LA Times Crossword Answers 18 Jun 17, Sunday










Constructed by: Gail Grabowski

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Pop Culture

Happy Father’s Day to all of us “pops” out there. Today’s themed answers each contain the hidden word “DAD”.

  • 111D. Today’s honoree, found in this puzzle’s eight longest answers : DAD
  • 23A. Brand created in Toronto in 1904 : CANADA DRY
  • 25A. 23-Across buyer : SODA DRINKER
  • 42A. School social worker’s concern : CHILD ADVOCACY
  • 89A. Alert precipitated by heavy rain : FLOOD ADVISORY
  • 108A. Audio system connector : IPOD ADAPTER
  • 110A. Annual Silver State celebration : NEVADA DAY
  • 32D. Newspaper revenue source : CLASSIFIED AD
  • 38D. Gorilla Glue, for one : WOOD ADHESIVE

Bill’s time: 18m 06s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • REZA (Rena)
  • EZIO (Enio)



Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

14. Aussie bedrolls : SWAGS

In Australia and New Zealand, a “swagman” was a migratory worker who walked from farm to farm seeking work, and carrying his bedroll on his back (called a “swag”). A swagman typically wore a hat strung with corks that kept away flies.

19. Comics pooch : ODIE

Odie is Garfield’s best friend and is a slobbery beagle. Both are characters in Jim Davis’ comic strip named “Garfield”.

21. British county : SHIRE

The word “shire” comes from the Old English “scir” meaning “administrative district”. The term was replaced with county as far back as the 14th century, but the usage persists to this day, largely because some counties retain the use of -shire as a suffix (Yorkshire, Lancashire etc.).

22. Garlicky mayo : AIOLI

To the purist, especially in Provence in the South of France, the “home” of aioli, aioli is prepared just by grinding garlic with olive oil. However, other ingredients are often added to the mix, particularly egg yolks.

23. Brand created in Toronto in 1904 : CANADA DRY

Canada Dry’s first beverage was called Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale. The word “dry” was used in the name of the drink to underscore that the formulation was less sweet than other ginger ales on sale.

27. Bank protection : LEVEE

A levee is an artificial bank usually made of earth, running along the length of a river. A levee is designed to hold back river water at a time of potential flooding. “Levée” is the French word for “raised” and is an American term that originated in French-speaking New Orleans around 1720.

34. Some basilica singers : ALTI

In choral music, an alto (plural “alti”) is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word “alto” describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term “contralto” describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male’s voice (not a boy’s) with the same range as an alto is called a “countertenor”.

In its modern usage, the term “basilica” applies to a Roman Catholic church that has been given special ceremonial rights by the Pope.

37. “The Dark Mirror” antagonist, e.g. : EVIL TWIN

“The Dark Mirror” is a 1946 psychological drama starring Olivia de Havilland in two roles, as identical twin sisters. One of the twins murders their psychiatrist, and each refuses to confirm that she has an alibi for the crime.

41. Infamous 1974 bank robbers: Abbr. : SLA

The Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA) was founded in 1973 by an escapee from the prison system, Donald DeFreeze. The group’s manifesto promoted the rights of African Americans although, in the 2-3 year life of the group, DeFreeze was the only black member. Famously, the SLA kidnapped heiress Patty Hearst in 1974. Hearst apparently fell victim to what is called the Stockholm syndrome and became sympathetic to her captors’ cause. She joined the SLA and assumed the name “Tania”.

47. Plastic __ Band : ONO

The Plastic Ono Band was a so-called “super-group”, brought together by John Lennon and Yoko Ono in 1969. Members of the group included John and Yoko, Ringo Starr, George Harrison, Eric Clapton and Keith Moon.

50. Fence material? : LOOT

To fence something is to deal in stolen goods, and is a slang term. The use of “fence” in this sense dates back to about 1700, the idea being that such transactions take place under “defense of secrecy”.

