LA Times Crossword Answers 24 May 15, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Mark Bickham
THEME: Hatch Job … each of today’s themed answers contains a type of bird as a hidden. That is, we have a collection of NESTING BIRDS:

104A. Signs of spring that are literally hidden in the answers to starred clues NESTING BIRDS
25A. *Dreamt of ALWAYS WANTED (hiding “swan”)
27A. *Type of surplus store ARMY NAVY (hiding “myna”)
32A. *Forgot the past STARTED OVER (hiding “dove”)
64A. *Yellow Monopoly property VENTNOR AVENUE (hiding “raven”)
94A. *School in-crowd POPULAR KIDS (hiding “lark”)
101A. *Tape width, perhaps HALF INCH (hiding “finch”)
33D. *”Be My Baby” singers THE RONETTES (hiding “heron”)
38D. *Alpine feline SNOW LEOPARD (hiding “owl”)
49D. *Like some flats LOW-RENT (hiding “wren”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. 1996 Olympic tennis gold medalist AGASSI
Renowned tennis professional Andre Agassi wrote an autobiography called “Open”, published in 2009. An amazing revelation in the book is that Agassi’s famous head of hair was actually a wig for much of his playing career. Can you imagine how hard it must have been to play tennis at his level with a rug stuck on?

14. Track fastener SPIKE
I think that the reference here is to the use of spikes to fasten railroad tracks to railroad ties.

19. Jim Brickman fan, perhaps NEW AGER
Jim Brickman is a songwriter and pianist whose name is associated with New Age music. Brickman has also been hosting his own radio show since 1997 called “Your Weekend with Jim Brickman”.

21. Darlings’ creator BARRIE
The author and dramatist J.M. Barrie is best remembered as the creator of Peter Pan. Barrie wrote a play in 1904 called “Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up”. He turned this into a novel called “Peter and Wendy” in 1911. The girl’s name “Wendy” was very uncommon before Barrie named his character, and he is given credit for making the name as popular as it is today.

In J.M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Peter takes takes Wendy Darling and her two brothers on adventures on the island of Neverland.

23. Dishes set in gelatin ASPICS
Aspic is a dish in which the main ingredients are served in a gelatin made from meat stock. “Aspic” is a French word for “jelly”.

24. Canine coat? ENAMEL
Tooth enamel covers the crowns of our teeth. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. It is composed of 96% crystalline calcium phosphate.

The canine teeth of a mammal are also called the eye teeth. The name “canine” is used because these particular teeth are very prominent in dogs. The name “eye” is used because in humans the eye teeth are located in the upper jaw, directly below the eyes.

27. *Type of surplus store ARMY NAVY (hiding “myna”)
Some species of myna (also “mynah”) bird are known for their ability to imitate sounds.

30. Equal ARE
For example, two fives equal/are ten.

37. Dope (out) SUSS
The verb “to suss” means “to figure out”. The term originated in the 1950s as police slang, a shortening of “to suspect”.

38. Eponymous Belgian town SPA
The word “spa” migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name “Spa” comes from the Walloon word “espa” meaning “spring, fountain”.

41. Nincompoop SCHMO
“Schmo” (also “shmo”) is American slang for a dull or boring person, from the Yiddish word “shmok”.

The word “nincompoop”, meaning a fool, seems to have been around for quite a while. It has been used since the 1670s, but no one appears to know its origins.

42. German article DER
“Der”, “die” and “das” are German words meaning “the”. “Der” is used with a masculine noun, “die” with a feminine noun and “das” with a neuter noun.

44. War of the Ring force ENTS
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth in his series of books “The Lord of the Rings”. “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

55. Hinduism’s Chandra, e.g. MOON GOD
Chandra is a moon god in the Hindu tradition. Chandra rides his chariot across the night sky, pulled by an antelope and ten white horses.

