LA Times Crossword 13 Jan 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: John Lampkin
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Beta Blockers

Themed answers are common phrases with a letter B dropped at the start:

  • 23A. Defeat decisively in an annual Nathan’s contest? : (B)EAT THE PANTS OFF
  • 46A. Cutlery causing boo-boos? : (B)OWIE KNIFE
  • 69A. Explore à la an aging Captain Kirk? : (B)OLDLY GO
  • 97A. Roleo official? : (B)UMP ON A LOG
  • 122A. Farm workers’ coffee setup near a fence post? : (B)URNS AT THE STAKE
  • 17D. One who sniffs out good investments? : (B)ASSET HOUND
  • 36D. Painfully off-pitch Jewish diva? : (B)OY SOPRANO
  • 58D. Sampling from Quaid’s vineyard? : (B)RANDY WINE
  • 75D. Carpet made from corn husks? : (B)EARSKIN RUG

Bill’s time: 22m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. It’s usually spotted in a game : DOMINO

A pip is a dot on a die or a domino, or a mark on a playing card.

14. Pablo’s putting-off word : MANANA

In Spanish, the day after “hoy” (today) is “mañana” (tomorrow).

21. 1982 Toto hit : ROSANNA

Toto is an American rock band dating back to 1977. As well as their big hit “Rosanna”, Toto also sang another good tune called “Africa”.

23. Defeat decisively in an annual Nathan’s contest? : (B)EAT THE PANTS OFF

Nathan’s Famous has held a Hot Dog Eating Contest every July 4th since 1916, and always at the same location on Coney Island.

25. Hardly modest : BRASSY

Someone described as brazen might also be described as shameless. The term “brazen” comes from the Middle English “brasen” meaning “made of brass”. The suggestion is that a shameless person has a hardened, brass-like face. And so, the similar-meaning word “brassy” has the same etymology.

27. Steamed dumplings, e.g. : DIM SUM

Dim sum is a Chinese cuisine made up of small portions of various dishes. The tradition of serving dim sum is associated with the serving of tea, when small delicacies were offered to travelers and guests along with tea as a refreshment. The name “dim sum” translates as “touch the heart” implying that dim sum is not a main meal, just a snack “that touches the heart”.

28. Oft-mispunctuated word : ITS

The word “it’s” is a contraction for “it is”, as in “it’s a fun crossword”. The spelling “its”, without an apostrophe, is used in all other cases, most commonly as the possessive form of the pronoun “it”. In that sense, “its” is akin to the pronouns his, hers, ours, etc., as in “the newspaper is known for its great crosswords”.

30. Plane angle symbol : THETA

The Greek letter theta is commonly used in geometry to represent the angle between two lines (say at a corner of a triangle).

31. Alley Oop’s love : OOOLA

“Alley Oop” is a comic strip that ran for four decades starting in 1932. “Alley Oop” was drawn by V. T. Hamlin. The title character lived in the prehistoric kingdom of Moo, although for much of the strip’s life, Alley Oop had access to a time machine. Alley Oop also had a girlfriend called Ooola. I had assumed that Ooola’s name was a play on “hula hoop”, but that little toy wasn’t invented until the 1950s (a kind blog reader informs me) …

35. Tribute with bent elbows : TOAST

The tradition of “toasting” someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

43. Whale-tale captain : AHAB

Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville’s “Moby-Dick”. The role of Captain Ahab was played by Gregory Peck in the 1956 John Huston film adaptation. Patrick Stewart played Ahab in a 1998 miniseries in which Peck made another appearance, as Father Mapple.

46. Cutlery causing boo-boos? : (B)OWIE KNIFE

A Bowie knife is a fixed-blade knife that was made famous by Colonel Jim Bowie in the early 1800s. A Bowie knife is one that comes with a sheath and has a crossguard at the end of the hilt. It also has a clip point, meaning that the forward third of the blade appears to be “clipped off”, leaving a sharp point.

51. European capital : ROME

According to tradition, Rome was founded by the twin brothers Romulus and Remus. The pair had a heated argument about who should be allowed to name the city and Romulus hit Remus with a shovel, killing him. And so, “Rome” was born, perhaps instead of “Reme”!