54. Galileo’s birthplace : PISA

Galileo Galilei may be the most famous son of the city of Pisa in Italy and was considered by many to have been the father of modern science. In the world of physics, Galileo postulated that objects of different masses would fall at the same rate provided they did so in a vacuum (so there was no air resistance). There is a story that he dropped two balls of different masses from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate this, but this probably never happened. Centuries later, Astronaut David Scott performed Galileo’s proposed experiment when he dropped a hammer and feather on the moon during the Apollo 15 mission and we all saw the objects hit the moon surface, at exactly the same time.

59. Cat Nation people : ERIES

The Erie people lived on lands south of Lake Erie. The Erie were sometimes referred to as the Cat Nation, a reference to the mountain lions that were ever-present in the area that they lived. The name “Erie” is a shortened form of “Erielhonan” meaning “long tail”, possibly a further reference to the mountain lion or cat, which was possibly used as a totem. The Erie people gave their name to the Great Lake.

68. “The Call of the Wild” ride : SLED

“The Call of the Wild” is the most widely published novel of writer Jack London. The book tells the story of a dog named Buck that is forced into the hard life of a sled dog in the Yukon. When I was at school in Ireland, we got to read London’s follow-up novel “White Fang”. “White Fang” is a companion novel that the tells the tale of a wolf-dog that is born in the wild but eventually settles into a domesticated life.

74. “Swing Shift” Oscar nominee : LAHTI

Christine Lahti is an actress probably best known for playing Dr. Kate Austen on the TV medical drama “Chicago Hope”. If you read “The Huffington Post” you might run across her as well, as Lahti is a contributing blogger.

“Swing Shift” is a 1984 movie starring Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell. It was while filming “Swing Shift” that Hawn and Russell met for the first time, and have been in a relationship ever since.

78. Farm denizen : ANT

Nowadays we use “denizen” to mean simply a resident, but historically a denizen was an immigrant to whom certain rights had been granted, somewhat like today’s “resident alien”.

79. Exiled Shah Mohammad __ Pahlavi : REZA

The last Shah of Iran was Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, as he was overthrown in the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this resentment precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

81. Press Secretary Spicer : SEAN

Sean Spicer became White House press secretary when President Donald Trump assumed office on January 20th, 2017. Prior to taking his position with the Trump administration, Spicer has served as the communications director for the Republican National Committee since 2011.

82. Taylor’s husband between Wilding and Fisher : TODD

Actress Elizabeth Taylor married eight times, to seven husbands. Those marriages were to:

  1. Conrad “Nicky” Hilton, the young hotel heir
  2. Michael Wilding, the English actor
  3. Mike Todd, the film and stage producer
  4. Eddie Fisher, the singer
  5. Richard Burton (twice), the Welsh actor
  6. John Warner, who went on to become a US Senator for Virginia
  7. Larry Fortensky, a construction worker whom Taylor met at the Betty Ford Clinic

83. City near Tulsa : ENID

Enid, Oklahoma takes its name from the old railroad station around which the city developed. Back in 1889, that train stop was called Skeleton Station. An official who didn’t like the name changed it to Enid Station, using a character from Alfred Lord Tennyson’s “Idylls of the King”. Maybe if he hadn’t changed the name, the city of Enid would now be called Skeleton, Oklahoma! Enid has the nickname “Queen Wheat City” because is has a huge capacity for storing grain, the third largest grain storage capacity in the world.

Tulsa is the second-largest city in the state of Oklahoma (after Oklahoma City). Tulsa started out as a settlement established by the Loachapoka and Creek Native American tribes in 1836. These early settlers called their new home “Tallasi” meaning “old town”, and this name morphed into “Tulsa” that we use today.

87. Return ID : SSN

Social Security number (SSN)

88. Former “How Do Your Children Grow?” PBS host LeShan : EDA

Eda LeShan wrote several nonfiction books including “When Your Child Drives You Crazy” and “The Conspiracy Against Childhood”. LeShan was also host of the PBS television show “How Do Your Children Grow?”

