LA Times Crossword Answers 14 Oct 16, Friday




la-times-crossword-solution-14-oct-16







Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: By the Ounce

Today’s themed answers are common phrases, but with the letter sequence OZ inserted:

  • 57A…How perfume is sold … and this puzzle’s title..BY THE OUNCE
  • 17A…Doughnut order from a king?..LION’S DOZEN (“lion’s den” + oz”)
  • 25A…Musicians given to tippling?..BOOZY BAND (“boy band” + oz”)
  • 34A…Set of data within an atmospheric analysis?..TABLE FOR OZONE (“table for one” + oz”)
  • 48A…Occupants of a well-insulated nest?..COZY YOUNG (“Cy Young” + oz”)

Bill’s time: 10m 19s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

5…Calyx part..SEPAL

In a flower, the sepals are those green, leaf-like structures that are “interleaved” with the petals, providing support. Prior to acting as support for the petals, the sepals protect the flower in bud.

The calyx is the collective name for the sepals of a flower, the outermost whorl that forms the flower (the pretty part!).

14…Samoan capital..APIA

Apia is the capital city, and in fact the only city, of the Pacific island-nation of Samoa. The harbor of Apia is famous for a very foolish incident in 1889 involving seven naval vessels from Germany, the US and Britain. A typhoon was approaching so the safest thing to do was to head for open water away from land, but no nation would move its ships for fear of losing face in front of the others. Six of the ships were lost in the typhoon as a result and 200 American and German sailors perished. The British cruiser HMS Calliope barely managed to escape from the harbor and rode out the storm safely.

15…Amtrak option..ACELA

The Acela Express is the fastest train routinely running in the US, getting up to 150 mph at times. The service runs between Boston and Washington D.C. via Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. The brand name “Acela” was created to evoke “acceleration” and “excellence”.

16…Cabinet dept. formed under Carter..ENER

The US Department of Energy (DOE) came into being largely as a result of the 1973 oil crisis. The DOE was founded in 1977 by the Carter administration. The DOE is responsible for regulating the production of nuclear power, and it is also responsible for the nation’s nuclear weapons. The official DOE seal features symbols denoting five sources of energy: the sun, an atom, an oil derrick, a windmill and a dynamo.

19…Fifty percent up front?..DEMI-

Ever wonder what the difference is between the prefixes “hemi-”, “demi-” and “semi-”, all of which mean “half”? Well, the general observation is that words using the “demi-” prefix date back to the days of Norman influence over the English language. As a result, “demi-” turns up in the world of period costume and coats of arms. Words using “hemi-” tend to have Greek roots, and are prevalent in the world of the sciences and the medical field. Words with “semi-” tend to have Latin roots, and are most often found in music and the arts, and mathematics.

21…GPS info..RTE

A global positioning system (GPS) might point out a route (rte.).

23…Pisa possessive..MIO

“Mio” is Italian for “my”.

The city of Pisa is right on the Italian coast, sitting at the mouth of the River Arno, and is famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city’s cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are …

28…Writer LeShan..EDA

Eda LeShan wrote several nonfiction books including “When Your Child Drives You Crazy” and “The Conspiracy Against Childhood”. LeShan was also host of the PBS television show “How Do Your Children Grow?”

31…Sergeant Bilko, to friends..ERNIE

Master Sergeant Ernie Bilko was played by Phil Silvers in his TV show that aired in the fifties. “The Phil Silvers Show” was hugely successful in reruns in the British Isles, even more so than over here in the US. Master Sergeant Bilko is routinely referred to as the lower-ranking Sergeant Bilko by viewers, and even by those airing the show in reruns.

32…Tapestry thread..WEFT

When cloth is woven, the lengthwise yarns held in tension on the loom are known as warps. The horizontal yarn that is drawn back and forth through the warps is known as the weft or woof.

33…Saturn models..IONS

The Saturn Ion was produced by GM from 2003 to 2007. It was the longest (in length) of any car sold in North America to be marketed as a “compact”.

34…Set of data within an atmospheric analysis?..TABLE FOR OZONE (“table for one” + oz”)

Ozone gets its name from the Greek word ozein, meaning “to smell”. It was given this name as ozone’s formation during lightning storms was detected by the gas’s distinctive smell. Famously, there is a relatively high concentration of the gas in the “ozone layer” in the Earth’s stratosphere. This ozone layer provides a vital function for animal life on the planet as it absorbs most of the sun’s UV radiation. A molecule of ozone is made up of three oxygen atoms, whereas a “normal” oxygen has just two atoms.

