LA Times Crossword 3 Mar 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Revisiting the Past

Themed answers include the hidden word “DATE” written backwards:

  • 122A. Makes retroactive … or what the eight other longest Across answers have : BACKDATES
  • 23A. Process that may transform a neutron into a proton : BETA DECAY
  • 28A. Line on a package : STREET ADDRESS
  • 45A. Navy bigwig : FLEET ADMIRAL
  • 53A. Online pop-up, say : INTERNET AD
  • 69A. Common animal welfare goal : PET ADOPTION
  • 90A. Tip for a loser? : DIET ADVICE
  • 97A. Barbershop standard : SWEET ADELINE
  • 114A. Anonymous fan : SECRET ADMIRER

Bill’s time: 12m 40s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Island near Java : BALI

Bali is both an island and a province in Indonesia. It is a popular tourist spot, although the number of visitors dropped for a few years as a result of terrorist bombings in 2002 and 2005 that killed mainly tourists. Bali became more popular starting in 2008 due to a significant and favorable change in the exchange rate between the US dollar and the Indonesian rupiah.

Java is a large island in Indonesia that is home to the country’s capital, Jakarta. With a population of over 130 million, Java is the most populous island in the world, with even more people than Honshu, the main island of Japan.

5. At the drop of __ : A HAT

It is suggested that the idiomatic phrase “at the drop of a hat” comes from the Old West, where a signal to start a fight was just that, a drop of a hat.

19. Jay of “Jerry Maguire” : MOHR

Jay Mohr is an American actor, one I most remember playing a supporting role in the wonderful HBO series “From the Earth to the Moon” (must-see-TV!). Mohr also created and hosted a reality show called “Last Comic Standing”.

Jerry Maguire is a 1996 film starring Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Renée Zellweger. The title character is played by Cruise, and is a sports agent. There are several lines oft quoted from “Jerry Maguire” including:

  • “Show me the money!”
  • “You complete me”
  • “You had me at ‘hello’”

20. Top story : ATTIC

An attic or loft is a room or space located below the roof of a building. The term “attic” is a shortened form of “attic story”, the uppermost story or level of a house. This term “attic story” originally applied to a low, decorative level built on top of the uppermost story behind a building’s decorative facade. This use of decoration at the top of buildings was common in ancient Greece, and was particularly important in the Attica style. That Attica style was so called because it originated in the historical region of Attica that encompassed the city of Athens. And that’s how our attics are linked to ancient Greece.

22. Post with a column : EMILY

Emily Post was a writer from Baltimore, Maryland who is best known for her writings on the subject of etiquette. Her work giving advice on etiquette is continued by the Emily Post Institute, which she founded in 1946.

23. Process that may transform a neutron into a proton : BETA DECAY

In nuclear physics, beta particles (also “beta rays”) are high-energy electrons or positrons. Beta particles are produced by unstable atomic nuclei with an excess of neutrons in the process of beta decay.

25. Tree with edible nuts : BEECH

The small triangular nuts of the beech tree are edible, but are very bitter. The nuts are called “beechmast” or simply “beechnuts”.

27. Man of La Mancha : SENOR

La Mancha is a region in Spain, a plateau lying south of Madrid. The area became famous after publication of the novel “Don Quixote de La Mancha” by Miguel de Cervantes.

31. Hefty closer : TWIST TIE

Hefty is a brand name of trash bags and related products.

34. Out before the term ends : PAROLED

The term “parole” is a French word that we use in English, with the French “parole” meaning “word, speech”. Of particular interest is the French phrase “parole d’honneur” which translates as “word of honor”. In the early 1600s we started using “parole” to mean a promise by a prisoner of war not to escape, as in the prisoner giving his “word of honor” not to run off. Over time, parole has come to mean conditional release of a prisoner before he or she has served the full term of a sentence.

38. Cote call : COO

The Old English word “cote” was used for a small house. Our modern word “cottage” comes from “cote”. We now use “cote” to mean a small shelter on a farm for sheep or birds.

