LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Apr 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Garry Morse
THEME: Musical Variations … we have themed clues today. Those in the top half of the grid are SHARP, and those in the bottom are FLAT. The themed clue in the middle is NATURAL:

23A. SHARP STYLISHLY DRESSED
31A. SHARP PUNGENT IN TASTE
41A. SHARP SHREWD GAMBLER
66A. NATURAL CRAPS WINNER
93A. FLAT BRIT’S DWELLING
102D. FLAT NO LONGER BUBBLY
115D. FLAT TROUBLE ON THE ROAD

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Outlaw played by Tyrone in 1939 JESSE
Jesse James was an outlaw from Missouri who became a legendary figure of the Wild West. James somehow earned the reputation that he was a Robin Hood figure, robbing the rich and giving to the poor, but in fact this is far from the truth. After being chased persistently by law enforcement officers, he was eventually killed by one of his own gang members who hoped to collect a reward. As soon as newspaper reported his death in 1882, rumors started that Jesse James had in fact survived. Eventually, the body buried in the grave marked with Jesse James’ name was exhumed in 1995, and DNA testing showed that almost certainly it was the resting place of the infamous outlaw.

Tyrone Power was a Hollywood actor from Cincinnati, Ohio. Power tended to play the romantic lead, as well as the swashbuckler that was so popular in the thirties. His career was interrupted during WWII when he volunteered to serve with the Marine Corps as a pilot. Power served with distinction and resumed his career after the war. He died on set, suffering a massive heart attack while filming a sword duel with his friend George Sanders. Power was only 44 years of age.

“Jesse James” is a 1939 film starring Tyrone Power in the title role, alongside Henry Fonda and Randolph Scott. The movie is notorious for a scene in which a horse falls to his death after being driven off a cliff. As a result, “Jesse James” is one of the films that led to the American Humane Association monitoring the use of animals in filmmaking.

19. With 62-Across, many a sonata PIANO …
(62A. See 19-Across … PIECE)
The term “sonata” comes via Italian from the Latin word “sonare” meaning “to sound”. A sonata is a piece of music that is played, as opposed to a cantata (from Latin and Italian “cantare” meaning “to sing”), a piece of music that is sung.

20. Skateboard maneuver OLLIE
An “ollie” is a skateboarding trick invented in 1976 by Alan “Ollie” Gelfand. Apparently it’s a way of lifting the board off the ground, while standing on it, without touching the board with one’s hands. Yeah, I could do that …

26. Student’s complete file, to a teacher CUME
“Cume” is an informal term used by a teacher when referring to a student’s grade point average, from the word “cumulative”.

29. Trees whose fruit yields a moisturizing butter SHEAS
“Shea butter” is a common moisturizer or lotion used as a cosmetic. It is a fat that is extracted from the nut of the African shea tree. There is evidence that shea butter was used back in Cleopatra’s Egypt.

30. Author Rand AYN
Ayn Rand was the pen name of Russian-American novelist Alisa Rosenbaum. Rand’s two best known works are her novels “The Fountainhead” published in 1943 and “Atlas Shrugged” in 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, “Atlas Shrugged”. This group called itself “The Collective”, and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan.

36. Some U.S. Army transports UTES
A utility vehicle is often called a “ute” for short. Nowadays one mainly hears about sports utes and crossover utes.

39. Palmer with trophies ARNIE
Arnold Palmer is one of the greats of the world of golf. Palmer is very popular with many fans of the game, and his followers are usually referred to as “Arnie’s Army”. Off the course, Palmer was an avid pilot, but is now retired from flying. He resides in Latrobe, Pennsylvania for much of the year and the local airport is named in his honor: Arnold Palmer Regional Airport.

41. SHARP SHREWD GAMBLER
A “card sharp” is someone who is skilled and deceptive with playing cards, particularly when playing gambling games like poker. It seems that the term “card sharp” predates the related “card shark”, both of which have the same meaning.

46. Mole’s activity SPYING
A mole is a spy who works from within the ranks of an enemy’s government of intelligence service.

50. Pilot maker HONDA
The Honda Pilot is mid-size crossover SUV that was introduced in 2002. The luxury version of the vehicle is sold as the Acura MDX.