40…Quarterback Tony..ROMO

Tony Romo is a quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys. Romo is also an avid amateur golfer and has even tried (albeit unsuccessfully) to qualify for the US Open golf championship.

42…Protection against Mr. Decay Germ, in old ads..IPANA

Ipana toothpaste was introduced in 1915 and was at the height of its popularity in the forties and fifties. Sales declined in the sixties and the product was withdrawn from the US market in the seventies. Bucky the Beaver was the “spokesman” for Ipana. Bucky the Beaver’s slogan was “Brusha… Brusha… Brusha. Get the New Ipana – it’s dandy for your teeth!” Bucky’s nemesis in commercials was Mr. Decay Germ.

45…MDX ÷ X..CLI

In Roman numerals, “MDX” (1,510) divided by “X” (10) equals “CLI” (151).

48…Occupants of a well-insulated nest?..COZY YOUNG (“Cy Young” + oz”)

Cy Young was a pitcher in the major leagues from 1890-1911. Young is remembered for pitching the first perfect game of baseball’s modern era. Soon after he died in 1955, the Cy Young Award was created and is presented to the best pitcher in each baseball season.

50…One of the Coen brothers..ETHAN

I think it’s great to see two brothers working together and being so successful. Joel and Ethan Coen are two movie producers and directors who both live in New York City. The Coen brothers do love the movie-making business and they even married industry “insiders”. Ethan’s wife is film editor Tricia Cooke, and Joel is married to one of my favorite actresses, the lovely Frances McDormand.

52…”10538 Overture” gp…ELO

“10538 Overture” was the first single to be recorded by the British rock group Electric Light Orchestra (ELO). ELO’s lead singer Jeff Lynne wrote the song, which is about an escaped prisoner. Lynne didn’t want to give his “hero” a name, and opted for a number. He noticed the number 1053 on a mixing console, and so he used it. The number 8 was later added so that it better fit with the melody. Hence, the song’s title is “10538 Overture”.

53…Ocean bird..ERN

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also called the white-tailed eagle, or the sea-eagle.

55…M’s favorite agent..BOND

The character “M” in the James Bond stories is the head of Secret Intelligence Service, also called MI6. The name “M” is chosen as a nod to former head of MI5 Maxwell Knight who routinely signed his memos simply as “M”.

57…How perfume is sold … and this puzzle’s title..BY THE OUNCE

Our term “ounce” comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a “libra”, the Roman “pound”.

60…Commercial exchange fee..AGIO

The term “agio” derives from the Italian “aggio” meaning “exchange rate, discount, premium”. Most often, the agio is defined as the difference between the actual exchange rate and the nominal exchange rate for two currencies. That difference is mainly made up of the service fee for making the exchange.

61…Ames native..IOWAN

The Iowa city of Ames was founded as a stop on the Cedar Rapids and Missouri Railroad in 1864. It was named for US Congressman Oakes Ames from the state of Massachusetts in honor of the role that Ames played in the building of the transcontinental railroad.

62…Future ENT’s exam..MCAT

Medical College Admission Test (MCAT)

63…”You’ve Got Mail” co-star..RYAN

Meg Ryan is the stage name of the actress Margaret Mary Hyra. Ryan’s big break came with the excellent 1989 movie “When Harry Met Sally”, from which she went on to star in some of the greatest romantic comedies ever made.

“You’ve Got Mail” is a 1998 romantic comedy film starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, directed by Nora Ephron. The film is an adaptation of the Miklos Laszlo play “Parfumerie”. The storyline of “Parfumerie” was also used for the movies “The Shop Around the Corner” (from 1940 starring James Stewart and Margaret Sullivan) and “In the Good Old Summertime” (from 1949 starring Van Johnson and Judy Garland).

Down

1…Biblical seductress..SALOME

In the New Testament, Salome was a dancer and a seductress. She was the stepdaughter of Herod and when she danced for him on his birthday, her mother demanded as a reward the execution of John the Baptist. Salome is not actually named in the account in the gospels, and historians rely on other sources to determine that she was indeed “Salome”. Famously, the seductive dance that she performed is said to be the Dance of the Seven Veils. The dance isn’t named in the Biblical account, and is an elaboration that developed in later Christian mythology.

