LA Times Crossword 23 Mar 19, Saturday

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Constructed by: Kyle Dolan
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 10m 37s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 Each of its chapters is called a “sura” : QUR’AN

A “sura” is any one of the 114 chapters of the Koran.

The Koran is also known as the “Qur’an” in English, with “Qur’an” a transliteration of the Arabic name for the holy text of the Muslim faith. The literal translation of “Koran” is “the recitation”.

15 Georgian Bay is part of it : LAKE HURON

Georgian Bay in Ontario is a bay of Lake Huron. The bay was named for King George IV in 1822.

Lake Huron takes its name from the Huron Native American people that lived by its shores. Early French explorers often called the lake “La Mer Douce”, which translates as “the freshwater sea”.

16 Fifth sense? : UMAMI

Umami is one of the five basic tastes, along with sweet, sour, bitter and salty. “Umami” is a Japanese word used to describe “a pleasant savory taste”. Umami was proposed as a basic taste in 1908, but it wasn’t until 1985 that the scientific community finally accepted it as such.

18 Park with an “Innoventions” museum : EPCOT

Innoventions is a museum in Florida’s Epcot theme park that showcases the practical application of technology in our everyday lives.

19 Humanities subj. : PSY

Psychology (psy.)

The academic studies of human culture are collectively called the humanities. Subjects included in the humanities are languages, literature, philosophy, religion and music.

20 Small white toy : MALTESE

The Maltese breed of dog falls into the toy group, as adults weigh just 3-10 pounds. The breed is an old one. Indeed, ancient Greek geographer Strabo suggested in the first century CE that the breed originated on the Mediterranean island of Malta. He also noted that Maltese dogs were favored by noble women.

23 Old Route 66 city : TULSA

Tulsa is the second-largest city in the state of Oklahoma (after Oklahoma City). Tulsa started out as a settlement established by the Loachapoka and Creek Native American tribes in 1836. These early settlers called their new home “Tallasi” meaning “old town”, and this name morphed into “Tulsa” that we use today.

The famous old highway called Route 66 has largely been replaced by modern interstates. It ran from Chicago to Los Angeles, right through the heart of America, and so it was often called the “Main Street of America”. The road gained notoriety because of Nat King Cole’s song “(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66”, and also because of the sixties TV show called “Route 66”.

26 Flag of Chicago quartet : STARS

The city of Chicago’s flag was adopted in 1917. It comprises two horizontal blue bars and four red stars on a white background. The four six-pointed stars represent four historical sites and events that are significant to the city:

  • Fort Dearborn
  • The Great Chicago Fire of 1871
  • The World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893
  • The Century of Progress Exposition of 1933–34

29 Mainland Africa’s smallest nation : GAMBIA

The Islamic Republic of the Gambia is a country in West Africa. It is the smallest country on the African mainland, and is almost completely surrounded by Senegal. The Gambia lies on the Gambia River, for which the nation is named.

37 Whitewater sight, perhaps : KAYAKER

There is a type of boat used by Inuit people called an “umiak”. . The term “umiak” means “woman’s boat”, whereas “kayak” means “man’s boat”.

42 Maker of Oikos Greek yogurt : DANNON

Danone is a French company that sells a wide range of food products, as well as bottled water. Here in the US Danone sells under the brand name “Dannon”. Examples of Danone products are Evian bottled water and Activia yogurt.

43 Big Ten team since 2014, familiarly : TERPS

The sports teams of the University of Maryland are called the Maryland Terrapins, or “the Terps” for short. The name dates back to 1932 when it was coined by the the university’s president at the time, Curley Byrd. He took the name from the diamondback terrapins that are native to the Chesapeake Bay.

44 Actually being : IN ESSE

The Latin term “in esse” is used to mean “actually existing”, and translates as “in being”.

46 Match.com results : DATES

Match.com is an online dating service. The company was started in 1993 and claims to have over 20 million members worldwide, in the ratio of male to female of 49:51.

50 “The Murder Room” author : PD JAMES

P. D. James was an incredibly successful English author of crime fiction, with her most famous books being a series that features a policeman and sometime poet named Adam Dalgliesh. James’ 1992 novel called “The Children of Men” was adapted into a 2006 movie (“Children of Men”) starring Clive Owen and Julianne Moore. It tells of a world that develops after two generations of human infertility.

“The Murder Room” is a detective novel by P. D. James that was first published in 2003. It is the twelfth in the series of novels featuring James’ detective Adam Dalgliesh. There’s a BBC adaptation of “The Murder Room” released in 2004 that I have on my “to watch” list …

52 Red choice : CAB

The cabernet sauvignon grape has been around since the 17th century, and is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the cabernet franc and sauvignon blanc grapes.

