a word derived from the name “Pan”) and a group of shepherds were driven to kill Echo.

12 Game show host, e.g. : EMCEE

The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism used for a Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

19 Mars explorer : ROVER

There have been several rovers sent to Mars from Earth. The Soviet Union’s Mars 2 landed in 1971, and failed. Mars 3 landed the same year, and ceased operation just 20 seconds after landing. NASA’s Sojourner landed in 1997 (what a great day that was!) and operated from July through September. The British rover Beagle 2 was lost six days before its scheduled entry into the Martian atmosphere. NASA’s Spirit landed in 2004, and operated successfully for over six years before getting trapped in sand and eventually ceasing to communicate. NASA’s Opportunity also landed in 2004, and operated for over fourteen years. And then NASA’s Curiosity made a spectacular, hi-tech landing in 2012 and is continuing to explore the planet today. Based on the Curiosity design, NASA’s Perseverance rover landed in 2021, along with the Mars helicopter named Ingenuity. The China National Space Administration landed it’s first rover, named Zhurong (“Rover” in English), five months after Perseverance started its mission on the planet.

25 “Late Night” actress Amy : RYAN

Actress Amy Ryan is perhaps best known on the big screen for her playing Helene McCready, the mother of the abducted girl in the 2007 crime thriller “Gone Baby Gone”. On the small screen, she plays Holly Flax, the love interest of Michael Scott in “The Office”.

“Late Night” is an entertaining 2019 film starring Emma Thompson as a late-night TV host and Mindy Kaling as one of the show’s writers who is newly hired. As well as playing a leading role on screen, Kaling wrote the screenplay and was one of the producers.

28 Hallucinogenic drug : LSD

LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist named Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

30 It’s a copy and a company : XEROX

A xerox is a copy made on a xerography machine. Xerography is a dry photocopying technique that was invented in 1938 by Chester Carlson, although he originally referred to the process as electrophotography. Joseph Wilson commercialized Carlson’s process some years later, coining the term “Xerography” using the Greek words for “dry” and “writing”. Wilson changed the name of his own photographic company to Xerox.

33 Shop with a slicer : DELI

The word “delicatessen” (or “deli” for short) came into English from the German “Delikatessen”. The Germans borrowed the word from French, in which language “délicatesse” means “delicious things (to eat)”. The term’s ultimate root is “delicatus”, the Latin for “giving pleasure, delightful”.

35 Company with a spokeslizard : GEICO

GEICO was founded in 1936 with a very specific mission, to provide auto insurance for employees of the federal government and their families, hence the name Government Employees Insurance Company (GEICO). GEICO is a private company, despite the word “government” in its name. The founders’ idea was to focus on government employees as they believed such a group represented a lower risk profile than the rest of the population. Nowadays any qualifying person can take out a policy with GEICO.

Gecko is the “spokes-lizard” for GEICO. When Gecko was introduced in 1999, he was voiced by actor Kelsey Grammer of “Cheers” and “Frasier” fame. Since then, Gecko has been voiced by British radio presenter Dave Kelly and most recently by actor Jake Wood, who plays Max Branning on the British soap opera “EastEnders”.

39 Desserts topped with gummy worms : DIRT PIES

Dirt cake (sometimes “dirt pie, dirt pudding”) is a dessert usually made by breaking up Oreo cookies and scattering the pieces over chocolate pudding, and then adding gummy worms on top. Sounds delicious …

43 Chocolate-and-toffee bar : SKOR

The candy bar named Skor is produced by Hershey’s. “Skor” is Swedish for “shoes”, and the candy bar’s wrapping features a crown that is identical to that found in the Swedish national emblem. What shoes have to do with candy, I don’t know …

45 Champagne variety : BRUT

Sparkling wines can be classified according to sweetness. These classifications are, from driest to sweetest:

  • Brut Nature
  • Extra Brut
  • Brut
  • Extra Dry
  • Dry
  • Semi-Dry
  • Sweet

54 Solar panel component : CELL

Solar panels are arrays of solar cells that make use of what’s known as the photovoltaic effect. We are more likely to have learned about the photoelectric effect in school, in which electrons were ejected from the surface of some materials when it was exposed to light or other forms of radiation. The photovoltaic effect is related but different. Instead of being electrons ejected from the surface, in the photovoltaic effect electrons move around in the material creating a difference in voltage.

56 Debut on the NYSE : IPO

An initial public offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

The roots of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) go back to 1792 when a group of 24 stock brokers set up the New York Stock & Exchange Board. They did so in an agreement signed under a buttonwood tree outside 68 Wall Street. That document became known as the Buttonwood Agreement. Today, the NYSE is located in a National Historic Landmark building with the address 11 Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City.