39. Hectic hosp. areas : ERS

Emergency room (ER)

41. “Iron Man” Ripken : CAL

Cal Ripken played his entire, 20-year professional baseball career for the Baltimore Orioles. Ripken was known as the “Iron Man” because he showed up for work every day, come rain or shine. He played 2,632 straight games, blowing past the previous 2,130-game record held by Lou Gehrig.

42. Ostrich relative : EMU

Even though emu meat is classified as a red meat because of its color, it has a fat content that is comparable to other poultry.

51. Sound mixing control : FADER

A fader is a knob (more usually a slider) that gradually increases or decreases the level of an audio signal. You’ll often see audio engineers at a performance or in a recording studio sliding buttons up and down. Those are faders.

52. Georgia, once: Abbr. : SSR

The former Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) of Georgia is now an independent country. Supposedly, the Georgian people were given their name because they especially revered St. George. The flag of Georgia does indeed feature five St. George’s crosses.

56. Asia’s __ Darya river : AMU

The Amu Darya is a major river in Central Asia that empties into the Aral Sea. It is also called the Oxus or Amu River.

60. Magazine since 1850 : HARPER’S

“Harper’s Bazaar” was first published in 1867, making it the first women’s fashion magazine to hit the newsstands.

62. Princess in “The Princess and the Frog” : TIANA

“The Princess and the Frog” is an animated feature released in 2009 by Walt Disney Studios. The film is set in New Orleans in the twenties. A waitress called Tiana kisses a prince who had been turned into a frog, and then she herself turns into a frog.

63. Don Juan : CASANOVA

Giacomo Casanova was an 18th-century adventurer from Venice. We know so much about him, and his reputation as a womanizer, because he left us his autobiography “Histoire de ma vie” (Story of My Life). A guy recounting stories of his love life and conquests? All true, I am sure …

Don Juan is a flighty character who has been featured by a number of authors, poets and composers, including Molière, Byron, and Mozart. In the underlying legend, Don Juan ends up talking to the statue of the dead father of one of his conquests. Don Juan dines with the ghost of the dead man and when shaking the hand of the ghost he is dragged away to hell. We now use the term “Don Juan” to describe any womanizer or ladies’ man.

66. One of Donald Duck’s nephews : HUEY

Donald Duck’s nephews are identical triplets called Huey, Dewey and Louie, and they first appeared on the screen in 1938. Once in awhile due to errors in production, a fourth duck can be seen in the background. This little “mistake” is affectionately called “Phooey Duck” by folks in the industry.

68. Isaac’s eldest : ESAU

Esau, was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born to Isaac and Rebekah, the event was described “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother Jacob, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

73. Actor __ James of “Divergent” films : THEO

Theo James is an English actor who is perhaps best known for playing Tobias Eaton (aaka “Four”) in the “Divergent” series of movies.

77. It ends in Nov. : DST

Arizona and Hawaii are the only two states in the US that do not observe daylight saving time (DST), having opted out when the Uniform Time Act was passed by the US Congress in 1966. Some Native American nations in Arizona observe DST, and some don’t. As a result, times can change back and forth a few times while driving across Arizona during the summer.

82. Skate park move : OLLIE

An ollie is a skateboarding trick invented in 1976 by Alan “Ollie” Gelfand. Apparently it’s a way of lifting the board off the ground, while standing on it, without touching the board with one’s hands. Yeah, I could do that …

85. Spice rack staple : OREGANO

Oregano is a perennial herb that is in the mint family. Also known as wild marjoram, oregano is very much associated with the cuisine of southern Italy. Oregano’s popularity surged in the US when soldiers returning from WWII in Europe brought with them an affinity for what they called “the pizza herb”.

88. Like the Beatles? : FAB

The Beatles were described on the sleeve notes of their 1963 album “With the Beatles” as the “fabulous foursome”. The press picked up on the phrase and morphed it into “the Fab Four”.

89. __ Fridays : TGI

T.G.I. Fridays is an American restaurant chain that was founded in 1965 in New York City. Today there are over a thousand T.G.I. Friday’s restaurants in over 50 countries. I think that Fridays has always been particularly successful overseas. I used to visit one a lot with my family when we lived in the Philippines, and I believe the most successful Fridays restaurant anywhere in the world is the one in Haymarket Leicester Square in London in the UK.

