LA Times Crossword Answers 2 Mar 17, Thursday










Constructed by: Kevin C. Christian

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Queen’s Domain

Today’s themed answers all have the same clue: “Queen’s domain”.

  • 17A. Queen’s domain : CHESS GAME
  • 26A. Queen’s domain : BEEHIVE
  • 36A. Queen’s domain : DECK OF CARDS
  • 51A. Queen’s domain : ENGLAND
  • 60A. Queen’s domain : ARENA ROCK

Bill’s time: 12m 47s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

4. Shed door attachments : HASPS

The “hasp” of a lock might refer to more than one thing. The u-shape loop protruding from a padlock is often called a “lock hasp”, for example.

9. Like iceberg lettuce : CRISP

Iceberg lettuce is the most popular lettuce consumed in the US. Also known as “crisphead”, it is considered by many experts to be one of least flavorful varieties of lettuce available. I agree …

14. Freudian topic : EGO

Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

16. Relative of bongos : TABLA

A tabla is a percussion instrument used in the Indian subcontinent. The tabla consists of a pair of hand drums and is similar to bongos.

17. Queen’s domain : CHESS GAME

In the game of chess, the pawns are the weakest pieces on the board. A pawn that can make it to the opposite of the board can be “promoted” to a piece of choice, usually a queen. Using promotion of pawns, it is possible for a player to have two or more queens on the board at one time. However, standard chess sets come with only one queen per side, so a captured rook is often used as the second queen by placing it on the board upside down.

19. Cause of a skid, perhaps : SLEET

Apparently “sleet” is a term used to describe two weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets, smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls.

20. Tom Jones’ “__ a Lady” : SHE’S

“She’s a Lady” is a 1971 song composed by Paul Anka and released by Tom Jones.

Tom Jones, now he has a real voice and is a great showman. I saw him in Las Vegas many, many moons ago, one of the best Vegas shows I’ve ever attended. Although Tom Jones is a carefully selected stage name (he was born Thomas Woodward) the name isn’t too far from reality as Jones is his mother’s maiden name. The stage name was chosen by his manager to capitalize on the appeal of “Tom Jones”, a filmed version of the Henry Fielding novel that was having a successful run at the time. The name also emphasized Tom’s Welsh roots, as Jones is a very common name in Wales.

21. Payroll service co. : ADP

Automatic Data Processing (ADP) is an enterprise based in Roseland, New Jersey that provides business services to companies.

23. __-à-porter: ready-to-wear : PRET

“Prêt-à-Porter” is a common enough phrase over in Europe, a French expression meaning “ready-to-wear” that has made it into a number of other languages including English.

32. Hide from a hunter : PELT

A “pelt” is the skin of a furry animal.

33. Coppertone’s 30, e.g. : SPF

In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

Coppertone is a brand of sunscreen owned by Bayer.

34. Bit of IM mirth : HEE

Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties. The “AOL Instant Message” service was known as AIM.

40. Versailles monarch : ROI

“La reine” (the queen) is the wife of “le roi” (the king), in French.

Versailles is a city located just 10 miles from the center of Paris. It is famous as home to the magnificent Palace of Versailles. The palace started out as a hunting lodge built in the village of Versailles in 1624, built for Louis XIII. Louis XIII extended the lodge into a full-blown château, but it was Louis XIV who expanded it into one of the largest palaces on the planet. Louis XIV moved the royal court from Paris to Versailles starting in 1678.

41. West __: high-end furniture retailer : ELM

West Elm is an upscale furniture store that is owned by Williams-Sonoma. The chain was founded in 2002.

45. Actress Arthur : BEA

Actress Bea Arthur’s most famous roles were on television, as the lead in the “All in the Family” spin-off “Maude” and as Dorothy Zbornak in “The Golden Girls”. Arthur also won a Tony for playing Vera Charles on stage in the original cast of “Mame” in 1966, two years after she played Yente the matchmaker in the original cast of “Fiddler on the Roof”.

51. Queen’s domain : ENGLAND

The terms “United Kingdom”, “Great Britain” and “England” can sometimes be confused. The official use of “United Kingdom” originated in 1707 with the Acts of Union that declared the countries of England and Scotland as “United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain”. The name changed again with the Acts of Union 1800 that created the “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland” (much to the chagrin of most of the Irish population). This was partially reversed in 1927 when the current name was introduced, the “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland”, in recognition of an independent Irish Free State in the south of the island of Ireland.