3…Shoeless Joe Jackson portrayer in “Field of Dreams”..LIOTTA

The actor Ray Liotta is best known for playing Shoeless Joe Jackson in the movie “Field of Dreams” and Henry Hill in “Goodfellas”.

“Field of Dreams” is a fantasy drama about baseball, released in 1989 and starring Kevin Costner. “Field of Dreams” was also the last film in which Burt Lancaster made an appearance. The baseball stadium that was built for the movie can be visited in Dubuque County, Iowa.

Shoeless Joe Jackson was an outfielder who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Naps/Indians and most famously for the Chicago White Sox. Jackson was one of the eight White Sox players accused of accepting a bribe to throw the 1919 World Series, in the so-called “Black Sox” scandal. Jackson earned his nickname early in his career, while playing for a local mill team. A new pair of cleats fitted badly giving him blisters, so Jackson removed them before going to bat. A fan noticed him running the bases in his socks and yelled out “You shoeless son of a gun, you!” The name stuck.

4…Mother of Perseus..DANAE

In Greek mythology, Danaë was the mortal mother of the heroic slayer of monsters Perseus, with the father being Zeus. Danaë herself was the daughter of King Acrisius of Argos and his wife Queen Eurydice.

5…Marquis de __..SADE

The Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat with a reputation for a libertine lifestyle. De Sade was also a writer, well known for his works of erotica. He fell foul of the law for some of his more extreme practices and for blaspheming the Catholic church. On an off, de Sade spent 32 years of his life in prison and in insane asylums.

7…Product with a Simpsons set..PEZ

PEZ is an Austrian brand name for a particular candy sold in a mechanical dispenser. Famously, PEZ dispensers have molded “heads”, and have become very collectible over the years. The list of heads includes historical figures like Betsy Ross and Paul Revere, characters from “Star Wars” and “Star Trek”, and even British royalty like the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (“William and Kate”). The name PEZ comes from the first, middle and last letters of “Pfefferminz”, the German word for “peppermint”.

8…Last Olds models..ALEROS

The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

9…Andy Panda creator..LANTZ

The cartoonist Walter Lantz is best known for creating Woody Woodpecker. Lantz’s wife suggested the idea of a cartoon woodpecker when she heard one pecking at the roof while the newly-wed couple were on their honeymoon. Lantz debuted Woody in a cartoon short featuring Andy Panda, his most successful character up till that time. Woody became a hit, and Lantz’s wife Grace Stafford provided the woodpecker’s voice.

12…Like “executrix,” e.g…FEMININE

An executrix is a female executor of a will. Nice word …

13…Old TV parts..TRIODES

A triode is like a diode, in that it has a cathode from which electrons flow to an anode. However, there is a third terminal called a grid, between the cathode and anode. By applying a potential to the grid, the flow of electrons can be regulated.

22…”Beauty is bought by judgement of the __”: Shakespeare..EYE

“Love’s Labour’s Lost” is a comedy by William Shakespeare that was first performed in 1597, in the presence of Queen Elizabeth I. Here are some lines spoken by the Princess of France to Lord Boyet, one of her attendants:

Good Lord Boyet, my beauty, though but mean,
Needs not the painted flourish of your praise:
Beauty is bought by judgement of the eye,
Not utter’d by base sale of chapmen’s tongues:
I am less proud to hear you tell my worth
Than you much willing to be counted wise
In spending your wit in the praise of mine.

26…Certain footrest..OTTOMAN

The piece of furniture known as an ottoman can be a couch, usually with a head but no back or sides. Here in the US, the term more usually applies to a padded and upholstered seat or bench that can also be used as a footrest. The original ottoman couch came from the Ottoman Empire, hence the name.

27…Verve..BRIO

“Brio” is borrowed from Italian, in which language it means vigor and vivacity. “Con brio” is a musical direction often found on a score, instructing the musicians to play “with energy, vigor”.

30…Quilting party..BEE

Back in 18th-century America, when neighbors would gather to work for the benefit of one of their group, such a meeting was called a “bee”. The name “bee” was an allusion to the social nature of the insect. In modern parlance, a further element of entertainment and pleasure has been introduced, for example in a “quilting bee”, or even a “spelling bee”.

