LA Times Crossword 24 Mar 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: Jason Mueller
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Pollination

Themed answers each include the name of a flower. Hovering above each flower in the grid are the letters “BEE”:

  • 18A Hardwood tree : BEECH
  • 23A *Henry James heroine : DAISY MILLER
  • 26A “Three Tall Women” Pulitzer playwright : ALBEE
  • 29A *Hip-hop artist with the 2014 #1 hit “Fancy” : IGGY AZALEA
  • 37A “Cold one over here, please” : BEER ME
  • 42A *Youngest NBA player to win the MVP : DERRICK ROSE
  • 60A 2007 IHOP acquisition : APPLEBEE’S
  • 67A *Bashful one : SHRINKING VIOLET
  • 87A Designer Geoffrey : BEENE
  • 93A *”Under the Net” novelist : IRIS MURDOCH
  • 99A Borscht veggie : BEET
  • 109A *Looney Tunes girlfriend : PETUNIA PIG
  • 114A Creature found atop the apt part of each answer to a starred clue : BEE
  • 117A *Add unneeded ornamentation : GILD THE LILY

Bill’s time: 16m 24s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 “Behind the __ I’ll convey myself”: Polonius : ARRAS

A famous arras is seen in Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”. In one pivotal scene, Polonius is hiding behind a tapestry listening to an argument between Hamlet and Gertrude. Hamlet hears Polonius, mistakes his identity and stabs wildly through the cloth, killing Polonius. The name “arras”, used for such a tapestry, comes from the French town of Arras which was famous for the production of fine wall hangings.

11 EMT skill : CPR

An emergency medical technician (EMT) might administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

14 Judge’s seat : BANC

“Banc” is the French word for bench or seat.

18 Hardwood tree : BEECH

Beech bark is very thin and delicate, and is often scarred by people carving their initials or other forms of graffiti. These markings are permanent because the tree cannot heal itself. There is also a fungal infection that damages the American beech that is called beech bark disease, which can be fatal to the tree.

20 WC : LOO

When I was growing up in Ireland, a bathroom was a room that had a bath and no toilet. The separate room with the commode was called the toilet or sometimes the W.C. (the water closet). Apparently the term “closet” was used because in the 1800s when homeowners started installing toilets indoors they often displaced clothes and linens in a closet, as a closet was the right size to take the commode.

23 *Henry James heroine : DAISY MILLER

“Daisy Miller” is a novella by Henry James that first appeared in serial form in 1878, and in book form in 1879. The title character is a young American woman striving to enter the high society she finds as she tours Europe.

25 Top of a scepter, perhaps : ORB

A scepter is a ceremonial staff, one often held by a monarch.

26 “Three Tall Women” Pulitzer playwright : ALBEE

Playwright Edward Albee’s most famous play is “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Albee won three Pulitzer Prizes for Drama:

  • 1967: “A Delicate Balance”
  • 1975: “Seascape”
  • 1994: “Three Tall Women”

Albee also won three Tony Awards:

  • 1963: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (Best Play)
  • 2002: “The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?”
  • 2005: Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement

27 German university city : ULM

Ulm is a city in the south of Germany that sits on the River Danube. Ulm is famous as home to the tallest church in the world, Ulm Minster, a Gothic building with a steeple that is 530 feet tall, with 768 steps to climb. Ulm is also the birthplace of Albert Einstein, and is where the entire Austrian army surrendered to Napoleon after the Battle of Ulm in 1805.

29 *Hip-hop artist with the 2014 #1 hit “Fancy” : IGGY AZALEA

“Iggy Azalea” is the stage name of Australian rapper Amethyst Kelly. I haven’t heard of her outside of crosswords …

34 Delivery pros : OB/GYNS

Obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN)

35 One taking a selfie : CELL

A selfie is a self-portrait, one usually taken with a digital camera or cell phone. A “group selfie” is sometimes referred to as a “groufie” or “wefie”. A “couple selfie” is known as an “usie” or “ussie”, although those terms are sometimes also used for a group picture.

