LA Times Crossword 21 Jun 19, Friday

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Constructed by: Bruce Venzke & Gail Grabowski
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme (according to Bill): That’s a Wrap

Themed clues are all the same, i.e. “That’s a Wrap”:

  • 17A That’s a wrap : GIFT BOX COVERING
  • 27A That’s a wrap : TERRYCLOTH ROBE
  • 44A That’s a wrap : ROLLED SANDWICH
  • 60A “That’s a wrap!” : END OF A FILM SHOOT

Bill’s time: 6m 59s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 It’s sold in bars : SOAP

Soap is basically made by adding a strong alkali (like lye) to a fat (like olive oil or palm oil). The fats break down in the basic solution in a process called saponification. The crude soap is extracted from the mixture, washed, purified and finished in molds.

5 D-Day invasion city : ST-LO

Saint-Lô is a town in Normandy that was occupied by Germany in 1940. Saint-Lo stood at a strategic crossroads and so there was intense fighting there during the Normandy invasion of 1944. After a prolonged bombardment, very little of the town was left standing.

The most famous D-Day in history was June 6, 1944, the date of the Normandy landings in WWII. The term “D-Day” is used by the military to designate the day on which a combat operations are to be launched, especially when the actual date has yet to be determined. What D stands for seems to have been lost in the mists of time although the tradition is that D just stands for “Day”. In fact, the French have a similar term, “Jour J” (Day J), with a similar meaning. We also use H-Hour to denote the hour the attack is to commence.

14 Willing follower? : ABLE

Willing and able …

16 Certain Ivy Leaguer : YALIE

The term “Ivy League” originally defined an athletic conference, but now it is used to describe a group of schools of higher education that are associated with both a long tradition and academic excellence. The eight Ivy League Schools are: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

25 Gym shorts go-with : TEE

Our word “gymnasium” comes from the Greek “gymnasion” meaning “public place where exercise is taken”. The Greek term comes from “gymnos” meaning “naked”, as that physical training was usually done unclothed in ancient Greece.

27 That’s a wrap : TERRY CLOTH ROBE

Terry cloth is a fabric designed to absorb lots of liquid. The fabric has relatively large loops of thread that improve the absorption properties. The larger the loop, the more thread, the better the absorption.

35 Bushy-tailed canines : FOXES

Male foxes are usually called dogs, and sometimes tods or reynards. Females are vixens, and young foxes are cubs, pups or kits.

40 School for a prince : ETON

The world-famous Eton College is just a brisk walk from Windsor Castle, which itself is just outside London. Eton is noted for producing many British leaders including David Cameron who was British prime minister from 2010 to 2016. The list of Old Etonians also includes Princes William and Harry, the Duke of Wellington and George Orwell. Author Ian Fleming was also and Eton alumnus, as was Fleming’s iconic character James Bond, although the 007 was expelled by the school.

41 Beehive State athlete : UTE

The Utah Utes are the athletic teams of the University of Utah.

When Mormon pioneers were settling what is today the state of Utah, they referred to the area as Deseret, a word that means “beehive” according to the Book of Mormon. Today Utah is known as the Beehive State and there is a beehive symbol on the Utah state flag. In 1959, “Industry” was even chosen as the state motto, for the term’s association with the beehive.

47 Ike’s WWII arena : ETO

Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE) was the 34th US president, but he wanted to be remembered as a soldier. He was a five-star general during WWII in charge of the Allied Forces in the European Theater of Operations (ETO). President Eisenhower died in 1969 at Walter Reed Army Hospital. He was buried in an $80 standard soldier’s casket in his army uniform in a chapel on the grounds of the beautiful Eisenhower Presidential Library in Abilene, Kansas.

60 “That’s a wrap!” : END OF A FILM SHOOT

When shooting of a film is concluded the movie is said to wrap, and everyone heads to the wrap party. There is one story that “wrap” is actually an acronym for “wind, reel and print”, a reference to the transition of the filming process into post-production. But, this explanation is disputed.

