LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Oct 2017, Thursday










Constructed by: Bruce Haight

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Solved with EE, So We Hear

Today’s themed answers are common phrases in which the last word has been replaced by a pair of letters. The plural form of those letters sounds just like the word that has been replaced:

  • 17A. Southern dish, so we hear : BLACK-EYED PP (peas)
  • 25A. World’s navigable waters, so we hear? : SEVEN CC (seas)
  • 36A. Welcome relief, so we hear : A SIGHT FOR SORE II (eyes)
  • 48A. Suggestive dance, so we hear : STRIP TT (tease)
  • 57A. Warning hint, so we hear : WORD TO THE YY (wise)

Bill’s time: 6m 10s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Wing it : AD LIB

“Ad libitum” is a Latin phrase meaning “at one’s pleasure”. In common usage the phrase is usually shortened to “ad lib”. On the stage the concept of an ad lib is very familiar.

11. Quarterback Brady : TOM

Quarterback Tom Brady signed up with the New England Patriots in 2000, and led the team to more Super Bowl appearances than any other player in history. Brady is from San Mateo, California, which isn’t very far from here. He dated actress Bridget Moynahan for a couple of years, and the pair have a child together. Brady has been married to Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bündchen since 2009.

14. “Fun With Dick and Jane” (2005) actress : LEONI

Téa Leoni is an American actress. One of Leoni’s early parts was in the great film “A League of Their Own” (a minor role, Racine at first base). She also played the fiancée of Sam Malone from “Cheers” on the spin-off sitcom “Frasier”. A leading role on the big screen was opposite Adam Sandler in “Spanglish”. My favorite of her more prominent movie roles was as Jane in “Fun with Dick and Jane”. Leoni is now playing the title role in the drama series “Madam Secretary”, a show that I really enjoy …

The 2005 comedy film “Fun with Dick and Jane” stars Jim Carrey and Téa Leoni in the title roles. It is a remake of the 1977 movie of the same name starring George Segal and Jane Fonda as Dick and Jane. The film centers on a middle-class couple who get into financial difficulties and who turn to robbery to make ends meet.

16. Political commentator Navarro : ANA

Ana Navarro is a Nicaraguan-born American political strategist and commentator. Navarro is a lifelong Republican who worked for Governor Jeb Bush and for Senator John McCain. However, she was very critical of presidential candidate Donald Trump during his 2016 campaign. She was so vehement in her anti-Trump views that she ended up voting for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in the election.

17. Southern dish, so we hear : BLACK-EYED PP (peas)

Black-eyed peas (also called “black-eyed beans”) are a type of cowpea. Black-eyed peas are especially popular in soul food and other southern cuisine.

20. Justice Dept. branch : ATF

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is today part of the Department of Justice (DOJ). The ATF has its roots in the Department of Treasury dating back to 1886 when it was known as the Bureau of Prohibition. “Explosives” was added to the ATF’s name when the bureau was moved under the Department of Justice (DOJ) as part of the reorganization called for in the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

22. What “A” is for, in Sue Grafton’s mystery series : ALIBI

Sue Grafton writes detective novels, and her “alphabet series” features the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with “A Is for Alibi” in 1982 and is working her way through the alphabet. Apparently Ms. Grafton has already decided that “Z is for Zero” will be the final title in the series. What a clever naming system!

25. World’s navigable waters, so we hear? : SEVEN CC (seas)

The phrase “the seven seas” has been used for centuries by many different peoples. The actual definition of what constitutes the collection of seven has varied depending on the period and the culture. Nowadays we consider the seven largest bodies of water as the seven seas, namely:

  • The North Pacific Ocean
  • The South Pacific Ocean
  • The North Atlantic Ocean
  • The South Atlantic Ocean
  • The Indian Ocean
  • The Southern Ocean
  • The Arctic Ocean

30. Savory Chinese snack : TEA EGG

The Chinese dish known as a tea egg is made by boiling an egg in water, cracking the shell, and then reboiling the egg in tea or a spiced sauce. Often sold as a snack food, the tea egg is also called a “marble egg”, referring to the marbled appearance of the cracked shell after boiling in a colored liquid.

32. Manhattan developer? : BAR

The cocktail called a Manhattan is made from whiskey, sweet vermouth and Angostura bitters. I make my own version of a Brandy Manhattan, using brandy, sweet vermouth and orange bitters.

33. #1 texting pal : BFF

Best friend forever (BFF)

41. Sevilla sun : SOL

The city of Seville (“Sevilla” in Spanish) is the capital of Andalusia in southern Spain. Seville is a favored setting for many operas including “The Barber of Seville” by Rossini, “Fidelio” by Beethoven and Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” and “The Marriage of Figaro”.