54. De Matteo of “Sons of Anarchy” : DREA

Drea de Matteo is an actress who is most familiar to me for playing Adriana la Cerva on HBO’s wonderful series “The Sopranos”. De Matteo also played Joey’s sister on the short-lived “Friends” spin-off called “Joey”, and the character Angie Bolen on “Desperate Housewives”.

“Sons of Anarchy” is a popular FX crime series about an outlaw motorcycle club in California’s Central Valley. Apparently, it is the most successful FX show ever.

57. Baseball analyst Hershiser : OREL

Orel Hershiser is big into poker now that he has retired from Major League Baseball. Hershiser lives in Las Vegas and when he isn’t working for ESPN, apparently he is at the poker tables, playing professionally. When Hershiser is eliminated in a poker tournament, he is in the habit of presenting the person who ousts him with an autographed baseball.

58. Odyssey on the road : HONDA

The Honda Odyssey is a minivan that has been around since 1994. We had one for many years …

60. Queen’s domain : ARENA ROCK

“Arena rock” (also “stadium rock”) is a rock music played in large arenas. It is a phenomenon that dates back to the British Invasion when successful bands like the Beatles played to large audiences in places such as Shea Stadium in New York.

Queen is an English rock band that was formed back in 1970. With the help of lead singer Freddie Mercury (now deceased), Queen has a long list of great hits, including “Bohemian Rhapsody”, “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions”. “Bohemian Rhapsody” spent a total of nine weeks at number one in the UK.

66. Writer who inspired the Raven Award : POE

The Raven Society is a University of Virginia Honor Society that was founded in 1904. It is named for the 1845 poem titled “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe, who attended UVA for one semester. The Raven Society presents annual Raven Fellowships, and since 1933 has presented an annual Raven Award to outstanding UVA students, faculty or alumni.

67. Pineal or pituitary : GLAND

The pineal gland is a small gland located in the epithalamus, near the center of the brain. The gland gets its name from its shape, like a tiny pine cone. The pineal gland produces melatonin, a hormone that helps maintain our circadian rhythm, so varying levels of melatonin control our sleep-wake cycle.

The pituitary gland is found at the base of the brain and is about the size of pea. The pituitary secretes nine hormones in all, and so affects many aspects of bodily function.

69. Soufflé need : EGG

A soufflé is a French dish, usually served as a dessert. The verb “souffler” means “to blow, blow up”.

Down

1. 39th pres. : JEC

President James Earl “Jimmy” Carter (JEC) is a graduate of the US Naval Academy (USNA). Carter served in the Navy on surface ships and submarines, and chose to pursue a career in the submarine service as he was interested in nuclear power and believed it had a great future in submarine design. As a result, he became an expert in nuclear propulsion. In 1952, the Navy sent the young Carter to the Chalk River Laboratories in Canada to lead the US effort to shutdown the reactor after an accident and partial meltdown of a reactor core. He and his team had to be lowered into the leaking reactor core for mechanical disassembly, staying there for only seconds at a time to minimise exposure to radiation. Decades later as US President, it was this experience that influenced Carter’s decision not to complete the development of the neutron bomb.

3. Runs amok : GOES WILD

The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy …

4. Uncouth types, in Canadian slang : HOSERS

The derogatory word “hoser”, meaning “foolish or uncultivated person”, is apparently attributed to Canadians. That said, I just read that the term is in fact rarely used north of the border.

6. Yellow __ : SEA

The Yellow Sea is the northern part of the East China Sea, and is located between the Korean peninsula and China. The water surface does indeed take on a golden yellow hue at times when it picks up sand particles from sand storms in the Gobi Desert, which lies to the west of the Yellow Sea.

7. Adidas rival : PUMA

Puma is a German company that sells athletic shoes worldwide. The company is most famous for its line of soccer boots.