63 Frequent genre for composer John Williams : SCI-FI

The great composer John Williams has won five Academy Awards for his work on film scores, for:

  • “Fiddler on the Roof”
  • “Jaws”
  • “Star Wars”
  • “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”
  • “Schindler’s List”

64 Bay, play or gray follower : … AREA

The San Francisco Bay Area comprises the nine counties that impinge on the San Francisco Bay itself: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano and Sonoma. The region also includes the major cities of San Jose, San Francisco and Oakland.

65 Kurylenko of “Quantum of Solace” : OLGA

Olga Kurylenko is a Ukrainian actress and model. Kurylenko played the Bond girl Camille Montes in the James Bond movie “Quantum of Solace”.

In addition to the James Bond series of novels, Ian Fleming wrote a collection of “Bond” short stories called “For Your Eyes Only”. The name of the collection was used as for one of the Bond films. “Quantum of Solace” was one of those stories, and this title was also used for a Bond film, even though the plot bears no resemblance to the storyline.

68 Mulching material : PEAT

Peat moss is actually sphagnum moss that has partially decayed and dried. The term “peat moss” is used as sphagnum moss is often found in peat bogs. Sphagnum moss has the ability to store large quantities of water, so the dried form is used by gardeners to condition soil, i.e. to increase the soil’s capacity to retain moisture.

Mulch is a layer of material applied by gardeners over the top of soil. The intent can be to retain moisture, to add nutrients, to reduce weed growth, or just to improve the look of the garden.

Down

2 “Hamilton” award : OBIE

The Obies are the “Off-Broadway Theater Awards”. The Obies have been presented annually since 1956. The recipients used to be chosen by “The Village Voice” newspaper, but now are jointly administered with the American Theatre Wing.

“Hamilton” is a 2015 musical based on the life of US Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, as described in the 2004 biography by Ron Chernow. The show opened off-Broadway in February 2015, and transferred to Broadway in August of the same year. Advance ticket sales for the Broadway production were unprecedented, and reportedly amounted to $30 million. The representations of the main characters is decidedly ground-breaking. The show is rooted in hip-hop and the main roles such as Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington are all played by African-American and Hispanic actors.

3 Opposite of Zulu? : ALFA

The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. It goes Alfa, Bravo, Charlie … X-ray, Yankee, Zulu.

5 Like angel food cake : SPONGY

Angel food cake is an American creation, with the name being a reference to the sponge’s lightness, as if it is “food of angels”. The chocolate butter cake called Devil’s food cake came along later, and is considered to be a counterpart to the more angelic variety.

7 Bothersome bugs : LICE

Lice (singular “louse”) are small wingless insects of which there are thousands of species, three of which are human disease agents. The three kinds of lice affecting humans are head lice, body lice and pubic lice. Most lice feed on dead skin found on the body of the host animal, although some feed on blood. Ick …

8 Reason to use Febreze : ODOR

The odor-eliminating product we know today as Febreze was developed in England in the early nineties. It is now produced by Procter & Gamble.

11 Author Hilderbrand : ELIN

Elin Hilderbrand is an author of romance novels who was once dubbed “the queen of summer beach read” by the “New York Post”. When growing up, she spent her summers on Cape Cod, and now lives on Nantucket Island. As a result, Hilderbrand sets all of her works on and around Nantucket.

12 Dust bunny component : LINT

What we call “dust bunnies” in American English, have similar inventive names in other languages. The Finns know them as sheep, the Germans wool mice, the Hungarians dust kittens, the Italians dust cats, and the Swedish dust rats.

13 Danish brick : LEGO

Lego is manufactured by Lego Group, a privately held company headquartered in Billund, Denmark. The company was founded by a carpenter called Ole Kirk Christiansen in 1934 and the now-famous plastic interlocking blocks were introduced in 1949. The blocks were originally sold under the name “Automatic Binding Bricks” but I think “Lego” is easier to remember! The name “Lego” comes from the Danish term “leg godt” meaning “play well”.