57. 2005 horror sequel SAW II
The “Saw” franchise of movies is gruesome in the extreme. I’ve only seen a few minutes of “Saw” footage (accidentally). The stories are about imprisoned victims who are faced with having to mutilate themselves to escape. Ugh …

58. Singer Tori AMOS
Tori Amos is an American pianist and singer. Amos started playing the piano at two years old, and was composing piano pieces by age five. She was playing in piano bars (chaperoned by her father) when she was 14. I’m going to have to find some of her music (I lead such a sheltered life …)!

61. Scottish export TWEED
Tweed is a rough woolen fabric very much associated with Scotland in the UK, and County Donegal in Ireland. The cloth was originally called “tweel”, the Scots word for “twill”. Apparently a London merchant misinterpreted some handwriting in the early 1800s and assumed the fabric was called “tweed”, a reference to the Scottish River Tweed, and the name stuck …

62. Where texts are often read CELL
Texts are often read on a cell phone.

63. ISP option MSN
The Microsoft Network (MSN) used to be an Internet service provider (ISP). These days, MSN is mainly a web portal.

64. *Yellow Monopoly property VENTNOR AVENUE (hiding “raven”)
Ventnor Avenue is a property in the game of Monopoly. The street names in the US version of Monopoly are locations in or around Atlantic City, New Jersey.

73. Bouncer’s handful SOT
Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning a fool. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

83. Potters’ wheels, e.g. LATHES
A potter’s wheel is sometimes referred to as a potter’s lathe. I guess a potter’s wheel resembles a lathe in that the material being worked (the clay) is rotated about an axis so that a tool (the hands, usually) can shape it.

85. Home of Mandrake the Magician XANADU
“Mandrake the Magician” is a comic strip that was created by Lee Falk in 1934. Some folks hold that Mandrake was the comic world’s first superhero. Mandrake lives in a high-tech home called Xanadu.

86. Part of BOGOF FREE
Buy one, get one free (BOGOF)

87. Annoyances RUBS
Here are some famous lines from Hamlet’s “To be or not to be” soliloquy:

To die — to sleep.
To sleep — perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub!

A “rub” is a difficulty or obstruction. The usage predates Shakespeare, and comes from the game of lawn bowls in which a rub is a fault in the bowling surface.

89. They’re often found in mice AAS
AA batteries might be found in a computer mouse.

91. Sign of an omission CARET
The character known as a caret was originally a proofreading mark, used to indicate where a punctuation mark was to be inserted. “Caret” is Latin for “it lacks”.

93. Deere rival TORO
Toro is a manufacturer of mainly lawn mowers and snow removal equipment based in Bloomington, Minnesota. The company was started in 1914 to build tractor engines.

99. Game with an Angry Birds version UNO
In my youth I remember being taught a great card game, by a German acquaintance of mine, called Mau Mau. Years later I discovered that Uno is basically the same game, but played with a purpose-printed deck instead of the regular deck of playing cards that’s used for Mau Mau. I hear that Mau Mau is derived from the game called Crazy Eights.

Angry Birds is a video game that was developed for smartphones. Angry Birds is the third most downloaded game, after Tetris and Pac-Man.

100. Cal. column TUE
Týr (sometimes “Tīw”, “Tius” or “Tio”) is the Norse god of single combat, victory and heroic glory. Our “Tuesday” is in fact “Tīw’s Day”.

111. Tennyson’s “lily maid of Astolat” ELAINE
“The Lady of Shalott” is a beautiful poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. The storyline is based on the Arthurian legend of Elaine of Astolat. The opening lines are:

On either side the river lie
Long fields of barley and of rye,
That clothe the wold and meet the sky.
And thro’ the field the road runs by
To many-tower’d Camelot.

112. Cuthbert of “24” ELISHA
Elisha Cuthbert is a Canadian actress who came to world attention playing Kim Bauer, Jack Bauer’s daughter on TV’s “24”. After “24”, Cuthbert played one of the lead characters on the sitcom “Happy Endings” that ran from 2011 to 2013.

