LA Times Crossword Answers 1 May 15, Friday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Max Carpenter
THEME: Double U … we are missing the letter W in today’s grid as each time it is used, it is replaced with the letter sequence “UU”, i.e. DOUBLE-U:

64A. Letter that hints at how 18 answers in this puzzle should be filled in DOUBLE-U (W)

17A. Tennis shot delivered from between one’s legs TUUEENER (tweener)
20A. Duo TUUO (two)
22A. Conference, informally POUUUUOUU (powwow)
37A. Blogosphere backdrop UUORLD UUIDE UUEB (World Wide Web)
44A. Quarterback’s target: Abbr. UUR (WR)
48A. Socially inept AUUKUUARD (awkward)
58A. Slapstick performer CLOUUN (clown)
2D. Sad LOUU (low)
6D. Really let loose RAN UUILD (ran wild)
7D. All over again ANEUU (anew)
10D. Declare AVOUU (avow)
25D. High-profile caucus locale IOUUA (Iowa)
33D. Function UUORK (work)
36D. Rod with power UUAND (wand)
38D. Court case LAUUSUIT (lawsuit)
45D. Pigtailed redhead in a restaurant logo UUENDY (Wendy)
48D. Leather craftsperson’s beltful AUULS (awls)
50D. Hospital division UUARD (ward)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Math course ALGEBRA
Algebra is a branch of mathematics in which arithmetical operations are performed on variables rather than specific numbers (x,y etc). The term “algebra” comes from the Arabic “al jebr” meaning “reunion of broken parts”.

8. Oslo Accords participant ARAFAT
Yasser (also Yasir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father’s funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat’s explanation was that he wanted to “study the mentality” of the Jewish people.

The Oslo Accords grew out of secret negotiations between the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel in a residence in Oslo in the early nineties. The delegates shared the same house while they conducted 14 meetings. While eating all their meals together at the same table, the negotiators came to respect one another and apparently friendships developed.

17. Tennis shot delivered from between one’s legs TUUEENER (tweener)
The tennis shot known as a “tweener” is a defensive measure, performed by hitting the tennis ball between the player’s own legs, with the back turned towards the net. The shot was created by the Argentine player Guillermo Vilas, and so it is often referred to a “Gran Willy”, as “Guillermo” is Spanish for “William”.

18. Cold-climate coat ANORAK
Anoraks aren’t very popular over here in America. Everyone has one in Ireland! An anorak is a heavy jacket with a hood, often lined with fur (or fake fur), and is an invention of the Inuit people.

21. Almond Joy cousin MOUNDS
I think my favorite candy growing up was an Almond Joy, although in my part of the world it was a little different formulation and was called a Bounty Bar (and was more like a Mounds bar). The Almond Joy bar has been around since 1946.

22. Conference, informally POUUUUOUU (powwow)
A “pow-wow” is a gathering, a term used by Native Americans. The term derives from the Algonquian Narragansett word “powwow” which means “spiritual leader”. The Narragansett also gave us such words as “moose”, “papoose” and “squash”.

24. Suit at a shoot BIKINI
The origin of the name “bikini”, a type of bathing suit, seems very uncertain. My favorite story is that it is named after the Bikini Atoll, site of American A-bomb tests in the forties and fifties. The name “bikini” was chosen for the swim-wear because of the “explosive” effect it had on men who saw a woman wearing the garment!

27. Nine-digit no. SSN
A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot, as since 2011 SSN’s are assigned randomly.

28. Secretly send a dupe email to BCC
A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

32. Large moth LUNA
The lime-green Luna Moth is one of the largest moths found in North America, growing to a wingspan of up to 4½ inches.

35. Spicy Indian dish CURRY
Curry powder is a mixture of spices used in South Asian cuisine. The actual composition of curry powder varies depending on the cuisine.