18 Male razorbacks : BOARS

A feral pig is a wild pig that is descended from domesticated pigs that have escaped captivity. Here in North America, we often use the terms “razorback” and “wild hog” to describe both feral pigs and true wild boar.

19 Iconic Chevys : VETTES

The Chevrolet Corvette was introduced to the world in 1953, and was named after the small maneuverable warship called a corvette. The “Vette” has legs. It is the only American sports car that has been around for over 50 years.

27 2013 role for Johnny Depp : TONTO

In the television version of “The Lone Ranger”, Tonto was played by the actor Jay Silverheels. In the terrible 1981 movie “The Legend of the Lone Ranger”, Tonto was played by Michael Horse. In the 2013 movie “The Lone Ranger”, Tonto was played by Johnny Depp. Famously, the Lone Ranger’s horse was called Silver and Tonto’s mount was named Scout. But, in the early TV shows, Tonto rode a horse called White Feller.

29 Common hummingbird feeder color : RED

Hummingbirds are the smallest of all the birds. The bee hummingbird is native to Cuba and weighs less than a tenth of an ounce and is about two inches in length!

30 Cocoon dweller : LARVA

The textile known as silk is made from a natural protein fiber produced from the cocoons of the larvae of the the mulberry silkworm. Ethical vegans tend to avoid silk as many, many silkworms die in order to produce a relatively small amount of fabric. Raw silk is obtained by boiling the silkworms alive inside the cocoons that yield the fibers.

32 __ disc: eye part : OPTIC

The optic nerve enters the eyeball at a location on the retina called the optic disc. Because there are no light-sensitive cells at the optic disc, there is a “hole” in our visual field that is called the blind spot. People with normal vision don’t usually notice this blind spot as the brain “fills in” the blind spot with information from the other eye.

35 Common par : FOUR

That would be golf.

39 Resort near Flagstaff : SEDONA

The city of Sedona is noted for its location amid an array of red sandstone rock formations, which are particularly beautiful at sunrise and sunset. Sedona was named after the wife of the city’s first postmaster, one Sedona Arabella Miller Schnebly.

The Arizona city of Flagstaff is named for a flagpole that was erected by a scouting party in celebration of the US Centennial on July 4th, 1876.

40 Former Radiohead label : EMI

EMI was a British music company, with the initialism standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

Radiohead is an alternative rock band from England that formed in 1985. When the band self-released their 2007 studio album “In Rainbows”, it was a big deal for the music industry. Radiohead offered a digital version of the album using a pay-what-you-want pricing model. Reportedly, most fans paid what would be a normal retail price for the download version of the album. That’s not bad, considering the relatively low cost to produce a download compared to the cost of producing a CD.

43 “Star Wars” critters : EWOKS

The Ewoks are creatures that live on the moon of Endor in the “Star Wars” universe. First appearing in “Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi”, they’re the cute and cuddly little guys that look like teddy bears.

51 Singer Brickell : EDIE

Edie Brickell is a singer-songwriter from Dallas, Texas. Brickell has been married to fellow singer Paul Simon since 1991.

54 Copter’s forerunner : GIRO

“Giro” is a reference to the autogyro, an aircraft that uses an unpowered rotor to create lift, and a powered propeller to provide thrust. The first autogyro was flown in 1923 in Spain, where it was invented.

56 2007 Applebee’s acquirer : IHOP

The Applebee’s chain of “Neighborhood Bar & Grill” restaurants was founded in 1980, with the first Applebee’s eatery opening in Decatur, Georgia. When it comes to “chain” restaurants, I quite like Applebee’s …

58 Costume made from a sheet : TOGA

In Ancient Rome, the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae” or “togas”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a “stola”.