56. __ fu : KUNG

In the West, we sometimes use the term “kung fu” to describe a Chinese martial art. We’ve gotten the wrong idea though, as the term “kung fu” really describes any skill that can be learned through dedication and hard work. So, “kung fu” can indeed describe a martial art, but by no means exclusively.

57. Amer. fliers : USAF

The US Air Force (USAF) is the youngest of the seven uniformed services in this country, having being formed in 1947. Today’s USAF was preceded by:

  • Aeronautical Division, Signal Corps (1907-1914)
  • Aviation Section, Signal Corps (1914-1918)
  • Division of Military Aeronautics (1918)
  • US Army Air Service (1918-1926)
  • US Army Air Corps (1926-1941)
  • US Army Air Forces (1941-1947)

62. Actress Peeples : NIA

Actress Nia Peeples played the character Nicole Chapman in the TV series “Fame”. Peeples is also a successful singer, having released the 1988 song “Trouble” that made it to #35 in the Billboard charts.

63. Bird on LSU’s seal : PELICAN

The pelican is an example of a “piscivore”. A piscivorous animal is actually a carnivore, but one that lives on fish.

LSU’s full name is Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, and is located in Baton Rouge. LSU was founded in 1860 as a military academy, with then-Colonel William Tecumseh Sherman as superintendent.

69. Explore à la an aging Captain Kirk? : (B)OLDLY GO

The original “Star Trek” TV show opened each episode with a speech from Captain Kirk, played by William Shatner:

Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before.

72. Director Lee : ANG

Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as “Sense & Sensibility” (my personal favorite), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, “Hulk”, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi”.

77. Vague opening? : VEE

The word “vague” opens with a letter V (vee).

78. 98, but not 98.6 : INTEGER

An integer is a number that does not include a fraction. The word “integer” is Latin for “whole”.

82. Bird hunted to extinction by the Maori : MOA

Moa were flightless birds native to New Zealand that are now extinct. The fate of the Moa is a great example of the detrimental effect that humans can have on animal populations. The Maoris arrived in New Zealand about 1300 AD, upsetting the balance of the ecosystem. The Moa were hunted to extinction within 200 years, which had the knock-on effect of killing off the Haast’s Eagle, the Moa’s only predator prior to the arrival of man. Moa were huge creatures, measuring up to 12 feet tall with their necks stretched upwards.

83. Easygoing sort : TYPE B

The Type A and Type B personality theory originated in the fifties. Back then, individuals were labelled as Type A in order to emphasize a perceived increased risk of heart disease. Type A personality types are so called “stress junkies”, whereas Type B types are relaxed and laid back. But there doesn’t seem to be much scientific evidence to support the linkage between the Type A personality and heart problems.

85. The boy well-known in meteorology? : EL NINO

When the surface temperature of much of the Pacific Ocean rises more that half a degree centigrade, then there is said to be an El Niño episode. That small temperature change in the Pacific has been associated with climatic changes that can stretch right across the globe. El Niño is Spanish for “the boy” and is a reference to the Christ child. The phenomenon was given this particular Spanish name because the warming is usually noticed near South America and around Christmas-time.

87. California roll ingredient : NORI

Nori is an edible seaweed that we used to know as “laver” when I was living in Wales. Nori is usually dried into thin sheets. Here in the US, we are most familiar with nori as the seaweed used as a wrap for sushi.

A California roll is a kind of sushi roll that is made inside-out, with the seaweed inside and the rice on the outside. A California roll often includes rice, seaweed, cucumber and avocado. The dish originated in Los Angeles where a chef at the Tokyo Kaikan restaurant substituted avocado for fatty tuna (“toro”) in a traditional sushi recipe. The chef also put the seaweed on the inside, as his American customers preferred not to look directly at seaweed while they were eating it!

88. Bat head? : ACRO-

An acrobat is someone who performs gymnastic feats. The term comes into English via French from the Greek “akrobatos” meaning “going on tip-toe, climbing up high”.

90. Cardiff’s country : WALES

Cardiff, located on the country’s south coast, has been the capital of Wales since 1955. “Cardiff” is an anglicized form of “Caerdydd”, the city’s name in Welsh.