114. Steak __ TARTARE
What we now call steak tartare was first served in French restaurants in the early 1900s, and back then was called steak à l’Americaine, would you believe? It was basically raw, seasoned beef mixed with egg yolk. A later version of l’Americaine, without the egg yolk and with tartar sauce served on the side, was called steak tartare. Over time the two versions became one, and the steak tartare moniker won out. By the way, if you order steak tartare in Switzerland, I believe you are served horse meat.

118. Downed with a jolt TASED
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called “Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle”. The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym TASER stands for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle”.

119. Wheelhouse SPHERE
The idiom “in one’s wheelhouse” means “within one’s area of expertise”.

120. Elizabeth I or Prince Harry REDHEAD
The Elizabethan Era, the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, is considered by many to be the golden age of English history, the age of Shakespeare and the English Renaissance. Elizabeth I was the last sovereign of the House of Tudor, the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn.

Prince William is second in line to the British throne, after his father Prince Charles, with Prince Harry holding the third spot. Prince Harry moved down the list when William and Kate had their first child George. The law was changed in 2011 so that the oldest child of Prince William and Kate Middleton would be next in line, regardless of sex. Up until 2011, sons took precedence, even over older daughters.

Down
1. Sapa __: ancient South American ruler INCA
“Sapa Inca” was the name given to the ruler of the Kingdom of Cusco and then the Emperor of the Inca Empire. The last in the Sapa Inca line was Atahualpa, who was executed by the Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro.

2. Jodie Foster title role NELL
“Nell” is a thoughtful drama film from 1994 starring Jodie Foster in the title role, playing a young woman who had been raised by her mother in isolation, away from all human contact. Nell is discovered as an untamed child and gradually introduced into society. The movie is a screen adaptation of a play by Mark Handley called “Idioglossia”.

3. Relative of IMO FWIW
For what it’s worth (FWIW)

In my opinion (IMO)

4. Collector’s suffix -IANA
The suffix “-iana” is a variant of “-ana”.

An ana (plural “anas”) is a collection, perhaps of literature, that represents the character of a particular place or a person. Ana can be used as a noun or as a suffix (e.g. Americana).

6. Sics on LETS AT
“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

8. Jackson with a 2015 “Keepin’ It Country” tour ALAN
Alan Jackson is a country music singer, and a bit of an author too. Jackson married his high school sweetheart in 1979, but they had a parting of the ways about twenty years later due to the pressures on the marriage from Jackson’s career. The pair reconciled, and Jackson wrote a book describing the relationship he has with his wife and his commitment to Christianity. The book is called “It’s All About Him: Finding the Love of My Life”, and it topped the New York Times Bestseller List.

9. Austrian painter Klimt GUSTAV
Gustav Klimt was an Austrian painter who primarily painted the female body, often producing works that were described as erotic. One of Klimt’s most famous paintings was “The Kiss” completed in 1908.

10. Word in current news? AMPERE
The unit of electric current is the ampere, abbreviated correctly to “A” rather than “amp”. It is named after French physicist André-Marie Ampère, one of the main scientists responsible for the discovery of electromagnetism.

12. Texas A&M joined it in 2012 SEC
Southeastern Conference (SEC)

Texas A&M is the seventh largest university in the country, and was the first public higher education institute in the state when it accepted its first students in 1876. The full name of the school was the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas and its primary mission used to be the education of males in the techniques of farming and military warfare. That’s quite a combination! Because of the agricultural connection, the college’s sports teams use the moniker “Aggies”.

14. Some HDTVs SANYOS
Sanyo is a Japanese electronics manufacturer based near Osaka and founded in 1947. The company name means “three oceans” reflecting the company’s original aim to sell its products all around the world (across three oceans: the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian).

