LA Times Crossword 9 Mar 19, Saturday

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Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme : None

Bill’s time: 15m 02s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

16. Cruise woe : NAUSEA

“Nausea” is a sick feeling in the stomach. The term derives from the Greek “naus” meaning “ship”, and so was originally associated only with seasickness.

19. “¿Quién __?” : SABE

“Quién sabe?” is Spanish for “who knows?”

20. Green card fig. : ID NO

A “green card” is more correctly called a US Permanent Resident Card. The informal term harks back to the period between 1946 and 1964 when the document was indeed green in color. After dropping the green for many years, the Permanent Resident Card was changed back to a green color in 2010.

23. What unGlue helps parents and kids manage : SCREEN TIME

unGlue is an app that can be installed by parents on their children’s smart devices, with the intent of limiting the amount of time spent on social media, online games, etc. What’s unusual about unGlue is that the kids themselves get to earn and manage that screen time.

29. Linda of Broadway : EDER

Linda Eder is a singer and actress. She came to public attention when she won the television talent show “Star Search” for a record 13 weeks in a row.

30. Film lioness : ELSA

The life story of Elsa the lion was told by game warden Joy Adamson, who had a very close relationship with the lioness from when Elsa was orphaned as a young cub. Adamson wrote the book “Born Free” about Elsa, and then “Living Free” which tells the story of Elsa and her three lion cubs. In the 1966 film based on “Born Free”, Adamson is played by the talented actress Virginia McKenna.

36. Nebraska’s official soft drink : KOOL-AID

The drink we know today as Kool-Aid was invented by Edward Perkins and his wife in Perkins’ mother’s kitchen in southwest Nebraska. Kool-Aid is now the Official Soft Drink of the state.

41. Small stingers : RED ANTS

Fire ants are stinging ants, and many species are known as “red ants”. Most stinging ants bite their prey and then spray acid on the wound. The fire ant, however, bites to hold on and then injects an alkaloid venom from its abdomen, creating a burning sensation in humans who have been nipped.

44. Second person? : EVE

According to the Bible, Eve was created as Adam’s companion by God, creating her from Adam’s rib.

45. Mideast port : ADEN

Aden is a seaport in Yemen that is located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967. A native of Aden is known as an Adeni. Some believe that Cain and Abel are buried in the city.

46. “The Moor already changes with my poison” speaker : IAGO

In William Shakespeare’s play “Othello”, Iago utters the words “The Moor already changes with my poison.” Iago is celebrating the fact that Othello’s mind has already become infected with iago’s devious suggestions.

56. Copper : CENT

The original 1-cent coin was introduced in the US in 1793 and was made of 100% copper, giving rise to the nickname “copper” for a 1-cent coin. The composition varied over time, and was 100% bronze up to the 1940s. During WWII there was a shortage of copper to make bronze, so the US Mint switched to zinc-coated steel for production of one-cent coins in 1943. The “steelie” is the only coin ever issued by the US mint that can be picked up by a magnet. Today’s one-cent coin is comprised mainly of zinc.

60. Home of Tumnus, in fiction : NARNIA

In the “Narnia” series of books, Mr. Tumnus is a faun, i.e. half-man and half-goat. According to author C.S. Lewis, the whole idea for the “Narnia” stories was born from a single image that he had of a faun carrying parcels and an umbrella through a snowy wood. And that’s just what Lucy sees when she first steps into Narnia via the famous wardrobe.

66. Big group : PASSEL

A passel is a large group or quantity. “Passel” is a variant of the word “parcel”.

Down

1. Sticking points? : RUTS

One can get “stuck in a rut”, perhaps while solving a crossword.

2. Org. with a QuickTakes online newsletter : OSHA

QuickTakes is a biweekly online newsletter issued by the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

3. Model for Hook : AHAB

Captain Hook is the bad guy in “Peter Pan”, the famous play by J. M. Barrie. Hook is Peter Pan’s sworn enemy, as Pan cut off Hook’s hand causing it to be replaced by a “hook”. It is implied in the play that Hook attended Eton College, just outside London. Hook’s last words are “Floreat Etona”, which is Eton College’s motto. Barrie openly acknowledged that the Hook character is based on Herman Melville’s Captain Ahab from the novel “Moby Dick”.