The brand name Adidas dates back to when Adolf “Adi” Dassler started making his own sports shoes in his mother’s laundry room in Bavaria after returning from WWI. With his brother, Adi founded Dassler shoes. The company’s big break came in 1936 at the Berlin Olympics, when Adi persuaded American sprinter Jesse Owens to use his shoes, and with the success of Jesse Owens came success for the fledgling shoe company. After WWII the brothers split, acrimoniously. Adi’s brother, Ru-dolf Da-ssler, formed “Ruda” shoes (later to become Puma), and Adi Das-sler formed “Adidas”.

9. Nos. that are beside the point : CTS

When writing an amount of money, the two digits to the right of the decimal point signify a number of cents (cts.).

10. Actor Fiennes : RALPH

English actor Ralph Fiennes comes from a very aristocratic family, as one might guess from his full name, Ralph Nathaniel Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes. He is in fact an eighth cousin of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir to the British throne. Fiennes has played some nasty characters in his time, including the commandant of the concentration camp in “Schindler’s List” and the dreaded Lord Voldemort in the “Harry Potter” movies.

11. It’s across the Pyrenees from France : IBERIA

The Iberian Peninsula in Europe is largely made up of Spain and Portugal. However, also included is the Principality of Andorra in the Pyrenees, a small part of the south of France, and the British Territory of Gibraltar. Iberia takes its name from the Ebro, the longest river in Spain, which the Romans named the “Iber”.

The Pyrénées is a mountain range that runs along the border between Spain and France. Nestled between the two countries, high in the mountains, is the lovely country of Andorra, an old haunt of my family during skiing season …

13. Auction spiel : PATTER

A spiel is a lengthy speech or argument designed to persuade, like a sales pitch. “Spiel” comes to us from German, either directly (“spiel” is the German for “play”) or via the Yiddish “shpil”.

22. New York suburb bordering New Rochelle : PELHAM

The suburban town of Pelham lies about 14 miles northeast of Manhattan. The land on which the town now sits was purchased in 1654 by English-born physician Thomas Pell, who named the area in honor of his old tutor Pelham Burton.

24. Recipe amt. : TSP

Teaspoon (tsp.)

29. USCG rank : CPO

A Chief Petty Officer (CPO) is a non-commissioned officer (NCO) in the Navy (USN) and Coast Guard (USCG). The “Petty” is derived from the French word “petit” meaning “small”.

33. Gossip : SKINNY

The use of the word “skinny” meaning information, comes from WWII military slang for “the truth”, probably a derivative of the expression “the naked truth” (evocative of “skinny-dipping”).

35. Santa portrayer in “Elf” : ED ASNER

“Elf” is a comedy movie released for the 2003 Christmas season. “Elf” was directed by Jon Favreau and stars Will Ferrell in the title role, with James Caan supporting and Ed Asner playing Santa Claus. It’s all about one of Santa’s elves who finds out he is human and goes to meet his father in New York City.

38. Cavs, on a scoreboard : CLE

The Cleveland Cavaliers are the professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. The Cavs joined the NBA as an expansion team in 1970.

43. Chem class suffix : -IDE

In chemistry, when a metal combines with a nonmetal, the nonmetal is often given the suffix “-ide”. One example would be iron sulfide, made from iron (a metal) and sulfur (a nonmetal).

44. “Game of Thrones” patriarch Stark : NED

Ned Stark is the protagonist in George R. R. Martin’s fantasy novel “A Game of Thrones”, although his character doesn’t exactly come out on top by the end of the story. Stark is played by actor Sean Bean in the HBO television adaptation of the novel.

47. Guide for a chair : AGENDA

“Agenda” is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

53. __ boom : SONIC

Supersonic transports (SSTs) like the Concorde broke Mach 1, the speed of sound. As a plane flies through air, it creates pressure waves in front (and behind) rather like the bow and stern waves of a boat. These pressure waves travel at the speed of sound, so as an aircraft itself accelerates towards the speed of sound it catches up with the pressure waves until they cannot “get out of the way”. When the aircraft reaches the speed of sound, the compressed waves merge into one single shock wave, creating a sonic boom.

56. Met delivery : ARIA

The Metropolitan Opera (often “the Met”) of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you …

61. Critter on the Australian 50-cent coin : EMU

The Australian 50-cent coin is one of the largest coins in circulation in any country across the globe. It is a twelve-sided coin with a diameter of just under 1¼ inches. The obverse of the 50-cent piece features the profile of Queen Elizabeth II, and the reverse bears the Australian coat of arms.

