LA Times Crossword Answers 5 Jan 16, Tuesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tom Uttormark & C.C. Burnikel,
THEME: A-New Interpretation … today’s themed answers are common phrases starting with the letter A. Each phrase has been reinterpreted for the clue, using that letter A as an indefinite article:

20A. One hospital celebration? A WARD CEREMONY (from “award ceremony”)
25A. One mug from the boxing ring? A BOUT FACE (from “about face”)
46A. One news magazine managing editor? A HEAD OF “TIME” (from “ahead of time”)
52A. One adorable romantic threesome? A CUTE TRIANGLE (from “acute triangle”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 55s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Nothing, in Nogales NADA
Nogales (properly called “Heroica Nogales”) is a city in the Mexican State of Sonora. Nogales lies right on the Mexico-US border, opposite the city of Nogales, Arizona.

14. “The Big Country” Oscar winner Ives BURL
As well as being an actor, Burl Ives was a folk singer, which was his original calling. In Hollywood he had a distressing experience with the House Unamerican Activities Committee and avoided being blacklisted by cooperating to some level with McCarthy and his team. This cooperation created a rift between him and Pete Seeger in particular, a fellow singer whom he “discussed” with the committee.

“The Big Country” is a 1958 western with a star-studded cast including Gregory Peck, Jean Simmons, Charlton Heston and Burl Ives. The film earned Burl Ives an Oscar as Best Supporting Actor.

15. Hertz competitor ALAMO
The third largest car rental company right now is Alamo, a relative newcomer founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun intended!) into the market by popularizing the idea of “unlimited mileage”.

The Hertz car rental company was started in 1918 by Walter L. Jacobs in Chicago. He began with just twelve model T Ford cars available for rent. In 1923, the car rental operation was bought out by John D. Hertz who incorporated it into his truck and coach manufacturing company.

16. Germany’s von Bismarck OTTO
Germany first became a country of her own in 1871 when the Princes of the various independent German states met at Versailles outside Paris to proclaim Wilhelm of Prussia as the Emperor of the German Empire. The man behind this historic development was Wilhelm’s Ministerpräsident, Otto von Bismarck. Von Bismarck was a powerful figure in Prussia and indeed on the world stage, earning him the nickname of the “Iron Chancellor”.

20. One hospital celebration? A WARD CEREMONY (from “award ceremony”)
The Old English “weard” was used for a protection or guarding, or the persion carry out that protection. The sense of guardianship evolved into our “ward”, used for administrative disctricts back in the late 1500s. The usage was extended to rooms in a hospital in the mid 1700s.

23. The blahs ENNUI
“Ennui” is the French word for boredom, a word that we now use in English. It’s one of the few French words we’ve imported that we haven’t anglicized and actually pronounce “correctly”.

24. Radon and ozone GASES
Radon is a radioactive gas, a byproduct produced when uranium decays naturally in the earth. Radon gas can collect and accumulate in buildings and rooms that are particularly well insulated with very little air exchange. The danger is very real, as radon is listed as the second most frequent cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoke.

Ozone gets its name from the Greek word ozein, meaning “to smell”. It was given this name as ozone’s formation during lightning storms was detected by the gas’s distinctive smell. Famously, there is a relatively high concentration of the gas in the “ozone layer” in the Earth’s stratosphere. This ozone layer provides a vital function for animal life on the planet as it absorbs most of the sun’s UV radiation. A molecule of ozone is made up of three oxygen atoms, whereas a “normal” oxygen has just two atoms.

25. One mug from the boxing ring? A BOUT FACE (from “about-face”)
The verb “to mug” means to make an exaggerated facial expression. The term comes from mugs used to drink beer (called Toby mugs) that are the made in the shape of heads with grotesque expressions. “Mug” can also be a noun meaning “face”.

29. Joe of “Casino” PESCI
Joe Pesci got his big break in movies with a supporting role in “Raging Bull” starring Robert De Niro, earning Pesci an Oscar nomination early in his career. There followed a string of gangster roles played alongside De Niro, namely “Once Upon a Time in America”, “Goodfellas” and “Casino”. But I like Pesci’s comedic acting best of all. He was marvelous in the “Home Alone” films, the “Lethal Weapon” series, and my personal favorite, “My Cousin Vinny”. Pesci gets a mention in the stage musical “Jersey Boys”, which isn’t too surprising as he is one of the show’s producers.

“Casino” is a 1995 Martin Scorsese film. One of the movie’s stars is Robert De Niro, someone who collaborated with Scorsese in eight films in all, “Casino” being the last.

32. [Not my typo] SIC
“Sic” indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. “Sic” is Latin for “thus, like this”. The term is more completely written as “sic erat scriptum”, which translates as “thus was it written”.