95. Duncan of the Obama Cabinet : ARNE

Long before Arne Duncan became Secretary of Education he was a professional basketball player, but not in the NBA. Duncan played for the National Basketball League of Australia, for the Eastside Spectres in Melbourne.

98. Sandberg in Cooperstown : RYNE

Ryne “Ryno” Sandberg is a former second baseman who played most of his career for the Chicago Cubs. Sandberg holds the major league fielding percentage record at second base.

99. Biker’s headgear, perhaps : DO-RAG

Hip-hoppers might wear do-rags today, but they have been around for centuries. If you recall the famous image of Rosie the Riveter, she was wearing a do-rag. The etymology is pretty evident, a piece of cloth (rag) to hold a hairstyle (do) in place.

107. Wrangler material : DENIM

Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase “de Nimes” (meaning “from Nimes”) gives us the word “denim”. Also, the French phrase “bleu de Genes” (meaning “blue of Genoa”) gives us our word “jeans”.

Wrangler is a manufacturer of jeans headquartered in Greensboro, North Carolina. Wrangler jeans were first made in the mid-1940s and were designed specifically for use by cowboys in rodeos.

110. Annual Silver State celebration : NEVADA DAY

The Silver State has been celebrating Nevada Day as an official holiday since 1933. Observed on the last Friday in October, the holiday commemorates the admission of Nevada into the union on October 31, 1864.

The official nickname of Nevada is the “Silver State”, a reference to importance of silver ore in the state’s growth and economy. The unofficial nickname is the “Battle Born State”. “Battle Born” is a reference to Nevada being awarded statehood during the American Civil War.

115. Espresso order : LATTE

Espresso is made by forcing extremely hot water, under pressure, through finely ground coffee beans. The result is a thick and concentrated coffee drink, which contains quite a lot of solids and a lot of foam. An espresso machine was first patented in 1884 in Italy, although it was a machine to make the beverage in bulk. The first patent for a machine that made individual measures was applied for in 1901, also in Italy.

121. Some emailed files : PDFS

Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

Down

1. Comfy footwear : MOC

Moc is short for “moccasin”, a type of shoe.

2. Crown-installing org. : ADA

American Dental Association (ADA)

3. Sloth, e.g. : SIN

“Sloth”, meaning “indolence, sluggishness”, comes from the Middle English word “slowe”, the same root for our contemporary word “slow”. The animal, the sloth, is so named as it exhibits slow-moving behavior.

4. Aquanaut’s habitat : SEALAB

SEALAB I, II and II were man-made habitats built by the US Navy designed to advance the technology needed for humans to live and work underwater for extended periods. SEALAB I was lowered to a depth of just under 200 feet off the coast of Bermuda in 1964. Four divers stayed in SEALAB for 11 days, before the experiment was halted due to the approach of a tropical storm.

10. Fingerprint pattern : WHORL

Fingerprint patterns are classified into three different patterns: loops, whorls and arches.

11. Big name in auto maintenance : MIDAS

The chain of auto service centers called Midas was established in 1956 as the Muffler Installation Dealers’ Associated Service (MIDAS).

12. Word near Kazakhstan, on maps : ARAL

The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

The Republic of Kazakhstan in Central Asia is the world’s largest landlocked country. Kazakhstan was also the last of the former Soviet Republics (SSRs) to declare itself independent from Russia.

13. Composer Rorem : NED

American composer Ned Rorem is famous for his musical compositions, but also for his book “Paris Diary of Ned Rorem” that was published in 1966. Rorem talks openly about his sexuality in the book, and also about the sexual orientation of others including Noel Coward, Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber, much to some people’s chagrin.