62 Honolulu Airport wreath : LEI

Honolulu International Airport in Hawaii was renamed in 2012 to honor Senator Daniel K. Inouye, who had represented the state for almost 50 years. Back in the early fifties, Honolulu Airport was the third-busiest in the country, and its 13,000-foot runway was the longest in the world. The airport’s IATA code is “HNL”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 It’s sold in bars : SOAP
5 D-Day invasion city : ST-LO
9 Live : DWELL
14 Willing follower? : ABLE
15 Forked over : PAID
16 Certain Ivy Leaguer : YALIE
17 That’s a wrap : GIFT BOX COVERING
20 Make more flavorful : SEASON
21 Poet’s preposition : ERE
22 Fascinated by : INTO
23 Opposite of hence : AGO
25 Gym shorts go-with : TEE
27 That’s a wrap : TERRY CLOTH ROBE
35 Bushy-tailed canines : FOXES
36 Eat-on-the-street places : CAFES
37 What an amateur may turn : PRO
38 Like some audiobooks : ON CD
39 Goes from site to site : SURFS
40 School for a prince : ETON
41 Beehive State athlete : UTE
42 Start a court contest : SERVE
43 Radiates : EMITS
44 That’s a wrap : ROLLED SANDWICH
47 Ike’s WWII arena : ETO
48 Italian god : DIO
49 Made it up : LIED
52 Find fault to a fault : NAG
55 Evades : SKIRTS
60 “That’s a wrap!” : END OF A FILM SHOOT
63 Frequent genre for composer John Williams : SCI-FI
64 Bay, play or gray follower : … AREA
65 Kurylenko of “Quantum of Solace” : OLGA
66 Identity __ : THEFT
67 Provoke : ROIL
68 Mulching material : PEAT

Down

1 Loses elasticity : SAGS
2 “Hamilton” award : OBIE
3 Opposite of Zulu? : ALFA
4 They’re often adopted : PETS
5 Like angel food cake : SPONGY
6 Strain : TAX
7 Bothersome bugs : LICE
8 Reason to use Febreze : ODOR
9 Salon supply : DYE
10 Not as trusting : WARIER
11 Author Hilderbrand : ELIN
12 Dust bunny component : LINT
13 Danish brick : LEGO
18 Male razorbacks : BOARS
19 Iconic Chevys : VETTES
24 Goes down, so to speak : OCCURS
26 Reactions to missing things : EHS
27 2013 role for Johnny Depp : TONTO
28 Get all A’s : EXCEL
29 Common hummingbird feeder color : RED
30 Cocoon dweller : LARVA
31 Cause resentment : OFFEND
32 __ disc: eye part : OPTIC
33 Stock : BROTH
34 Quite a stretch : EONS
35 Common par : FOUR
39 Resort near Flagstaff : SEDONA
40 Former Radiohead label : EMI
42 Financially secure : SET
43 “Star Wars” critters : EWOKS
45 Started : LED OFF
46 Dreary : DISMAL
49 Out of concern that : LEST
50 Rainfall measure : INCH
51 Singer Brickell : EDIE
53 Miles away : AFAR
54 Copter’s forerunner : GIRO
56 2007 Applebee’s acquirer : IHOP
57 Part : ROLE
58 Costume made from a sheet : TOGA
59 Sports page entry : STAT
61 Require no alteration : FIT
62 Honolulu Airport wreath : LEI

17 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 21 Jun 19, Friday”

  1. 22:13 no errors….Its nice to work a puzzle that doesn’t rely on crosses to solve some off the wall “never heard of” answers once in a while

  2. LAT: 10:29, no errors. Newsday: 16:28, no errors (but a lot of missteps). WSJ: 10:08; easy one; and, as for the meta, I think I see something I’m supposed to see in the theme entries, but so far I don’t know what to do with it. New Yorker: 12:56, no errors; pretty easy in spite of some references to things outside my knowledge base. Croce later …

    @Sallee (from yesterday) … I think I’m going to fill the area that I’ve been working on with the volunteer roses that have appeared in some large plastic pots on my patio. So far, I’ve removed the damaged golden rain tree that was in there, dug out all of its roots (along with a bunch of other stuff – vinca, mostly), removed a bunch of (not very 😜) decorative concrete pavers that were used to raise the area above the lawn, and improved the soil to a depth of about a foot and a half. At 76, I don’t think I have a lot of this sort of work left in me: it’s kind of a shock to see how much I’ve changed in the last five years. (And today is most definitely a rest day! … 😜 )

    1. @dave
      Thank you for the interesting reply. I can’t believe you did all that, in the heat, and at your age. I will be 73 in August so I can relate to the effort that you put in. I hope it turns out wonderfully and brings you great joy and pleasure! I love my yard when it is all fixed up and looking good!