36 AP rival : UPI

Founded in 1958, United Press International (UPI) used to be one of the biggest news agencies in the world, sending out news by wire to the major newspapers. UPI ran into trouble with the change in media formats at the end of the twentieth century and lost many of its clients as the afternoon newspapers shut down due to the advent of television news. UPI, which once employed thousands, still exists today but with just a fraction of that workforce.

The Associated Press (AP) is a news agency based in New York City. AP is a non-profit cooperative that was set up by five New York newspapers in 1846 to share the cost of transmitting news. Nowadays, AP recoups most of its cost by selling news stories and related materials to newspapers all around the world, mostly outside of the US.

40 Campaign funding org. : PAC

A political action committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent, expenditure-only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

42 *Youngest NBA player to win the MVP : DERRICK ROSE

In 2011, basketball player Derrick Rose became the youngest player to win the NBA’s MVP Award in 2011. He was 22 years of age at the time.

53 Studio supporter? : EASEL

The word “easel” comes from an old Dutch word meaning “donkey” would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

58 Bird in Saint-Saëns’ “The Carnival of the Animals” : SWAN

“The Carnival of the Animals” is a lovely musical suite that French composer Camille Saint-Saëns composed in 1886. Interestingly, Saint-Saens would not allow the work to be published during his lifetime, as he viewed it simply as “such fun”. He made an exception for the most famous movement in “The Carnival”, namely

59 1912 Olympic legend : THORPE

The sports star Jim Thorpe was quite the all-rounder. He played professional football, baseball, and basketball, and also won Olympic golds in two other all-rounder events, the pentathlon and decathlon (in 1912). However, he lost his medals when it was revealed that he had been paid for playing baseball before the Games, and back then, amateur status was important to the Olympic governing body.

60 2007 IHOP acquisition : APPLEBEE’S

The Applebee’s chain of “Neighborhood Bar & Grill” restaurants was founded in 1980, with the first Applebee’s eatery opening in Decatur, Georgia. When it comes to “chain” restaurants, I like Applebee’s …

66 Barrett of Pink Floyd : SYD

Syd Barrett was the lead singer and a founding member of the English rock band Pink Floyd. Barrett was only active as a musician for just over ten years. He retired from the music scene in 1975 and spent the next 30 years living off Pink Floyd royalties until he passed away in 2006.

67 *Bashful one : SHRINKING VIOLET

Someone who is very shy might be described as a “shrinking violet”. The violet in this case is the flower, and not the girl’s name. The plant Viola odorata has been referred to “shrinking violet” because of its habit of hugging the ground as it grows.

71 “NCIS” was spun off from it : JAG

The legal drama “JAG” is named for the highest ranking uniformed lawyer in the US Navy, the Judge Advocate General. Apparently the show was created as a cross between “Top Gun” and “A Few Good Men”.

75 60-year-old Mattel classic : BARBIE

The famous Barbie doll was created by businesswoman Ruth Handler and first appeared on store shelves in 1959. Barbie was based on a German fashion doll called Bild Lilli that was introduced in 1955. Lilli had been a German cartoon character before taking on a three-dimensional form. Prior to the introduction of Bild Lilli and Barbie, children’s dolls were primarily representations of infants.

81 D.C. VIP : SEN

Senator (sen.)

82 Pocatello natives : IDAHOANS

Pocatello is a city in the southeast of Idaho. It is home to Idaho State University (ISU). The city was founded as a railroad stop in the days of the gold rush. Pocatello was named for the chief of the Shoshone tribe who granted the right of way for the railroad to pass through the nearby Fort Hall Indian Reservation.

84 Korean rice dish : BIBIMBAP

The name of the Korean dish bibimbap translates literally as “mixed rice”, with “bibim” meaning “mixed ingredients” and “bap” meaning “rice”. Generally, the dish comes as a bowl of white rice topped with sautéed vegetables flavored with chili pepper paste. Variants often include a fried egg and sliced beef.

87 Designer Geoffrey : BEENE

Geoffrey Beene was an American fashion designer. He had an impressive list of clients that included First Ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Pat Nixon and Nancy Reagan.