16. “Joy of Cooking” author Rombauer IRMA
Irma Rombauer was the author of the famous cookbook “The Joy Of Cooking”. Rombauer self-published the book back in 1931 in St. Louis, Missouri. She and her family continued to publish privately as demand was high, and then a commercial printing house picked it up in 1936. “The Joy of Cooking” has been in print continuously ever since.

17. Capital ESE of Warsaw KIEV
Kiev is the capital of Ukraine and a beautiful city, from what I’ve heard from friends who have visited …

”Warszawa” is a song written by David Bowie and Brian Eno, released in 1977. “Warszawa” is the Polish word for “Warsaw”.

26. Puff __ ADDER
There are several species of venomous snakes that are referred to as puff adders. The so called common puff adder is more correctly called the Bitis arietans. The most widespread snake in Africa, the common puff adder is responsible for more snakebite fatalities on the continent than any other snake.

33. *”Be My Baby” singers THE RONETTES (hiding “heron”)
The Ronettes were a sixties “girl group” from New York City who worked with famed record producer Phil Spector. Their most famous hit was probably “Be My Baby” from 1963. The lead singer of the group was Veronica Bennett, who ended up marrying Spector in 1968. Veronica left him in 1974 to become “Ronnie” Spector, “the original bad girl of rock and roll”.

35. “American Pastoral” Pulitzer-winning writer ROTH
Author Philip Roth’s two most famous works are probably his 1959 novella “Goodbye, Columbus” for which he won a National Book Award, and his extremely controversial 1969 novel “Portnoy’s Complaint”. The latter title was banned in some libraries in the US, and was listed as a “prohibited import” in Australia. The controversy surrounded Roth’s treatment of the sexuality of the main character, a young Jewish bachelor undergoing psychoanalysis for his “complaint”.

Several Philip Roth novels feature the character Nathan Zuckerman as the protagonist and author. Acclaimed title’s in the Zuckerman series are “American Pastoral” (1997) and “The Human Stain” (2000).

36. City near Provo OREM
Orem, Utah was originally known as “Sharon” (a Biblical name), then “Provo Bench”, and in 1914 it was given the family name of a local railroad operator called “Orem”. Orem gave itself the nickname “Family City USA” and sure enough in 2010, “Forbes” rated Orem the 5th best place in the country to raise a family.

Provo, Utah is a city located just over 40 miles south of South Lake City. Provo is home to Brigham Young University. The city was originally called Fort Utah, and the name was changed to Provo in 1850 in honor of Étienne Provost. Provost was a French-Canadian fur trader who was perhaps the first man of European descent to see the Great Salt Lake.

38. *Alpine feline SNOW LEOPARD (hiding “owl”)
Snow leopards are creatures that tend to keep to themselves, living in high ground in the mountain ranges of Central and South Asia. Given that they are so “secretive” estimates of the size of the snow leopard population are pretty rough, with perhaps 3,500 to 7,000 in the wild.

40. Wine commonly served chilled ASTI
Asti is in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy. The region is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine.

43. Beersheba’s region NEGEV
The Negev is a desert region in southern Israel. The largest city in the Negev is Beersheba.

44. Series ender ET AL
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

46. Feature of some Roy Rogers numbers YODEL
Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers’ real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was “King of the Cowboys”. Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans’ nickname was “Queen of the West”.

49. *Like some flats LOW-RENT (hiding “wren”)
“Flat” is a word more commonly used in the British Isles than here. A flat is basically an apartment or condominium. The word “flat” is Scottish in origin, in which language it meant a “floor in a house”.

54. Weigh station unit TON
Here in the US, a ton is equivalent to 2,000 pounds. Over in the UK, a ton is 2,240 pounds. The UK unit is sometimes referred to as an Imperial ton or sometimes a “long ton”. Folks over there refer to the US ton then as a “short ton”. To further complicate matters, there is also a “metric ton” or “tonne”, which is equivalent to 2,204 pounds. I wish we’d just stick to kilograms …

56. The __: Horace works ODES
One of Ancient Rome’s leading lyric poets was Quintus Horatius Flaccus, or “Horace” as we tend to know him. One of Horace’s most famous works is his collection of Latin lyric poems titled “Carmina” (Latin for “Odes).

