LA Times Crossword 22 Oct 21, Friday

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Constructed by: Alexander Liebeskind & Jeff Chen
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Thrown for a Loop

Circled letters in the grid spell out “BOOMERANG”, and are in a BOOMERANG shape. Also, themed answers are phrases reminiscent of a BOOMERANG’S flight path:

  • 19A *Failed-delivery words : RETURN TO SENDER
  • 37A *Arrives back at square one : COMES FULL CIRCLE
  • 53A *Bamboozled … and what the circled letters, when connected in the proper sequence, can be? : THROWN FOR A LOOP

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 8m 34s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Spec. for tires : PSI

Pounds per square inch (PSI) is a measure of pressure.

4 Alphabetical lunch : BLT

The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second-most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

10 PC component : CPU

The central processing unit (CPU) is the main component on the motherboard of a computer. The CPU is the part of the computer that carries out most of the functions required by a program. Nowadays you can get CPUs in everything from cars to telephones.

15 Searches, like a pig does for truffles : ROOTLES

To “rootle” around is to “root” around, to dig with the snout.

Truffles are rooted out by pigs, or by specially trained dogs. The reason why pigs, especially sows, are so attracted to truffles is that there is a chemical compound found within the truffle that is very similar to androstenol, a sex pheromone found in the saliva of boars.

18 Starts up again : REBOOTS

The verb “to boot”, as used in the world of computers, comes from the phrase “pull oneself up by one’s bootstraps”. The idea is that the software that has to be loaded before a computer can do anything useful is called a “bootstrap load”.

26 Home of Triple-A baseball’s Rainiers : TACOMA

The Rainiers are a AAA affiliate of the Seattle Mariners baseball team located in Tacoma, Washington. The Rainiers have their roots in the Tacoma Tigers who first played in Tacoma in 1904, having moved from Sacramento.

32 Order to leave : SCAT

Our word “scat!” means “get lost!” It comes from a 19th-century expression “quicker than s’cat”, which meant “in a great hurry”. The original phrase probably came from the words “hiss” and “cat”.

35 Eyeroll inducer, perhaps, briefly : PDA

Public display of affection (PDA)

42 Dubai’s fed. : UAE

Dubai is one of the seven emirates that make up the federation known as the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The two largest members of the UAE (geographically) are Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the only two of the seven members that have veto power over UAE policy.

43 Information : DATA

Our word “data” (singular “datum”) comes from the Latin “datum” meaning “given”. The idea is that data are “things given”.

48 Granola bit : OAT

The names “Granola” and “Granula” were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole-grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

53 *Bamboozled … and what the circled letters, when connected in the proper sequence, can be? : THROWN FOR A LOOP

It’s thought that the lovely word “bamboozle” came into English from the Scottish “bombaze” meaning “perplex”. We’ve been using “bamboozle” since the very early 1700s.

61 Oxford campus : OLE MISS

“Ole Miss” is the nickname for the University of Mississippi located in Oxford, Mississippi. The name “Ole Miss” dates back to 1897, the first year a student yearbook was published. The graduating class held a competition to name the yearbook and “Ole Miss” emerged as the winner. The name stuck to the yearbook, and also as a nickname for the school itself. The University of Mississippi sports teams have been known as the Rebels since 1936. Prior to 1936, they were known as the Mississippi Flood.

65 Neruda wrote one to “things” : ODE

“Odes to Common Things” is a collection of poems by Chilean poet Pablo Neruda. Included in the list of 25 odes is “Ode to the Table”, “Ode to the Dog”, “Ode to the Artichoke”, “Ode to French Fries” and “Ode to Things”.

67 Naval initials : USS

The abbreviation “USS” stands for “United States Ship”. The practice of naming US Navy vessels in a standard format didn’t start until 1907, when President Theodore Roosevelt issued an executive order that addressed the issue.

68 46-yr.-old satire : SNL

NBC first aired a form of “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) in 1975 under the title “NBC’s Saturday Night”. The show was actually created to give Johnny Carson some time off from “The Tonight Show”. Back then “The Tonight Show” had a weekend episode, and Carson convinced NBC to pull the Saturday or Sunday recordings off the air and hold them for subsequent weeknights in which Carson needed a break. NBC turned to Lorne Michaels and asked him to put together a variety show to fill the vacant slot, and he came up with what we now call “Saturday Night Live”.