90 Keats, for one : ODIST

The poet John Keats is famous for writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most renowned are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

91 “These go to eleven” band : SPINAL TAP

“This Is Spın̈al Tap” is a rock musical mockumentary about the fictional band Spinal Tap, directed by the great Rob Reiner. I love Rob Reiner’s work, but this movie … not so much …

The idioms “these go to eleven” (sometimes “up to eleven”) come from the 1984 movie “This is Spinal Tap”. In the film, the band’s guitarist is proud of his amplifier that can attain a volume of “eleven” as opposed to the standard “ten”. And so, we can say “turning it up to eleven” when we are taking something to the extreme.

93 *”Under the Net” novelist : IRIS MURDOCH

Dame Iris Murdoch was an Irish-born British author and philosopher. She was awarded the Booker Prize in 1978 for her novel “The Sea, the Sea”, although her best-known work is probably her first novel “Under the Net”, which was published in 1954.

95 Prefix with Pen : EPI-

EpiPen is a brand of epinephrine auto-injector. An EpiPen delivers a measured dose of epinephrine, which is a common treatment for an extreme allergic reaction.

99 Borscht veggie : BEET

Borscht is a beetroot soup that originated in Ukraine. Borscht can be served both hot and cold.

109 *Looney Tunes girlfriend : PETUNIA PIG

Petunia Pig is a cartoon character in the “Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” universes. Petunia is the girlfriend of Porky Pig and has been around since 1937.

115 Pine Tree State campus town : ORONO

The town of Orono is home to the University of Maine that was founded in 1862. The college is actually located on an island (Marsh island) lying between the Penobscot and Stillwater rivers. The town of Orono is named after Joseph Orono, a chief of the Penobscot Nation. The school’s athletic teams are named the Maine Black Bears.

Maine is the least densely populated state east of the Mississippi, with almost 90% of its land covered with forests. Perhaps that’s why the state’s nickname is “The Pine Tree State” …

116 __ Diego : SAN

The name of the California city of San Diego dates back to 1602, when Spanish explorer Sebastián Vizcaíno named the area after the Catholic Saint Didacus. Saint Didacus was more commonly referred to as San Diego de Alcalá.

117 *Add unneeded ornamentation : GILD THE LILY

To gild is to coat with gold. The phrase “to gild the lily” means to add unnecessary ornamentation, to try to improve something that is already ideal.

120 Some, in Stuttgart : EINES

Stuttgart is the sixth-largest city in Germany, and is located in southern Germany. The city is sometimes called “the cradle of the automobile” as Karl Benz made his first cars and motorcycles there, as were the first VW Beetle prototypes. Mercedes-Benz and Porsche cars are still manufactured in Stuttgart and the surrounding area.

121 Bit of work : ERG

An erg is a unit of mechanical work or energy. It is a small unit, with one joule comprising 10 million ergs. it has been suggested that an erg is about the amount of energy required for a mosquito to take off. The term comes from “ergon”, the Greek word for work.

123 Big fight : MELEE

Our term “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means “confused fight”.

124 Palindromic Latin verb : ESSE

“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am”, and “erat” means “he, she was”.

125 Rehab woe : DTS

The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called delirium tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is “trembling madness”.

126 Palindromic court star : SELES

Monica Seles has a Hungarian name as she was born to Hungarian parents in former Yugoslavia. Seles was the World No. 1 professional tennis player in 1991 and 1992 before being forced from the sport when she was stabbed by a spectator at a match in 1993. She did return to the game two years later, but never achieved the same level of success.

Down

1 “Idol” judge replaced by DeGeneres : ABDUL

Paula Abdul is primarily a singer and dancer, and someone who endeared herself even more to the American public in recent years as a judge on “American Idol”. Abdul had a famous husband for a couple of years, as she was married to actor Emilio Estevez from 1992-94.

Ellen DeGeneres is a very, very successful TV personality, having parlayed her career in stand-up comedy into lucrative gigs as an actress and talk show host. Back in 1997 DeGeneres chose the “Oprah Winfrey Show” to announce that she was a lesbian. Her character on “The Ellen Show” also came out as a lesbian in a scene with her therapist, who was played by Oprah Winfrey. Nice twist!

2 “Around the Horn” host Tony : REALI

Tony Reali is sports personality who began hosting the ESPN TV show “Around the Horn” in 2004. Apparently, Reali is quite the sports statistician.