62. Polish brand CUTEX
Cutex introduced the first liquid nail polish in 1917. That polish was basically automobile paint.

64. Credit giant VISA
A visa is a usually a stamp in one’s passport, an indication that one is authorized to enter a particular country. The word “visa” comes into English, via French, from the Latin expression “charta visa” meaning “paper that has been seen”, or “verified paper”.

66. Crunched things, for short NOS
An abbreviation for the word “number” is “no.” The “no.” is short for the Latin word “numero” meaning “with the number”.

68. Large groups HORDES
A “horde” is a large crowd. “Horde” ultimately derives from the Turkish “ordu” that means “camp, army”.

69. Weevil feature SNOUT
A weevil is a small beetle, known for the damage that it can do to crops. The boll weevil damages cotton plants by laying eggs inside cotton bolls. The young weevils then eat their way out. Some weevils have snouts that are as long as their body.

74. Egyptian peninsula SINAI
The Sinai Peninsula is in the eastern part of Egypt, the triangular peninsula bounded by the Mediterranean to the north and the Red Sea to the south. It is the only part of Egypt that lies in Asia as opposed to Africa. The eastern land border of the peninsula is shared with Israel, and Israel occupied the Sinai during the 1956 Suez Crisis and the Six Day War of 1967.

75. Belgium-based imaging company AGFA
Agfa was founded in Germany in 1867, a company focused on the manufacture of dyes. The full name of the enterprise was Aktiengesellschaft für Anilinfabrikation, shortened to Agfa, and translating as “Corporation for Aniline (a dye) Production”. Agfa merged with the Belgian company Gevaert in 1894, getting them into the photographic business. Agfa 35mm film hasn’t been produced for a few years now, but there is still inventory out there and purists are buying it when they can.

77. Journalist who has been a host on all “Big Three” networks COURIC
Katie Couric left NBC’s “The Today Show” in 2006 and took over as news anchor for “CBS Evening News”. In so doing she became the first solo female anchor of a broadcast network evening news program. Couric also has the honor of being the only person to guest-host on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno”. In fact she “swapped jobs” on that particular day, and Leno filled in for Couric on “The Today Show”. Since 2012, Couric has a hosted a daytime talk show called “Katie” on ABC.

78. 12-time NFL Pro Bowler Junior SEAU
Junior Seau was an NFL linebacker, first playing for the San Diego Chargers and then the Miami Dolphins and the New England Patriots. Sadly, Seau was found dead in his home in 2011, having committed suicide by shooting himself in the chest.

80. Connie __, winningest MLB manager MACK
Cornelius “Connie” Mack managed the Philadelphia Athletics (now the Oakland A’s) baseball team from 1901 when the club was founded, until he retired at the end of the 1950 season, at 87 years of age. Mack is the longest-serving manager in the history of Major League Baseball.

84. U.S./Soviet pact SALT I
There were two rounds of Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) between the US and the Soviet Union, and two resulting treaties (SALT I & SALT II). The opening round of SALT I talks were held in Helsinki as far back as 1970, with the resulting treaty signed by President Richard Nixon and General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev in 1972.

93. Twisted together TWINED
Our word “twine”, meaning a light string, has the same root as our word “twin”. The original Old English “twin” referred to a double thread.

95. Garment easy to get in and out of ONESIE
A “onesie” is a baby’s bodysuit, and is a common gift at a baby shower.

96. More swank POSHER
No one really knows the etymology of the word “posh”. The popular myth that POSH stands for “Port Out, Starboard Home” is completely untrue, and is a story that can actually be traced back to the 1968 movie “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang”. The myth is that wealthy British passengers travelling to and from India would book cabins on the port side for the outward journey and the starboard side for the home journey. This trick was supposedly designed to keep their cabins out of the direct sunlight.