6. Outer space feature : NO AIR

The exploration and use of outer space is governed by the Outer Space Treaty that came into force in 1967. The initial signatories were the US, UK and USSR, and now 102 nations are party to the treaty. For the purposes of the treaty, outer space begins at the Kármán line, a theoretical sphere that lies at an altitude of 100km about the Earth’s sea level.

9. The Wildcats of the America East Conf. : UNH

The University of New Hampshire (UNH) is the largest university in the state. UNH was founded as the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts in 1866 in Hanover. The college was moved to Durham in the early 1890s, which is where UNH’s main campus is located to this day. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Wildcats.

10. Physics Nobelist Wolfgang __ : PAULI

Wolfgang Pauli was an Austrian-born theoretical physicist whose name is most associated with the Pauli exclusion principle. The principle states that particle such as protons, neutrons and electrons cannot have the same quantum numbers, cannot be at the same place at the same time and with the same energy. The discovery of his exclusion principle led to Pauli being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1945.

21. RAM unit : ONE-K

Random-access memory (RAM) is a form of computer storage.

24. Cheat : COZEN

“To cozen” is such a lovely verb! Meaning to cheat or hoodwink, it comes from the Middle English word “cosin” meaning fraud or trickery.

25. Irony, say : TROPE

A trope is a figure of speech. The term “trope” comes from the Greek word “tropos” that has the same meaning.

26. Play with music : OPERA

Opera is a performing art involving musicians as well as singers who perform a dramatic work that combines a libretto and a musical score. The art form developed in the Italy in the late 1500s, with the first opera being recognised as “Dafne”, a work by Jacopo Peri that is now lost but was first performed in Florence in 1598. The oldest surviving opera score is also by Peri, a work called “Euridice” that was first staged in 1600. The oldest opera that is still performed regularly today is “L’Orfeo” by Claudio Monteverdi, which dates back to 1607.

35. Sean of “Rudy” : ASTIN

Sean Astin is best known for playing the title role in the 1993 film “Rudy” and the character Samwise Gamgee in “The Lord of the Rings” movies. You might also have seen him playing Lynn McGill in the 5th season of “24”. Astin is the son of actress Patty Duke, and the adopted son of actor John Astin (of “The Addams Family” fame).

“Rudy” is a 1993 sports biopic about the life of Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger, who played college football at Notre Dame. The movie is all about the title character’s desire to play football despite countless obstacles. And play he did, albeit very briefly. After that appearance, Rudy became the first player in Notre Dame history to be carried off the field by his teammates.

37. Film on the range : OATER

The term “oater” that is used for a Western movie comes from the number of horses seen, as horses love oats!

39. Tropical vacation souvenirs : TAN LINES

That’s if you go out in the sun. Not this fair-skinned Irishman …

42. Barneys rival : SAKS

Saks Fifth Avenue is a high-end specialty store that competes with the likes of Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. The original Saks & Company business was founded by Andrew Saks in 1867. The first Saks Fifth Avenue store was opened on Fifth Avenue in New York City in 1924. There are now Saks Fifth Avenue stores in many major cities in the US, as well in several locations worldwide.

Barneys New York is a luxury department store chain. It was founded by Barney Pressman in 1923, with the first store opening in Manhattan. Pressman raised the funds necessary to lease that first retail space by pawning his wife’s engagement ring!

43. Bit of sparring : POTSHOT

When firing a gun, a “potshot” is a “shot” taken purely to get the prey into the “pot” for cooking. The term was coined in the 1830s, hence distinguishing between a shot taken for sport or marksmanship, and a shot taken as part of a hunt for game.

47. Gear for some test pilots : G-SUITS

A G-suit is needed when astronauts and aviators are subject to high accelerations. Such acceleration can cause blood to pool in the lower part of the body, reducing the supply to the brain and possibly leading to a blackout. A G-suit is basically a special pair of tight-fitting pants that are fitted with inflatable bladders. The bladders inflate during high accelerations, tightening around the legs and abdomen, reducing the amount of blood pooling. So, a “G-suit” is more correctly referred to as an “anti-G suit”.

52. Mountain Pose is a standing one : ASANA

“Asana” is a Sanskrit word literally meaning “sitting down”. The asanas are the poses that a practitioner of yoga assumes. The most famous is the lotus position, the cross-legged pose called “padmasana”.

