LA Times Crossword 20 Oct 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: Gary Larson
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Off to a Good Start

Themed answers are common phrases reinterpreted as things that are AWESOME:

  • 22A Awesome product component? : CHILL FACTOR
  • 24A Awesome mattress covering? : DOPE SHEET
  • 43A Awesome plumbing connector? : TIGHT FITTING
  • 68A Awesome hobby? : HOT PURSUIT
  • 70A Awesome hunting dog? : HIP POINTER
  • 88A Awesome entitlement? : RADICAL RIGHT
  • 113A Awesome suit fabric? : BOSS TWEED
  • 115A Awesome predicament? : SWEET PICKLE

Bill’s time: 18m 58s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Dojo maneuver : CHOP

The Japanese word “dojo” literally means “place of the way”. Originally the term applied to training halls that were found in or beside temples. The teaching in a dojo was not limited to the martial arts, but in the Western world we use the dojo as the name for a training facility for judo, karate and the like.

5 Guitarist Joe of The Eagles : WALSH

Joe Walsh is a musician who has been a member of several successful bands, including the Eagles and Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band.

14 Start of an incantation : ABRA-

The incantation “abracadabra” has a long history. It was used as far back as the 2nd century AD in ancient Rome when the word was prescribed by a physician to be worn on an amulet to help his emperor recover from disease. “Abracadabra” is Aramaic, and roughly translates as “I will create as I speak”.

18 The last Mrs. Chaplin : OONA

Oona O’Neill dated J. D. Salinger and Orson Welles in her teens, but ended up marrying Charlie Chaplin in 1943. Oona was still quite young when she married Chaplin, much to the dismay of her famous father, playwright Eugene O’Neill. Eugene went as far as disowning 18-year-old Oona because of the marriage to 54-year-old Chaplin.

20 Shiraz’s land : IRAN

The Iranian city of Shiraz has long been associated with wine, but there is no proven link between the city and the wine/grape we know today as “Shiraz” (also called “Syrah”). Having said that, some clay jars were found just outside of the city of Shiraz that contained wine; wine that was 7,000 years old!

29 Glenn Miller Orchestra singer Ray : EBERLE

Ray Eberle was a singer, one most associated with the Glenn Miller Orchestra. Ray’s elder brother was Bob Eberly, and Bob sang with the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra.

30 Immortal name in dance : ASTAIRE

Fred Astaire’s real name was Frederick Austerlitz. Fred was from Omaha, Nebraska and before he made it big in the movies, he was one half of a celebrated music hall act with his sister Adele. The pair were particularly successful in the UK, and Adele ended up marrying into nobility in England, taking the name Lady Charles Cavendish.

34 DEA agent : NARCO

“Narc” and “narco” are slang terms describing a law enforcement officer who tracks down criminals associated with illegal drugs. Both words are short for “narcotics officer”. Narcs might work for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

36 Court game word : ALAI

Jai alai is a game that derives from Basque pelota, and is known as “cesta-punta” in the Basque language. The name “jai alai” translates from the original Basque as “merry festival”.

54 “__ & Basie”: 1963 jazz collaboration : ELLA

“Ella and Basie!” is the 1963 album in which Ella Fitzgerald sings, with the Count Basie Orchestra accompanying. The album marked only the second time that Fitzgerald and the Basie band had recorded together, the previous occasion being the recording of “One O’Clock Jump” in 1957.

55 “True Detective” actor McNairy : SCOOT

Actor Scoot McNairy earned the nickname “Scoot” when he was about two years, apparently because he was always “scooting” around on his butt!

“True Detective” is a crime drama made by HBO that has an interesting format. Each series has its own narrative and cast. The show seems to be attracting some great actors. The first season was led by Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, and the second by Colin Farrell and Rachel McAdams.

60 Peacock’s pride : PLUMAGE

The male peafowl is known as a peacock, and the female a peahen. The peafowl’s young are sometimes called peachicks.

64 QVC sister channel : HSN

The Home Shopping Network (HSN) was the first national shopping network, and was launched locally as the Home Shopping Club in Florida in 1982.