Down

1 Wilbur of “Charlotte’s Web,” e.g. : PIG

“Charlotte’s Web” is a children’s novel by author E. B. White. Charlotte is a barn spider, who manages to save the life of a pig named Wilbur. Wilbur is a pet pig, owned by the farmer’s daughter, Fern Arable. The story also includes a gluttonous rat named Templeton who provides some light and comical moments.

4 Many air rifles : BB GUNS

A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.070″ in diameter) to size FF (.230″). Birdshot that is size BB (0.180″ in diameter) gives the airgun its name.

5 Trilogy with hobbits: Abbr. : LOTR

“Lord of the Rings” (LOTR)

6 1982 sci-fi film set in a computer : TRON

Released in 1982, Disney’s “Tron” was one of the first mainstream films to make extensive use of computer graphics. The main role in the movie is played by Jeff Bridges. The original spawned a 2010 sequel called “Tron: Legacy”, as well as a 2012 TV show called “Tron: Uprising”.

9 Iced tea brand named for a Florida neighborhood : SOBE

The brand name “SoBe” can be found on teas, juices and bottled waters. SoBe is an abbreviation for South Beach, the neighborhood in Miami Beach, Florida.

11 Best on drums : PETE

Musician Pete Best is most famous as the first drummer with the Beatles. Famously, Best was sacked from the band by manager Brian Epstein. However, Epstein took this step reluctantly, and at the request of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison. Several stories have emerged about why the decision was made, but it seems that record producers at Parlophone were insisting that a session drummer be used in the band’s first recordings, and things snowballed from there. And of course, Best was soon replaced by Ringo Starr.

12 Cold War initials : USSR

The term “Cold War” was coined by novelist George Orwell in a 1945 essay about the atomic bomb. Orwell described a world under threat of nuclear war as having a “peace that is no peace”, in a permanent state of “cold war”. The specific use of “cold war” to describe the tension between the Eastern bloc and the Western allies is attributed to a 1947 speech by Bernard Baruch, adviser to Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

14 Predators named for their prey : ANTEATERS

Anteaters tear open ant and termite nests using their sharp claws and then eat up the eggs, larvae and mature ants using their tongues. They have very sticky saliva which coats the tongue hence making the feeding very efficient. The tongue also moves very quickly, flicking in and out of the mouth at about 150 times per minute.

24 Beach lotion meas. : SPF

In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

25 School URL ending : EDU

The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

27 NFL’s Cardinals, on scoreboards : ARI

The Arizona Cardinals were founded in 1898 as the Chicago Cardinals. That makes the Cardinals the oldest, continuously-run, professional football team in the whole country.

28 Bridge locales : CARD ROOMS

The version of the card game bridge that is played mostly today is contract bridge. Auction bridge is a similar game, and is a precursor to contract bridge.

29 Penguin predator : ORCA

Penguins are flightless, aquatic birds that spend half their lives on land, and half in the sea. All species of penguins, bar one, live in the southern hemisphere. The one species found north of the equator is the Galápagos penguin that is endemic to the Galápagos Islands located west of Ecuador. Adult male penguins are called cocks, females are hens, and the young are chicks. A group of penguins in the water is a raft, and on land is a waddle. Apt, and cute …

33 JavaScript lines, say : CODE

JavaScript is a computer programming language that is mainly used as an integral part of web browsers. The language was developed at Netscape in the days of the Browser Wars with Microsoft. It was developed under the codename Mocha and the first official release was called LiveScript. The name was changed to JavaScript in a blatant attempt by Netscape to cash in on the reputation of Sun Microsystem’s Java language.

34 “Famous” cookie guy : AMOS

Wally Amos was a talent agent, one who was in the habit of taking home-baked cookies with him as an enticement to get celebrities to see him. He was urged by friends to open a cookie store (the cookies were that delicious, I guess) and this he did in Los Angeles in 1975 using the name “Famous Amos”. The store was a smash hit and he was able to build on the success by introducing his cookies into supermarkets. The brand was eventually purchased, making Wally a rich man, and Famous Amos cookies are still flying off the shelf. Wally Amos also became an energetic literacy advocate. He hosted 30 TV programs in 1987 entitled “Learn to Read” that provided reading instruction targeted at adults.