59 Jackie’s predecessor : MAMIE

Mamie Eisenhower has to have been one of the most charming of all the First Ladies of the United States. Ms. Eisenhower suffered from an inner ear complaint called Ménière’s disease which caused her to lose her balance quite often. Because she was unsteady on her feet there were unfounded rumors floating around Washington that Ms. Eisenhower had a drinking problem. People can be very unkind …

Jackie Kennedy Onassis was born into a privileged family, the daughter of Wall Street stockbroker John Vernou Bouvier III. Ms. Bouvier moved in the same social circles as the Kennedy clan, and first met the then-US Representative John Kennedy at a dinner party hosted by mutual friends. Years later, after she saw her husband assassinated and then her brother-in-law (Bobby Kennedy) suffer the same fate, Jackie declared that she feared for the life of her children as they bore the Kennedy name. She left the country, eventually meeting and marrying Aristotle Onassis. Reportedly she was very satisfied that the Greek shipping magnate was able to provide privacy and security for her children.

Down

5 Gland essential to T cell maturation : THYMUS

T cells are a group of white blood cells that are essential components of the body’s immune system. T cells are so called because they mature in the thymus, a specialized organ found in the chest.

7 Range with one end in Kazakhstan : URALS

The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia and Kazakhstan is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

The Republic of Kazakhstan in Central Asia is the world’s largest landlocked country. Kazakhstan was also the last of the former Soviet Republics (SSRs) to declare itself independent from Russia.

10 Artist with the 2016 album “Lemonade,” to fans : QUEEN BEY

Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny’s Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2003, two years after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical “Dreamgirls”. Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as “Queen Bey”, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”.

11 One verifying a tag : UMP

That would be baseball.

12 20km Summer Olympian : RACEWALKER

There are three racewalking events contested at a Summer Olympics:

  • 20 kilometers race walk (men)
  • 20 kilometers race walk (women)
  • 50 kilometers race walk (men)

14 Fertilizer ingredient : NITER

The chemical name for saltpeter (also called “niter, nitre”) is potassium nitrate. The exact origin of the name “saltpeter” isn’t clear, but it may have come from the Latin “sal petrae” meaning “stone salt”. The main use for potassium nitrate is as a fertilizer, a source of potassium and nitrogen. As it is a powerful oxidizing agent, it is also used in amateur rocket propellants. Anyone who has ignited one of those “engines” would have noticed the lilac-colored flame, indicating the presence of potassium.

21 Ballroom dances : SAMBAS

The samba is a Brazilian dance that is very much symbolic of the festival of Carnival. Like so much culture around the world, the samba has its roots in Africa, as the dance is derived from dances performed by former slaves who migrated into urban Rio de Janeiro in the late 1800s. The exact roots of the name “samba” seem to have been lost in the mists of time. However, my favorite explanation is that it comes from an African Kikongo word “semba” which means “a blow struck with the belly button”. We don’t seem to have a need for such a word in English …

23 Three-horse carriages : TROIKAS

“Troika” is a Russian word meaning “set of three”. “Troika” can apply to a sled or carriage drawn by three horses, or to a folk dance between one man and two women. The term might also apply to a triumvirate of political leaders.

25 Preserved fodders : SILAGES

“Silage” is fodder, such as hay, that has fermented in a “silo” due to the activity anaerobic bacteria. The process of ensilaging (sometimes “silaging”) is said to make the fodder more tasty to the animals being fed, and at least provides some variety in the diet.

26 “__ Came in Through the Bathroom Window”: Beatles : SHE

“She Came In Through the Bathroom Window” is a Beatles song from their “Abbey Road” album. It was composed by Paul McCartney, and was inspired by the hordes of ardent fans who hung around the recording studios and homes of the band members. There actually was a case of one fan climbing a ladder, entering McCartney’s home, and opening the front door to let in some of her fellow “Beatle manics”.

27 One might include an emoji : TEXT

An emoji is a character found on many cell phones that is much like an emoticon, but is more elaborate.

28 Dance Dance Revolution, e.g. : ARCADE GAME

Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) is a series of music video games that launched in 1998. DDR is usually found in arcades, as players have to stand on a special dance stage and hit arrows with their feet on cue.

30 Sacred chests : ARKS

The Torah ark is found in a synagogue, and is the ornamental container in which are stored the Torah scrolls. The word “Torah” best translates as “teaching” or “law”, I am told.

32 More than brushed back : BEANED

To bean someone is to hit them on the head (the “bean”).