92. Raised rumblers : ELS

Elevated railroad (El)

96. An official election ballot can’t have one : ERASURE

Today, a ballot is a piece of paper used to cast a vote. Back in the 1500s, a “ballot” was a small “ball” used in the process of voting.

97. Barbershop standard : SWEET ADELINE

“Sweet Adeline” is a marvelous ballad that is most often heard these days sung by barbershop groups. My favorite version of “Sweet Adeline” was sung by the Australian group called the Seekers.

102. Clearance rack abbr. : IRR

Irregular (“irr.” or “irreg.”)

104. Danson of TV’s “Fargo” : TED

The actor Ted Danson is noted for in particular for three successful roles that he has played on television. He played Sam Malone on the sitcom “Cheers”, the title role on the sitcom “Becker”, and eventually led the cast on the drama series “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”. Danson has been married to actress Mary Steenburgen since 1995.

“Fargo” is a TV series inspired by the 1996 film of the same name by the Coen brothers. The small-screen version first aired in 2014, with the credits including Joel and Ethan Coen as executive producers. Each season of the show features a new cast. The 2014 cast is led by Billy Bob Thornton, the 2015 cast by Kirsten Dunst, and the 2017 cast by Ewan McGregor. Each episode, and indeed the original film, includes the on-screen claim that “This is a true story”. However, that claim is in fact untrue.

106. Tailless primates : APES

Apes and monkeys both belong to the order of primates. The most obvious way to distinguish apes from monkeys is by the presence or lack of a tail. Almost all apes have no tail, and almost all monkeys have tails.

111. Longtime comic with a “Great Jewish Joke Book” : ALAN KING

Alan King was a comedian and satirist, famous for joking about his Jewish culture. He was also an actor and starred in many movies over a 50-year period, including “I, the Jury (1982), “Author! Author!” (1982), “Casino” (1995) and “Rush Hour 2” (2001).

117. Singer Jones : NORAH

The beguiling Norah Jones is the daughter of famous sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar, and is one of my favorite singers. If you haven’t heard Jones sing her song “Come Away with Me”, you just haven’t lived …

120. Brown with a frying pan : ALTON

Alton Brown is a celebrity chef who is behind the Food Network show “Good Eats”, and is the host of “Iron Chef America”.

127. Mississippi’s __ River : YAZOO

The Yazoo River in the state of Mississippi was named by the French explorer La Salle after the Yazoo Native American tribe who lived near the river’s mouth. It was in the Yazoo River that a naval mine was used for the first time to sink a ship, in 1862. The Confederates successfully used a mine to sink the Union’s ironclad USS Cairo during the Civil War.

129. Sushi roll wrap : NORI

Nori is an edible seaweed that we used to know as “laver” when I was living in Wales. Nori is usually dried into thin sheets. Here in the US, we are most familiar with nori as the seaweed used as a wrap for sushi.

131. The Ivy League’s Quakers : PENN

The University of Pennsylvania (Penn or UPenn) was founded in 1740 by by Benjamin Franklin. Penn was the first school in the country to offer both graduate and undergraduate courses. Penn’s sports teams are known as the Quakers, and sometimes the Red & Blue.

132. Caboose : REAR

The word “caboose” originally came from Middle Dutch and was the word for a ship’s galley. When the last car in a train in North America was given a stove for the comfort of the crew, it took on the name “caboose”. The term has also become slang for a person’s backside.

133. Agt. after tax evaders : T-MAN

A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (T stands for “Treasury”).

Down

2. Iowa college town : AMES

Iowa State University of Science and Technology (ISU) is located in Ames, Iowa. Among many other notable milestones, ISU created the country’s first school of veterinary medicine, in 1879. The sports teams of ISU are known as the Cyclones.

5. “West Side Story” number : AMERICA

“America” is a song from Broadway musical “West Side Story” with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and music by Leonard Bernstein. The lyrics used in the stage version of the musical differ somewhat from the lyrics used in the 1961 film adaptation. The original lyrics were reportedly changed to present a more honest view of the immigration experience, and to remove wording that demeaned Puerto Rico and the Puerto Rican people.

6. Ad __ committee : HOC

The Latin phrase “ad hoc” means “for this purpose”. An ad hoc committee, for example, is formed for a specific purpose and is disbanded after making its final report.