39 Asian language : LAO

Lao, the language of Laos, does not use spaces between words (or periods!), although this is apparently changing. Spaces are used between sentences and clauses.

40 Road Runner frame : CEL

Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner are two much-loved cartoon characters from Warner Bros. Wile E. Coyote was created first, and Road Runner was invented as someone for Wile E. to play off. I love this cartoon; it’s definitely one of the best …

45 Beethoven’s “Waldstein,” e.g. : SONATA

In addition to 5 cello sonatas and 10 violin sonatas, Ludwig van Beethoven composed 35 piano sonatas. The most famous of his sonatas that have acquired names are probably the “Pathétique”, “Moonlight”, “Waldstein” and “Appassionata”. I should add that, until relatively recently, the count of Beethoven’s sonatas was accepted as 32. Nowadays, the total is said to include 3 previously uncounted sonatas, composed when he was just 12 years old.

47 Where to see strikes but not strikeouts : ALLEYS

In bowling, a spare is recorded on a score sheet with a forward slash mark. A strike is recorded with a large letter X.

52 One of three companies in the Seiko Group : EPSON

Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, and one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (with “EP” standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

Watch manufacturer Seiko was founded as a watch and jewelry shop in Tokyo in 1881. The store was opened by one Kintaro Hattori, who started to produce clocks under the name Seikosha, which can be translated as “House of Exquisite Workmanship”. The first Seiko watches went on sale in 1924, and today the company suggests that the name “Seiko” is Japanese for “exquisite” and “success”.

53 This clue has on : TYPO

There’s a typo; “on” should be “one”.

56 Symbol of wisdom : OWL

The Greek goddess Athena (sometimes “Athene”) is often associated with wisdom, among other attributes. In many representations. Athena is depicted with an owl sitting on her head. It is this linkage of the owl with the goddess of wisdom that led to today’s perception of the owl as being “wise”. Athena’s Roman counterpart was Minerva.

58 Amazon Fire TV Stick alternative : ROKU

Roku is a manufacturer of digital media players that allow access to audio and video programming over the Internet that is shown on television. Roku was founded in Los Gatos, California in 2002 by Anthony Wood. Wood chose the company name “Roku” as it is the Japanese word for “six”, and Roku is the sixth company that Wood founded. For what it’s worth, Rokus are my streaming devices of choice …

Fire TV is Amazon’s digital media player. It is used to deliver audio and video programming to televisions by picking up content from the Internet. I use the smaller version of the player, the Fire TV Stick, quite a lot when traveling.

59 Brew choices : ALES

The many, many different styles of beer can generally be sorted into two groups: ales and lagers. Ales are fermented at relatively warm temperatures for relatively short periods of time, and use top-fermenting yeasts, i.e. yeasts that float on top of the beer as it ferments. Lagers ferment at relatively low temperatures and for relatively long periods of time. Lagers use bottom-fermenting yeasts, i.e. yeasts that fall to the bottom of the beer as it ferments.

62 MLB’s Cardinals, on scoreboards : STL

The St. Louis Cardinals were originally called the “Brown Stockings”, changing their name to the “Perfectos” in 1899. That obviously didn’t go down well with the locals, as the owners changed it one year later to the Cardinals.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Spec. for tires : PSI
4 Alphabetical lunch : BLT
7 Show stoppers : ADS
10 PC component : CPU
13 Close to a delivery : IN LABOR
15 Searches, like a pig does for truffles : ROOTLES
17 Attending : GOING TO
18 Starts up again : REBOOTS
19 *Failed-delivery words : RETURN TO SENDER
21 Perfect spot : EDEN
22 Lease alternative : OWN
23 Bond, say : ASSET
26 Home of Triple-A baseball’s Rainiers : TACOMA
32 Order to leave : SCAT
35 Eyeroll inducer, perhaps, briefly : PDA
36 Not seen as much : RARER
37 *Arrives back at square one : COMES FULL CIRCLE
41 Worship : ADORE
42 Dubai’s fed. : UAE
43 Information : DATA
44 Diddles (around) : MESSES
46 __ opposite : POLAR
48 Granola bit : OAT
50 Folk tail? : -LORE
53 *Bamboozled … and what the circled letters, when connected in the proper sequence, can be? : THROWN FOR A LOOP
60 Incredulous response to an unexpected revelation : YOU WHAT?
61 Oxford campus : OLE MISS
63 Blow off some steam, maybe? : POLLUTE
64 Many a door opening : KEY SLOT
65 Neruda wrote one to “things” : ODE
66 Many a golfer’s aim : PAR
67 Naval initials : USS
68 46-yr.-old satire : SNL