92. Galileo’s birthplace : PISA

Galileo Galilei may be the most famous son of the city of Pisa in Italy and was considered by many to have been the father of modern science. In the world of physics, Galileo postulated that objects of different masses would fall at the same rate provided they did so in a vacuum (so there was no air resistance). There is a story that he dropped two balls of different masses from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate this, but this probably never happened. Centuries later, Astronaut David Scott performed Galileo’s proposed experiment when he dropped a hammer and feather on the moon during the Apollo 15 mission and we all saw the objects hit the moon surface, at exactly the same time.

97. Roleo official? : (B)UMP ON A LOG

The log-rolling competition traditionally engaged in by lumberjacks is referred to as “roleo”.

Someone who is idle, inactive might be said to be “like a bump on a log”.

99. Actress Sommer : ELKE

Elke Sommer is a German-born actress who was at the height of her success on the silver screen in the sixties. Sommer won a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer Actress for her role opposite Paul Newman in 1964’s “The Prize”. She also sings and has released several albums. Now Sommer focuses on painting, producing artwork that is strongly influenced by the work of Marc Chagall.

101. Some reddish deer : ROES

Roe deer are found mainly in Europe. They would be the deer shown on television and in movies when Robin Hood was out hunting in Sherwood Forest.

105. Against a thing, at law : IN REM

“In rem” translates from Latin as “in a thing”. In a lawsuit, an action is described as “in rem” if it is directed against some property. This would be the case if someone disputes ownership of a piece of land, for example. An action “in personam” on the other hand, is directed against a specific individual.

107. Utah national park : ZION

The highest number of National Parks (NPs) in any one state is nine, in California. Alaska comes in second with eight, and Utah comes in third with five. The five NPs in Utah are:

  • Arches NP
  • Bryce Canyon NP
  • Canyonlands NP
  • Capitol Reef NP
  • Zion NP

112. Heady quaff : ALE

“Quaff” is both a verb and a noun. One “quaffs” (takes a hearty drink) of a “quaff” (a hearty drink).

116. GI no-show : AWOL

MPs (military police officers) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

126. Consequence of only getting close? : NO CIGAR

The expression “close but no cigar” is a reference meaning that one can come close in a competition, but may not win the prize, the cigar.

128. “The Communist Manifesto” co-author : ENGELS

Friedrich Engels was a German political theorist who worked closely with Karl Marx to develop what became known as Marxist Theory. Along with Marx, he also co-authored “The Communist Manifesto” in 1848, and later he supported Marx as he worked to publish “Das Kapital”.

130. Govt. securities : T-NOTES

A Treasury note (T-note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-bond matures in 20-30 years.

Down

1. Conks out : DIES

The phrase “conk out” was coined by airmen during WWI, and was used to describe the stalling of an engine.

3. Con __: musical tempo : MOTO

The musical term “con moto” indicates that a passage should be played quickly, briskly, The term translates from Italian as “with motion”.

5. Japanese 7-Down : NOH
(7D. See 5-Down : DRAMA)

Noh is a form of musical drama in Japan that has been around since the 14th century. Many of the Noh performers are masked, allowing all the roles to be played by men, including the female parts.

6. Dies in this puzzle? : ONE-DOWN

“Dies” is the answer to the 1-down clue in this puzzle.

8. Pitchers Darling and Guidry : RONS

Ron Darling is former Major league Baseball pitcher. Darling retired from the game in 1995, and starting working as a color commentator for TBS in 2007.

Ron Guidry is a former pitcher for the New York Yankees. Guidry’s number 49 was retired by the Yankees in 2003.

10. Pilot feeder : GAS MAIN

A pilot light is a small gas flame, one using a relatively small amount of fuel that remains lit as an ignition source for larger gas burners.

11. Palindromic celeb : ONO

Yoko Ono is an avant-garde artist. Ono actually met her future husband John Lennon for the first time while she was preparing her conceptual art exhibit called “Hammer a Nail”. Visitors were encouraged to hammer in a nail into a wooden board, creating the artwork. Lennon wanted to hammer in the first nail, but Ono stopped him as the exhibition had not yet opened. Apparently Ono relented when Lennon paid her an imaginary five shillings to hammer an imaginary nail into the wood.