33. Ethan of “Before Midnight” HAWKE
Ethan Hawke is a Hollywood actor who made his breakthrough in a supporting role in “Dead Poet’s Society”, playing opposite Robin Williams. Hawke was married to Uma Thurman, with whom he has two children.

Richard Linklater wrote and directed a series of romantic drama film starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy as a couple who have periodic romantic encounters around the world:

– “Before Sunrise” is an encounter in Paris (1995)
– “Before Sunset” is an encounter in Vienna (2004)
– “Before Midnight” is an encounter in Greece (2013)

41. Breathable mixture AIR
Air is mainly composed of nitrogen (78%), oxygen (21%) and argon (1%). We hear a lot about carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It makes up (or should make up!) about 0.04%, but that’s an important 0.04%.

42. “Count on it” lawnmower brand TORO
Toro is a manufacturer of mainly lawn mowers and snow removal equipment based in Bloomington, Minnesota. The company was started in 1914 to build tractor engines.

44. Fast-spreading Internet phenomena MEMES
A “meme” (short for “mineme”) is a cultural practice or idea that is passed on verbally or by repetition from one person to another. The term lends itself very well to the online world where links, emails, files etc. are so easily propagated.

45. Michelin rating unit STAR
Michelin is a manufacturer of tires based in France. The company was founded by brothers Édouard and André Michelin in 1888. The brothers were running a rubber factory at the time, and invented the world’s first removable pneumatic tire, an invention that they used to launch their new company. Michelin is also noted for rating restaurants and accommodation in its famous Michelin Travel Guides, awarding coveted Michelin “stars”.

46. One news magazine managing editor? A HEAD OF “TIME” (from “ahead of time”)
“Time” magazine has a readership of about 25 million, making it the largest circulation weekly news magazine in the world.

52. One adorable romantic threesome? A CUTE TRIANGLE (from “acute triangle”)
An acute triangle is a triangle in which all three angles are less than 90 degrees (i.e. acute angles). An obtuse triangle is one which has one angle that is greater than 90 degrees (i.e. obtuse). Acute and obtuse triangles are collectively referred to as oblique triangles, meaning they are not right triangles. A right triangle is one that includes a 90-degree angle.

56. Long-distance swimmer Diana NYAD
Diana Nyad is a long-distance swimmer. Nyad holds the distance record for a non-stop swim without a wet-suit, a record that she set in 1979 by swimming from Bimini to Florida. In 1975 she became the fastest person to circle Manhattan in a swim that lasted 7 hours 57 minutes. More recently, in 2013, she became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without the protection of a shark cage. She was 64 years old when she made that swim!

57. Crime scene clue exposed by dusting PRINT
In the world of criminology, there are three classes of fingerprints. Patent prints are those which are obvious, easily spotted by the naked eye. Impressed prints are those made when the fingertips apply pressure to a soft material or surface, such as the skin. Latent prints are those that are invisible to the naked eye, but which can be detected using special equipment and materials.

58. Hereditary code carrier GENE
A gene is a section of a chromosome that is responsible for a particular characteristic in an organism. For example, one gene may determine eye color and another balding pattern. We have two copies of each gene, one from each of our parents, with each copy known as an allele.

60. Table tennis video game PONG
Do you remember the arcade video game that was like a game of tennis, with paddles moving up and down to hit what looked like a ball, over what looked like a net? Well, that was “Pong”.

61. Cozumel cash PESOS
Cozumel is an island in the Caribbean of the coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. It is a tourist destination, and is especially attractive to scuba divers. My son and I spent a great week there diving some years ago.

Down
1. “Parks and Recreation” network NBC
“Parks and Recreation” is a sitcom that started airing on NBC in 2009, and it is a show that has grown on me. It stars the “Saturday Night Live” alum Amy Poehler. The creators of “Parks and Recreation” are part of the team responsible for the American version of “The Office”, so you’ll notice some similarities in the style of the two shows, and some actors that have appeared in both.

4. Annually updated reference ALMANAC
A nautical almanac is a book used by navigators, usually at sea. The main content has traditionally been tables of star position designed to help determine one’s geographical position. Some almanacs also include tide tables.

5. Pulse-boosting exercise, for short CARDIO
Aerobic exercise is moderate activity, designed to be at a low enough intensity that very little anaerobic activity takes place. In other words, the exercise is at a level where oxygen is taken in in order to burn fat and carbohydrate to create energy. Anaerobic exercise is more intense and uses carbohydrate (glycogen) in the muscle to provide energy, without the need for oxygen. Aerobics are also called “cardio” as the exercises strengthen the cardiovascular system.

7. Fill with cargo LADE
The verb “lade” meaning “to load” comes from an Old English word “hladan”. Lade also used to mean “to draw water” and indeed gave us our word “ladle”. So “lade” and “ladle” are close cousins.