16. Golfer Isao : AOKI

Isao Aoki is one of Japan’s greatest golfers. Aoki’s best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

30. Brand measured in drops : VISINE

Visine is a brand of eye drops made by Johnson & Johnson, advertised to “get the red out”. The red in the eye is reduced because Visine contains tetrahydrozoline hydrochloride, a vasoconstrictor. The blood vessels creating the redness constrict when Visine is applied, and you “get the red out” as the blood is “squeezed” away from the surface of the eye.

34. Online icon : AVATAR

The Sanskrit word “avatar” describes the concept of a deity descending into earthly life and taking on a persona. It’s easy to see how in the world of “online presences” one might use the word avatar to describe one’s online identity.

38. Gorilla Glue, for one : WOOD ADHESIVE

The Gorilla Glue brand of polyurethane adhesives was introduced in 1999. The original formulation came from the furniture manufacturing industry in Indonesia.

39. How sun-dried tomatoes are packed : IN OIL

Tomatoes are placed in the sun for 4-10 days in order to dry out. They lose about 90% of their weight to become “sun-dried” tomatoes.

43. Military drill syllable : HUP

Hup, two three, four …

45. Brand with a spokesstork who sounds like Groucho : VLASIC

Apparently, Vlasic invented the glass-packed, shelf-stable pickle. The company adopted the stork mascot in the late sixties, with the stork originally carrying a baby. The mascot was a play on the perception that pregnant women have a higher than average appetite for pickles.

57. __ Butterworth : MRS

Mrs. Butterworth is a brand of syrups and pancake mixes.

62. Meeting staple : AGENDA

“Agenda” is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

63. Bad-mouth : ASPERSE

To asperse is to spread false charges or make insinuations. The more common expression is “to cast aspersions”. “To asperse” comes from the Latin “aspergere” meaning “to sprinkle”. So, “to asperse” is also the term used when sprinkling holy water.

65. Campaign funding org. : PAC

A Political Action Committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent, expenditure-only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

69. Clan symbol : TOTEM

“Totem” is the name given to any entity that watches over a group of people. As such, totems are usually the subjects of worship. Totem poles are really misnamed, as they are not intended to represent figures to be worshiped, but rather are heraldic in nature often celebrating the legends or notable events in the history of a tribe.

70. Battery pole : ANODE

A battery is a device that converts chemical energy into electric energy. A simple battery is made up of three parts: a cathode, an anode and a liquid electrolyte. Ions from the electrolyte react chemically with the material in the anode producing a compound and releasing electrons. At the same time, the electrolyte reacts with the material in the cathode, absorbing electrons and producing a different chemical compound. In this way, there is a buildup of electrons at the anode and a deficit of electrons at the cathode. When a connection (wire, say) is made between the cathode and anode, electrons flow through the resulting circuit from the anode to cathode in an attempt to rectify the electron imbalance.

73. Opera star Pinza : EZIO

Ezio Pinza was an opera singer from Italy. Pinza performed for many years with the Metropolitan Opera in New York before retiring from the Met in 1948. He then launched a career on Broadway and in Hollywood.

76. Landscape artist George : INNESS

The painter George Inness is often referred to as “the father of American landscape painting”.

78. Samaritan’s offering : AID

“The Good Samaritan” is a parable told by Jesus that can be read in the Gospel of Luke. According to the story, a Jewish traveler is robbed and beaten and left for dead at the side of the road. A priest happens by and sees the poor man, but does not stop to help. A fellow Jew also passes and refuses to help. A third man stops and gives aid. This kind person is a Samaritan, a native of Samaria. Back then Jewish and Samarian people were said to generally despise each other, and yet here a detested creature gives aid. Jesus told to the story to a self-righteous lawyer, the intent being (I assume) to shake up his self-righteousness.

80. National Humor Mo. : APR

National Humor Month was launched in 1976, and is observed in April of each year. The idea came from author and humorist Larry Wilde. Wilde’s intent was to highlight the therapeutic value of laughter and joy.