37. Blogosphere backdrop UUORLD UUIDE UUEB (World Wide Web)
The World Wide Web (WWW) was effectively the invention of British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee. The key to Berner-Lee’s invention was bringing together two technologies that already existed: hypertext and the Internet. I for one am very grateful …

40. Oklahoma city TULSA
Tulsa is the second-largest city in the state of Oklahoma (after Oklahoma City). Tulsa started out as a settlement established by the Loachapoka and Creek Native American tribes in 1836. These early settlers called their new home “Tallasi” meaning “old town”, and this name morphed into “Tulsa” that we use today.

41. Marriott competitor OMNI
Omni Hotels & Resorts is headquartered in Irvine, California and has properties in the US, Canada and Mexico.

43. IBM-inspired villain HAL
In Arthur C. Clarke’s “Space Odyssey” (famously adapted for the big screen as “2001: A Space Odyssey”) the computer system that went rogue was called HAL 9000, or simply “HAL”. The abbreviation “HAL” stands for Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic computer. Even though, Clarke denied it, there’s a good argument that can be made that “HAL” is a veiled reference to IBM, the big player in the world of computing at the time of the novel’s publication (1968), as the acronym HAL is just a one-letter shift from the initials “IBM”.

44. Quarterback’s target: Abbr. UUR (WR)
Wide receiver (WR)

54. Apartment manager, for short SUPE
“Supe” is short for “supervisor”.

55. Chronological start? CEE
The letter C (cee) starts the word “chronological”.

58. Slapstick performer CLOUUN (clown)
“Slapstick” is a physical comedy, horseplay. Back in the late 19th century, the term described a device made from two sticks loosely fastened together, which could be “slapped” together to create a sound effect offstage. The sound effect added to the laugh when a clown or actor was given a slap on stage.

61. Geometry giant EUCLID
Euclid of Alexandria was a Greek mathematician who was active around 300 BC, and who is often referred to as the “Father of Geometry”. Euclid wrote a famous book called “Elements” on the subject of mathematics, a book that was so enduring that it was used as the main textbook for the subject right up to the late 19th century.

64. Letter that hints at how 18 answers in this puzzle should be filled in DOUBLE-U (W)
We call our letter W a “double u” simply because that is what it looks like, two letters U written side-by-side.

Down
1. ABA member ATTY
A attorney (atty.) might be a member of the American Bar Association (ABA).

5. Jacques Cartier or Jules Verne, e.g. BRETON
A Breton is a native of Brittany. Brittany is a large peninsula in the northwest of France, known in French as “Bretagne”.

Jacques Cartier was a French explorer who is best remembered as the man who claimed Canada for France. Cartier first used the word “Canada” to describe the area around what we now call the St. Lawrence River. He transcribed the Saint-Lawrence Iroquoian word “Kanata”, meaning “village, settlement”, as “Canada”.

Jules Verne really was a groundbreaking author. Verne pioneered the science fiction genre, writing about space, air and underwater travel, long before they were practical and proved feasible. Verne is the second most translated author of all time, with only Agatha Christie beating him out.

8. Los __, New Mexico ALAMOS
The town of Los Alamos, New Mexico takes its name from the Spanish for “the poplars” or “the cottonwoods”. Famously, it is home to Los Alamos National Laboratory which was founded during WWII to work on the Manhattan Project, the development of the first atomic bomb. The town of Los Alamos didn’t exist as such, until it was planned and constructed to support the employees working on development of the bomb.

12. “__-in His Lamp”: Bugs Bunny cartoon A-LAD
“A-Lad-In His Lamp” is a 1948 Bugs Bunny cartoon with the famous Mel Blanc providing the voices of Bugs Bunny and Bugs’ nemesis in the piece, the Caliph Hassa Pfeiffer. Smokey the Genie was voiced by Jim Backus (who later voiced Mr. Magoo), in one of his first professional screen roles.

15. Slacks, briefly TROU
“Trou” is short for “trousers”.

The term “slacks” was introduced in the early 1800s with the the meaning “loose trousers”. Those early slacks were part of a military uniform.