54. Actress Vardalos NIA
Not only is the delightful Nia Vardalos the star of the 2002 hit movie “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”, she also wrote the screenplay. The film never made it to number one at the box office, but it still pulled in more money than any other movie in history that didn’t make it to number one. That record I think reflects the fact that the film wasn’t a blockbuster but rather a so-called “sleeper hit”, a movie that people went to see based on referrals from friends. The big fat mistake came when a spin-off TV show was launched, “My Big Fat Greek Life”. It ran for only 7 episodes. “My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2” will hit movie theaters in 2016.

55. Western, calendar-wise GREGORIAN
Our contemporary western calendar was introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, giving it the name “Gregorian” calendar. The Gregorian calendar superseded the Julian calendar, both of which were aligned with movement of the sun across the sky. At issue was that the Julian calendar was misaligned with the solar year by about 11 minutes, creating an error that accumulated over time. Pope Gregory corrected the length of the year by introducing a more accurate rule for calculating leap years. He also wiped out the cumulated “misalignment”, in order to bring together the Christian celebration of Easter and the spring equinox. That correction involved the “loss” of 11 days. The last day of the Julian calendar (Thursday, 4 October 1582) was immediately followed by the first day of the Gregorian calendar (Friday, 15 October 1582).

60. Tech sch. overlooking the Hudson RPI
The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the “application of science to the common purposes of life”, an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school’s sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

63. Ruth around bases BABE
Jack Dunn was the owner/manager of the Baltimore Orioles back in 1913, when he signed on George Herman Ruth as a pitcher. The other players called Ruth “Jack’s newest babe”, and the name “Babe” stuck.

66. NATURAL CRAPS WINNER
In the game of craps, a throw of 7 or 11 is known as a “natural”.

If one considers earlier versions of craps, then the game has been around for a very long time and probably dates back to the Crusades. It may have been derived from an old English game called “hazard” also played with two dice, which was mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” from the 1300s. The American version of the game came here courtesy of the French and first set root in New Orleans where it was given the name “crapaud”, a French word meaning “toad”.

72. Tests for advanced-deg. seekers GRES
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

75. Drawn: Abbr. ILLUS
Illustrated (illus.)

76. Sense of self EGO
Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

80. Game show host for 50 years BOB BARKER
Bob Barker is a retired TV host of game shows, most famous for hosting “The Price Is Right” for 35 years from 1972 to 2007. He retired when he was 83½ years old, having secured the record as the oldest man ever to host a regularly scheduled TV game show. Barker is a celebrated animal rights activist, after becoming a vegetarian in 1979.

86. __ garden ZEN
Japanese Zen gardens are inspired by the meditation gardens of Zen Buddhist temples. Zen gardens have no water in them, but often there is gravel and sand that is raked in patterns designed to create the impression of water in waves and ripples.

87. Capital of Kazakhstan ASTANA
Astana is the capital of Kazakhstan, although only since 1997. Prior to 1997, the nation’s capital was Almaty. The decision to move the capital was made as Almaty is in a part of the country populated by ethnic Russians and the new government wanted to distance itself even further from its Soviet history.

89. Earthen building material ADOBE
The building material known as adobe has been around a long time, and has been used in dry climates all over the world. The original form of the word “adobe” dates back to Middle Egyptian times, about 2000 BC. The original spelling is “dj-b-t”, and translates as mud (sun-dried) brick.

91. 1990s TV judge ED KOCH
Ed Koch was a Democratic Representative in the US Congress from 1969-73, and then Mayor of New York City from 1978-89. From 1997 to 1999 Koch was a “judge” on the TV show “The People’s Court”. And in 2004, he collaborated with his sister Pat Koch, and wrote a children’s book called “Eddie, Harold’s Little Brother”, a tale about Ed’s own childhood experiences.

93. FLAT BRIT’S DWELLING
“Flat” is a word more commonly used in the British Isles than here. A flat is basically an apartment or condominium. The word “flat” is Scottish in origin, in which language it meant a “floor in a house”.

97. Ferris Bueller’s girlfriend SLOANE
The character Sloane Peterson in “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” is played by the very beautiful actress Mia Sara. Sloane is the girlfriend of the title character.

“Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” is one of my favorite movies of all time, and was written and directed by John Hughes and released in 1986. There are so many classic scenes in the film, including two wonderful musical interludes. The more sedate of these is vignette shot in the Art Institute of Chicago that is beautifully filmed. The more upbeat musical scene is a rendition of “Twist and Shout” during a Von Steuben Day parade.

106. Incidentally, in texts BTW
By the way (BTW)

108. Kindle reading, briefly EMAGS
Amazon chose the name “Kindle” for their e-reader as they wanted to convey the feeling of lighting a fire, creating intellectual excitement through reading.

109. Online search results URLS
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

110. Ill-fated 2006 Kentucky Derby champion BARBARO
The racehorse Barbaro won the Kentucky Derby in 2006, but shattered his leg a couple of weeks later while running in the Preakness Stakes. Barbaro underwent several complex surgeries over the next few months, but was eventually euthanized in early 2007.

115. FLAT TROUBLE ON THE ROAD
Here’s another example of terms that change as we cross the Atlantic Ocean. When talking about tires (“tyres” in Britain and Ireland), a defect can cause a “flat” (“puncture” in Britain and Ireland).

121. “Sweet is the breath of __”: Milton MORN
Here are some lines from John Milton’s 1667 epic poem “Paradise Lost” …

Sweet is the breath of Morn, her rising sweet,
With charm of earliest birds: pleasant the sun,
When first on this delightful land he spreads
His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower,
Glistering with dew;

“Paradise Lost” is an epic poem written by Englishman John Milton. It is indeed an epic work, published originally in ten volumes with over ten thousand lines of verse. The “paradise” that is “lost” is the Garden of Eden, from which Adam and Eve were expelled by God in the “Fall of Man”.

122. Bordeaux bye ADIEU
“Adieu” is the French for “goodbye” or “farewell”, from “à Dieu” meaning “to God”. The plural of “adieu” is “adieux”.

Bordeaux is perhaps the wine-production capital of the world. Wine has been produced in the area since the eighth century. Bordeaux has an administrative history too. During WWII, the French government relocated from Paris to the port city of Bordeaux when it became clear that Paris was soon to fall to the Germans. After the German’s took France, the capital was famously moved to Vichy.

123. Time being NONCE
The quaint phrase “for the nonce” means “for the present”, “for now”.

127. Boss mocked by Nast TWEED
William Magear Tweed was known as “Boss” Tweed. He was a 19th-century, American politician who led the Democratic Party machine in New York, headquartered in Tammany Hall. He was one of the most successful of the corrupt politicians of the day, siphoning from taxpayers (in today’s money) billions of dollars. In 1871 he was arrested, and served time in jail. He was then rearrested on civil charges and served time in debtor’s prison. He managed to escape to Spain, but was arrested once more and extradited to the United States. He died in jail in 1878.

Thomas Nast was an American caricaturist and cartoonist. Nast was the creator of the Republican Party elephant, the Democratic Party’s donkey, Uncle Sam and the image of the plump and jocular Santa Claus that we use today. Thomas Nast drew some famous cartoons in which he depicted the Tammany Society as a vicious tiger that was killing democracy. Nast’s use of the tiger symbology caught on and was used by other cartoonists to harp at the society.

Down
1. Church area APSE
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

2. Naan relative PITA
Pita is a lovely bread in Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines. Pita is usually round, and has a “pocket” in the center. The pocket is created by steam that puffs up the dough during cooking leaving a void when the bread cools.

Naan (also “nan”) bread is very popular in Indian restaurants, as well as in other West, Central and South Asian cuisines. Indian Naan is traditionally baked in a clay oven known as a tandoor.

3. One of eight teams that never won a World Series RAYS
The Tampa Bay Rays are a relatively “young” franchise, being formed in 1998. The initial name of the franchise was the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. While known as the Devil Rays, the team finished last in the league in almost every year. The name was changed to the Tampa Bay Rays in 2008, and I am told the Rays started into a streak of winning seasons soon after.

5. Cacophonous NOISY
“Cacophony” is such a lovely word, one used to describe a harsh or jarring sound. The term arises from the Greek “kakos” (bad) and “phone” (voice).

6. He frequently toured with Joel JOHN
Elton John and Billy Joel made several incredibly successful “Face to Face” tours together, starting in 1994. The concerts involved John and Joel performing their own songs individually, each other’s songs as well as some duets.