102. “The Aviator” actor ALDA
Alan Alda has had a great television career, especially of course on “M*A*S*H”. Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H”. He won his most recent Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

“The Aviator” is a great film from 2004, a biographical piece about much of the life of aviation pioneer Howard Hughes. Leonardo DiCaprio plays the title role, with Cate Blanchett playing a very credible Katharine Hepburn, Hughes’ lover with whom he lived for quite some time. Blanchett won a very much deserved Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for her performance. Alan Alda received an Oscar nomination as a supporting actor, playing Senator Owen Brewster, a thorn in the side for Howard Hughes.

103. Landlocked land LAOS
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country’s name is “Meuang Lao”. The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of “Lao” entities united into one, the French added the “S” and so today we tend to use “Laos” instead of “Lao”.

105. Weigh station concern TARE
“Tare” is the weight of a container that is deducted from the gross weight to determine the net weight, the weight of the container’s contents.

109. De Matteo of “Sons of Anarchy” DREA
Drea de Matteo is an actress who is most familiar to me for playing Adriana la Cerva on HBO’s wonderful series “The Sopranos”. De Matteo also played Joey’s sister on the short-lived “Friends” spin-off called “Joey”, and the character Angie Bolen on “Desperate Housewives”.

“Sons of Anarchy” is a popular FX crime series about an outlaw motorcycle club in California’s Central Valley. It is the most successful FX show ever.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Mound site INFIELD
8. 1996 Olympic tennis gold medalist AGASSI
14. Track fastener SPIKE
19. Jim Brickman fan, perhaps NEW AGER
20. Gathered in a mass LUMPED
21. Darlings’ creator BARRIE
22. Stay with doggedly CLING TO
23. Dishes set in gelatin ASPICS
24. Canine coat? ENAMEL
25. *Dreamt of ALWAYS WANTED (hiding “swan”)
27. *Type of surplus store ARMY NAVY (hiding “myna”)
29. Couple maker AND
30. Equal ARE
31. Question of concern YOU OK?
32. *Forgot the past STARTED OVER (hiding “dove”)
37. Dope (out) SUSS
38. Eponymous Belgian town SPA
41. Nincompoop SCHMO
42. German article DER
43. Word with dive or drops NOSE
44. War of the Ring force ENTS
45. Pact TREATY
47. Fix, as a model airplane REGLUE
51. Bleep EDIT OUT
53. Discernible range EARSHOT
55. Hinduism’s Chandra, e.g. MOON GOD
57. 2005 horror sequel SAW II
58. Singer Tori AMOS
59. Words before dare or ever DO I
61. Scottish export TWEED
62. Where texts are often read CELL
63. ISP option MSN
64. *Yellow Monopoly property VENTNOR AVENUE (hiding “raven”)
67. “Speak up” requests EHS
70. Base path? EVIL
72. Cutting beam LASER
73. Bouncer’s handful SOT
74. In short order SOON
75. Some saxes ALTOS
77. Law office visitors CLIENTS
79. Part-time player SEMIPRO
81. “I’m outta here” GOTTA GO
83. Potters’ wheels, e.g. LATHES
85. Home of Mandrake the Magician XANADU
86. Part of BOGOF FREE
87. Annoyances RUBS
89. They’re often found in mice AAS
91. Sign of an omission CARET
92. Spots ADS
93. Deere rival TORO
94. *School in-crowd POPULAR KIDS (hiding “lark”)
98. Look forward to AWAIT
99. Game with an Angry Birds version UNO
100. Cal. column TUE
101. *Tape width, perhaps HALF INCH (hiding “finch”)
104. Signs of spring that are literally hidden in the answers to starred clues NESTING BIRDS
111. Tennyson’s “lily maid of Astolat” ELAINE
112. Cuthbert of “24” ELISHA
114. Steak __ TARTARE
115. Thought quite a lot of ADORED
116. More promising ROSIER
117. In ELECTEE
118. Downed with a jolt TASED
119. Wheelhouse SPHERE
120. Elizabeth I or Prince Harry REDHEAD