8. Clandestine arrangement : TRYST

In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting. Further, a tryst taking place at lunchtime is sometimes referred to as a nooner.

9. 11-time MLB All-Star Miguel : CABRERA

Miguel “Miggy” Cabrera is a Major League Baseball (MLB) player from Venezuela. Miggy’s MLB career started with the Florida Marlins in 2003, and continued with the Detroit Tigers in 2008.

11. Exorbitant : STEEP

Back in the mid-1400s, “exorbitant” was a legal term meaning “deviating from rule”. The word came from the Latin “ex” meaning “out of” and “orbita” meaning “wheel track”. We use “exorbitant” today to mean “outside of the scope of the law”, and “exceeding the norms in terms of price, size, etc.”

12. Altoids rival : TIC TAC

Tic Tacs aren’t American candies (as I always mistakenly believed). Tic Tacs are made by the Italian company Ferrero, and were introduced in 1969.

Altoids breath mints have been around since 1780, when they were introduced in Britain. The famous tin in which Altoids are sold is often reused for other purposes. The most famous use is as a container to hold a mini-survival kit.

13. Tennis great Ivan : LENDL

Ivan Lendl is a former professional tennis player from Czechoslovakia. Lendl appeared in eight consecutive US Open finals in the eighties, a record that stands to this day.

14. Valentino’s love : AMORE

Rudolph Valentino was an Italian actor who emigrated to the US when he was 18 years old. He developed a Hollywood career in silent movies that propelled him to the status of sex symbol in the twenties. Valentino died very young, having being admitted to hospital with appendicitis and gastric ulcers. He underwent surgery and developed peritonitis, and passed away when he was only 31 years old.

15. Rosetta Stone discovery area : NILE DELTA

A river delta is a triangular landform at the mouth of a river created by the deposition of sediment. The Nile Delta in Northern Egypt is one of the world’s largest river deltas, and covers 150 miles of coastline on the Mediterranean. The most famous “delta” in the United States isn’t actually a delta at all. The Mississippi Delta is an alluvial plain that lies 300 miles north of the river’s actual delta, yet it is known as the “Mississippi River Delta”. Very confusing …

16. Yale alumni : ELIS

An alumnus (plural “alumni”) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural “alumnae”). The term comes into English from Latin, in which an alumnus is a foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

21. Classic parlor game : CHARADES

In the parlor game known as charades, players take turns in acting out words or phrases. “Charade” is a French word describing a literary puzzle that was popular in 18th-century France. In said game, the word or phrase was broken into its constituent syllables, with each syllable being described somewhat enigmatically. This puzzle evolved into “acted charades”, which we now refer to simply as “charades”.

24. Investor’s barometer, with “the” : DOW

Dow Jones & Company was founded as a publishing house in 1882 by three newspaper reporters, Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. Today, the company’s most famous publication has to be “The Wall Street Journal”. In 1884, Charles Dow started reporting the average dollar value of the stock of eleven companies, an index which spawned a whole host of metrics that carry the Dow Jones name to this day, including the renowned Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), also known as the “Dow 30”.

29. __ del Fuego : TIERRA

Tierra del Fuego is an archipelago off the southern tip of South America and is the location of the famed Cape Horn. Tierra del Fuego was discovered by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan. He saw native fires on land as he passed by and originally called the location “Land of Smoke” This was later changed to “Land of Fire”, or “Tierra del Fuego” in Spanish.

33. Alley prowlers : TOMS

A group of cats can be referred to as a “clowder” or a “glaring”. A male cat is a “tom” or “tomcat”, and a neutered male is a “gib”. An unaltered female cat is a “queen”, and a spayed female might be referred to informally as a “molly”. A young cat is of course a “kitten”.

35. Rub out : EFFACE

To efface is to erase or obliterate, with the term “efface” coming from the Middle French “effacer” meaning “to wipe out”, or more literally “to remove the face”.

36. Incan herd members : LLAMAS

The wool from a llama is much softer than that from a sheep, and it is also free from lanolin.