9. Comical Caesar SID
Sid Caesar achieved fame in the fifties on TV’s “Your Show of Shows”. To be honest, I know Sid Caesar mainly from the very entertaining film version of the musical “Grease”, in which he played Coach Calhoun.

14. Teacher’s deg. EDD
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

15. President before Millard ZACHARY
Zachary Taylor won the 1848 election to become the 12th US president, and the first president to hold office without a political resume. Taylor was a career military man, known as “Old Rough and Ready” Taylor. He died only 16 months into his term, apparently of gastroenteritis. Given that rumors of poisoning persisted over the decades, his body was exhumed in 1991 and tissue samples were checked for signs of foul play. Nothing out of order was discovered, although rumours still persist.

Vice President Millard Fillmore took over the US Presidency when Zachary Taylor died after only 16 months in office. Fillmore was born in the Finger Lakes region of New York State, but grew up around Buffalo. He was one of the founders of the University of Buffalo and served as chancellor there after he left office in 1853.

16. Ma Rainey, notably BLUES SINGER
Ma Rainey was a blues singer, in fact the earliest-known professional blues singer in North America. Born Gertrude Pridgett in 1886, she adopted the stage name Ma Rainey after marrying Will Rainey in 1904.

18. Dodger teammate of Robinson REESE
Pee Wee Reese met Jackie Robinson after Robinson was signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. As Reese tells the story, when he greeted Robinson it was the first time he had shaken hands with a black man. In those early days life was difficult for Robinson, and Reese made himself very visible as a friend, supporting the breaking down of racial barriers despite very vocal opposition.

31. Devil’s wear, in a 2006 film PRADA
“The Devil Wears Prada” is a 2003 novel by Lauren Weisberger that is set in the fashion industry. One of the main characters in the story is Miranda Priestly, the tyrannical editor-in-chief of the the fictional fashion magazine “Runway”. It has been suggested that the Priestly character was inspired by Anna Wintour, the real life editor-in-chief of “Vogue”. The novel was adapted into a successful 2006 film, with Meryl Streep playing Priestly.

33. Bird’s beak NIB
“Nib” is a Scottish variant of the Old English word “neb”, with both meaning the beak of a bird. This usage of “nib” as a beak dates back to the 14th century, with “nib” meaning the tip of a pen or quill coming a little later, in the early 1600s.

34. Shampoo, e.g. GEL
Back in the 1760s, the verb “to shampoo” was an Anglo-Indian word meaning “to massage”. A century later we started to shampoo our hair.

36. Maritime safety gp. USCG
The US Coast Guard (USCG) has the distinction of being the country’s oldest continuous seagoing service. The USCG was founded as the Revenue Cutter Service by Alexander Hamilton in 1790. The USCG motto is “Semper Paratus”, a Latin phrase meaning “Always Prepared”.

37. Whaler’s direction THAR
“Thar she blows!” is a phrase that originated on whaling ships. A lookout spotting a whale surfacing to breathe might see the spray from the blowhole caused by the expulsion of carbon dioxide. Thar (there) she blows!

38. Deco designer ERTE
Erté was the pseudonym of French artist (Russian born) Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials “R.T.”

39. Latin lambs AGNI
“Agnus” (plural “agni”) is Latin for “lamb”, as in “Agnus Dei”, which translates as “Lamb of God”.

43. Architectural order including circular column tops DORIC
The ancient Greeks fell into four ethnic groups: the Ionians, Aeolians, Achaeans and Dorians. The Dorians spoke their own Doric dialect of Greek, and had a distinctive, ornate Doric style of art and architecture.

44. Mushroom in Japanese cuisine ENOKI
Enokitake (also known as enoki) are long and thin white mushrooms often added to soups or salads.

45. Violinist’s supply ROSIN
Rosin is a solid form of resin derived from plant sources. Rosin is formed into cakes that players of stringed instruments use to rub along the hairs of their bows to help improve sound quality. The rosin increases the degree of friction between the strings and the bow. That same friction-increasing property comes into play when baseball pitchers use rosin to get a better grip on the ball.