42. Nice way to say no? : NON

The French city of Nice is on the Mediterranean coast in the southeast of the country. Although Nice is only the fifth most populous city in France, it is home to the busiest airport outside of Paris. That’s because of all the tourists flocking to the French Riviera.

51. Hindu class : CASTE

Although caste systems exist in several societies around the world, we tend to associate the concept with the social stratification that is still found in many parts of India. The term “caste” comes from the Portuguese word “casta” meaning “race, breed”. The Portuguese used the term to describe the hereditary social groups that they found in India when they arrived in the subcontinent in 1498.

56. __ Dhabi : ABU

Abu Dhabi is one of the seven Emirates that make up the federation known as the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The two largest members of the UAE (geographically) are Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the only two of the seven members that have veto power over UAE policy. Before 1971, the UAE was a British Protectorate, a collection of sheikdoms. The sheikdoms entered into a maritime truce with Britain in 1835, after which they became known as the Trucial States, derived from the word “truce”.

62. “Middlemarch” novelist : ELIOT

George Eliot’s novel “Middlemarch” was first published in installments in 1871-72. The storyline is set some fifty years earlier, in the fictional English Midlands town of Middlemarch.

66. Butch and Sundance chasers : POSSE

Our word “posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

When the great movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” was in development, Paul Newman was always the first choice to play one of the leads, although the initial casting had him in the role of Sundance. Steve McQueen actually accepted the co-starring role, but left over a dispute about the billing (the film was entitled “The Sundance Kid and Butch Cassidy” at that point). The role of Sundance was then offered to Jack Lemmon, but he turned it down. Warren Beatty and Marlon Brando were considered next, before opting for the relatively unknown Robert Redford. What a great choice …

Down

1. Goya’s “Duchess of __” : ALBA

María Cayetana de Silva was the 13th Duchess of Alba. She was a favorite subject of the Spanish painter Francisco Goya. The duchess is the subject in the famous portraits known as “La maja desnuda” (The Nude Maja) and “La maja vestida” (The Clothed Maja). “Maja” translates from Spanish as “beautiful lady”.

2. Muscle used to raise your hand in school, for short : DELT

The deltoid “muscle” is actually a group of muscles, the ones that cover the shoulder and create the roundness under the skin. The deltoids (delts) are triangular in shape resembling the Greek letter delta, hence the name.

4. “Monsters, __” : INC

The animated feature “Monsters, Inc.” was released in 2001, and was Pixar’s fourth full-length movie. It’s about cute monsters, and that’s all I know other than that the voice cast included the likes of John Goodman, Billy Crystal and Steve Buscemi.

9. Galaxy download : APP

The Galaxy is a series of mobile computing devices made by Samsung that was introduced in 2009. All of the Galaxy devices have used Google’s Android operating system, although a Windows 10 Galaxy device was introduced by Samsung in 2016.

12. Last non-AD yr. : ONE BC

The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

27. Calculating pros : CPAS

Certified public accountant (CPA)

34. Bravo automaker : FIAT

The Bravo is a small 3-door car made by Fiat from 1995 through 2001. The 5-door version of the same vehicle is sold as a Brava. The Fiat Bravo was reintroduced in 2007 and manufactured through 2014. The newer Bravo was a 5-door vehicle. A little confusing …

35. Dough used in baklava : FILO

Filo (also “phyllo”) is an extremely thin unleavened dough used in Middle Eastern and Balkan cuisines. The most famous dish made from filo is baklava, a rich and sweet pastry made from layers of filo filled with chopped nuts and held together with syrup.

40. Bris, e.g. : RITE

A mohel is a man who has been trained in the practice of brit milah (circumcision). Brit milah is known as “bris” in Yiddish. The brit milah ceremony is performed on male infants when they are 8-days old.

48. Rapscallion : SCAMP

We might call a little imp a rapscallion, an evolution from “rascallion”, which in turn comes from “rascal”.

49. Just not done : TABOO

The word “taboo” was introduced into English by Captain Cook in his book “A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean”. Cook described “tabu” (likely imitative of a Tongan word that he had heard) as something that was both consecrated and forbidden.

55. Literary alter ego : HYDE

Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” was first published in 1886. There are many tales surrounding the writing of the story including one that the author wrote the basic tale in just three to six days, and spent a few weeks simply refining it. Allegedly, Stevenson’s use of cocaine stimulated his creative juices during those few days of writing.

59. Wrestler Flair nicknamed “The Nature Boy” : RIC

The wrestler Ric Flair’s real name is Richard Fliehr. Perhaps following the lead of his compatriot Jesse Ventura, Flair explored the possibility of running for governor of the state of North Carolina.