The Inca people emerged as a tribe around the 12th century, in what today is southern Peru. The Incas developed a vast empire over the next 300 years, extending along most of the western side of South America. The Empire fell to the Spanish, finally dissolving in 1572 with the execution of Tupac Amaru, the last Incan Emperor.

37. Gorgon slain by Perseus : MEDUSA

In Greek mythology, Medusa was one of the monstrous female creatures known as Gorgons. According to one version of the Medusa myth, she was once a beautiful woman. But she incurred the wrath of Athena who turned her lovely hair into serpents and made her face hideously ugly. Anyone who gazed directly at the transformed Medusa would turn into stone. She was eventually killed by the hero Perseus, who beheaded her. He carried Medusa’s head and used its powers as a weapon, before giving it to the goddess Athena to place on her shield. One myth holds that as Perseus was flying over Egypt with Medusa’s severed head, drop of her blood fell to the ground and formed asps.

43. Like the Grinch : MEAN

The Grinch is the title character in Dr. Seuss’s 1957 children’s book “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” He is a grouchy creature who lives as a hermit in a cave outside the town of Whoville. The Grinch’s only companion is his dog Max. Based on Seuss’s hero, we now use the term “grinch” for someone who is opposed to Christmas festivities or who is coarse and greedy in general.

44. Org. that may request food recalls : USDA

The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) actually dates back to 1862, when it was established by then-president Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln referred to the USDA as the “people’s department” as our economy had such a vast agrarian base back then.

46. Air__: Southwest subsidiary : TRAN

AirTran Airways was a budget airline that has its principal hub in Atlanta. The company was founded in 1993 as ValuJet Airlines. AirTran had been owned by Southwest Airlines since 2010 and was fully integrated into the parent company in 2014, when the AirTran brand was shelved.

50. Franklin and Jefferson, religiously : DEISTS

Deism (from the Latin “deus” meaning god) is the belief that a supreme being created the universe, a belief based on observation and reason and without the need for faith. Further, a deist does not accept divine intervention and rather believes that the supreme being, having created the universe, leaves the world to it own devices.

54. Nair rival, once : NEET

The hair removal product “Neet” was launched in Canada in 1901, and was also sold as “Immac”. Today it is sold under the name “Veet”.

58. Egyptian Christian : COPT

The Copts make up the largest minority religious group in Egypt. Copts are Christians, with most adhered to the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, and others practicing Coptic Catholicism or Coptic Protestantism. The term “Copt” ultimately derives from a Greek word for Egyptian.

61. Mary’s best friend : RHODA

The seventies sitcom “Rhoda” starring Valerie Harper was a spin-off of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. The eighth episode of the show was an hour-long special in which Rhoda married her fiance Joe (played by David Groh). At the time of airing it was the second-most watched television episode in history, second only to the 1953 birth of Little Ricky on “I Love Lucy”.

65. Missile Command producer : ATARI

Missile Command is a fun arcade game that was introduced by Atari in 1980. Playing the game involves protecting six cities that are being attacked by ballistic missiles. The original game’s design featured six cities in California, namely Eureka, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and San Diego.

67. Pizarro victim : INCA

Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro discovered the Incas in 1526, marking the beginning of the end for an ancient civilization that was to be ravaged by brutal Spanish colonists and by imported smallpox. The last leader of the Inca was Atahualpa. Pizarro staged a mock trial and then condemned Atahualpa to execution by burning. A Spanish friar intervened on behalf of the condemned man, as Atahualpa believed that if he was burned his soul would not move on to the afterlife. Pizarro, was kind enough to have Atahualpa garroted instead.

70. Con counterpart, across the Pyrenees : AVEC

Our word “with” translates into “con” in Spanish, and into “avec” in French.

74. Inside investment info : HOT TIP

75. Oregon college town : EUGENE

Eugene is the second-largest city in Oregon (after Portland). The city is named for its founder, Eugene Franklin Skinner. Skinner arrived in the area in 1846, after which the settlement he established was called Skinner’s Mudhole. The name was changed to Eugene City in 1852, which was shortened to Eugene in 1889.

The University of Oregon was founded in 1876 as Oregon State University. I hear that the campus is very attractive, being located along the banks of the Willamette River.