The QVC shopping channel was founded in 1986 in West Chester, Pennsylvania. The company now has operations not only in the US but also in the UK, Germany, Japan and Italy. That means QVC is reaching 200 million households. The QVC initialism stands for Quality, Value and Convenience.

66 Wall St. hedger : ARB

An arbitrageur (arb.) is someone one who profits from the purchase of securities in one market and the subsequent sale in another, by taking advantage of price discrepancies across markets.

70 Awesome hunting dog? : HIP POINTER

The breed of dog known as a pointer is also known as an English pointer. There are other pointing breeds though, dogs that instinctively “point” by stopping and aiming their muzzles at game when hunting. The list of other pointing breeds includes the English setter and the Irish setter.

A hip pointer is a bruise on the pelvis resulting from a blow to the tissue sitting on the iliac crest located on either side of the pelvic bone. Hip pointers are often incurred in contact sports.

76 Gallivant : TRAIPSE

“Gallivant” is such a lovely word, and is probably a derivative of “gallant”. To gallivant is to gad about, to flirt, wander in search of pleasure or amusement. My mother was always accusing me of gallivanting when I was a youth …

80 Wine choice : ROSE

Rosé wines get their color from the skins of the grapes, although the intensity of the color is not sufficient to make them red wines. Of the varying type of rosé wines available, we are most familiar with sweet White Zinfandels. Personally I am fond of the really dry Provençal rosé wines.

88 Awesome entitlement? : RADICAL RIGHT

The concept of left-right politics started in France during the French Revolution. When members of France’s National Assembly convened in 1789, supporters of the King sat to the President’s right, and supporters of the revolution to the President’s left. The political terms “left” and “right” were then coined in the local media and have been used ever since.

92 Zodiac animal : RAM

Aries the Ram is the first astrological sign in the Zodiac, and is named after the constellation. Your birth sign is Aries if you were born between March 21 and April 20, but if you are an Aries you would know that! “Aries” is the Latin word for “ram”.

94 “Truly, the souls of men are full of __”: Shak. : DREAD

Here are some lines from William Shakespeare’s “Richard III”:

Truly, the souls of men are full of dread:
Ye cannot reason almost with a man
That looks not heavily and full of fear.

“Richard III” is one of the more famous of William Shakespeare’s historical plays. A well-known 1955 version of the play was made for the big screen with Laurence Olivier playing the title role. The most oft-quoted words from “Richard III” are probably the opening lines “Now is the winter of our discontent/Made glorious summer by this sun of York”, and Richard’s plea at the climax of battle “A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse!”

96 “We the Living” novelist : AYN RAND

“We the Living” is the first novel by the author Ayn Rand, and was published in 1936.

113 Awesome suit fabric? : BOSS TWEED

Tweed is a rough woolen fabric that is very much associated with Scotland in the UK, and with County Donegal in Ireland. The cloth was originally called “tweel”, the Scots word for “twill”. Apparently a London merchant misinterpreted some handwriting in the early 1800s and assumed the fabric was called “tweed”, a reference to the Scottish River Tweed, and the name stuck …

William Magear Tweed was known as “Boss” Tweed. He was a 19th-century, American politician who led the Democratic Party machine in New York, headquartered in Tammany Hall. He was one of the most successful of the corrupt politicians of the day, siphoning from taxpayers (in today’s money) billions of dollars. In 1871 he was arrested, and served time in jail. He was then rearrested on civil charges and served time in debtor’s prison. He managed to escape to Spain, but was arrested again and extradited to the United States. He died in jail in 1878.

117 Tennis great Nastase : ILIE

I think that Ilie Nastase was the most entertaining tennis player of the 1970s, the days of Jimmy Connors, Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe. No matter how much pressure there was in a match, Nastase always had time to share a joke with the crowd. After retiring from the sport, he had a few novels published (in French) during the eighties. Then Nastase went into politics, making an unsuccessful run for the mayorship of Bucharest in 1996. He made a successful run for the Romanian Senate though, and was elected senator in 2014.

118 Villain named Julius : DR NO

“Dr. No” may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you’ve read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you’ll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. Julius No and Fu Manchu. By the way, the author Ian Fleming tells us that Julius No attended medical school in Milwaukee.