60. “Entourage” channel : HBO

I haven’t seen the HBO series “Entourage”, but will have to take a look one day as I am a huge fan of HBO productions. “Entourage” is the story of a young movie star from New York City learning about life in Los Angeles. The show is co-produced by the actor Mark Wahlberg and so the storyline is somewhat autobiographical, based on a few of Wahlberg’s own experiences.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Wing it : AD LIB

6. Doing battle : AT WAR

11. Quarterback Brady : TOM

14. “Fun With Dick and Jane” (2005) actress : LEONI

15. Hourglass, e.g. : SHAPE

16. Political commentator Navarro : ANA

17. Southern dish, so we hear : BLACK-EYED PP (peas)

19. Tap site : KEG

20. Justice Dept. branch : ATF

21. Fair : EVEN

22. What “A” is for, in Sue Grafton’s mystery series : ALIBI

24. Hot rod? : SPIT

25. World’s navigable waters, so we hear? : SEVEN CC (seas)

27. __ Friday : CASUAL

30. Savory Chinese snack : TEA EGG

31. Manufacturing facility : PLANT

32. Manhattan developer? : BAR

33. #1 texting pal : BFF

36. Welcome relief, so we hear : A SIGHT FOR SORE II (eyes)

41. Sevilla sun : SOL

42. Nice way to say no? : NON

43. __ signs : VITAL

44. “I bet!” : OH SURE!

47. Composes, as music for a poem : SETS TO

48. Suggestive dance, so we hear : STRIP TT (tease)

50. Put on : WORE

51. Hindu class : CASTE

52. Works on walls : OILS

53. Nursery complaint : WAH!

56. __ Dhabi : ABU

57. Warning hint, so we hear : WORD TO THE YY (wise)

61. “Little ol’ me?” : MOI?

62. “Middlemarch” novelist : ELIOT

63. Flowed back : EBBED

64. Soup cooker : POT

65. Criticize sharply : DECRY

66. Butch and Sundance chasers : POSSE

Down

1. Goya’s “Duchess of __” : ALBA

2. Muscle used to raise your hand in school, for short : DELT

3. Lollygag : LOAF

4. “Monsters, __” : INC

5. Spokesperson’s route? : BIKE PATH

6. Till now : AS YET

7. In those days : THEN

8. Gum ball : WAD

9. Galaxy download : APP

10. Maintain, as roads : REPAVE

11. Bookie’s work : TAKING BETS

12. Last non-AD yr. : ONE BC

13. Tricks : MAGIC

18. Wicked : EVIL

23. Cut of lamb : LEG

24. Belted out : SUNG

25. Burn slightly : SEAR

26. They may ring or have rings : EARS

27. Calculating pros : CPAS

28. Plus : ALSO

29. Outfit with bell-bottom trousers : SAILOR SUIT

30. Steak named for its shape : T-BONE

34. Bravo automaker : FIAT

35. Dough used in baklava : FILO

37. Letter-shaped fastener : T-NUT

38. One might be made of sheets and pillows : FORT

39. Exceed, as a boundary : OVERSTEP

40. Bris, e.g. : RITE

45. Flop’s opposite : HIT

46. Gushed : SPEWED

47. Go it alone : SOLO

48. Rapscallion : SCAMP

49. Just not done : TABOO

50. Quick with comebacks : WITTY

52. Funk : ODOR

53. Halloween decor : WEBS

54. All in favor : AYES

55. Literary alter ego : HYDE

58. Stadium cry : OLE!

59. Wrestler Flair nicknamed “The Nature Boy” : RIC

60. “Entourage” channel : HBO

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12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Oct 2017, Thursday”

  1. LAT: 11:02, no errors. Newsday: 10:07, no errors. WSJ: 22:02, no errors, no write-overs, but a pretty thoughtful solve (IMO).

    @Carrie … Glad to hear you finished that Croce puzzle! Each of his posts starts with a link to the answers for the puzzle that was posted seven days earlier. To get his answers sooner, I click on the “.puz” link, open it in “Across Lite” on my iPad and then do a “Reveal All”. That said, I have found that it’s probably a good idea, after finishing a Croce puzzle, to wait for a day and do a final walk-through of one’s answers before checking them against his. Many of the errors I have recorded on his puzzles could have been avoided if I had done that, because his clues have a way of clarifying themselves when slept on for a day or two.

    On my way to get a flu shot … they say the flu strain making the rounds this year is apt to be a bad one … ?

    1. @Carrie Besides what Dave said, Croce posts a regular solution file a week after for each of his puzzles. So Friday night, he will post a PDF solution file to #301.