3 French coronation city : REIMS

The city of Reims is the de facto capital of the Champagne region of France, being the biggest city in the area. Reims was badly damaged during both world wars, including extensive damage to the much loved cathedral during WWI by German bombardment. It’s perhaps fitting that Reims was the location where the German forces surrendered to General Eisenhower on the 7 May 1945, ending the war in Europe.

6 Target Field team : TWINS

Target Field is a baseball park in Minneapolis, Minnesota that has been home to the Minnesota Twins since the stadium opening in 2010. Target Corporation, which is headquartered in Minneapolis, paid an undisclosed sum to get the naming rights of the park.

8 Bermuda, e.g. : ISLE

Bermuda is a British Overseas Territory that is located off the east coast of the US. It is named for the Spaniard Juan de Bermúdez who in 1503 become the first European to discover the archipelago. Bermuda is the oldest remaining British Overseas Territory (since Newfoundland became part of Canada in 1949). It is also the most populous British Overseas Territory (since Hong Kong was returned to China in 1997).

9 GPS data : RTES

A global positioning system (GPS) might point out a route (rte.).

10 Aachen article : DER

The definite article in German is der, die or das, for masculine, feminine and neuter nouns. The indefinite article is ein, eine or ein, again depending on the gender of the noun. A further complication, relative to English, is that the masculine form (and only the masculine form) of the article changes when used in the accusative case, when used with the object of a sentence. The accusative forms are “den” and “einen”.

Aachen is a city in the very west of Germany, right on the border with Belgium and the Netherlands. In English, we quite often refer to this city by its French name, Aix-la-Chapelle.

12 Gershwin title lover : PORGY

“Porgy and Bess” is an opera with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and libretto by DuBose Heyward. The storyline of the opera is based on the novel “Porgy” written by DuBose Heyward and and wife Dorothy. “Porgy and Bess” was first performed in 1935, in New York City, but really wasn’t accepted as legitimate opera until 1976 after a landmark production by the Houston Grand Opera. The most famous song from the piece is probably the wonderful aria “Summertime”.

13 One-named Swedish pop singer : ROBYN

“Robyn” is the stage name of Swedish singer Robin Miriam Carlsson. Never heard of her outside of crosswords …

14 Ruth’s husband : BOAZ

In the Bible’s Book of Ruth, the widowed Ruth marries a wealthy landowner from Bethlehem called Boaz.

17 Angler’s basket : CREEL

A creel is a basket used for catching sea creatures (lobsters, for example). Creel is also the name given to the small wicker basket used to hold fish that have been caught by an angler. “Creel” is originally a Scottish word.

29 Watson creator : IBM

Watson is a computer system developed by IBM. Watson is designed to answer questions that are posed in natural language, so that it should be able to interpret questions just as you and I would, no matter how the question is phrased. The program is named after the founder of IBM, Thomas J. Watson. Today’s Watson competed in a few memorable episodes of “Jeopardy!” in 2011 taking out two of the best players of the quiz show. That made for fun television …

30 Vail alternative : ASPEN

Aspen, Colorado used to be known as Ute City, with the name change taking place in 1880. Like many communities in the area, Aspen was a mining town, and in 1891 and 1892 it was at the center of the highest production of silver in the US. Nowadays, it’s all about skiing and movie stars.

32 Tina and Lana : TURNERS

“Tina Turner” is the stage name used by Anna Mae Bullock, the “Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll”. Turner has always loved Europe and moved there in the eighties. She now splits her time between her homes in England, France and Switzerland.

Lana Turner started work as a Hollywood actress at a very young age, signing up with MGM at only sixteen. Early in her career she earned the nickname “The Sweater Girl” after wearing a pretty tight sweater in the film “They Won’t Forget”, which was her film debut. She married eight times, to seven different husbands, the first of which was bandleader Artie Shaw. Shaw and Turner eloped and married on their very first date, when the young actress was just nineteen years old. After divorcing Shaw she married restaurateur Joseph Crane, but had the marriage annulled when she found out that Crane was still married to his first wife. The two had a daughter together, and so remarried when Crane’s divorce was finalized. Cheryl Crane was the daughter from the marriage to Joseph and she lived with Turner after her parents split up. When Cheryl was 14-years-old, her mother was romantically involved with a shady character named Johnny Stompanato. One evening Cheryl found her mother engaged in a violent argument with Stompanato, and Cheryl became so scared that she pulled out a gun and killed him in what was deemed to be justifiable homicide. Turner’s last marriage was to a nightclub hypnotist named Ronald Pellar, and that union lasted just six months as Pellar disappeared one day with a lot of Turner’s money and jewelry. Years later Turner said, “My goal was to have one husband and seven children, but it turned out to be the other way around.”