47. Bridget Fonda, to Jane NIECE
Jane Fonda is the daughter of Henry Fonda, sister of Peter Fonda, and aunt of Bridget Fonda, making the Fondas quite the acting family. Jane Fonda had many memorable screen performances, but is equally memorable for her anti-war activism. Most famously she was outspoken against the Vietnam War, going so far as to visit North Vietnam during the height of the conflict in 1972, posing for photographs and making radio broadcasts denouncing American leaders as “war criminals”. For her stance, Fonda earned the nickname “Hanoi Jane”.

48. Noble __ GASES
The rare gases are better known as the noble gases, but neither term is really very accurate. Noble gas might be a better choice though, as they are all relatively nonreactive. But rare they are not. Argon, for example, is a major constituent (1%) of the air that we breathe.

52. “Milk” Oscar recipient PENN
Actor Sean Penn is a two-time Oscar winner, for his roles in “Mystic River” released in 2003 and “Milk” released in 2008. Penn’s celebrity on screen is only matched with his fame off the screen. Apart from his “big name” marriages to singer Madonna and actress Robin Wright, Penn is also well known for political and social activism. He perhaps inherited some of his political views from his father, actor and director Leo Penn. As an actor, Leo refused to “name names” in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee and so was blacklisted in Hollywood and had to move into directing to put bread on the table. In later years as a director he gave his son Sean his first acting role, in a 1974 episode of “Little House on the Prairie”.

“Milk” is a 2008 biopic based on the life of activist and politician Harvey Milk, with Sean Penn playing the title role. In 1977, Milk became the first openly gay person to be elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Tragically, Milk was assassinated along with Mayor George Moscone in 1978 by former city supervisor Dan White.

57. Look for water DOWSE
Dowsing is the practice of divining for not just water, but also buried metals and gemstones for example. Often a dowser will use a Y-shaped or L-shaped rod as a tool, which can also be called a dowser. Here in the US, the tool used might be referred to as a “witching rod”, as it is usually made from witch-hazel.

63. Faux felt BAIZE
Baize is a coarse woellen, or sometimes cotton, cloth. These days, baize is most often used to cover the playing surface on snooker and billiard tables, as well as on gaming tables in casinos.

65. Tabulae rasae BLANK SLATES
Tabula rasa (plural “tabulae rasae”) is the idea that people are born with a “blank slate”, and that knowledge comes from experience and perception.

68. Radio code opener ALFA
The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. It goes Alfa, Bravo, Charlie … Zulu.

71. Jewish spiritual leader REBBE
“Rebbe” is the Yiddish word for “rabbi”.

77. Hebrides native GAEL
A Gael is anyone who speaks or spoke one of the Erse tongues. There are actually three Erse languages. Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be Gaeilge (in Ireland), Gaelg (on the Isle of Man) and Gaidhlig (in Scotland).

The Hebrides is a group of islands just off the west coast of Scotland. The Hebrides are divided into two main groups: the Inner and Outer Hebrides.

80. Herb in pesto BASIL
The term “pesto” applies to anything made by pounding. What we tend to know as “pesto” sauce is more properly called “pesto alla genovese”, pesto from Genoa in northern Italy. I love, love pesto sauce …

83. Dullea of “2010: The Year We Make Contact” KEIR
Keir Dullea is an actor best known for portraying David Bowman, the astronaut who is the protagonist in the 1968 film “2001: A Space Odyssey”. Dullea also appears as astronaut Bowman in the 1984 sequel “2010: The Year We Make Contact”.

85. Stds. of conduct REGS
Regulations (regs.)

88. Plush carpet SHAG
Shag carpet is one with a deep pile, one with a “shaggy” appearance.

92. Academic expert, facetiously OLOGIST
“Ologist” is an informal term describing an expert or student in an academic discipline.

94. Like Shostakovich’s “Symphony No. 2” IN B
Dmitri Shostakovich’s “Symphony No. 2” was written for the tenth anniversary of the October Revolution, and so is subtitled “To October”. Shostakovich also celebrated the October Revolution with his “Symphony No. 12”, subtitled “The Year 1917”.

Dmitri Shostakovich was Russian composer, producing works in the Soviet period. He had a difficult relationship with the Communist Party, twice being officially denounced.

98. Impulse-conducting cell NEURON
A nerve cell is more correctly called a neuron, and the long nerve fiber that is part of a neuron is called the axon. A neuron that has no definite axon is referred to as “apolar” or “nonpolar”. In apolar neurons the nerve impulses radiate in all directions.