78. Hall of Fame linebacker Junior : SEAU

Junior Seau was an NFL linebacker, first playing for the San Diego Chargers and then the Miami Dolphins and the New England Patriots. Sadly, Seau was found dead in his home in 2011, having committed suicide by shooting himself in the chest.

81. English horn relative : OBOE

The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name “oboe” comes from the French “hautbois” which means “high wood”.

The English horn is also known by its French name “cor anglais”. It is a double-reed woodwind instrument.

83. Constantinople coin : LIRA

The currency of Turkey is the Turkish lira, which is divided into 100 kuruş. In 1927, the Turkish lira replaced the Ottoman lira, which had been in use since 1844.

Istanbul, Turkey (formerly “Constantinople”) is the only metropolis in the world that is situated in two continents. The city extends both on the European side and on the Asian side of the Bosphorus river.

87. Flamenco cheer : OLE!

Flamenco is a style of Spanish music and dance. The origin of the word “flamenco” isn’t clearly understood, but the explanation that seems most credible to me is that it comes from Flanders in Northern Europe. Given that “flamenco” is the Spanish word for “Flemish” and Flanders is home to the Flemish people it makes perfect sense, doesn’t it?

93. Suffix meaning “country” : -STAN

The suffix “-stan” in many place names is Persian for “place of”. One example is “Pakistan”, the Place of the Pure. “Pakistan” is a relatively recent name, first coined in 1933. It comes from the abbreviation PAKSTAN, standing for Punjab – Afghan Province – Kashmir – Sindh – BaluchisTAN, all regions in the north of India. The “I” was added to Pakistan to make it easier to pronounce, and to fit the translation “Land of the Pure”.

95. Egregious : FLAGRANT

Something described as egregious is especially obvious, flagrant. The word “egregious” comes from the Latin “ex grege”, which translates as “rising above the flock”. The original use of the word was very positive, meaning “distinguished, excellent”, but that morphed into a disapproving sense in the late 1700s.

99. Vessel for couples : ARK

The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah’s life-preserver during the flood.

103. One with a lot of baggage : REDCAP

“Redcap” is a term used for a railroad station porter here in North America. That term comes from the fact that redcaps wear red caps!

110. Pollution portmanteau : SMAZE

“Smaze” is a weather phenomenon, a smoky haze that is like a fog but less damp. The term is a portmanteau of “smoke” and “haze”.

115. Jazz great Fitzgerald : ELLA

Ella Fitzgerald, the “First Lady of Song”, had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Her mother died while Ella was still a schoolgirl, and around that time the young girl became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow Fitzgerald managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

116. Tofu nutrient : IRON

“Tofu” is a name for bean curd, and is a Japanese word meaning just that … bean that has curdled. Tofu is produced by coagulating soy milk, using either salt or something acidic. Once the protein has coagulated, the curds are pressed into the familiar blocks. Personally I love tofu, but my wife, she absolutely hates it …

118. Splittable bit : ATOM

By some definitions, New Zealand-born physicist and chemist Ernest Rutherford was the first person to “split the atom”. Rutherford bombarded nitrogen with alpha particles and thereby forced neutrons out of the nucleus of the nitrogen atom. The first intentional nuclear “fission” came decades later in the 1930s, with experiments in which larger nuclei were split into smaller nuclei.

119. Eldest daughter of Cronus : HERA

In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealous and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

In Greek mythology, Cronus (also “Kronos”) was one of the Titans. Cronus overthrew his father Uranus and rook over rule of the Titans. Eventually, Cronus was ousted by own son, Zeus.

124. Its HQ is named for George H.W. Bush : CIA

The CIA headquarters is located in Langley, Virginia in a complex called the George Bush Center for Intelligence. The facility was named for former Director of the CIA and US President George H. W. Bush.