33 Mel Blanc’s “That’s All Folks” et al. : EPITAPHS

Mel Blanc was known as “The Man of a Thousand Voices”. We’ve all heard Mel Blanc at one time or another, I am sure. His was the voice behind such cartoon characters as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Woody Woodpecker, Elmer Fudd and Barney Rubble. And the words on Blanc’s tombstone are … “That’s all folks”.

34 Pitcher Hershiser : OREL

Orel Hershiser is big into poker now that he has retired from Major League Baseball. Hershiser lives in Las Vegas and when he isn’t working for ESPN, apparently he is at the poker tables, playing professionally. When Hershiser is eliminated in a poker tournament, he is in the habit of presenting the person who ousts him with an autographed baseball.

38 Dawn deity : EOS

In Greek mythology, Eos was the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos was Aurora. Rather delightfully, Homer referred to Eos as “rosy-fingered dawn” in both “Iliad” and “Odyssey”.

43 Cole Porter’s “Well, Did You __?” : EVAH

“Well, Did You Evah!” is a song from the 1939 Cole Porter musical “DuBarry Was a Lady”. A more famous rendition of the song was by Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra in the 1956 movie “High Society”.

45 Mauna __ : KEA

Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, the peak of which is the highest point in the whole state. Mauna Kea is in effect the tip of a gigantic volcano rising up from the seabed.

47 Suspect’s story : ALIBI

“Alibi” is the Latin word for “elsewhere” as in, “I claim that I was ‘elsewhere’ when the crime was committed … I have an ‘alibi’”.

48 Copland ballet with a hoedown : RODEO

“Rodeo” is a ballet with a score by Aaron Copland that was originally choreographed by Agnes de Mille. First performed in 1942, “Rodeo” is one of the earliest examples of a truly American classical ballet.

56 “The Way We __” : WERE

The 1973 movie “The Way We Were” is a romantic drama directed by Sydney Pollack and starring Barbra Streisand and Robert Redford. The screenplay and novel of the same name were written by Arthur Laurents, who based the storyline on his own experiences at Cornell University and later with the House Un-American Activities Committee. Streisand sung the theme song “The Way We Were”, which won that season’s Oscar for Best Original Song.

62 __ Park: Pirates’ field : PNC

PNC Park is home to the Pittsburgh Pirates baseball team. The park is sponsored by PNC Financial Services, the sixth largest bank in the US, and one founded and based in Pittsburgh.

64 Site of Napoleon’s exile : ELBA

Napoléon Bonaparte was a military professional from Corsica who rose to prominence after the French Revolution during the French First Republic. He took over the country in 1799 in a coup d’état and installed himself as First Consul. Soon after, he led France in the Napoleonic Wars, conflicts between the growing French Empire and a series of opposing coalitions. He was eventually defeated at the Battle of Leipzig and was forced into exile on the Italian island of Elba off the Tuscan coast. Napoleon escaped in 1815 and regained power, only to be finally defeated a few months later at the Battle of Waterloo. The British dispatched him to the island of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic where he lived out the last six years of his life as a prisoner.

65 Fish in the genus Hippocampus : SEAHORSE

Seahorses belong to the genus Hippocampus. The genus name comes from the Greek “hippo” meaning “horse” and “kampos” meaning “sea monster”. It’s the male seahorse who carries the fertilized eggs, and not the females. The region of the brain known as the hippocampus, is so called because it resembles a seahorse in shape.