  2. Dave K., are there any ‘good’ flu strains ? …. probably the ‘best’ ones are those that have already ‘flu-on’ …. flown away … 😉
    Although, I am also of your age … I have never taken flu shots, on principle, … keeps the ole immune system in good shape …. developing all those exotic anti-bodies, fighting the various combinations of strains …. so it appears … until, one day, I just disappear ( pop -off ) off the screen …. My wife, being a health worker, is required to take a flu shot, as a part of her job, every year, or so …. so, I think I get the immunity, just by being around her …. so I think. Much as I try to avoid her ….

    I had a good time with the puzzle … and the ii’s, ee’s etc. Was very cute. Took much longer than normal. Nice Thursday puzzle.

    I thought that the TeaeGG was a part of the puzzle theme as well … maybe, some concept of gravity …. or some sleep inducing savory …

    Have a Nice day, bon jour, folks,

  3. 17:28. Clever theme that I got pretty fast. I also thought TEAEGG was part of the theme. Could not understand BIKEPATH for “Spokesperson route” until I finished and realized the “spokes” part of it. Sheeesh. Second time in 3 days there has been a Manhattan reference in the puzzle. Perhaps it’s a sign I’ll need one this weekend….

    Did you hear the one about the mohel who made $30,000/year plus tips?…

    Best –

  4. Yes, this was a fun puzzle. Had to fight with myself re: the double letters at the end of a phrase, but once I got over that stumbling block it went right along.

    Well, will the Dodgers win tonight? I’m also Cubs fan, so it’s a win, win for me. But living in LA, I can’t wear my Cubs shirt. Surprised that Cleveland and Washington lost. Houston is in jeopardy also. May the best teams win!

  5. Today’s BEQ: 20:06, no errors, with a top-row entry that made me finally look up two almost-identical words to see when and where each is used.

    @Vidwan … Curiously, I don’t think that I have ever had the flu – even in years past when either flu shots were not available or I didn’t bother getting one – but I always do it now. And there is something to be said for challenging one’s immune system: When I was five, my family moved to a farm; all the water we used came from a 30-foot-deep, hand-dug well that was across the road in the middle of a cowyard. Some years later, the county health inspector informed my dad that the water was unsafe to drink, so he had a new well drilled near the house. They had to go down 400 feet to find water. It was pronounced safe and we used it from then on … but it never tasted nearly as good as the water from the old well, and it’s possible that it wasn’t as good for us … ?.

    Oh, and … @Jeff, thanks for the groaner … ?.

  6. Jeff, thanks for the joke …. I have a couple of ones, but not for this page.

    Finish this one …. A mohel had a picture of a watch in front of his shop, the premises. He was asked, ‘why do you have an advertisement for a watch when you’re in the bris business ? ‘.
    His answer was …..

    Dave Ken …. you’re right on the flu shot – better safe than sorry.

    As for your shallow water well, it must have been the cows ….
    And to imagine, the old folks of yore, lived through so many hazards, and took so many chances with their water supply, with their foods, even with their patent medicines and snake oils. It was a miracle that they survived at all… No wonder beer was so popular …. it was the safest liquid to drink.

  7. Did this Thursday at a leisurely pace, while selling my honey. The theme and the traffic meant I had to get home to finish it. No errors and just TEA EGG being new to me.

    Interesting that the Southern Ocean has moved steadily southward starting in 1928, then 1937, 1953 and again in 2002. I’d have actually seen it, from Australia, if I’d been around in 1928.

    Never taken a flu shot, outside of the time I was in the Army, when they had the swine flu scare and we were given them. Might start getting them…still undecided.

    @Carrie Happy belated birthday two days ago. Your Dodgers finally did it!

  8. Hi y’all! ⚾
    No errors, but I stared at the finíshed puzzle for a few minutes…I was sure I had something wrong somewhere. Good challenge. ?
    @Howard– hilarious!! ? Nicely done. Wonder if that’s the punchline Vidwan had in mind. It certainly works.
    Thank you Dave for the info! I clicked on . puz on my desktop but I guess it’s an app that won’t open, so I’ll try on my tablet. I will have to force myself not to peek. As you say, it helps to give it a few days to simmer. That requires patience that I don’t always have, however…?
    Thank you so much Dirk!! Actually, my birthday is next Tuesday….I must have misspoken…. but in fact I still have four days left where I can say “I’m in my 50s!” !!!
    DODGERS TO THE WORLD SERIES!!! Kay, I also love the Cubs, and at this time last year I was rooting for them over the Dodgers…. one of maybe two times I’ve not rooted for my LA team. Now it’s Dodgers all the way– they earned it this season. So excited for the Series.
    Be well~~™⚾?⚾?⚾?

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