125. Sloth, e.g. : SIN

“Sloth”, meaning “indolence, sluggishness”, comes from the Middle English word “slowe”, the same root for our contemporary word “slow”. The animal, the sloth, is so named as it exhibits slow-moving behavior.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Island near Java : BALI
5. At the drop of __ : A HAT
9. Players with parts : CAST
13. Like highways : LANED
18. Apple variety : IMAC
19. Jay of “Jerry Maguire” : MOHR
20. Top story : ATTIC
22. Post with a column : EMILY
23. Process that may transform a neutron into a proton : BETA DECAY
25. Tree with edible nuts : BEECH
26. “I swear!” : NO LIE!
27. Man of La Mancha : SENOR
28. Line on a package : STREET ADDRESS
31. Hefty closer : TWIST TIE
34. Out before the term ends : PAROLED
35. Sturdy trees : ELMS
38. Cote call : COO
39. Hectic hosp. areas : ERS
41. “Iron Man” Ripken : CAL
42. Ostrich relative : EMU
45. Navy bigwig : FLEET ADMIRAL
48. School notebook decorations : DOODLES
51. Sound mixing control : FADER
52. Georgia, once: Abbr. : SSR
53. Online pop-up, say : INTERNET AD
56. Asia’s __ Darya river : AMU
57. Expert : ACE
60. Magazine since 1850 : HARPER’S
62. Princess in “The Princess and the Frog” : TIANA
63. Don Juan : CASANOVA
66. One of Donald Duck’s nephews : HUEY
67. Google : Android :: Apple : __ : IOS
68. Isaac’s eldest : ESAU
69. Common animal welfare goal : PET ADOPTION
73. Actor __ James of “Divergent” films : THEO
77. It ends in Nov. : DST
79. Like die-hard fans : AVID
80. Hearty bowlful often topped with tortilla chips : TACO SOUP
82. Skate park move : OLLIE
85. Spice rack staple : OREGANO
88. Like the Beatles? : FAB
89. __ Fridays : TGI
90. Tip for a loser? : DIET ADVICE
92. Raised rumblers : ELS
94. Every hour on the hour, say : OFTEN
96. An official election ballot can’t have one : ERASURE
97. Barbershop standard : SWEET ADELINE
101. Bummed : SAD
102. Clearance rack abbr. : IRR
104. Danson of TV’s “Fargo” : TED
105. Bus sched. item : ARR
106. Tailless primates : APES
107. Withdrawal charges : ATM FEES
111. Longtime comic with a “Great Jewish Joke Book” : ALAN KING
114. Anonymous fan : SECRET ADMIRER
117. Singer Jones : NORAH
120. Brown with a frying pan : ALTON
121. Permanent marks : SCARS
122. Makes retroactive … or what the eight other longest Across answers have : BACKDATES
126. Sun block? : CLOUD
127. Mississippi’s __ River : YAZOO
128. Sandbox boo-boo : OWIE
129. Sushi roll wrap : NORI
130. Mini racers : KARTS
131. The Ivy League’s Quakers : PENN
132. Caboose : REAR
133. Agt. after tax evaders : T-MAN