69 Hip-hop’s Salt-__ : N-PEPA

Salt-N-Pepa are an all-female hip hop trio from New York made up of “Salt” (Cheryl James), “Pepa” (Sandra Denton) and “DJ Spinderella” (Deidra Roper). The group’s 1991 song “Let’s Talk Sex” created quite a fuss as the lyrics explored the subject of sex, and safe sex in particular. A later version addressed the dangers of AIDS.

73 Mongolian desert : GOBI

The large desert in Asia called the Gobi lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. The Gobi desert is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity. The Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so called “Green Wall of China”. The name “Gobi” is Mongolian for “waterless place, semidesert”.

76 Scott of “Charles in Charge” : BAIO

Scott Baio is the actor who played Chachi Arcola in the great sitcom “Happy Days” and in the not-so-great spin-off “Joanie Loves Chachi”. Baio also played the title role in a later sitcom called “Charles in Charge”. Earlier in his career, he played another title role, in the 1976 movie “Bugsy Malone”, appearing opposite a young Jodie Foster.

77 Etched: Abbr. : INSC

Inscribed (insc.)

78 Bk. read at Purim : ESTH

Esther was a Jewish queen, wife of the Persian king Ahasuerus, and the heroine of the Book of Esther in the Bible. By the way, Esther is the only book in the Bible that doesn’t mention the word “God”.

82 Research ctr. : INST

Institute (inst.)

83 JFK, say : DEM

The modern-day Democratic Party was founded in 1828 when supporters of Andrew Jackson broke away from the former Democratic-Republican Party during the presidency of John Quincy Adams. That date makes the Democratic Party the oldest voter-based political party in the world. Andrew Jackson became the first Democratic US president, in 1829.

86 Pancakes sometimes served with caviar : BLINI

A blintz (also “blintze”, and “blin”, plural “blini”) is a thin pancake similar to a crêpe although unlike a crêpe, a blintz may contain yeast.

87 What Superman first looked like? : BIRD

Here’s a famous line from the “Superman” television show from the fifties:

It’s a bird. It’s a plane. it’s Superman!

89 Grafton’s “__ for Evidence” : E IS

Sue Grafton wrote detective novels, and her “alphabet series” feature the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with “A Is for Alibi” in 1982 and worked her way up to “Y is for Yesterday” before she passed away in 2017.

94 “He that __ many words shall be abhorred”: Eccl. : USETH

“He that useth many words shall be abhorred; and he that taketh to himself authority therein shall be hated.”

99 Fraternal org. : BPOE

The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) was founded in 1868, and is a social club that has about a million members today. It started out as a group of men getting together in a “club” in order to get around the legal opening hours of taverns in New York City. The club took on a new role as it started to look out for poor families of members who passed away. The club now accepts African Americans as members (since the seventies) and women (since the nineties), but atheists still aren’t welcome. The list of US presidents that have been members of the BPOE includes Presidents Eisenhower, Harding, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy and Ford.

101 Preppy jackets : ETONS

An Eton jacket is usually black in color, cut square at the hips and has wide lapels. It is named for the design of jacket that is worn by the younger students at Eton College just outside London.

106 Govt. security : T-BILL

A Treasury note (T-note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A Treasury bill (T-bill) is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-bond matures in 20-30 years.

107 Caught congers : EELED

Conger eels can grow to be very, very large, perhaps up to 10 feet in length.

108 Judy of “Devious Maids” : REYES

Judy Reyes is an actress best known for her TV roles, playing Carla Espinosa on “Scrubs” and Zoila Diaz on “Devious Maids”.

112 Israeli airline : EL AL

El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. El Al is known for its high levels of security, both on the ground and in the air. Reportedly, the airline’s passenger aircraft have been operating with anti-missile technology for several years.

118 “Unbelievable” rock band : EMF

EMF is an alternative rock dance band from England. EMF’s biggest hit was 1990’s “Unbelievable” that made it to the number one spot here in the US. The initialism “EMF” supposedly stands for “Epsom Mad Funkers”.