The official symbol of Australia is a coat of arms that features a kangaroo and an emu.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Bleach container : JUG

4. Shed door attachments : HASPS

9. Like iceberg lettuce : CRISP

14. Freudian topic : EGO

15. Marginally ahead : ONE UP

16. Relative of bongos : TABLA

17. Queen’s domain : CHESS GAME

19. Cause of a skid, perhaps : SLEET

20. Tom Jones’ “__ a Lady” : SHE’S

21. Payroll service co. : ADP

23. __-à-porter: ready-to-wear : PRET

24. Keep from happening : THWART

26. Queen’s domain : BEEHIVE

28. Corporate big shots : SUITS

29. With false modesty : COYLY

31. Bubbly opener? : AER-

32. Hide from a hunter : PELT

33. Coppertone’s 30, e.g. : SPF

34. Bit of IM mirth : HEE

36. Queen’s domain : DECK OF CARDS

40. Versailles monarch : ROI

41. West __: high-end furniture retailer : ELM

42. Related : AKIN

45. Actress Arthur : BEA

48. Slyly disparaging : SNIDE

50. Back of a single : B-SIDE

51. Queen’s domain : ENGLAND

53. Picked up : SENSED

54. De Matteo of “Sons of Anarchy” : DREA

55. One in favor : YEA

57. Baseball analyst Hershiser : OREL

58. Odyssey on the road : HONDA

60. Queen’s domain : ARENA ROCK

64. Of yesteryear : OLDEN

65. Keep down : LIMIT

66. Writer who inspired the Raven Award : POE

67. Pineal or pituitary : GLAND

68. Chef’s creation : SAUCE

69. Soufflé need : EGG

Down

1. 39th pres. : JEC

2. “Bummer” : UGH

3. Runs amok : GOES WILD

4. Uncouth types, in Canadian slang : HOSERS

5. Severe anxiety : ANGST

6. Yellow __ : SEA

7. Adidas rival : PUMA

8. Left in the dust : SPED BY

9. Nos. that are beside the point : CTS

10. Actor Fiennes : RALPH

11. It’s across the Pyrenees from France : IBERIA

12. Tailor’s measure : SLEEVE

13. Auction spiel : PATTER

18. Destroy : SHATTER

22. New York suburb bordering New Rochelle : PELHAM

24. Recipe amt. : TSP

25. Tinge : HUE

27. Once-over giver : EYER

29. USCG rank : CPO

30. Took out : OFFED

33. Gossip : SKINNY

35. Santa portrayer in “Elf” : ED ASNER

37. Alguna __: something, in Spain : COSA

38. Cavs, on a scoreboard : CLE

39. White way : SKI SLOPE

43. Chem class suffix : -IDE

44. “Game of Thrones” patriarch Stark : NED

45. Covers stealer : BED HOG

46. Join the club : ENROLL

47. Guide for a chair : AGENDA

49. High standards : IDEALS

50. Scold : BERATE

52. Weighted down : LADEN

53. __ boom : SONIC

56. Met delivery : ARIA

59. “Then what happened?” : AND?

61. Critter on the Australian 50-cent coin : EMU

62. Machine part : COG

63. Beer source : KEG

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13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 2 Mar 17, Thursday”

  1. The puzzle was very challenging, and I was lucky to complete it. Very nice clues and I even ‘got’ the theme – which was quite obvious.

    I kept thinking Pack of Cards, before DECK of cards. Bob Hope once described a collection of european royalty, who attended Eliz.II’s wedding – as enough pieces to form a chess set, and with enough left over for a pack of cards …..

    Jeff, nice to hear from you. I hope the cigar is not causing any ‘funny stuff ‘- or is that the wrong country ? I notice you are on the far eastern coast of the island – did you or have you ever gone ‘over’ to the western side – Haiti ? Do the islanders speak spanish and french, or a combination, as ‘Spench’ ?

    Here is a ‘showy’ tabla player, virtuoso, demonstration. A tabla is generally always an accompaniment, and rarely played alone, although its effect is very very noticeable and prominent.