58. Weather-tracking org. : NOAA

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is one of the seven federal uniformed services, namely:

  • Army
  • Marine Corps
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Coast Guard
  • Public Health Service Commissioned Corps
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps

61. Icel. surrounder : ATL

The earliest known mention of the name “Atlantic” for the world’s second-largest ocean was in Ancient Greece. The Greeks called said ocean “the Sea of Atlas” or “Atlantis thalassa”.

Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in the whole of Europe, with two-thirds of the nation’s population residing in and around the capital city of Reykjavik. Iceland was settled by the Norse people in AD 874, and was ruled for centuries by Norway and then Denmark. Iceland became independent in 1918, and has been a republic since 1944. Iceland is not a member of the EU but is a member of NATO, having joined in 1949 despite not having a standing army.

63. “Miss Pym Disposes” author : TEY

Josephine Tey was a pen name used by Scottish mystery writer Elizabeth Mackintosh. One of Tey’s novels is “Miss Pym Disposes”, which was first published in 1946.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Sign words suggesting a bad shortcut? : ROAD ENDS
9. Mental grasp : UPTAKE
15. See to the door : USHER OUT
16. Cruise woe : NAUSEA
17. “Let’s get started!” : THAT’S A GO!
18. Take shelter, with “down” : HUNKER
19. “¿Quién __?” : SABE
20. Green card fig. : ID NO
22. Tanning salon equipment : LAMPS
23. What unGlue helps parents and kids manage : SCREEN TIME
26. Decide one will : OPT TO
29. Linda of Broadway : EDER
30. Film lioness : ELSA
33. Course standard : PAR
34. Deal with, in a way, as ads : ZAP
36. Nebraska’s official soft drink : KOOL-AID
38. Lifts up : ELATES
40. Slightly touched : PATTED
41. Small stingers : RED ANTS
43. Adoptee, maybe : PET
44. Second person? : EVE
45. Mideast port : ADEN
46. “The Moor already changes with my poison” speaker : IAGO
48. Texted the wrong person, say : ERRED
50. Sign of confusion : BLANK STARE
53. Part of a case : STAIR
55. Figure (out) : SUSS
56. Copper : CENT
60. Home of Tumnus, in fiction : NARNIA
62. Angry overstatement, usually : I HATE YOU
64. Ideally : AT BEST
65. Unable to hit a pitch : TONE DEAF
66. Big group : PASSEL
67. Visited overnight : STAYED AT

Down

1. Sticking points? : RUTS
2. Org. with a QuickTakes online newsletter : OSHA
3. Model for Hook : AHAB
4. Not fancy at all : DETEST
5. Med. show locales : ERS
6. Outer space feature : NO AIR
7. Found inner strength : DUG DEEP
8. High : STONED
9. The Wildcats of the America East Conf. : UNH
10. Physics Nobelist Wolfgang __ : PAULI
11. Hot lunch order : TUNA MELT
12. “Not now” : ASK ME LATER
13. Preserve : KEEP
14. All __ : EARS
21. RAM unit : ONE-K
24. Cheat : COZEN
25. Irony, say : TROPE
26. Play with music : OPERA
27. Showed fear, perhaps : PALED
28. Spar : TRADE BARBS
31. It won’t hold water : SIEVE
32. Topped with, say : ADDED
35. Sean of “Rudy” : ASTIN
37. Film on the range : OATER
39. Tropical vacation souvenirs : TAN LINES
42. Barneys rival : SAKS
43. Bit of sparring : POTSHOT
47. Gear for some test pilots : G-SUITS
49. Move away : RECEDE
51. Spring up : ARISE
52. Mountain Pose is a standing one : ASANA
53. Piece of cake : SNAP
54. Word on the way out : TA-TA
57. Observed : EYED
58. Weather-tracking org. : NOAA
59. Thread cluster : TUFT
61. Icel. surrounder : ATL
63. “Miss Pym Disposes” author : TEY

15 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 9 Mar 19, Saturday”

  1. LAT: 41:04, no errors. Still amazes me that Bill and others finish these in the amount of time it takes me to even get a foothold into the grid. WSJ: 44:09, no errors. Worked out all the nonsense (hey Agard is involved, there’s going to be nonsense) in this one eventually. Terrible contrived theme contributed to a lot of it. A good prime example of “manufactured difficulty”. Newsday: DNF after 58:41, about half-filled, 7 errors. At least I managed half of it as opposed to none as I do most times.