119 Celestial lion : LEO

The constellation named Leo can be said to resemble a lion. Others say that it resembles a bent coat hanger. “Leo” is the Latin for “lion”, but I’m not sure how to translate “coat hanger” into Latin …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 “Behind the __ I’ll convey myself”: Polonius : ARRAS
6 Base near home : THIRD
11 EMT skill : CPR
14 Judge’s seat : BANC
18 Hardwood tree : BEECH
19 Fail to make use of : WASTE
20 WC : LOO
21 Prayer opening : O LORD …
23 *Henry James heroine : DAISY MILLER
25 Top of a scepter, perhaps : ORB
26 “Three Tall Women” Pulitzer playwright : ALBEE
27 German university city : ULM
28 Initial payments : ANTES
29 *Hip-hop artist with the 2014 #1 hit “Fancy” : IGGY AZALEA
31 Pays attention : LISTENS
34 Delivery pros : OB/GYNS
35 One taking a selfie : CELL
36 AP rival : UPI
37 “Cold one over here, please” : BEER ME
40 Campaign funding org. : PAC
42 *Youngest NBA player to win the MVP : DERRICK ROSE
46 Big risk taker : DAREDEVIL
52 Happening : EVENT
53 Studio supporter? : EASEL
54 Remote, as a road : LONESOME
55 Dwindle : FADE AWAY
57 Divested (of) : RID
58 Bird in Saint-Saëns’ “The Carnival of the Animals” : SWAN
59 1912 Olympic legend : THORPE
60 2007 IHOP acquisition : APPLEBEE’S
66 Barrett of Pink Floyd : SYD
67 *Bashful one : SHRINKING VIOLET
71 “NCIS” was spun off from it : JAG
74 Key movie scenes : SET PIECES
75 60-year-old Mattel classic : BARBIE
79 Since : AS OF
81 D.C. VIP : SEN
82 Pocatello natives : IDAHOANS
84 Korean rice dish : BIBIMBAP
87 Designer Geoffrey : BEENE
90 Keats, for one : ODIST
91 “These go to eleven” band : SPINAL TAP
93 *”Under the Net” novelist : IRIS MURDOCH
95 Prefix with Pen : EPI-
96 Nab : ARREST
98 Pocatello-to-Provo dir. : SSE
99 Borscht veggie : BEET
102 Approached : NEARED
105 Go back in : RE-ENTER
109 *Looney Tunes girlfriend : PETUNIA PIG
111 “The way I __ … ” : SEE IT
114 Creature found atop the apt part of each answer to a starred clue : BEE
115 Pine Tree State campus town : ORONO
116 __ Diego : SAN
117 *Add unneeded ornamentation : GILD THE LILY
120 Some, in Stuttgart : EINES
121 Bit of work : ERG
122 Saying : ADAGE
123 Big fight : MELEE
124 Palindromic Latin verb : ESSE
125 Rehab woe : DTS
126 Palindromic court star : SELES
127 Creases : FOLDS