103. __ vincit amor OMNIA
“Omnia vincit amor” is a line from Eclogue X, one of the major works of the Latin poet Virgil. We know the phrase in English as “love conquers all”.

105. PC port USB
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

107. Nine Inch Nails founder Reznor TRENT
Nine Inch Nails is a rock band that was founded in Cleveland, Ohio in 1988.

110. A/C units BTUS
In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured in British Thermal Units (BTUs). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water’s temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

115. “Enough details, please” TMI
Too much information! (TMI)

116. Chocolate pet LAB
The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814, and the chocolate Labrador appeared over a century later in the 1930s.

118. Van Gogh work OIL
Vincent Van Gogh was a Dutch post-impressionist painter who seems to have had a very tortured existence. Van Gogh only painted for the last ten years of his life, and enjoyed very little celebrity while alive. Today many of his works are easily recognized, and fetch staggering sums in auction houses. Van Gogh suffered from severe depression for many of his final years. When he was only 37, he walked into a field with a revolver and shot himself in the chest. He managed to drag himself back to the inn where he was staying but died there two days later.

119. First st. admitted to the Union after the Civil War NEB
Nebraska gets its name from the Platte River which flows through the state. “Nebraska” is an anglicized version of Otoe or Omaha words meaning “flat water”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Kitchen cover APRON
6. Outlaw played by Tyrone in 1939 JESSE
11. Speculate MUSE
15. Letter-shaped beam Z-BAR
19. With 62-Across, many a sonata PIANO …
20. Skateboard maneuver OLLIE
21. Copied APED
22. Living __ A LIE
23. SHARP STYLISHLY DRESSED
26. Student’s complete file, to a teacher CUME
27. Enters carefully EASES IN
28. Hardships WOES
29. Trees whose fruit yields a moisturizing butter SHEAS
30. Author Rand AYN
31. SHARP PUNGENT IN TASTE
36. Some U.S. Army transports UTES
39. Palmer with trophies ARNIE
40. Nasty smiles SNEERS
41. SHARP SHREWD GAMBLER
46. Mole’s activity SPYING
49. Cause of an allergic response CAT
50. Pilot maker HONDA
51. Unwelcome sign for a 49-Across owner NO PETS
54. Actress Vardalos NIA
55. Western, calendar-wise GREGORIAN
57. Medicated DOSED
58. Cravings URGES
60. Tech sch. overlooking the Hudson RPI
61. Signing, perhaps OKING
62. See 19-Across … PIECE
63. Ruth around bases BABE
66. NATURAL CRAPS WINNER
72. Tests for advanced-deg. seekers GRES
73. Didn’t feel well AILED
75. Drawn: Abbr. ILLUS
76. Sense of self EGO
78. Burning up IRATE
79. Old enough OF AGE
80. Game show host for 50 years BOB BARKER
86. __ garden ZEN
87. Capital of Kazakhstan ASTANA
89. Earthen building material ADOBE
90. Before, in verse ERE
91. 1990s TV judge ED KOCH
93. FLAT BRIT’S DWELLING
97. Ferris Bueller’s girlfriend SLOANE
100. Tough as __ NAILS
101. Some deposits ORES
102. FLAT NO LONGER BUBBLY
106. Incidentally, in texts BTW
108. Kindle reading, briefly EMAGS
109. Online search results URLS
110. Ill-fated 2006 Kentucky Derby champion BARBARO
114. Fighting ANTI
115. FLAT TROUBLE ON THE ROAD
120. Connections TIES
121. “Sweet is the breath of __”: Milton MORN
122. Bordeaux bye ADIEU
123. Time being NONCE
124. Dost possess HAST
125. 60-Across, e.g.: Abbr. INST
126. Fall plantings BULBS
127. Boss mocked by Nast TWEED