35…Rain forest region..AMAZONIA

The Amazon rainforest is the world’s largest, 1.4 billion acres of rainforest that includes territory in nine different countries in South America. Those 1.4 billion acres represent more than half of the rainforest that’s left on the planet.

37…Former PBS “Mystery!” host..RIGG

Diana Rigg is a marvelous actress from England who is best known for playing Emma Peel on the hit sixties show “The Avengers”. Rigg also won an Emmy for her performance in a 1997 television adaptation of “Rebecca”. In my humble opinion, she was also the best-ever Bond girl (opposite the worst ever Bond guy: George Lazenby), in “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” …

39…Louisiana genre featuring the accordion..ZYDECO

Zydeco is a style of folk music that evolved from Creole music in Louisiana. The name “Zydeco” is imitative of the French word for green beans, “les haricots”. The term arose from a popular dance tune called “Les Haricots Sont Pas Salés” (“The Green Beans Ain’t Salty”).

44…His stories inspired “Guys and Dolls”..RUNYON

“Guys and Dolls” is a musical with music and lyrics by Frank Loesser. It was first produced on Broadway, in 1950, and ran for 1200 performances. The show was based on a book written by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows, which book was inspired by the short stories :The Idyll of Miss Sarah Brown” and “Blood Pressure” by Damon Runyon. “Guys and Dolls” was chosen as winner of a Pulitzer in 1951, but the award was cancelled as Abe Burrows was having problems with the House Un-American Activities Committee at the time.

49…”__ non sufficit”: the world is not enough..ORBIS

“Orbis non sufficit” (Latin for “the world is not enough”) was the motto of English Baronet Sir Thomas Bond. Ian Fleming decided to name real-life Sir Thomas as an ancestor of his fictional spy James Bond. And that’s the backstory to the book and movie title “The World Is Not Enough”.

54…Beltway VIPs..SENS

The phrase “inside the Beltway” is used to refer to the infrastructure and politics of Washington, D.C. The Beltway in this case is Interstate 495, also known as the Capital Beltway.

58…BOAC competitor..TWA

Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan Am, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the initialism “TWA”) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) was one of the two airlines that were merged in 1974 to form British Airways (the other was British European Airways, known as BEA).

59…Storied cauldron stirrer..HAG

“Hag” is a shortened form of the Old English word “haegtesse” meaning, “witch”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…Talked into, with “on”..SOLD

5…Calyx part..SEPAL

10…Typical artist’s apartment..LOFT

14…Samoan capital..APIA

15…Amtrak option..ACELA

16…Cabinet dept. formed under Carter..ENER

17…Doughnut order from a king?..LION’S DOZEN (“lion’s den” + oz”)

19…Fifty percent up front?..DEMI-

20…Recorded..ON TAPE

21…GPS info..RTE

23…Pisa possessive..MIO

24…Recording device..METER

25…Musicians given to tippling?..BOOZY BAND (“boy band” + oz”)

28…Writer LeShan..EDA

29…Is next to..ABUTS

31…Sergeant Bilko, to friends..ERNIE

32…Tapestry thread..WEFT

33…Saturn models..IONS

34…Set of data within an atmospheric analysis?..TABLE FOR OZONE (“table for one” + oz”)

40…Quarterback Tony..ROMO

41…Swamplike..MIRY

42…Protection against Mr. Decay Germ, in old ads..IPANA

44…Continued violently..RAGED

45…MDX ÷ X..CLI

48…Occupants of a well-insulated nest?..COZY YOUNG (“Cy Young” + oz”)