121 Picnic staple : SLAW

The term “coleslaw” is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name “koolsla”, which in itself is a shortened form of “Koolsalade” meaning “cabbage salad”.

123 Mocking sarcasm : SNARK

“Snark” is a term that was coined by Lewis Carroll in his fabulous 1876 nonsense poem “The Hunting of the Snark”. Somehow, the term “snarky” came to mean “irritable, short-tempered” in the early 1900s, and from there “snark” became “sarcastic rhetoric” at the beginning of the 21st century.

Down

1 Movie mogul Harry and sportscaster Linda : COHNS

Columbia Pictures was founded in 1919 as Cohn-Brandt-Cohn Film Sales, by brothers Jack and Harry Cohn, and Joe Brandt. The name was changed to Columbia Pictures in 1924 when the company went public. The Columbia name became closely associated with the wonderful Hollywood screwball comedies of the thirties, thanks to the association with director Frank Capra, and stars like Jean Arthur and Cary Grant.

Linda Cohn is a sportscaster who started anchoring ESPN’s “SportsCenter” in 1992. When Cohn was in high school, she played hockey on the boys team.

4 Ease, as symptoms : PALLIATE

To “palliate” is to relieve the symptoms of a disease or disorder, without effecting any form of a cure. “Palliate” comes from the Latin “palliatus” meaning “cloaked”.

5 Ring org. : WBA

World Boxing Association (WBA)

6 Scythe blade shapes : ARCS

I guess there are several designs of scythe, e.g. English scythes and Austrian scythes. The two main components of any scythe are the blade and the handle known as a snaith.

7 Starbucks serving : LATTE

The term “latte” is an abbreviation of the Italian “caffelatte” meaning “coffee (and) milk”. Note that in the correct spelling of “latte”, the Italian word for milk, there is no accent over the “e”. An accent is often added by mistake when we use the word in English, perhaps meaning to suggest that the word is French.

8 Bar word meaning “cup” in Danish : SKOAL

“Skoal” is a Swedish and Norwegian toast that has roots in the old Norse word “skaal” meaning “cup”.

9 Sage and thyme : HERBS

In Britain, sage and thyme are listed as two of the four essential herbs. And those would be “parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme”.

11 2000s Yankee nickname : A-ROD

Baseball player Alex Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod”, broke a lot of records in his career, albeit under a shroud of controversy due to his use of illegal performance-enhancing drugs. When he signed a 10-year contract with the Texas Rangers for $252 million in 2000, it was the most lucrative contract in sports history. In 2007, Rodriguez signed an even more lucrative 10-year contract with the New York Yankees, worth $275 million. Rodriguez retired in 2016.

22 Org. in Clancy novels : CIA

Tom Clancy was an incredibly successful novelist who was noted for his technically-detailed military and espionage thrillers. Clancy’s first novel was “The Hunt for Red October”, published in 1984. Although “Red October” was to be his most successful work, I personally preferred his second book “Red Storm Rising”, published in 1986. Clancy passed away in 2013.

23 Wheel inventor : FERRIS

25 Govt. agency that aids entrepreneurs : SBA

The Small Business Administration (SBA) is a government agency with the mission of assisting small businesses. The SBA doesn’t give loans itself, but it does act as a guarantor under the right circumstances. The SBA was set up in 1953, and isn’t a favorite with fiscal conservatives.

31 Hosp. readout : ECG

An EKG measures the electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

33 Bolivian export : TIN

The Latin word for tin is “stannum”, and so tin’s atomic symbol is “Sn”. One of the ores used as a source of tin is “stannite”.

Bolivia is a landlocked country in South America, bordered by Brazil, Paraguay, Chile, Peru and Argentina. The land now occupied by Bolivia was originally part of the Inca Empire. The country declared independence from Spain in 1809, which led to 16 years of war. When the Republic was finally named, “Bolivia” was chosen in honor of Venezuelan-born revolutionary leader, Simón Bolívar.

35 Units of resistance : OHMS

The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm’s Law.

37 ’80s-’90s Compaq laptop model : LTE

These days the Compaq brand of computers are sold by Hewlett-Packard, as the two companies merged in 2002. The original Compaq entity was founded in 1982, with the company name coming from COMP-atibility A-nd Q-uality.