8. Qatari bigwig EMIR
In English, emir can also be written as emeer, amir and ameer (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry. Qatar is scheduled to who the 2022 FIFA World Cup, although the nation’s eligibility to do so is under question after a far-reaching bribery scandal was uncovered at the sport’s governing body.

9. Hispanic convenience store BODEGA
“Bodega” is the Spanish term for a winery, or these days for a grocery store. One might call a bodega a “ma-and-pa” shop, a “madre-y-padre” shop in Spanish.

22. Papier-__ MACHE
Papier-mâché is an artistic medium made from strips of paper, or pulped paper, that is bound with an adhesive. “Papier-mâché” translates from French as mashed or chewed paper.

27. Words of grande affetto TI AMO
In Italian, one usually says “ti amo” (I love you) with “grande affetto” (much affection).

28. Bass staff symbol F-CLEF
Clef is the French word for “key”. In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

30. Expressive rock genre EMO
The musical genre of “emo” originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from “emotional hardcore”. “Emo” is also the name given to the associated subculture. Not my cup of tea …

35. Sorento automaker KIA
The Kia Sorento is an SUV.

36. Throw wide of the cutoff man, say ERR
That would be in baseball …

39. Dr. Eric Foreman portrayer on “House” OMAR EPPS
Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Forman on the excellent television series “House”. Prior to playing Dr. Foreman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Grant on “ER”.

47. Nosh EAT
Our word “nosh” has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word “nashn” meaning “to nibble”. We use “nosh” as a noun that means snack, or as a verb meaning to eat between meals.

49. Louisiana wetland BAYOU
A bayou is a marshy inlet or outlet of a lake or river, usually with stagnant or slow-moving water. The exact origins of the term “bayou” is uncertain, but it is thought perhaps to come from the Choctaw (a Native American people from the southeast) word “bayuk”, meaning “small stream”.

55. Playing a fourth NHL period IN OT
Overtime (OT)

56. Network home to “A Prairie Home Companion” NPR
The amazing humorist Garrison Keillor is one of Minnesota’s most famous sons. Keillor’s wonderful radio show called “A Prairie Home Companion” made its debut in 1974 and is named after the Prairie Home Cemetery in Moorhead, Minnesota. I actually saw a live taping of “A Prairie Home Companion” not so long ago in San Francisco and thoroughly enjoyed the experience …

59. Takeoff approx. ETD
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Nothing, in Nogales NADA
5. A-list invitee CELEB
10. Inhale in awe GASP
14. “The Big Country” Oscar winner Ives BURL
15. Hertz competitor ALAMO
16. Germany’s von Bismarck OTTO
17. Study at the last minute CRAM
18. Decorated anew REDID
19. Grown-up tadpole TOAD
20. One hospital celebration? A WARD CEREMONY (from “award ceremony”)
23. The blahs ENNUI
24. Radon and ozone GASES
25. One mug from the boxing ring? A BOUT FACE (from “about face”)
29. Joe of “Casino” PESCI
32. [Not my typo] SIC
33. Ethan of “Before Midnight” HAWKE
37. Sound system component AMP
38. “Honest!” NOT A LIE!
41. Breathable mixture AIR
42. “Count on it” lawnmower brand TORO
44. Fast-spreading Internet phenomena MEMES
45. Michelin rating unit STAR
46. One news magazine managing editor? A HEAD OF “TIME” (from “ahead of time”)
49. Without question BY FAR
50. Store posting HOURS
52. One adorable romantic threesome? A CUTE TRIANGLE (from “acute triangle”)
56. Long-distance swimmer Diana NYAD
57. Crime scene clue exposed by dusting PRINT
58. Hereditary code carrier GENE
60. Table tennis video game PONG
61. Cozumel cash PESOS
62. “__ but not least … ” LAST
63. Trick RUSE
64. Look after SEE TO
65. Barely managed, with “out” EKED

Down
1. “Parks and Recreation” network NBC
2. Heavenly glows AURAE
3. Written (up), as a contract DRAWN
4. Annually updated reference ALMANAC
5. Pulse-boosting exercise, for short CARDIO
6. Utility measured in kilowatt hrs. ELEC
7. Fill with cargo LADE
8. Qatari bigwig EMIR
9. Hispanic convenience store BODEGA
10. Set sail GO TO SEA
11. Make reparations ATONE
12. Hangs around STAYS
13. Sci-fi escape craft POD
21. Apply before cooking, as spice to meat RUB IN
22. Papier-__ MACHE
26. Spanish pronoun USTED
27. Words of grande affetto TI AMO
28. Bass staff symbol F-CLEF
29. On-the-back praise PAT
30. Expressive rock genre EMO
31. “Contents under pressure” containers SPRAY CANS
34. Plumbing problem WATER LEAK
35. Sorento automaker KIA
36. Throw wide of the cutoff man, say ERR
39. Dr. Eric Foreman portrayer on “House” OMAR EPPS
40. “Honest?” IS THAT SO?
43. G-rated cry of dismay OH FUDGE!
45. Sneak across the border SMUGGLE
47. Nosh EAT
48. Electrified particle ION
49. Louisiana wetland BAYOU
51. Hearing, for one SENSE
53. It has bark, but no bite TREE
54. Get out of bed RISE
55. Playing a fourth NHL period IN OT
56. Network home to “A Prairie Home Companion” NPR
59. Takeoff approx. ETD