13. First presidential swinger, golf-wise : TAFT

The first US president to openly play golf while in office was President William Howard Taft. It is widely suspected that Taft’s predecessor President Theodore Roosevelt also played golf while in office. However, Roosevelt’s confidantes kept his golfing out of the newspapers as golf was considered a game for the only the rich in those days, and the concern was that the president would alienate potential voters.

14. Org. with minors : MLB

Major League Baseball (MLB)

15. Critical ticker valve : AORTA

The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

16. Where even termites were welcome, presumably : NOAH’S ARK

Genesis 6:19-20 states that Noah was instructed to take two animals of every kind into the ark. Later, in Genesis 7:2-3 Noah was instructed to take on board “every clean animal by sevens … male and female, to keep offspring alive on the face of all the earth”. Apparently “extras” (7 rather than 2) were needed for ritual sacrifice.

17. One who sniffs out good investments? : (B)ASSET HOUND

The basset hound wouldn’t be my favorite breed of dog, to be honest. Basset hounds have a great sense of smell with an ability to track a scent that is second only to that of the bloodhound. The name “basset” comes from the French word for “rather low”, a reference to the dog’s short legs.

19. “Dragonwyck” novelist Seton : ANYA

“Anya Seton” was the pen name of Ann Seton, an author of historical romances from New York City. Seton’s 1944 novel “Dragonwyck” was released into theaters in 1946 and starred Gene Tierney and Walter Huston.

32. Kentucky __, event before the Derby : OAKS

The Kentucky Oaks is a race that is held on the Friday before the Kentucky Derby. Both races are limited to three-year-old thoroughbreds, but the Oaks is also limited to fillies.

38. “__ woman wishes to be no one’s enemy (and) … refuses to be anyone’s victim”: Angelou : A WISE

Maya Angelou was an African-American author and poet. Angelou recited her poem “On the Pulse of Morning” at the inauguration of President Clinton in 1983. Here are some words of wisdom from the great lady:

I work very hard, and I play very hard. I’m grateful for life. And I live it – I believe life loves the liver of it. I live it.

39. Like some memes : VIRAL

A meme (short for “mineme”) is a cultural practice or idea that is passed on verbally or by repetition from one person to another. The term lends itself very well to the online world where links, emails, files etc. are so easily propagated.

44. OB/GYN test : AMNIO

Amniocentesis (“amnio” for short) is the prenatal test which involves the removal of a small amount of the amniotic fluid surrounding the fetus using a hypodermic needle. The fluid naturally contains some fetal cells, the DNA of which can then be tested to determine the sex of the child and to check for the presence of genetic abnormalities.

47. Into shenanigans : ELFISH

I suppose one might be forgiven for thinking that “shenanigan” is an Irish term, as it certainly sounds Irish. Usually written in the plural, shenanigans are acts of mischief, pranks. Apparently the word is of uncertain derivation, but was coined in San Francisco and Sacramento, California in the mid-1800s.

48. “The Gift of the Magi” gift : FOB

O’Henry’s short story called “The Gift of the Magi” was first published in 1905. It tells of relatively poor, newly-married couple who want to buy each other a gift for Christmas. The wife’s pride and joy is her long blonde hair, while the husband’s most treasured possession is his grandfather’s gold pocket watch. The wife sells her hair to buy her gift, and the husband sells his watch to buy his gift for his spouse. The wife is given a set of combs, hair accessories that are useless now that her hair is short. The husband gets a platinum fob chain for the watch that he no longer owns.

50. Support wear : BRA

The word “brassière” is French in origin, but it isn’t the word that the French use for a “bra”. In France, what we call a bra is known as a “soutien-gorge”, translating to “held under the neck”. The word “brassière” is indeed used in France but there it describes a baby’s undershirt, a lifebelt or a harness. “Brassière” comes from the Old French word for an “arm protector” in a military uniform (“bras” is the French for “arm”). Later “brassière” came to mean “breastplate” and from there the word was used for a type of woman’s corset. The word jumped into English around 1900.