50…One of the Coen brothers..ETHAN

52…”10538 Overture” gp…ELO

53…Ocean bird..ERN

54…Gets rid of..SCRAPS

55…M’s favorite agent..BOND

57…How perfume is sold … and this puzzle’s title..BY THE OUNCE

60…Commercial exchange fee..AGIO

61…Ames native..IOWAN

62…Future ENT’s exam..MCAT

63…”You’ve Got Mail” co-star..RYAN

64…Grabs..SNAGS

65…Turtles, sometimes..PETS

Down

1…Biblical seductress..SALOME

2…Offered a view..OPINED

3…Shoeless Joe Jackson portrayer in “Field of Dreams”..LIOTTA

4…Mother of Perseus..DANAE

5…Marquis de __..SADE

6…Prefix with friendly..ECO-

7…Product with a Simpsons set..PEZ

8…Last Olds models..ALEROS

9…Andy Panda creator..LANTZ

10…Took charge..LED

11…Two-run homer situation..ONE MAN ON

12…Like “executrix,” e.g…FEMININE

13…Old TV parts..TRIODES

18…Urban __..SPRAWL

22…”Beauty is bought by judgement of the __”: Shakespeare..EYE

25…Fit and muscular..BUFF

26…Certain footrest..OTTOMAN

27…Verve..BRIO

30…Quilting party..BEE

34…Math branch concerned with surfaces..TOPOLOGY

35…Rain forest region..AMAZONIA

36…Beyond slender..BONY

37…Former PBS “Mystery!” host..RIGG

38…Extractable natural resource..ORE

39…Louisiana genre featuring the accordion..ZYDECO

40…Grain-based treat..RICE BAR

43…”Understood, Cap’n”..AYE

44…His stories inspired “Guys and Dolls”..RUNYON

45…Luck..CHANCE

46…Pet that needs a sitter?..LAP CAT

47…Many Alaska maps..INSETS

49…”__ non sufficit”: the world is not enough..ORBIS

51…Outdo..TRUMP

54…Beltway VIPs..SENS

56…Put on..DON

58…BOAC competitor..TWA

59…Storied cauldron stirrer..HAG

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13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 14 Oct 16, Friday”

  1. Hi all! Hope you’ve had a good week!

    @Dave
    Got to the WSJ puzzle (10/9) you referenced a couple of days ago. Definitely very novel, though I have to wonder how long it took to come up with the mirror clues (not a spoiler, you see the theme when you look at it, in fact it’s one of the few where the theme helped me to solve it). Probably not too long though with a word/phrase list and a pattern matcher, especially if you write a program to search for matches of that sort…(speaking of which that gives me an idea…)

  2. Not too bad for a Friday but topology and triodes had me stumped for awhile.
    As usual the best part for me is Bill’s back stories. Permit me to make an addendum to BEA short for British European Airways. Their planes had “BEA” printed on their sides. I’m old enough to fondly remember the great times of Beatlemania. During it’s heyday, someone put “TLES” on the side of the plane. Most likely a photo op or publicity stunt. I think I have one of those Beatles collectible cards with the Fab Four standing alongside the plane. You got a hard thin piece of bubblegum with those cards; I have many. Good weekend, all!

  3. Another good Friday grid from Mr. Wechsler. I say that only because I finished this one. I think he stumped me the last time. Interesting re-treads of ELO (Jeff Lynne) and LANTZ from yesterday.Hmmmm. I had to be awfully confident in my other answers to leave WEFT alone. New to me. Nice theme.

    Goodfellas and Field of Dreams are 2 of my 10 favorite movies. Never thought of the fact that LIOTTA was in both.

    Interesting stuff on demi, hemi, and semi. Once again something I never thought about. What about a demi glaze I see on menus all the time? Maybe that’s referring to a coating of a sort?

    Best –

  4. 14:00, no errors, iPad. Initially, I suffered brain freeze in almost the entire upper left corner, so, two minutes in, all I had was EDA. The rest of the puzzle went pretty smoothly and gave me the theme, which then gave me LION’S DOZEN, at which point the problematic corner almost filled itself in.

    @Glenn … I have to wonder how many puzzle setters struggle with the ethics of using computer-based tools. You’re right that such tools would make it a lot easier to construct something like that WSJ puzzle, but is it “fair”? (I guess I have to admit that, although I insist on solving puzzles without using any such aids, I would be forced to use them in creating a puzzle.)

    I once knew a guy who was incredibly fast at unscrambling out-of-order words. It was as if his brain had a built-in subroutine for the purpose. At the time, I was a pretty good Scrabble player and I very much envied the guy’s talent.

    I also wonder to what extent the use of computer aids is degrading our own abilities. Why should I remember a phone number if my phone remembers it for me? Why should I remember how to do arithmetic on paper when there’s an app for that on half a dozen devices in my home? I observe that almost everything I read these days contains far more errors of certain types (missing words, extra words, misspelled words, etc.) than they used to. (Sometimes, I read my newspaper with a red pen in my hand, correcting errors as I go.)