  2. LAT: 16:43, no errors; I’d never heard of Ms. “TEY”, but crossing entries came to the rescue.

    Newsday: 42:07, no errors; wanted “FLAGONS” instead of “FLACONS” at first, but the crossing entry was solid and I finally remembered having see the correct word somewhere; otherwise, a bit easier than usual, with a scary stack of three 15-letter entries in the middle that actually turned out to be easier than the rest.

    WSJ: 31:11, no errors; a marvelous puzzle from young Agard, with a theme so clever and so meticulously carried out that I am even more in awe of his prowess! This one goes in my private Hall of Fame … 😄.

    Yesterday’s Croce turned out to be a “Wordomino”, a type of puzzle I don’t care for all that much, so I treated it as an opportunity to take care of some paperwork I’ve been neglecting. May try it later …

    Annnnd … I think today may be a bread-baking day! … 😜

  3. 53:12 no errors. Big difference between this and “YOUNG MR STEINBERGS ” gruesome NYT puzzle in my paper today.

  4. 16 mins 53 seconds before I gave this one up, about half filled (the bottom half). CC Burnikel at her most opaque and most irritating. I really don’t like it when two of every three clues is purposely worded to confuse or mislead… and then the other third of the clues are people nobody’s ever heard of.

    1. You’re only misled if you are locked into a single definition for a clue. (I admit to this shortcoming at times as well.) Thinking outside the box is often a prerequisite to success, especially in the case of weekend puzzles.

  5. 36:23. Tough one even by Saturday standards. More than once I thought I wasn’t going to finish.

    I wasn’t familiar with TROPE so I didn’t understand 25D even after Bill’s explanation. Apparently a TROPE can also refer to a rhetorical device in literature such as irony. Thank you, Google.

    Best –

  6. It would have also been a bummer for me, less than half. But, my
    son-in-law came over and got 2/3 of it and I was then able to fill
    in enough to give us 85% and I was satisfied. Just not a fun one,
    but I am happy enough with our final score.

    I, too, am amazed at the fast times some of you fellow players get. I would
    not be able to write them down that fast. That was not a complaint, just fact.

  7. Couldn’t finish. NW corner did me in. The most difficult LAT puzzle in quite some time. Hats off to author C.C. Burnikel.

  8. Too tough for me today; took about an hour with about 50 unfilled or erroneously filled squares. Had the NE, SE, E, S and only parts of the rest. At least I thought TROPE, OSHA and POTSHOT, without actually getting them…sigh!

    @Carrie – Yeah, mostly Jesse is sympathetic, but he does too many annoying things to really identify with, at least for me. The Cop Talk skits are on YouTube and also the Malcolm in the Middle alternative ending to Breaking Bad. The lite bondage isn’t and just has Hank on a bed, handcuffed to a bed post, when Marie comes in dressed in a sexy cop uniform for the “interrogation” 🙂 She straddles him and starts the questioning, with a grinning Hank. Apparently she says something slightly out of character – I couldn’t hear what it was – and Hank protests, which causes Marie to get indignant, after which she gets up and storms out, while Hank calls out to her, apologizing. So pretty tame, but funny. There’s also a skit with Jesse, Skinny Pete and a really sexy go-go dancer, where they’re just waiting for the DEA to eventually pop them, throwing money around, enjoying the dance, smoking pot…when Saul shows up. He recognizes the dancer and greets her by name, gives Jesse a gun in the back and leaves. Skinny Pete says at some point “this is just like Carpe..uh..Carpe..” “diem, Carpe Diem” the dancer finishes.

  9. Greetings!!!🐔

    Say! By the time I finish writing, an extra hour will have passed! 😯

    I think I got about 60% filled on my own on this one. Toughest I’ve seen from Ms Burnikel!😖 Could NOT crack the NW so I moved on to the NE and inked in ACUMEN….took forever to realize that was wrong– UPTAKE. Crosses helped here and there, but this has been a difficult week for me, puzzle-wise.

    Dirk! Interesting stuff– must find what’s there on YouTube! Wish there were those bonus scenes…maybe there are. Agreed as to Jesse….he was so self-destructive….but I love him. Apparently the upcoming Breaking Bad movie focuses mainly on him. 🙎‍♂️

    Be well ~~😎

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