84. Creamy quaff : NOG

It’s not really clear where the term “nog” (as in “eggnog”) comes from although it might derive from the word “noggin”, which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

85. Factor in tanning : UV RAY

At either end of the visible light spectrum are the invisible forms of radiation known as infrared (IR) light and ultraviolet (UV) light. IR light lies just beyond the red end of the visible spectrum, and UV light lie just below the violet end.

91. Claret or burgundy : DARK RED

Clairet is a dark rosé wine. Although it is uncommon today, clairet used to be the most common wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. For centuries now, English consumers have used the derivative term “claret” to describe any red wine from Bordeaux.

The Burgundy region of France is famous for its wine production. If you’re looking at a label that isn’t translated into English though, you’ll see Burgundy written in French, namely “Bourgogne”.

94. England’s first poet laureate : DRYDEN

John Dryden was a highly influential poet and playwright in the late 1600s. He came from good literary stock, and was a cousin once-removed of Jonathan Swift. Dryden was made England’s first Poet Laureate, in 1668.

A poet laureate is a poet who is officially pointed by some institution to compose works for special occasions. The US Poet Laureate is more correctly known as the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress.

99. Word of agreement : DITTO

“Ditto” was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So, “ditto” is just another wonderful import from that lovely land …

100. “All the Love” singer Adams : OLETA

Oleta Adams is an American soul singer from Seattle, Washington. Adams has had most of her success over in the UK, rather than here in the US.

102. Fatuous : INANE

Our word “inane” meaning silly or lacking substance comes from the Latin “inanitis” meaning “empty space”.

104. Many a Charlton Heston movie : EPIC

As well as having a fine career as an actor, Charlton Heston was a noted political activist. In the fifties he was very much a progressive and left-leaning in his political views. He was one of few in Hollywood to speak out against racism and support the Civil Rights Movement. Later in his life Heston became more associated with the conservative right, and was president of the National Rifle Association.

106. Yard or boom : SPAR

Yards are the horizontal spars that are attached to a mast and used to support square sails on older sailing vessels. Each end of a yard is known as a yardarm.

On a sailboat, the boom is a spar that runs along the bottom of a sail.

109. NATO member since 2009 : ALB

The Republic of Albania is a country in the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Albania was made a communist state after WWII but became independent again with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. Albania has been a member of NATO since 2009, and was accepted as an official candidate to join the European Union in 2014. The nation’s capital and largest city is Tirana.

111. Today’s honoree, found in this puzzle’s eight longest answers : DAD

Father’s Day was added as an official holiday in 1972, although bills to create the holiday had been with Congress since 1913. By rights, the holiday should be called “Fathers’ Day” (note the punctuation), but the bill that was introduced in 1913 used the “Father’s Day” spelling, and that’s the one that has stuck.

112. Boxer’s comment : ARF!

The boxer breed of dog (one of my favorites!) originated in Germany. My first dog was a boxer/Labrador mix, a beautiful animal. Our current family dog is a boxer/pug mix, another gorgeous creature.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Physics calculation : MASS

5. They may be broken on purpose : LAWS

9. “You gotta be kidding me!” : AW MAN!

14. Aussie bedrolls : SWAGS

19. Comics pooch : ODIE

20. Put in other words, say : EDIT

21. British county : SHIRE

22. Garlicky mayo : AIOLI

23. Brand created in Toronto in 1904 : CANADA DRY

25. 23-Across buyer : SODA DRINKER

27. Bank protection : LEVEE

28. Country : RURAL

29. Web search tool : ENGINE

30. Cleared out : VACATED

33. British peers : EARLS

34. Some basilica singers : ALTI

35. “How about that!” : I’LL BE!