23. Bolt with great speed USAIN
Usain Bolt is a Jamaican sprinter who won the 100m and 200m race gold medals in both the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games. Back in Jamaica, Bolt was really into cricket and probably would have been a very successful fast bowler had he not hit the track instead.

24. “Arrested Development” surname BLUTH
Jason Bateman is an actor from Rye, New York who is most associated with the role of Michael Bluth on TV’s “Arrested Development”. Jason’s older sister is Justine Bateman, who played Mallory Keaton on the show “Family Ties”.

“Arrested Development” is a sitcom that originally aired on Fox from 2003 to 2006. Ron Howard was heavily involved in the show behind the camera, serving as executive producer and also as the show’s narrator. Fifteen new episodes of “Arrested Development” were filmed specifically for release on Netflix in 2013, and there may even be a movie on the way.

25. High-profile caucus locale IOUUA (Iowa)
The Iowa caucuses have been the first major electoral event in the nominating process for President since 1972.

29. Minos’ kingdom CRETE
Minos was the King of Crete in Greek mythology, and the son of Zeus and Europa. Minos had an elaborate labyrinth built in Crete, designed by the architect Daedalus and his son Icarus (who famously died trying to escape from the island by “flying” away). In the labyrinth, King Minos kept the Minotaur, a dreadful creature with the head of a bull on the body of a man.

30. Modern crime head? CYBER-
Cybercrime, a nasty business …

34. O.T. book NUM
The Book of Numbers in the Hebrew and Christian Bibles relates much of the journey of Moses and the Israelites from Egypt to the promised land. The title comes from the numbering of the people that is described in the beginning of the book.

39. “The Wolf of Wall Street” star DICAPRIO
Hollywood star Leonardo DiCaprio is from Los Angeles, California. DiCaprio’s mother was visiting a museum in Italy when she was pregnant and felt the first kick of her unborn child. At the moment of that first kick, Mama DiCaprio was looking at a painting by Leonardo da Vinci, and so named her son Leonardo.

“The Wolf of Wall Street” is an entertaining 2013 biographical film about a corrupt New York City stockbroker. The movie is based on a memoir of the same name by Jordan Belfort. Directed by Martin Scorsese, it is his highest-grossing movie to date.

45. Pigtailed redhead in a restaurant logo UUENDY (Wendy)
Famously, the Wendy’s chain of fast food restaurants was founded by Dave Thomas, in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. Dave named his establishment after his fourth child, Melina Lou “Wendy” Thomas.

47. 1974 Mocedades hit ERES TU
We have a big event across Europe every year called the Eurovision Song Contest. Each nation enters one song in competition with each other, and then voters across the whole continent decide on the winner. That’s how ABBA got their big break when they won in 1974 with “Waterloo”. In 1973, Spain’s entry was “Eres tú” (the Spanish for “You Are”) sung by the band Mocedades. “Eres tu” came second in the competition, but should have won in my humble opinion.

49. DOD branch USMC
The US Marine Corps (USMC) is the smallest of the four branches in the US Department of Defense (DOD).

51. __-deucey ACEY
Acey-deucy is a fast-played variant of backgammon. Apparently the game has been a favorite with members of the armed forces since the days of WWI.

53. Partner of Caesar COCA
Famously, Imogene Coca performed opposite Sid Caesar on NBC’s “Your Show of Shows” in the fifties.

55. Swedish King __ XVI Gustaf CARL
King Carl XVI Gustaf is the reigning King of Sweden, having ascended to the throne in 1973. In 1980, Sweden became the first European country to adopt a law transmitting title and property to the firstborn, regardless of gender. As a result, the King’s eldest daughter, Crown Prince Victoria, is now the heir apparent to the Swedish throne.

56. “Night” author Wiesel ELIE
Elie Wiesel is a holocaust survivor, best known for his book “Night” that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

57. Isaac’s hirsute son ESAU
Esau, was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born to Isaac and Rebekah, the event was described, “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

“Hirsute” means “hairy”. The Latin word “hirsutus” means “rough, shaggy”.