62 Speck in a URL : DOT

An Internet address (like NYXCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) is more correctly called a uniform resource locator (URL).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 To-do list entry : TASK
5 Largely seasonal Golden Arches sandwich : MCRIB
10 Mimicked : APED
14 Not doing much : IDLE
15 “The Vampire Diaries” protagonist : ELENA
16 Sleeveless top, briefly : CAMI
17 Special access for celebrities : PRIVATE ENTRANCE
20 Slender fish : EELS
21 Boxer Laila : ALI
22 Garfield’s dog frenemy : ODIE
23 Mass communication? : PRAYER SERVICE
26 Fire up, as a motor : REV
27 Thumbs-up vote : YEA
28 Superman foe Luthor : LEX
31 Fill drink orders : TEND BAR
35 Navigational aid letters : GPS
38 Winter glider : SLED
40 Greet at the door : SEE IN
41 Well-organized : NEAT
42 Presidential biographer __ Kearns Goodwin : DORIS
44 Ctrl-__-Del : ALT
45 Heats, as water for pasta : BOILS
46 Popular Chinese takeout dish : PORK FRIED RICE
49 Praise highly : EXTOL
50 Freeway vehicles : AUTOS
51 Markdowns, and what 17-, 23- and 46-Across all exhibit : PRICE CUTS
55 Modern hotel amenity : WI-FI
58 Word from the Yiddish for “expert” : MAVEN
59 Stereotypical techie : NERD
63 Fencing sword : EPEE
64 Like milk on the floor : SPILT
65 Nabisco cookie : OREO
66 “Easy __ it” : DOES
67 Screams : YELLS
68 Negotiator’s asset : TACT

Down

1 Helpful hint : TIP
2 Madison Ave. figure : AD REP
3 More cunning : SLIER
4 Body armor fiber : KEVLAR
5 Got together with : MET
6 Easily understood : CLEAR
7 Film spools : REELS
8 Concave navel : INNIE
9 Softball club : BAT
10 Northeasternmost U.S. national park : ACADIA
11 Terrified reaction : PANIC
12 Game show host, e.g. : EMCEE
13 Fizzle out : DIE
18 To date : AS YET
19 Mars explorer : ROVER
24 Pre-holiday nights : EVES
25 “Late Night” actress Amy : RYAN
28 Hallucinogenic drug : LSD
29 Skip the big wedding, maybe : ELOPE
30 It’s a copy and a company : XEROX
32 At hand : NEAR
33 Shop with a slicer : DELI
34 Quick meal : BITE
35 Company with a spokeslizard : GEICO
36 Goes white from fright : PALES
37 Ave. crossers : STS
39 Desserts topped with gummy worms : DIRT PIES
41 “Wrong-o!” : NO IT’S NOT!
43 Chocolate-and-toffee bar : SKOR
45 Champagne variety : BRUT
47 Weak, as an excuse : FLIMSY
48 Discourages : DAUNTS
52 Magician’s garb : CAPE
53 Bad to the bone : EVIL
54 Solar panel component : CELL
55 Tied the knot : WED
56 Debut on the NYSE : IPO
57 Consultant’s payment : FEE
60 Named time span : ERA
61 Remote button : REC
62 Speck in a URL : DOT

12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 30 Aug 21, Monday”

  1. Usual easy Monday. No errors, no lookups. My only complaint
    with this type of puzzle is that the fun doesn’t last long enough!

  2. No errors, no Googles. Actually used the theme to solve the puzzle.
    Had ADman before ADREP. Did not actually know DORIS, Amy or ELENA; OR DIRT PIES. Didn’t Know MAVEN was Yiddish.

  3. Not a bad Monday – 11:19, no errors or lookups. Easy theme.

    Went from ITEM>TASK, ADMAN>ADREP, PRIVATEENTRYWAY>PRIVATEENTRANCE, PRAYERSESSION>PRAYERSVICE, EXALT>EXTOL.

    The “Lincoln” movie based on Goodwin’s “Team of Rivals” had a wonderful performance by Daniel Day-Lewis. I highly recommend the book, too.

    Gave an explanation of SILO work groups on yesterday’s puzzle posting.

  4. Basically, Bill defines a frenemy as an enemy of yours posing as a friend. In spydom, wouldn’t that be a mole? I always thought frenemy as being a true friend who’s a pest that loves to tease and annoy you but will always have your back. I actually considered one of my best friends as a frenemy of mine; maybe I need to apologize.

  5. 7:18 – no lookups/errors.

    Almost a personal best …

    Kinda too easy (even for a Monday) IMHO, and that’s coming from a newbie …

    Didn’t know MAVEN was Yiddish.

    Never heard of DIRTPIES.

    Ken Burns uses Doris Kearns Goodwin as an expert commentator on very many of his PBS documentaries. I think he’d use her to opine on atomic particle theory …

    Be Well

  6. 5:36

    Had to change ADMEN->ADREP, SLYER->SLIER, DIM->DIE, before I could find the PRIVATEENTRANCE. And then the them made sense.

    The constructor missed a chance to clue 65A as “Ingredient in 39D”.

    @A Nonny Muss, Oh dear, that was a “creative” typo, yesterday. I’m sorry my hasty fingers messed up your anonny-name! Too bad there’s no Check Grid for comments.

  7. Mostly easy Monday with only a bit of dancing around in the SW/middle. Had it in 7:44 with no errors or peeks. Initially had SKOl and DIRT_IES, which I finally sorted out. Never heard of DIRT PIES or ELENA and Amy RYAN for that matter.

    I agree with Fritz on frenemy; I didn’t think of them as being friendly with someone you have a fundamental disagreement.

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