    Okay … time to quit … I’m sounding like an old man again … 🙂

  5. This was one tough puzzle. But, thanks to the puzzle, and Bill’s blog – I learnt a lot. Thanks Jeffrey, and Bill, of course.

    Ofcourse, in the puzzle, and in Bill’s blog …. most perfumes are sold by the fluid ounce ,,,, a fl. oz. is approx 30 ml. or cc’s in USA, 28.4 ml. in the UK. It is obviously a unit of volume. Its “apothecary sign” is the number 3 with a double image on the top part of the number ( which I cannot reproduce here ;-D) )… like a person who would view the 3 with diplopia ( double vision ) on the vertical axis … more like a double z on the top of the number three. …

    This Apothecaries’ sysytem, Wikipedia may explain it better.
    Btw, this symbol is apparently used for BOTH ounces, mass and volume @#!

    I did not understand ‘fifty percent upfront’ until I read many explanations. Demi meaning one-half, and the ‘upfront’ meaning a prefix, as in demitasse etc.

    Btw, Bill, for 32 A, maybe the first line of the explanation needs to be broken up …. because there are two types of yarns, being referred to, and the warps refer to the latter yarns. Breaking up into 2 sentences, would go far in reinforcing the association.

    I like to remember by the ‘f’ in weft and woof, as ‘fro’ ( as in to and fro ) or the fill yarn, or transverse yarn … and the warp as the lengthwise or longitudinal thread.

    My mind was so addled today, I could not even figure out the MDX / X !!!

    Have a nice day all.

    1. Thanks, Vidwan. I really do need a full-time proofreader! That little blurb read terribly, but all fixed now thanks to your help. Much appreciated.

  6. Two letters off. MIa/TRIaDES. Never heard of TRIODES anyway.
    BOOZe BAND/seE/ RTs. Should have checked my answer to see that it didn’t fit the theme.
    Bill didn’t address 17A in the explanations.
    Why is LION’S DOZEN an order from a king?
    I don’t get it.
    Does Wechsler have to be every Friday’s constructor???
    @Carrie- you’ll have to get a Chicangeles shirt. 🙂

    1. @Pookie – Order from a king = lion, aka the “king of beasts”

      DNF for me. Put in Little instead of Liotta for 3 Down and never could untangle that issue. D’oh!

  7. @ JustJoel and Tony Michaels
    That came to mind after I wrote my comments, but really, is that the answer?
    Quote JustJoel……. “Too much of a stretch?”
    Yes, I think so.
    I should just not do Wechsler’s puzzles. They just irk me.
    (sigh)

  8. Jeffrey Wechsler’s puzzle today gets an overall thumbs-up from me — although better clues (even if they don’t belong in a family newspaper) come to mind for 51Down?.

  9. @David Kennison– I can relate to wanting to red pen correct the written word. Seems lately that the LA Times often hyphenates words incorrectly to divide them at the end of the printed line. Especially irritating are the ONE SYLLABLE words that are hyphenated. One would think the word processing program would be better than that. Maybe @Glenn can fix it for them.

  10. Hi everybody!!
    @Joe Bleaux : I hear ya!
    ONE LETTER OFF AGAIN, LIKE YESTERDAY!!! …but at least I knew LANTZ this time. Didn’t know SEPAL or PEZ, so I put SEFAL/FEZ!! Silly mistake — I should have caught it. Instead, I envisioned a set of Fez hats with images of Simpson family members on them.
    @Dave, I also froze in the northwest! Always scary when the opening clues won’t yield. This time, I went and started at the bottom instead, and I managed to gain traction.
    Good puzzle.
    @Pookie, love that shirt idea!! LOL! ??
    HEY AGAIN DAVE – and Blurble — I hear you! I’ve noticed it with the LA Times, and just about any place one sees the printed word nowadays. The WORST are jump pages where the break occurs in the middle of a hyphenated word.
    I saw something REALLY odd in the Times last week, tho it’s on a different topic: a photo accompanying an article was actually a stock photo from an online service! I’ve NEVER seen that in a major paper. Really!! A generic photo — NOT from The Times’ archives, let alone taken by one of their photographers. That just seemed so wrong.
    Hey Vic! I remember hearing that BEA story, and I also have some of those old Beatles cards. !!!
    Big game tomorrow!
    Sweet dreams~~?

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