33 First NHL player with a 100-point season, familiarly : ESPO

Phil “Espo” Esposito is a former professional hockey player who played for the Chicago Blackhawks, Boston Bruins and New York Rangers. Espo scored 126 points in the 1969 season, hence becoming the first NHL player to score 100 points in a season.

34 Site with many pans : YELP

yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

To pan something is to criticize it harshly.

38 __ feed: online news aggregator : RSS

Many websites and blogs publish content in a format known as Rich Site Summary (RSS). The “feed” can be read using an RSS reader. The advantage of using an RSS reader, is that the user doesn’t have to check the website for new content. That new material is fed to the RSS reader as soon as it is published.

40 Slowish tempo marking : ANDANTE

The tempo (plural “tempi”) of a piece of music is usually designated with an Italian word on the score. For example, “grave” is slow and solemn, “andante” is at a walking pace, “scherzo” is fast and light-hearted, and “allegro” is fast, quickly and bright.

43 One of Corleone’s capos : TESSIO

Sal Tessio is a character in Mario Puzo’s novel “The Godfather”. Tessio become a high-ranking confidante in Don Corleone’s crime organization. The character was played in the Francis Ford Coppola film by actor Abe Vigoda.

More properly called a caporegime, a capo is a high-ranking member of the Mafia (Cosa Nostra).

44 10-Across preachers : IMAMS
(10A Each of its chapters is called a “sura” : QUR’AN)

An imam is a Muslim leader, and often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

47 Jordan’s capital : AMMAN

Amman is the capital city of Jordan, and is one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in the world. Amman has been occupied by a number of different civilizations over the centuries, including the Greeks who called it “Philadelphia”, a name retained by the Romans when they occupied the city just after 100 AD.

The nation that we know as Jordan takes its name from the River Jordan that forms part of the country’s border with Israel and Palestine to the west. Jordan achieved independence in 1946 after the UN approved the end of the British Transjordan Mandate. The Kingdom of Transjordan changed its name to Jordan in 1948.

53 “Permit Me Voyage” poet : AGEE

“Permit Me Voyage” is the only volume of poetry published by American author James Agee.

56 Hyundai competitor : KIA

Kia Motors is the second largest manufacturer of cars in South Korea, behind Hyundai (and Hyundai is a part owner in Kia now). Kia was founded in 1944 as a manufacturer of bicycle parts, and did indeed produce Korea’s first domestic bicycle. The company’s original name was Kyungsung Precision Industry, with the Kia name introduced in 1952.

58 Paltry quantity : SOU

A sou is an old French coin. We use the term “sou” to mean “an almost worthless amount”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Source of moving fare : FOOD TRUCK
10 Each of its chapters is called a “sura” : QUR’AN
15 Georgian Bay is part of it : LAKE HURON
16 Fifth sense? : UMAMI
17 “Regardless … ” : AT ANY RATE …
18 Park with an “Innoventions” museum : EPCOT
19 Humanities subj. : PSY
20 Small white toy : MALTESE
22 Time of expectation : EVE
23 Old Route 66 city : TULSA
24 Solution : ANSWER
26 Flag of Chicago quartet : STARS
29 Mainland Africa’s smallest nation : GAMBIA
31 Decorated one : HERO
32 Pot seen in a bar : BEER BELLY
35 Charges up : EXCITES
37 Whitewater sight, perhaps : KAYAKER
39 Sit out : TAKE A PASS
41 Lock fixers : GELS
42 Maker of Oikos Greek yogurt : DANNON
43 Big Ten team since 2014, familiarly : TERPS
44 Actually being : IN ESSE
46 Match.com results : DATES
49 Brief storage unit : MEG
50 “The Murder Room” author : PD JAMES
52 Red choice : CAB
55 Up : AWAKE
57 In agreement with the party : ON MESSAGE
59 Jackie’s predecessor : MAMIE
60 Posted : STATIONED
61 Place : STEAD
62 Egg sources : HENHOUSES