Down

1 Wilbur of “Charlotte’s Web,” e.g. : PIG
2 It might keep you up : SNORE
3 “Fine, you got me” : I LIED
4 Many air rifles : BB GUNS
5 Trilogy with hobbits: Abbr. : LOTR
6 1982 sci-fi film set in a computer : TRON
7 Common keyboard symbol : ARROW
8 “It __ add up” : DOESN’T
9 Iced tea brand named for a Florida neighborhood : SOBE
10 Lump : CLOD
11 Best on drums : PETE
12 Cold War initials : USSR
14 Predators named for their prey : ANTEATERS
16 Overwhelming homework amount : TON
20 Equal, as a sum : TOTAL UP TO
24 Beach lotion meas. : SPF
25 School URL ending : EDU
27 NFL’s Cardinals, on scoreboards : ARI
28 Bridge locales : CARD ROOMS
29 Penguin predator : ORCA
30 Tuna __ : MELT
31 Geometry figure : AREA
32 Bit of trickery : SCAM
33 JavaScript lines, say : CODE
34 “Famous” cookie guy : AMOS
38 “Get the picture?” : SEE?
39 Asian language : LAO
40 Road Runner frame : CEL
45 Beethoven’s “Waldstein,” e.g. : SONATA
47 Where to see strikes but not strikeouts : ALLEYS
49 Subsequently : AFTER
51 Stirs up : ROILS
52 One of three companies in the Seiko Group : EPSON
53 This clue has on : TYPO
54 Rain protection : HOOD
55 “No shirt, no shoes, no service,” e.g. : RULE
56 Symbol of wisdom : OWL
57 Demolish : WHUP
58 Amazon Fire TV Stick alternative : ROKU
59 Brew choices : ALES
62 MLB’s Cardinals, on scoreboards : STL

22 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 22 Oct 21, Friday”

  1. No errors. Quick run. Using one of today’s punny answers, I WHUPPED it.
    Did not know OLE MISS was in OXFORD.

  2. Under 15 minutes for me, which is terrific for a Friday. On the other hand, it wasn’t very hard. I totally ignored the circles.

  3. 11:41

    After changing SAYWHAT to YOUWHAT, did a bunch of do-evers in the southwest corner. Then I collected the circles and tried to sort them out. I managed to come up with GONE RAMBO. Nope. Still bad at anagrams.

  4. 25:52 – 4 lookups/1 typo

    As a newb, I’m just thrilled to finish a Friday without too many (4) cheats.

    I can remember about 6 months ago I had lotsa trouble with Mondays.

    To any other newbs, there’s hope!

    Be Well

  5. i could not for the life of me get “typo” — and I thought about changing whip to whup which would have helped! but pollute for “blow off steam” is a really bad/misleading answer/clue combo. Otherwise, easy for a friday and got everything else right!

  6. Slightly confusing Friday for me; took 23:45 with no errors or peeks, albeit with a vowel roll on S_BE to finish. Had a little trouble in the SE and a big mess in the SW, where I finally backed out sayWHAT and THROW. Put back OWL, ventured in ODE and put THROW back in. That revealed the unsatisfying POLLUTE and WHUP, which just left the S_BE to finish.

    I gave a feeble effort to solve the theme after I finished, but to no avail. At least I finished with no errors!!

  7. Fairly easy for a Friday. I use Epson for my printers and did not know about how the name came about. 63A should not have pollute as the answer. Where’s the editor when we need one?

  8. Since the 53d clue was printed as intended, there was no error in it and therefore ‘typo’, short for ‘typographical error’ (mistake/misprint/mistake in printing/typesetting) can not be the correct answer.

    Water vapor is not a pollutant. It is not even a “Pollutant, maybe?”

    No need to even comment on ‘whup’.

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