40 Israeli leaders? : ALEPHS

Aleph is the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and beth is the second.

45 “Mending Wall” poet : FROST

“Mending Wall” is a 1914 poem from the pen of American poet Robert Frost. The poem is about a stone wall that separates a man from his neighbor. The last line of the piece includes the old adage “Good fences make good neighbors”.

50 Seductress : VAMP

A vamp (short for “vampire”) is a seductive woman. The term was first used in reference to the sultry performance of actress Theda Bara in the 1915 film “A Fool There Was”. The movie’s title is a quotation from Rudyard Kipling’s 1897 poem “The Vampire”. Bara’s role was positioned as a “vampire”, a woman out to seduce a man, launching the use of “vamp” as an alternative term for “femme fatale”.

61 Bellow title hero March : AUGIE

“The Adventures of Augie March” is a novel by Saul Bellow published first in 1953. The story tells of a young man growing up during the Great Depression.

63 Those, in Tijuana : ESAS

Tijuana is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California, and lies just across the US-Mexico border from San Diego. Tijuana is also the most westerly of all Mexican cities. A lot of Tijuana’s growth took place in the twenties as tourists flocked south of the border during the days of prohibition in the US. One of the many casinos and hotels that flourished at that time was Hotel Caesar’s in the Avenida Revolución area. Hotel Caesar’s claims to be the birthplace of the now ubiquitous Caesar Salad.

65 Coastal California scenic attraction : BIG SUR

Big Sur is a lovely part of the California Coast located south of Monterey and Carmel. The name “Big Sur” comes from the original Spanish description of the area as “el sur grande” meaning “the big south”.

67 Basenji and Borzoi : BREEDS

The basenji breed of dog originated in Africa, where they were used for hunting. The basenji doesn’t really bark, and instead produces a yodel-like sound. For this reason, the breed is sometimes known as the African barkless dog.

The borzoi breed of dog looks like a hairy version of a greyhound. The borzoi is also known as the Russian wolfhound.

70 Katherine of “Suits” : HEIGL

Katherine Heigl is best associated with the television show “Grey’s Anatomy” on which she plays Dr. Izzie Stevens. That’s not a show I ever watched, but I did enjoy the espionage show “State of Affairs” in which Heigl played the lead. I guess I was in the minority though, as NBC cancelled “State of Affairs” after only one season …

“Suits” is an entertaining, albeit formulaic, legal drama that is set in New York City. One of the main characters in the show Mike Ross, a brilliant law school dropout who poses as a law associate. Mike Ross’ love interest is paralegal Rachel Zane. Zane is played by actress Meghan Markle, who married the UK’s Prince Harry in 2018.

71 Edible seaweed : NORI

Nori is an edible seaweed that we used to know as “laver” when I was living in Wales. Nori is usually dried into thin sheets. Here in the US, we are most familiar with nori as the seaweed used as a wrap for sushi.

74 1970 Kinks hit : LOLA

“Lola” is a fabulous song that was written by Ray Davies and released by the Kinks back in 1970. Inspired by a real life incident, the lyrics tell of young man who met a young “lady” in a club, danced with her, and then discovered “she” was actually a transvestite. The storyline isn’t very traditional, but the music is superb.

79 Writer Bagnold : ENID

Enid Bagnold was a British author and is best known for her 1935 novel “National Velvet”, which famously was adapted into a very successful film starring Elizabeth Taylor.

87 “The Bourne Identity” malady : AMNESIA

“The Bourne Identity” is a great spy novel written by Robert Ludlum, and first published in 1980. It has been ranked as the second best spy novel of all time, just behind the even more enjoyable “The Spy Who Came in from the Cold” by John le Carré. Ludlum wrote two sequels, and all three parts of the Bourne Trilogy have been made into very successful movies now, starring Matt Damon in the title role. Ludlum died before he could write more than three novels featuring Jason Bourne, but five more titles in the series have been published, each written by Eric Van Lustbader. I must check them out …

90 Test for M.A. seekers : GRE

Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

Master of Arts (MA)

92 Yeshiva leaders : RABBIS

In the Jewish tradition, a yeshiva is an educational institution focusing on the study of sacred texts.