54. Comic-Con attendee : NERD

San Diego’s Comic-Con was founded in 1970 as the Golden State Comic Book Convention. Held over four days each summer, apparently Comic-Con is the largest show in North America.

58. Sampling from Quaid’s vineyard? : (B)RANDY WINE

Actor Randy Quaid is perhaps best known for his performances in the “National Lampoon’s Vacation” movies, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Independence Day”. Quaid also had the title role in the 1987 TV movie “LBJ: The Early Years”, for which he won a Golden Globe. Randy is the older brother of fellow actor Dennis Quaid, and is also a first cousin, twice removed of actor and singer Gene Autry.

67. Ax to grind : AGENDA

“Agenda” is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

69. Verdi opera based on a Shakespeare tragedy : OTELLO

Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Otello” was first performed in 1887 at La Scala Theater in Milan. The opera is based on Shakespeare’s play “Othello” and is considered by many to be Verdi’s greatest work.

70. TripAdvisor rival : YELP

yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

TripAdvisor.com is a travel website dedicated to helping users in most aspects of their travels. Much of TripAdvisor’s content is generated by users, in the form of reviews by travelers.

73. Photoshop fodder : IMAGE

Photoshop is a wonderful piece of software used for editing graphics. When I first bought a copy of Photoshop, it was really expensive (about $300, ten years ago), but now there are cost-effective, stripped-down versions available. Also, the full version of Photoshop is now only available as a monthly subscription service.

76. Beach in a classic bossa nova hit : IPANEMA

Bossa nova is a style of music from Brazil that evolved from samba. The most famous piece of bossa nova is the song “The Girl from Ipanema”.

84. Pollen-packing petal pusher : BEE

The fine powder known as pollen is basically a flower’s sperm. Pollen carries a seed plant’s male reproductive cells.

86. Surreal ending? : -ISM

The cultural movement known as Surrealism emerged in the 1920s, and grew out of the Dada activities that were a response to WWI. The term “surrealist” was coined by Guillaume Apollinaire, when he used it in the preface of his play “Les Mamelles de Tirésias”.

91. Mumbai wrap : SARI

Mumbai is the most populous city in India, and the second most populous city in the world (after Shanghai). The name of the city was changed from Bombay to Mumbai in 1995.

93. Designer Klein : ANNE

Anne Klein was a fashion designer from Brooklyn, New York. Anna was born Hannah Golofski, and founded her first clothing company in the 1940s along with her first husband Ben Klein.

98. Secretly : ON THE QT

“On the qt” is a slang term for “on the quiet”. It has been around since the 1870s.

107. Cause of temporary weight loss? : ZERO G

The force of gravity (g-force) that we all feel is referred to as “one G”. As gravity is a actually an accelerating force, acceleration is measured relative to that force of gravity. So, if we are sitting in a vehicle that accelerates at 3G, then we are experiencing a force that is three times that which we feel from the gravitational pull of the earth. Zero G is weightlessness that is experienced when in space, and outside the influence of the earth’s gravity.

110. NASCAR’s Yarborough : CALE

Cale Yarborough is a former NASCAR driver and owner. Yarborough was the first NASCAR driver to appear on the cover of “Sports Illustrated”.

111. Elvis’ middle name : ARON

Elvis Aron Presley (aka “the King”) was the younger of two identical twins. His brother was stillborn, and delivered 35 minutes before Elvis. The brother was named Jesse Garon Presley. So, although born a twin, Elvis was raised as an only child.

113. Moon goddess : LUNA

“Luna” is the Latin word for “moon”, and is the name given to the Roman moon goddess. The Greek equivalent of Luna was Selene. Luna had a temple on the Aventine Hill in Rome but it was destroyed during the Great Fire that raged during the reign of Nero.

115. Coup target : ETAT

A coup d’état (often just “coup”) is the sudden overthrow of a government, and comes from the French for “stroke of state”. The Swiss-German word “putsch” is sometimes used instead of “coup”, with “Putsch” translating literally as “sudden blow”.