60. N.T. book HEB
The Epistle to the Hebrews is a book in the Christian New Testament, with an unknown author.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Math course ALGEBRA
8. Oslo Accords participant ARAFAT
14. Broad-minded TOLERANT
16. Ranks LEVELS
17. Tennis shot delivered from between one’s legs TUUEENER (tweener)
18. Cold-climate coat ANORAK
19. “Sounds good!” YUM!
20. Duo TUUO (two)
21. Almond Joy cousin MOUNDS
22. Conference, informally POUUUUOUU (powwow)
24. Suit at a shoot BIKINI
27. Nine-digit no. SSN
28. Secretly send a dupe email to BCC
31. Unique LONE
32. Large moth LUNA
35. Spicy Indian dish CURRY
37. Blogosphere backdrop UUORLD UUIDE UUEB (World Wide Web)
40. Oklahoma city TULSA
41. Marriott competitor OMNI
42. One way to get a hand ANTE
43. IBM-inspired villain HAL
44. Quarterback’s target: Abbr. UUR (WR)
46. One targeting the quarterback CENTER
48. Socially inept AUUKUUARD (awkward)
51. Point one’s finger at ACCUSE
54. Apartment manager, for short SUPE
55. Chronological start? CEE
58. Slapstick performer CLOUUN (clown)
59. Ceremoniously ushers MARSHALS
61. Geometry giant EUCLID
62. Yardsticks CRITERIA
63. Like the smell of rising dough YEASTY
64. Letter that hints at how 18 answers in this puzzle should be filled in DOUBLE-U (W)

Down
1. ABA member ATTY
2. Sad LOUU (low)
3. Sad GLUM
4. Broad shoe size EEE
5. Jacques Cartier or Jules Verne, e.g. BRETON
6. Really let loose RAN UUILD (ran wild)
7. All over again ANEUU (anew)
8. Los __, New Mexico ALAMOS
9. Formally abandon RENOUNCE
10. Declare AVOUU (avow)
11. Fronded bit of flora FERN
12. “__-in His Lamp”: Bugs Bunny cartoon A-LAD
13. Impatient utterances TSKS
15. Slacks, briefly TROU
22. Strolling areas PIERS
23. Bolt with great speed USAIN
24. “Arrested Development” surname BLUTH
25. High-profile caucus locale IOUUA (Iowa)
26. Hillock KNOLL
28. Main impact BRUNT
29. Minos’ kingdom CRETE
30. Modern crime head? CYBER-
33. Function UUORK (work)
34. O.T. book NUM
36. Rod with power UUAND (wand)
38. Court case LAUUSUIT (lawsuit)
39. “The Wolf of Wall Street” star DICAPRIO
45. Pigtailed redhead in a restaurant logo UUENDY (Wendy)
47. 1974 Mocedades hit ERES TU
48. Leather craftsperson’s beltful AUULS (awls)
49. DOD branch USMC
50. Hospital division UUARD (ward)
51. __-deucey ACEY
52. Footprint, maybe CLUE
53. Partner of Caesar COCA
55. Swedish King __ XVI Gustaf CARL
56. “Night” author Wiesel ELIE
57. Isaac’s hirsute son ESAU
60. N.T. book HEB

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18 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 1 May 15, Friday”

  1. Good morning everyone.

    My bar for stupidity has been raised
    rather high lately,
    but this puzzle cleared it
    wearing street shoes!

    Have a great day all!

  2. My bar for stupidity has also been raised! This puzzle really tops it!
    It took a twisted mind to write this on!

  3. sure do agree with those other comments stupidest puzzle I have ever looked at in my life

  4. I'm waiting for a flight home, the taste of turtle soup and crawfish etouffee still in my mind…and plenty of wine.

    I'm 20 minutes in to this thing, and abandoning it in protest. I feel like I'm in a Monty Python skit, and Graham Chapman will eventually come along and tell me, "Stop that, now…much too silly."