    Thank you Bill, for explaining ‘Tom Jones’. I always wondered if the Feilding novel was fiction or non-fiction. If I remember, Tom Jones, of the novel, was a raunchy, ladies man …

    So, if I understand right,
    England = England
    Great Britain = England + Scotland +(Wales)
    United Kingdom = Great Britain + No. Ireland.
    Got it.

    I saw the Australian 50c. coin on Google. very impressive ! I do wish they had not been so realistic and showed the queen in being so old …. all those jowls and sagging cheeks …. why couldn’t they just stick to the youthful beauty ?? I think a little plastic, er, steel, surgery would have been so much more appropriate.

    Have a nice day, all.

    1. Canadian coins feature Queen Elizabeth II on all of our coins and every 20 years or so they have changed her looks. There have been 4 different busts they have used ranging from young to old.

  2. 13:07, no errors. Oddly, this one was harder, for me at least, than today’s NYT puzzle. I didn’t start making real progress until I got to the bottom and started back up. Interesting story about Jimmy Carter …

  3. For the record, I have never heard a Canadian use “hoser” ever. Unless they were quoting Bob & Doug MacKenzie.

    1. Canadian Alex Trebeck used the term “hoser” in one of the recent “Jeopardy!” answers — as an “undesirable” Canadian. It was the first time I had heard the term since the movie “Strange Brew” starring the McKensie “brothers.”

  4. “Hoser” was an answer on Jeopardy yesterday, in the category “Speak like a Canadian” Trebeck was familiar with it, being Canadian. He said it originated as a reference to hooligans siphoning gas out of cars – using a hose.

  5. I was clueless as to the clues. They made no sense to me this morning.
    I suppose they’ll make sense now that I know the answers, but a lot of them stumped me. I quit after 30 minutes and very little filled in.

  6. Never would have come up with PELHAM unless I had remembered the movie “The Taking of Pelham 123” (2009). How much of our knowledge comes from films? 🙂

  7. Piano man nailed it. I was stuck on 22 Down in which the first letter eluded me until I got to “p” in the alphabet and Pelham and that movie made the last two letters come together. Great minds (ahem) think alike!

    The WSJ was a little tricky until the theme finally revealed itself and then it came to fruition fairly quickly.

  8. The NE stopped me cold. (IBERIA? “Pyrenees” wasn’t enough to get me there. PATTER? Can’t believe I didn’t get it after that very clever “auction” hint.) The “queen” theme is as inspired as any of that ilk, but overall I found this puzzle neither fun nor challenging — for a Thursday, anyway.

  9. Another wonderful day here….and yes one cigar per day seems to be my pace. They have a national drink here called Mamajuana. It starts with tree bark and some other “natural”plants as they say here. Then they add red wine and let all of that ferment for about 2 weeks. Then they add rum and enjoy. It sounds awful but it’s remarkably tasty…and strong. You drink it like a shot. I asked if it was medicine vs a drink and they assured me (jokingly) that it is….

    Vidwan – Yes here in the Dominican Republic they speak Spanish. I’ve been to the eastern part of the country – the capital of Santo Domingo – but I’ve never ventured into Haiti. There of course they all speak French. There is an attitude with the Dominicans who look down upon all of the Haitian immigrants not unlike many in the U.S. who don’t like Mexican immigrants.

    I’ll catch up on the puzzles when I get back. I did yesterday’s on the plane, but I haven’t had time for today’s. It’s trips like these that make me marvel at Bill’s ability to do these blogs even while on vacation.

    this is a new laptop so I don’t have my name in here yet. this is Jeff…..

    Best –

  10. Very enjoyable puzzle for me today, with the NE giving a bit more thought than the rest. I had inseam before SLEEVE and that slowed things down a bit. PELHAM, I had to get through crosses, as that is about as Natticky as can be, for me.

    On to Friday…

  11. Good puzzle, but I was “tireder” than normal and cheated a bit. That top center section really hinged on PUMA for me.
    I also got PELHAM from the movie, tho I associate the name with the original version of the film, from the early 70s.

    Isn’t it the case that the actor RALPH Feinnes pronounces his name “Rafe”?
    Send pics, Jeff!!!
    So tired…..
    Sweet dreams~~™?

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