Down
1. Church area APSE
2. Naan relative PITA
3. One of eight teams that never won a World Series RAYS
4. Like many fleet autos ON LEASE
5. Cacophonous NOISY
6. He frequently toured with Joel JOHN
7. Architectural add-on ELL
8. Sneaky SLY
9. Comical Caesar SID
10. Slogan ending? -EER
11. Layer of bricks MASON
12. Political surprises UPSETS
13. Welcomes SEES IN
14. Teacher’s deg. EDD
15. President before Millard ZACHARY
16. Ma Rainey, notably BLUES SINGER
17. Draw a bead on AIM AT
18. Dodger teammate of Robinson REESE
24. Preacher’s subject SIN
25. Lady in a lea EWE
29. Increases STEPS UP
31. Devil’s wear, in a 2006 film PRADA
32. Dispirit UNMAN
33. Bird’s beak NIB
34. Shampoo, e.g. GEL
35. Cozy home NEST
36. Maritime safety gp. USCG
37. Whaler’s direction THAR
38. Deco designer ERTE
39. Latin lambs AGNI
42. Smack WHOP
43. Architectural order including circular column tops DORIC
44. Mushroom in Japanese cuisine ENOKI
45. Violinist’s supply ROSIN
47. Bridget Fonda, to Jane NIECE
48. Noble __ GASES
52. “Milk” Oscar recipient PENN
53. One of a cube’s dozen EDGE
56. Receive GREET
57. Look for water DOWSE
59. Strictness RIGOR
63. Faux felt BAIZE
64. Put on AIRED
65. Tabulae rasae BLANK SLATES
67. Life of the party RIOT
68. Radio code opener ALFA
69. Backup option PLAN B
70. Sweets SUGAR
71. Jewish spiritual leader REBBE
74. Parish officials DEACONS
77. Hebrides native GAEL
80. Herb in pesto BASIL
81. “Strange as it may seem … ” ODDLY …
82. Shows of respect BOWS
83. Dullea of “2010: The Year We Make Contact” KEIR
84. Fish-eating flier ERNE
85. Stds. of conduct REGS
88. Plush carpet SHAG
92. Academic expert, facetiously OLOGIST
94. Like Shostakovich’s “Symphony No. 2” IN B
95. Folder aid TAB
96. Hardly intellectual LOWBROW
98. Impulse-conducting cell NEURON
99. Proofer’s finds ERRORS
102. Not o’er ‘NEATH
103. __ vincit amor OMNIA
104. Direct BLUNT
105. PC port USB
106. “Phooey!” BAH!
107. Nine Inch Nails founder Reznor TRENT
110. A/C units BTUS
111. Tops A-ONE
112. Political contest RACE
113. Pigged out (on) ODED
115. “Enough details, please” TMI
116. Chocolate pet LAB
117. Student’s email ending EDU
118. Van Gogh work OIL
119. First st. admitted to the Union after the Civil War NEB

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5 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Apr 16, Sunday”

  1. 6 clues, numerous letters, most due to theme entries I couldn't make out from the crosses. That said, I was not very impressed with the thematic choices. Once you figured out the theme, you really didn't get anything, as they really weren't all that consistently applied. Even after I knew the theme entries, it still didn't add anything to the grid. Add to that numerous Fill That Should Not Be such as CUME, UNMAN, AGNI, INB, and WHOP, and it really didn't turn out to be a good grid at all.

    I'll probably go ahead and finish up the WSJ today, but really can't say much better of it given what I know of it. Like Joe's theme better, but still it's pretty inconsistently applied.

  2. BAH. Spent too much of my day on this.

    Shag carpets are not always plush. I've seen many a sparse shag in low-rent houses and apts.

  3. I'll say the LAT's is upping its game when it comes to the level of difficulty of their Sunday grid. I finally solved this, but it wasn't fast and it wasn't easy. Some very tricky clues and I'll agree with anyone selecting "cume" for Student's complete file to a teacher as pretty suspect in terms of being above board.

    Have a relaxing Sunday all. See you tomorrow for what I'm sure will be an easier time when it comes to filling in the grid.

  4. Too much time for not enough payback.
    I went wrong in so many places.
    @Anon at 5:49 yesterday-
    I'm getting tired of the "key of Bachman Turner's etude for 3 guitars and a tamborine" thing.
    Hillarious!!!!
    Me too. How 'bout, "Key that every jazz saxophonist plays in on 'Body and Soul'?"
    Answer- D Flat.
    Or "What key does the bridge go to in 'Body and Soul'?"
    Answer- D major.
    Well there was another one today.
    "Like Shostakovich's "Symphony No. 2".
    See you all tomorrow.

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