117. Power eponym : WATT

James Watt was a Scottish inventor. He figured prominently in the Industrial Revolution in Britain, largely due to the improvements he made to the fledgling steam engine. The SI unit of power is called the watt, and was named in his honor.

118. “The Grapes of Wrath” character : OKIE

“Okies” is a derogatory term used during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s for farming families who migrated from Oklahoma (hence the name), Arkansas, Kansas and Texas in search of agricultural jobs in California. The road used by many of these migrant families was Route 66, which is also called “Mother Road”.

John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath” is set during the Great Depression. The novel tells the story of the Joad family from Oklahoma, farmers who had to leave their home and head for California due to economic hardship.

121. Defib settings : ERS

A defibrillator (defib) might be operated by an emergency medical technician (EMT).

123. Big name in ATMs : NCR

NCR is an American company that has been in business since 1884 and was originally called the National Cash Register Company. The company has done well in a market where new technologies seem to be constantly disrupting the status quo. NCR is a leading supplier of automated teller machines (ATMs) and barcode scanners.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. It’s usually spotted in a game : DOMINO
7. Prolong painfully : DRAG OUT
14. Pablo’s putting-off word : MANANA
20. Heat-sensitive patch : IRON-ON
21. 1982 Toto hit : ROSANNA
22. Twist counterclockwise, as a nut : LOOSEN
23. Defeat decisively in an annual Nathan’s contest? : (B)EAT THE PANTS OFF
25. Hardly modest : BRASSY
26. Hardly quick : SLOW
27. Steamed dumplings, e.g. : DIM SUM
28. Oft-mispunctuated word : ITS
30. Plane angle symbol : THETA
31. Alley Oop’s love : OOOLA
33. Diplomacy : TACT
35. Tribute with bent elbows : TOAST
37. Best-liked, in texts : FAV
40. Flabbergast : AWE
41. One in line for what’s left : HEIR
42. For instance : SAY
43. Whale-tale captain : AHAB
46. Cutlery causing boo-boos? : (B)OWIE KNIFE
49. Cell dead spot indicator : NO BARS
51. European capital : ROME
52. Many misses : GIRLS
53. Ripped : TORN
55. Super : PRIMO
56. __ fu : KUNG
57. Amer. fliers : USAF
58. Ripped off : ROBBED
60. Handle change : ADAPT
62. Actress Peeples : NIA
63. Bird on LSU’s seal : PELICAN
65. Is for all : ARE
66. Apply, as butter : SPREAD ON
68. 41-Across, often : SON
69. Explore à la an aging Captain Kirk? : (B)OLDLY GO
72. Director Lee : ANG
73. “Enough already!” : I’VE HAD IT
77. Vague opening? : VEE
78. 98, but not 98.6 : INTEGER
82. Bird hunted to extinction by the Maori : MOA
83. Easygoing sort : TYPE B
85. The boy well-known in meteorology? : EL NINO
87. California roll ingredient : NORI
88. Bat head? : ACRO-
90. Cardiff’s country : WALES
92. Galileo’s birthplace : PISA
93. Give __ : A DARN
94. Last-__: desperate : GASP
95. Greening up : IN LEAF
97. Roleo official? : (B)UMP ON A LOG
99. Actress Sommer : ELKE
100. Revival prefix : NEO-
101. Some reddish deer : ROES
103. Place to stay when you’re out, ironically : INN
104. Many retirees: Abbr. : SRS
105. Against a thing, at law : IN REM
107. Utah national park : ZION
108. Bury : INTER
110. Eager kids’ plea : CAN WE?
112. Heady quaff : ALE
114. War zone excavation : TRENCH
116. GI no-show : AWOL
120. Achieve success : ARRIVE
122. Farm workers’ coffee setup near a fence post? : (B)URNS AT THE STAKE
125. “We can’t hear you!” : LOUDER!
126. Consequence of only getting close? : NO CIGAR
127. “Enough already!” : QUIT IT!
128. “The Communist Manifesto” co-author : ENGELS
129. Sign off on : AGREE TO
130. Govt. securities : T-NOTES