Down

1 “Idol” judge replaced by DeGeneres : ABDUL
2 “Around the Horn” host Tony : REALI
3 French coronation city : REIMS
4 Coolers in windows, briefly : ACS
5 Timid : SHY
6 Target Field team : TWINS
7 Cease : HALT
8 Bermuda, e.g. : ISLE
9 GPS data : RTES
10 Aachen article : DER
11 Blocked, as a drain : CLOGGED
12 Gershwin title lover : PORGY
13 One-named Swedish pop singer : ROBYN
14 Ruth’s husband : BOAZ
15 Allowing admittance anywhere, as a pass : ALL-ACCESS
16 Highborn : NOBLE
17 Angler’s basket : CREEL
22 Reason to shake : DEAL
24 Overexcited : MANIC
29 Watson creator : IBM
30 Vail alternative : ASPEN
32 Tina and Lana : TURNERS
33 Mel Blanc’s “That’s All Folks” et al. : EPITAPHS
34 Pitcher Hershiser : OREL
37 Donkey sound : BRAY
38 Dawn deity : EOS
39 Linguistic suffix : -ESE
41 Citrus suffix : -ADE
42 Skillful : DEFT
43 Cole Porter’s “Well, Did You __?” : EVAH
44 Make over : REDO
45 Mauna __ : KEA
47 Suspect’s story : ALIBI
48 Copland ballet with a hoedown : RODEO
49 Gives one’s word : VOWS
50 “It could happen” : I MAY
51 Allow to use : LEND
56 “The Way We __” : WERE
57 Guns : REVS
60 Like, with “to” : AKIN
61 Dessert option : PIE
62 __ Park: Pirates’ field : PNC
63 Part of XL: Abbr. : LGE
64 Site of Napoleon’s exile : ELBA
65 Fish in the genus Hippocampus : SEAHORSE
68 Where __ : IT’S AT
69 Hip-hop’s Salt-__ : N-PEPA
70 Walked-on : TRODDEN
71 Some punches : JABS
72 Take __ of: taste : A SIP
73 Mongolian desert : GOBI
76 Scott of “Charles in Charge” : BAIO
77 Etched: Abbr. : INSC
78 Bk. read at Purim : ESTH
80 Tweaks : FINE-TUNES
82 Research ctr. : INST
83 JFK, say : DEM
85 Plan, with “out” : MAP
86 Pancakes sometimes served with caviar : BLINI
87 What Superman first looked like? : BIRD
88 Prior to, in poems : ERE
89 Grafton’s “__ for Evidence” : E IS
92 Sliced-off parts : PARINGS
94 “He that __ many words shall be abhorred”: Eccl. : USETH
97 Coffee order: Abbr. : REG
99 Fraternal org. : BPOE
100 Strange : EERIE
101 Preppy jackets : ETONS
103 Abated : EASED
104 Aside (from) : APART
105 Ceremonies : RITES
106 Govt. security : T-BILL
107 Caught congers : EELED
108 Judy of “Devious Maids” : REYES
110 Support for glasses : NOSE
111 Facet : SIDE
112 Israeli airline : EL AL
113 Margin : EDGE
117 Energy metaphor : GAS
118 “Unbelievable” rock band : EMF
119 Celestial lion : LEO

9 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 24 Mar 19, Sunday”

  1. LAT: 16:51, 6 errors relating to that Natick Nest in the upper left and another block of them towards the bottom. Nothing I could even begin to make an educated guess at after a couple of minutes staring at it. Ruined the grid/experience. Newsday: 21:37, no errors. Washington Post: 18:40, no errors.

  2. LAT: 18:29, with a one-square error I can only blame on haste and inattention: I wrote in (Geoffrey) “BEANE”, stupidly thinking I remembered how to spell his name, noticed “A IS” (for Evidence!) and somehow said to myself, “Sounds just fine to me!”, understood the theme but failed to notice that I had a “BEA” floating over an “IRIS” … gee … whattayagonnado, some days you just shouldn’t be on the playing field! … 😳😜.

    Newsday: 20:27, no errors. Haven’t gotten to the Washington Post, (which was late appearing last night) and I have other things to do … 😳.

    1. Washington Post: 21:51, no errors. An okay puzzle, but it appeared in a somewhat different form than it usually does, with a smaller grid and numbers in the grid that were quite hard for me to read – the same problem I have with the weekday Universal puzzles in my newspaper. Oh, well … no matter … I can cope … 😜.

    2. And … for lack of anything better to do, I finished the last two Universal Sunday puzzles: 22:54 and 21:27, respectively; no errors, no missteps, but I learned a new word from each of them: “QUANT” and “LIBERO” (both of which I will probably have forgotten a week from now 😜).

  3. 29:13 and DNF; 8 unfilled words. Lots to dislike in this one: an annoying obsession with Pocatello (who *cares* where that is?) and multiple religious tract references are about all that’s needed to make this a real slog.

  4. 49:18 with no errors. This was much more pleasant than the NYT#0317 from my paper today which had Jeff Chen teaming up with someone as he usually does. This always seems like two against one. Add in Will Shortz and it kinda stinks even though I finished it with no errors.
    GIVE US MERE MORTALS A BREAK.

  5. Only one square wrong at the ARRAS/REALI cross. I had never heard of the word ARRAS nor had I ever heard of Tony REALI.

    I’m learning to like these Sunday LAX puzzles more. They are way easier than the Sunday NYT.

  6. No errors, but I worked on it most of the day off and on while I was
    getting a meal ready for guests….a good Sunday puzzle. But I learned
    something; I didn’t know about IHOP acquisition of Applebee’s until
    I got those blanks filled in.

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