36. Kin of -trix : -ENNE

37. “The Dark Mirror” antagonist, e.g. : EVIL TWIN

41. Infamous 1974 bank robbers: Abbr. : SLA

42. School social worker’s concern : CHILD ADVOCACY

47. Plastic __ Band : ONO

48. Hypotheticals : IFS

49. Noisy disturbance : TUMULT

50. Fence material? : LOOT

51. “I’m getting to it” : SOON

52. Curious to a fault : NOSY

54. Galileo’s birthplace : PISA

55. Partner of 46-Down : AAH!

56. Talk show medium : AM RADIO

59. Cat Nation people : ERIES

61. Industry heavyweights : TITANS

63. Airport sign : ARRIVALS

64. Flutter : FLAP

66. Colorful appetizer platter items : VEGGIES

68. “The Call of the Wild” ride : SLED

69. Outdoor party focal point : TAILGATE

72. Run off : ESCAPE

74. “Swing Shift” Oscar nominee : LAHTI

77. Free sample constraint : ONE EACH

78. Farm denizen : ANT

79. Exiled Shah Mohammad __ Pahlavi : REZA

81. Press Secretary Spicer : SEAN

82. Taylor’s husband between Wilding and Fisher : TODD

83. City near Tulsa : ENID

85. Still developing : UNRIPE

87. Return ID : SSN

88. Former “How Do Your Children Grow?” PBS host LeShan : EDA

89. Alert precipitated by heavy rain : FLOOD ADVISORY

92. Follower’s suffix : -ITE

93. Getting into the wrong business? : MEDDLING

95. Duncan of the Obama Cabinet : ARNE

96. They’re on the house : EAVES

98. Sandberg in Cooperstown : RYNE

99. Biker’s headgear, perhaps : DO-RAG

101. Weeds out : FILTERS

103. Confirm, as a password : RETYPE

106. Descriptor in lotion commercials : SILKY

107. Wrangler material : DENIM

108. Audio system connector : IPOD ADAPTER

110. Annual Silver State celebration : NEVADA DAY

114. Goes for the lure : BITES

115. Espresso order : LATTE

116. “Agreed!” : AMEN!