Down

1 Controversy : FLAP
2 Stable diet : OATS
3 “Agreed” : OKAY
4 Show watcher’s room : DEN
5 Gland essential to T cell maturation : THYMUS
6 Pastoral : RURAL
7 Range with one end in Kazakhstan : URALS
8 Weekend getaway : COTTAGE
9 Hopping joint? : KNEE
10 Artist with the 2016 album “Lemonade,” to fans : QUEEN BEY
11 One verifying a tag : UMP
12 20km Summer Olympian : RACEWALKER
13 “Don’t make __!” : A MOVE
14 Fertilizer ingredient : NITER
21 Ballroom dances : SAMBAS
23 Three-horse carriages : TROIKAS
25 Preserved fodders : SILAGES
26 “__ Came in Through the Bathroom Window”: Beatles : SHE
27 One might include an emoji : TEXT
28 Dance Dance Revolution, e.g. : ARCADE GAME
30 Sacred chests : ARKS
32 More than brushed back : BEANED
33 First NHL player with a 100-point season, familiarly : ESPO
34 Site with many pans : YELP
36 State-of-the-art 1970s bike : TEN-SPEED
38 __ feed: online news aggregator : RSS
40 Slowish tempo marking : ANDANTE
43 One of Corleone’s capos : TESSIO
44 10-Across preachers : IMAMS
45 Unaccustomed to : NEW AT
47 Jordan’s capital : AMMAN
48 Effectiveness : TEETH
51 Rib : JOSH
52 Recycled items : CANS
53 “Permit Me Voyage” poet : AGEE
54 Flower holders : BEDS
56 Hyundai competitor : KIA
58 Paltry quantity : SOU

14 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 23 Mar 19, Saturday”

  1. Strange today. Didn’t take long to finish but had one dumb oversight
    error which gave me two words wrong. Too much of a hurry to go
    back and check it over. Didn’t understand “flag of Chicago quartet”.

  2. LAT: 11:20, no errors. WSJ: 30:04, no errors; harder than usual, I thought (but maybe it was just me). Newsday: 46:08, no errors; for me, an odd mix of easy and hard; I spent about half my time in the lower right (but, again, maybe it was just me).

    I finished various puzzles rather late last night, but, just before going to bed, I took a short “final” look at the WSJ meta, which I had mostly ignored all day. As I was dropping off to sleep a few minutes later, a key observation popped into my head, so I got up, worked out the answer, and sent it in. A fiendishly clever construction!

    @Allen Dickerson … I’d like to know how you got the setter to make your initials “pop up” all over yesterday’s puzzle! Once I figure out how to do it, you’re gonna be faced with a puzzle full of DK! … 😜

    1. Don’t try and put that on me. Just a(n un)happy coincidence. I don’t usually go in for that kind of chicanery, and didn’t even think of the ADs being my initials…. 🙂

  3. LAT: SE corner caused some problem but I eventually got it. Screwed up stupidly though on “kayaker.” Entered “QueenBee” instead of “QueenBey” (because I don’t keep up with pop music), which caused the kayaker miss.

  4. 53:30 with 8 errors all in the upper right corner. I spelled Quran the only way I had ever heard of it (Koran ) and it went downhill from there.

  5. i did better than I thought. But “beer belly” never came to me and had Koran in, so that messed up a lot of things. Well, it’s Saturday so what else is new!

  6. My lawyer son-in-law was not here this morning and I was only able to
    get a couple of words. They came over for supper (dinner) and in what
    seemed like less than 30 minutes, he had 2/3 of it! He handed it to me
    and I kinda chuckled to myself. But don’t you know I was able to clean
    up the rest for him and we scored 100%! That gave our puzzle family
    five 100’s this week and only 3 empty squares on the other two days.
    Feeling very self-satisfied as we speak. Kudos to all for your efforts.

  7. Right about 16 minutes until I got fed up with the USELESS clues and quit, with probably half the grid filled, maybe less.

    A new name for my “don’t even bother” list. Life’s too short to waste time on puzzles you simply weren’t ever meant to solve.

  8. John Daigle: You’ve got a great family “team” going there! How fun for all of you. That’s what’s great about these puzzles. I always include others in the clues I can’t get. They seem to have fun in helping me out. Mostly it’s the NYT crossword that I have the most problems. So keep on doing your thing.

  9. Aloha!!😎

    No errors!! Yay! I love a good Saturday challenge– when I have no errors, that is. 😊 Allen, I’m sure I don’t know what you’re complaining about!! I thought this was a well-done puzzle.

    Here’s something strange: usually the puzzles say content copyright Tribune Content Agency, but today’s was copyright Kyle Dolan, the setter’s name. Wonder why. Maybe that happens sometimes and I just never noticed it.🤔

    And again that word SILAGE!! Never seen it before this week, when it appeared twice!!😯

    @KAY! FWIW I never do the puzzle with anyone else! I’m too fixated on getting it right on my own. 😊 I’ll make an exception occasionally for my niece….

    Be well~~🐧🕊🐔🦆🦅

  10. Tough Saturday for me; got everything except most of the SE corner after about an hour and 15 minutes. 19 missing and 2 in error, although I should have gotten the ED in BEDS. The rest I just didn’t know. At least I had CABS, CANS, AMMAN, SOU and DATES. Did have to change Afuss to AMOVE and koRAN.

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