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13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 5 Jan 16, Tuesday”

  1. Glenn took the words right out of my mouth…a challenging puzzle for a Tuesday, no doubt (I'm looking at you "f clef"!).

    Raining pretty good out here in L.A. right now, but we need it so no complaints.

    Have a good day all.

  2. A very nice and crunchy puzzle. I was stuc on several names that I had no idea about ….. USTED, TIAMO, F CLEF, NYAD, PESCI and even Bodega ( I saw one in Nashville, of all places !). But I throughly enjoyed the experience, even Omar Epps.

    Bill, I think you got the wrong 'ward' …. this ward refers to a division or section of the hospital like pediatric ward, or ICU ward etc. In the UK it might also be the general ward, as opposed to a special room, for private patients.

    Carrie or Bella should have fun with all the 'A' words, in the theme.

    I always think of Ives with Currier, the greeting cards.

    Otto von Bismarck, a dyed-in-the-wool patriotic german, only drank french champagne, rather than german ch. – called Sekt . His famous quote, made to the Kaiser was,' I am extremely sorry, but, patriotism stops short of the stomach'.

    At first, I had 'Noble' for Radon and Ozone. Silly me, Ozone is not noble, it is quite reactive. Infact explosively so. The common perception of the 'smell on the seashore', is not that of Ozone, which exists at less than 4 parts per billion, 'but more due to, the halogenated seaweed metabolites'. (Wiki on Ozone )

    Have nice day, all.

  3. As far as I know polliwogs and tadpoles are synonymous terms and will grow up to EITHER toads or frogs.

  4. ACUTE puzzle and theme. I finished it in my doctor's waiting room. Had my annual physical today so if I see anyone else coming at me from behind with a latex glove on, I'm going to put up a fight this time…..

    @Tony and Anon
    You're both wrong. It's French baby's that grow up to be frogs…

    @Vidwan
    Like the Bismarck story.

    @Carrie
    Catching up on the recent comments. From Saturday/Friday – Loony Bin instead of DITTY BAG? Classic.

  5. Yes, a tadpole can become either a toad or a frog. The word comes from two words in Middle English: tode, meaning toad; and polle, meaning head – combined to tadpole. A tadpole appears to be a head with an attached tail. Later legs develop etc. BTW another definition of "tadpole" is a young man who goes out with older women 🙂

  6. Not to be confused with a golliwog. A golliwog doll was a african ( caricature ?) doll, and I am proud to say, I had one as a child. My mother KNITTED one for me, and I loved it. Alas, it eventually fell apart, as most childhood toys do, and I still miss it. Probably, not popular today, for political correctness reasons. certainly, not sold it Target stores today.

  7. Late getting here today. We're getting the rain we were promised.
    Yaay! Good thing I don't have to be on the freeways.
    Fun and clever puzzle today. I erased a lot but now I can't exactly remember which ones. It all came together.
    Interesting stuff about frogs and toads.
    Who the heck thought up that thing about kissing a frog (toad) and turning it into a prince??? Blechh.
    See you guys tomorrow.

  8. The Frog Prince motif, Aarne Thompson's #440, is ancient. I believe the lesson is that if you're nice to all callers, some good will come of it. Anyway, as the Grimm brothers (along with others) collected tales from all over Europe for the publisher Brentano (who tired of it), they became fascinated with the similarities. Then they concluded that the tales moved along a path that reflected the Indo-European spread of language. In modern times, genetic studies reflect this path, also. There are other separate trails of tale development such as Arabic and Asian.

  9. This puzzle bugged me, tho I don't know exactly why…Couldn't see ENNUI even tho the word perfectly reflects my mood–which is exactly why the puzzle didn't thrill me, I suppose.
    @Jeff~indeedy! Inspired by Looney Tunes, I always "carry a tune" in my LOONY BIN! 😉
    @ Sfingi–fascinating info on the paths of tales.
    Does anyone else remember when "meme" had a more sophisticated meaning? I find it strange that the term has become so commonplace. Thanks go to the Interwebs for continuing to dumb down our language…
    Be well~~™

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