Down
1. Sapa __: ancient South American ruler INCA
2. Jodie Foster title role NELL
3. Relative of IMO FWIW
4. Collector’s suffix -IANA
5. Like rich batter EGGY
6. Sics on LETS AT
7. Overwhelmed, with “out” DROWNED
8. Jackson with a 2015 “Keepin’ It Country” tour ALAN
9. Austrian painter Klimt GUSTAV
10. Word in current news? AMPERE
11. Scorpion cousin SPIDER
12. Texas A&M joined it in 2012 SEC
13. “You’re probably right” I’D SAY SO
14. Some HDTVs SANYOS
15. Trick PRANK
16. “Joy of Cooking” author Rombauer IRMA
17. Capital ESE of Warsaw KIEV
18. Hard to control EELY
21. In a fog BEMUSED
26. Puff __ ADDER
28. Woke up ROUSED
32. Gets out SCRAMS
33. *”Be My Baby” singers THE RONETTES (hiding “heron”)
34. Pile up AMASS
35. “American Pastoral” Pulitzer-winning writer ROTH
36. City near Provo OREM
38. *Alpine feline SNOW LEOPARD (hiding “owl”)
39. Spitting sound PTUI!
40. Wine commonly served chilled ASTI
41. Momentum STEAM
43. Beersheba’s region NEGEV
44. Series ender ET AL
46. Feature of some Roy Rogers numbers YODEL
48. Ship out GO TO SEA
49. *Like some flats LOW-RENT (hiding “wren”)
50. Expose UNEARTH
52. “Understood” I SEE
54. Weigh station unit TON
56. The __: Horace works ODES
60. “__ be fun!” IT’LL
62. Polish brand CUTEX
64. Credit giant VISA
65. Does masterfully NAILS
66. Crunched things, for short NOS
68. Large groups HORDES
69. Weevil feature SNOUT
71. Poll position? VOTE
74. Egyptian peninsula SINAI
75. Belgium-based imaging company AGFA
76. Master LORD
77. Journalist who has been a host on all “Big Three” networks COURIC
78. 12-time NFL Pro Bowler Junior SEAU
80. Connie __, winningest MLB manager MACK
82. Responded to a bad joke GROANED
84. U.S./Soviet pact SALT I
88. Gets to BOTHERS
90. Walk easily SAUNTER
93. Twisted together TWINED
94. Ground, say PUNISH
95. Garment easy to get in and out of ONESIE
96. More swank POSHER
97. Throw a big party for REGALE
98. Burning AFIRE
101. Cops, or pressure from them HEAT
102. “The Aviator” actor ALDA
103. Landlocked land LAOS
105. Weigh station concern TARE
106. Brought up BRED
107. Hard-to-ignore feeling ITCH
108. Fixed __ RATE
109. De Matteo of “Sons of Anarchy” DREA
110. Apple product SEED
113. Cut off LOP

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2 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 24 May 15, Sunday”

  1. What a nice change of pace after yesterday's massacre. This is the closest I've ever come to Bill's time on a time percentage basis. I still wasn't close, however.

    Scratch "eating steak tartare in Switzerland" off of my bucket list. Yikes.

    Great write up as always. Some interesting and entertaining cluing in this one.

    Hope you're all enjoying the long weekend.

  2. I've had steak tartare in Geneva – in that part of Switzerland at least the dish is raw beef (though horse meat was on the menu as Entrecôte Chavalier or something like that).

    Bill's solving time blew me away as always, so clearly I'm not in the same league as he and Jeff!

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