Down

1. Conks out : DIES
2. Verbal : ORAL
3. Con __: musical tempo : MOTO
4. Halved : IN TWO
5. Japanese 7-Down : NOH
6. Dies in this puzzle? : ONE-DOWN
7. See 5-Down : DRAMA
8. Pitchers Darling and Guidry : RONS
9. Quick-witted : ASTUTE
10. Pilot feeder : GAS MAIN
11. Palindromic celeb : ONO
12. Not suitable : UNFIT
13. First presidential swinger, golf-wise : TAFT
14. Org. with minors : MLB
15. Critical ticker valve : AORTA
16. Where even termites were welcome, presumably : NOAH’S ARK
17. One who sniffs out good investments? : (B)ASSET HOUND
18. Tree house : NEST
19. “Dragonwyck” novelist Seton : ANYA
24. Criticize to death : PILE IT ON
29. Astronomer’s aid : STAR MAP
32. Kentucky __, event before the Derby : OAKS
34. Trim, as a pic : CROP
36. Painfully off-pitch Jewish diva? : (B)OY SOPRANO
37. Get all misty : FOG UP
38. “__ woman wishes to be no one’s enemy (and) … refuses to be anyone’s victim”: Angelou : A WISE
39. Like some memes : VIRAL
41. Kind of tea : HERBAL
42. “Because I __!” : SAID SO
44. OB/GYN test : AMNIO
45. Set off : BEGAN
47. Into shenanigans : ELFISH
48. “The Gift of the Magi” gift : FOB
50. Support wear : BRA
54. Comic-Con attendee : NERD
58. Sampling from Quaid’s vineyard? : (B)RANDY WINE
59. Dig deeply : DELVE
61. Sleeping bag site : TENT
64. Lab __ : COAT
67. Ax to grind : AGENDA
69. Verdi opera based on a Shakespeare tragedy : OTELLO
70. TripAdvisor rival : YELP
71. Einstein : GENIUS
73. Photoshop fodder : IMAGE
74. Outspoken : VOCAL
75. Carpet made from corn husks? : (B)EARSKIN RUG
76. Beach in a classic bossa nova hit : IPANEMA
78. If all else fails : IN A PINCH
79. Ends : GOALS
80. Misjudgment : ERROR
81. Smartphone options : RINGS
84. Pollen-packing petal pusher : BEE
86. Surreal ending? : -ISM
89. Dentist’s directive : OPEN WIDE
91. Mumbai wrap : SARI
93. Designer Klein : ANNE
96. It’s played secretly under the table : FOOTSIE
98. Secretly : ON THE QT
102. More than irk : ENRAGE
106. Celebrate wildly : REVEL
107. Cause of temporary weight loss? : ZERO G
108. 101 course : INTRO
109. 1:1, for one : RATIO
110. NASCAR’s Yarborough : CALE
111. Elvis’ middle name : ARON
113. Moon goddess : LUNA
115. Coup target : ETAT
117. Power eponym : WATT
118. “The Grapes of Wrath” character : OKIE
119. Rents : LETS
121. Defib settings : ERS
123. Big name in ATMs : NCR
124. Radiation source : SUN

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8 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 13 Jan 19, Sunday”

  1. LAT: 25:13, no errors; enjoyable word play 😜. Newsday: 14:27, no errors. WP: 22:44, no errors. NYT: 26:10, no errors. No more puzzles today!

  2. One hour & 6 min. and no errors.
    NYT puzzle # 0106 one hour and 26 min. With one error.
    I had Arctic froSt for Arctic froNt.
    I checked it on Rex Parkers blog as I am still trying to get Bills NYT answers with no success .

  3. 37 mins, 22 sec and error free, although I have to admit that the electronic version helped me find errors in 8 fills. The difficulty in this one came from trying to ferret out the dumb puns caused by leaving off the Bs. More aggravating than the usual examples of this trope.

    A few of the clues caused major squinting, and a few WT…F???’s Par for the course on a Sunday…

  4. Defeat decisively in an annual Nathan’s contest? : (B)EAT THE PANTS OFF

    Really don’t get the “pants” reference in this clue. All of the other themed clues worked on the front end and the back end but not this one. What am I missing here?

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