117. Whittle : PARE

118. Aromatherapy choice : SCENT

119. Far-reaching : BROAD

120. Put to sleep, perhaps : BORE

121. Some emailed files : PDFS

Down

1. Comfy footwear : MOC

2. Crown-installing org. : ADA

3. Sloth, e.g. : SIN

4. Aquanaut’s habitat : SEALAB

5. Time off : LEAVE

6. Tacked on : ADDED

7. Power conduit : WIRE

8. Squalid quarters : STY

9. Gave one’s word : ASSURED

10. Fingerprint pattern : WHORL

11. Big name in auto maintenance : MIDAS

12. Word near Kazakhstan, on maps : ARAL

13. Composer Rorem : NED

14. Holy : SAINTLY

15. Improvise : WING IT

16. Golfer Isao : AOKI

17. Secluded spot : GLEN

18. Many a retired racehorse : SIRE

24. Get a hint of : DETECT

26. Piece of the past : RELIC

28. Charged : RAN AT

30. Brand measured in drops : VISINE

31. Completely behind : ALL FOR

32. Newspaper revenue source : CLASSIFIED AD

33. Run over : END LATE

34. Online icon : AVATAR

36. Difficult to find : ELUSIVE

37. Start to tour? : ECO-

38. Gorilla Glue, for one : WOOD ADHESIVE

39. How sun-dried tomatoes are packed : IN OIL

40. “Tut-tut” evokers : NO-NOS

43. Military drill syllable : HUP

44. “You’ve found the right person” : I’M IT

45. Brand with a spokesstork who sounds like Groucho : VLASIC

46. Partner of 55-Across : OOH!

51. File command option : SAVE AS

53. Cried out : YELLED

55. Inner turmoil : ANGST

57. __ Butterworth : MRS

58. Streamlet : RILL

60. Trilogy, often : SAGA

62. Meeting staple : AGENDA

63. Bad-mouth : ASPERSE

65. Campaign funding org. : PAC

67. Bringing home : EARNING

69. Clan symbol : TOTEM

70. Battery pole : ANODE

71. Mr. Right : THE ONE

73. Opera star Pinza : EZIO

75. Culinary guard in ancient Rome : TASTER

76. Landscape artist George : INNESS

78. Samaritan’s offering : AID

80. National Humor Mo. : APR

84. Creamy quaff : NOG

85. Factor in tanning : UV RAY

86. It’s usually down for the night : EYELID

89. Go by quickly : FLY PAST

90. Like some index cards : LINED

91. Claret or burgundy : DARK RED

94. England’s first poet laureate : DRYDEN

97. Bank offering for smartphones : ATM APP

99. Word of agreement : DITTO

100. “All the Love” singer Adams : OLETA

101. Flu symptom : FEVER

102. Fatuous : INANE

103. Messy meal : RIBS

104. Many a Charlton Heston movie : EPIC

105. Haul : TOTE

106. Yard or boom : SPAR

107. How-to presentation : DEMO

109. NATO member since 2009 : ALB

110. Collar : NAB

111. Today’s honoree, found in this puzzle’s eight longest answers : DAD

112. Boxer’s comment : ARF!

113. No denial? : YES

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7 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 18 Jun 17, Sunday”

  1. 22:31, no errors. A straightforward solve.

    Yesterday’s WSJ actually took me a bit longer, 28:28, and I stared at one of the entries (6D) for a while before finally deciding it was actually a word. (The clue for it was “Where to see trots and slots”!) Another clue was “Weak heart?” (69D); I got the right answer, but I don’t understand it and I’m hoping someone here will enlighten me. And, finally, the answer for the clue “Turns up” (93A) struck me as a bit of a groaner, a “word” I wouldn’t expect to see anywhere but in a crossword puzzle. (I’d give the answers here, but I’m trying to avoid spoilers.)

    I also did this week’s “Saturday Stumper” before going to bed last night and, once again, I was astonished to observe how it progressed from “absolutely undoable” to “done, with no errors” in the course of about an hour, and that in spite of one clue messed up and another clue completely missing (a perennial problem with the print version on the Newsday site).

    And, finally, this is my week to win the WSJ mug! I can feel it! ?

  2. 31:49, no errors. Almost made the same mistake as Bill, but guessed that “Reza” sounded better. Happy Dads’ Day!

  3. A Father’s Day friendly puzzle so what’s up with crossing REZA and EZIO?? Had V instead of Z. I was thinking RAVA, but I was sure of the E so left it at REVA. So one square wrong or two words wrong. The Supreme Court has yet to rule if that is one or two errors….Oh well, I woke up to a skype call from my 3 year old daughter in the Dominican Republic this morning so I’ll be in a good mood the rest of today anyway.

    48 minutes, but it felt shorter. It was a comfortable 48 minutes, I suppose.

    Isn’t it a little self serving to have Nevada Day in Nevada? Maybe I’ll just declare a Jeff Day in my house……

    @Tony
    Yes – feel better. I had that back in the fall and it morphed into pneumonia. Took about 9 weeks to get it all out of me. What a nightmare. Take care of yourself and don’t be stupid…..and I’m the voice of experience on being stupid while sick.

    Best –

  4. DNF with numerous bad guesses. Got bored with it. Incredibly tedious. Dropped about 3/4 of the Stumper so far in less time than I spent on this… Onto the NYT and Monday stuff.

  5. Hiya folks!
    Finíshed by working it sporadically thru the day. I ALSO paused at EZIO — I’ve heard of him, yet I always think his name is Enio. Was sure about REZA tho, so it worked out.
    Somehow the “Vs” really helped me on this one. The “Vs” came through!! ? ADVOCACY got me to VLASIC, and EVIL to AVATAR. Same thing, to a lesser extent, on the Sunday NYT grid — tho I ain’t finished that one yet.

    Sweet dreams~~™???

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