  5. UUOUU!Just plain AUUFUL!!

    Yes – at first this puzzle was aggravating, and after I figured out the "theme" it morphed into annoying.

    I had YALTA for 25D High-profile conference. Wrong. TSK for IMPATIENT?? I see TSK as being used for admonishment not as a sign of impatience. One more reason to be aggravated. COCA for Ceasar partner really escaped me. OK one clever thing in the puzzle…

    On the good side – the etymology of ALGEBRA was interesting. I also didn't know curry was a mixture. I thought it was a spice like any other…ie like it was grown from curry plants or something.

    Lastly – 54A I saw SUPE as short for superintendent as in the super of the building rather than Bill's explanation of a supervisor.

    Just my TUUO CENTS UUorth – UGH!!!!

    Best –

  6. OK I get it. UU for W.
    Willie D. I'm with you. I absolutely refuse to spend another second on probably the lamest stinking pile of you-know-what I've ever come across.
    No one in their right mind would ever accept and publish this crap.

  7. How are we supposed to know what you think of the puzzle, Pookie, if you won't express your feelings??!! 🙂

  8. I enjoyed this puzzle about as much as those "heretics" enjoyed their auto-da-fé experience at the hands of the Inquisidor General Tomás de Torquemada. It uuas one of the uuorst experiences of my puzzle solving lifetime. Uuhat a uuaste of time.

  9. If you're going to play these silly games, state so up front so we don't waste our time. This one, definitely was stupid.

  10. Well, Wee Willie Winkie – I guess I'm the only one who/uuho liked it.

    Since I was in a diner in the boonies with nothing else to do, I spent the whole/uuhole afternoon on it – and did finish! but not the mountain of spaghetti in front of me. TWEENER/TUUEENER was/uuas the only word/uuord I hated, but I would have hated it anyway, since it's sports.

    I was/uuas dying to see how/houu long it took our host. No problem, eh?

    How/houu many u's were/uuere there?
    34, I think. Quite a challenge conquered, for me.

  11. Jeff at 9:53 am

    Curry powder = a generic name for a mixture of spices, used to make a curry, dry or wet ( depending on the amount of gravy desired – ).

    Curry = the dish which is produced using the above powder.

    Curry Plant a normally BARELY INEDIBLE plant that smells like … what curry might smell like. See paragragh Number 4, for explanation…. This plant is not used in any curries – just smells like one.@#*#

    On the other hand, a Curry tree, has leaves, which are predictably, called curry leaves, and these leaves are very edible, and when roasted or sauteed in oil, are indispensible for much of some indian cooking. A couple of leaves are enough – the curry leaves sell for $ 66 per lb. at Whole Foods. You may need $ 0.20 worth.

    But, with diversity of curry powder, I would guess that over 75% of the curry powders do not use these curry leaves in their formulation, whatsoever.

    Hope this helps.

  12. This has to be one of the worst puzzles I have seen, no fun in trying to solve this, way out in left field, Boo.

  13. Jeff, forgot to say something about TROU and TWEENER ( I refuse to use the blasted UU). Are you KIDDING ME???!!!!
    How about MOUS for moustache? Who says "I bought TROU yesterday at the mall?"
    Vidwan, I knew you'd set the record straight on CURRY.
    $66 a pound, you say?
    Here is Rich Norris' email to submit a puzzle
    xwordrich@aol.com
    I'm going to tell him just what I think of this atrocity.
    If I want gimmicks (which I don't) I'd subscribe to "I'm-so-clever-and-you'll-never-get-it" NY Times.
    Carrie, you've got to weigh in on this one!!

  14. TERRIBLE!! Always hate when puzzles use misspellings, but this one was the worst.
    I noticed a lot of the fillers were easier than a typical Friday, but that's small consolation.
    @Sfingi, congrats on finishing this thing!
    Myself,I never want to look at another "U", and I'm calling in sick for Saturday's grid — gotta recover.
    Enjoy the weekend, all!
    :-

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