      1. I thought I would miss the two trees I had to take out, but I like the new look already and the memory of the 30-40 hours I’ve spent on the project will fade pretty quickly (I hope … 😜).

        Meanwhile, my enforced day of rest has given me time to focus on the WSJ meta, and I got it! (And, of course, Heidi got it yesterday … so kudos are in order for her! … 😜)

      2. And … the Croce puzzle turned out to be a “Wordomino”, a type of puzzle that I normally won’t tackle, but I decided it would be good for me to try this one. It took me about two hours and I was forced to use Google to do it, but I finished it and I actually rather enjoyed it. If you want to take a look at it, you can download a PDF from here:

        https://club72.wordpress.com/

        A different experience … 😳 … 😜

  3. Had to work rather hard to get to the finish. BUT my biggest mistake was not reading 62D correctly. I missed the word “wreath” under the clue “honolulu airport”. So I was working with NHL. That killed that whole section. Bummer.

    1. Interesting. It appears that certain letters in the NATO and ICAO phonetic alphabets are written a little differently, as described on the following page:

      http://spellout.org/alphabetInfo?alphabet=en-nato

      (Go to the above site and then use the link provided to see the ICAO spellings.)

      It would appear that the object is to make sure that everyone pronounces the words the same way (which makes sense) …

  4. LAT: 11:31, no errors. WSJ: 11:22, no errors. No idea about the meta, as always. Newsday: 19:44, 1 error. New Yorker: 22:54, no errors. Another “day switched” grid. Not to mention they couldn’t keep the print version to one page…

    1. Yeah … I played with the New Yorker display until I could do a screen grab that included the stuff on the second page and then printed the resulting PNG file. I’m a little surprised by how often online versions of the various puzzles are messed up in one way or another: you’d think they’d take a little more care to get it right. (On the other hand, as a beggar on most of these sites, I guess I’m not entitled to be a chooser … 😜.)

      1. I could do a lot of manipulation like that but then again it’s almost easier to simply just let the second page print. Besides, I’m thinking about 2 page printing 21x21s (where I can). The text is just so small and the boxes to write the letters in take time just to be sure it’s legible and within the box line.

        In other news, got my ACPT paper work back, and almost have an entire set of the Fireball books. Kind of my “extra-curriculars” of the moment.

  5. I guess some of you are as old as I!

    Easier than yesterday’s, but had to Google for EDIE and BOARS. Also didn’t know ELIN, OLGA. Had mIte before LINT.
    A likable enough puzzle, since some Fridays I can’t get a hook into it.

  6. I liked it much better than Thursday’s, but could only drag 90%
    out of it. Made 7 posting errors and left 12 squares blank. Best
    we could do.

    You guys and gals are just good and do so well. Inspiring.

  7. Had a bit of trouble getting started in the top, but as I worked my way down things began to fill. Finally got to critical mass and I was able to zip through the rest, only having to change GyRO on the way. 26 minutes with no errors.

    On to Saturday, with confidence…

  8. Greetings!!🍹

    No errors. Seemed a bit easy for a Friday. I had FILM SCENE before FILM SHOOT, and that slowed me down in the SE. I guess after they film a scene they say that’s a take? 🤔 but that doesn’t make sense….Oh! Maybe they say “Cut…Print.” ???

    Dave, I envy your energy! Whenever I’m in my yard I have to avoid thinking about all the things that need to be done and try to enjoy what I do have. 🌿

    Be well~~🚋⚾️

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