Down

1. Marathon runner’s wear : BIB
2. Iowa college town : AMES
3. Past the deadline : LATE
4. Complaint from the nosebleed section : I CAN’T SEE
5. “West Side Story” number : AMERICA
6. Ad __ committee : HOC
7. “Gotcha!” : AHA!
8. Clandestine arrangement : TRYST
9. 11-time MLB All-Star Miguel : CABRERA
10. Perfectly, with “to” : … A TEE
11. Exorbitant : STEEP
12. Altoids rival : TIC TAC
13. Tennis great Ivan : LENDL
14. Valentino’s love : AMORE
15. Rosetta Stone discovery area : NILE DELTA
16. Yale alumni : ELIS
17. Turns red, perhaps : DYES
21. Classic parlor game : CHARADES
24. Investor’s barometer, with “the” : DOW
29. __ del Fuego : TIERRA
30. Melancholy : DOLOR
32. Ground cover : SOD
33. Alley prowlers : TOMS
35. Rub out : EFFACE
36. Incan herd members : LLAMAS
37. Gorgon slain by Perseus : MEDUSA
40. Mistake : SLIP-UP
43. Like the Grinch : MEAN
44. Org. that may request food recalls : USDA
46. Air__: Southwest subsidiary : TRAN
47. “More or less” cousin : -ISH
49. “I’m __ you!” : ONTO
50. Franklin and Jefferson, religiously : DEISTS
54. Nair rival, once : NEET
55. “Taste this” : TRY IT
58. Egyptian Christian : COPT
59. Prior night : EVE
61. Mary’s best friend : RHODA
64. Accounting jobs : AUDITS
65. Missile Command producer : ATARI
67. Pizarro victim : INCA
70. Con counterpart, across the Pyrenees : AVEC
71. Compendium : DIGEST
72. Clumsy one : OAF
74. Inside investment info : HOT TIP
75. Oregon college town : EUGENE
76. Offers a view : OPINES
78. Hall of Fame linebacker Junior : SEAU
81. English horn relative : OBOE
82. Tributes in verse : ODES
83. Constantinople coin : LIRA
84. Star : LEAD ACTOR
85. Eggs order : OVER EASY
86. Tattoo parlor sticker : NEEDLE
87. Flamenco cheer : OLE!
91. Snowstorm consequence : DRIFT
93. Suffix meaning “country” : -STAN
95. Egregious : FLAGRANT
98. Becomes tiresome to : WEARS ON
99. Vessel for couples : ARK
100. Pub patron : DRINKER
103. One with a lot of baggage : REDCAP
108. Salmon cousin : TROUT
109. Gives a darn? : MENDS
110. Pollution portmanteau : SMAZE
112. Shady area : ARBOR
113. Wordless agreement : NOD
114. Quarterback’s setback : SACK
115. Jazz great Fitzgerald : ELLA
116. Tofu nutrient : IRON
118. Splittable bit : ATOM
119. Eldest daughter of Cronus : HERA
123. Wonder : AWE
124. Its HQ is named for George H.W. Bush : CIA
125. Sloth, e.g. : SIN

11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 3 Mar 19, Sunday”

  1. My times on the LAT, Newsday, and WP were 20:16, 15:56, and 22:00, respectively, and I made no “real” errors except that, for some odd reason (distracted and in a hurry, I guess), I left a single square blank on both the LAT and the WP, even though I knew what to put in those squares (and, in fact, I thought I had filled them).

    The answer to a recent “Cryptoquote” made me think of Bill: “There is no language like the Irish for soothing and quieting.” The author was John Millington Synge, an Irish poet.

    And, speaking of Bill, take note of his astonishing time on today’s puzzle!

  2. Got it done with no errors, but I wouldn’t dare try to time myself!
    That would only be frustrating I think and would lead to lots of
    goofs.

    1. @Mary
      I just started timing myself because I got to the point where “no errors” happened almost all the time, and I wanted to see how well I was doing. Specifically though, it involved a Sat NYT grid that seemed to go incredibly fast for me (just didn’t know how fast). I forgot about the timer being there after about a couple of days.

      Only real “frustrating” part to it was when I started doing contest grids in “contest” fashion, which have a time ceiling. Worried about that until I realized that all I needed to do was keep to what I was doing and not worry if I ran out of time.

  3. 42:11 no errors. That’s 2 Sunday puzzles with no errors . Could be a first for me.
    @ Mary , I know I will never be as fast as Bill or Dave and those guys but I time myself anyway. Try it and nobody says you need to post it.

  4. 33 mins and 40 sec with 3 errors buried in the center somewhere. Lots of challenging, vexing clues, par for the course for a Burnickel grid. Just glad to get through it with my butt still attached.

  5. This was a pleasant Sunday puzzle. Don’t do times like the rest of you do as I like to keep it going throughout the day. A hobby I guess? Anyway the only weird thing I couldn’t come up, but finally did, was “vessel for couples.” Of course “ark.”Duh.

  6. Hi gang!!🐔

    Finished, but cheated on several words. I just didn’t give this puzzle its due… Sundays sometimes are too time consuming for me😖

    I almost never time myself! Kay, I’m like you — I work on puzzles throughout the day. Also, for me, I get antsy if I have to sit at the computer (to time myself accurately) and finish with that dang clock ticking away at me! I’m too ADD I guess. 😁

    Be well~~💃

  7. I’m not on your league. May take several days to complete. Didn’t understand the Yale reference, so looked it up: Elis is an informal, secondary nickname referencing Elihu Yale, a Welsh merchant for whom Yale College was named in 1718.
    Thanks for your detailed answers, I enjoy them.

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