95 One involved in a speculative “bubble” : DOT-COM

The dot-com bubble was a phenomenon seen in 1997 to 2000 during which speculation led to the overvaluation of poorly-understood Internet stocks. The bubble burst on March 10, 2000. Within ten days, the value of the NASDAQ was down by over 10%.

98 AIDS-fighting drug : AZT

“AZT” is the abbreviated name for the drug azidothymidine, which is used extensively in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. AZT was originally developed in the seventies as a potential treatment for retroviruses (cancer-causing viruses), although it was never approved for use in treatment. In 1984, it was confirmed that AIDS was caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), so scientists turned to known antiviral drugs in the search for a viable treatment. Burroughs-Wellcome came up with a treatment regime using AZT, and filed a patent in 1985. The patent was challenged in court but the patent expired anyway in 2005 without any decision being made. There are now at least four generic forms of AZT approved for sale in the US.

Someone infected by the human immunodeficiency virus is said to be HIV-positive. After the initial infection, the person is often asymptomatic for many years. Over time, the virus interferes with the immune system and so increasing the chances of picking up serious secondary infections. Those unfortunate enough to develop a severely compromised immune system are said to suffer from acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

101 Bridge positions : WESTS

The four people playing bridge (the card game) are positioned around a table at seats referred to as north, east, south and west. Each player belongs to a pair, with north playing with south, and east playing with west.

102 Novelist Shaw : IRWIN

Irwin Shaw was an author from New York City. Shaw’s most famous works are his novels “The Young Lions” (1948) and “Rich Man, Poor Man” (1970). The former was made into a successful 1958 film of the same starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift and Dean Martin. The latter became a successful TV miniseries of the same name starring Peter Strauss and Nick Nolte.

103 Actress Davis : GEENA

As well as being a successful Hollywood actress, Geena Davis is an accomplished archer and came close to qualifying for the US archery team for the 2000 Summer Olympics. Davis is also a member of American Mensa. She is quite the lady …

105 Kipling’s “__-Tikki-Tavi” : RIKKI

In Rudyard Kipling’s “The Jungle Book”, one of the short stories is titled “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi”, the story about a mongoose, the brave pet of an English family that protects them from a succession of snakes.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Dojo maneuver : CHOP
5 Guitarist Joe of The Eagles : WALSH
10 Wilts : SAGS
14 Start of an incantation : ABRA-
18 The last Mrs. Chaplin : OONA
19 Slow down : BRAKE
20 Shiraz’s land : IRAN
21 Trickle : SEEP
22 Awesome product component? : CHILL FACTOR
24 Awesome mattress covering? : DOPE SHEET
26 Step on it : INSOLE
27 Stuck a fork in : STABBED
29 Glenn Miller Orchestra singer Ray : EBERLE
30 Immortal name in dance : ASTAIRE
32 Ultimatum word : ELSE
33 Staring-into-space experiences : TRANCES
34 DEA agent : NARCO
36 Court game word : ALAI
39 Routine : ACT
40 Stubborn critter : ASS
43 Awesome plumbing connector? : TIGHT FITTING
48 Tiny toiler : ANT
49 Fall collection? : LEAVES
51 More consequence? : MERRIER
52 Poetic adverb : OFT
54 “__ & Basie”: 1963 jazz collaboration : ELLA
55 “True Detective” actor McNairy : SCOOT
56 Bump from the schedule : PREEMPT
60 Peacock’s pride : PLUMAGE
64 QVC sister channel : HSN
65 Shot in the arm : BOOST
66 Wall St. hedger : ARB
68 Awesome hobby? : HOT PURSUIT
70 Awesome hunting dog? : HIP POINTER
72 Bit of legal advice : SUE
73 Lose control : GO APE
74 Chicken dinner choice : LEG
75 Support : ENDORSE
76 Gallivant : TRAIPSE
78 Sound : NOISE
80 Wine choice : ROSE
81 Originally called : NEE
82 Tool in a kit : NAIL GUN
84 Shadowed : TAILED
86 Low-tech note-taking aid : PAD
88 Awesome entitlement? : RADICAL RIGHT
91 Snake’s sound : SSS
92 Zodiac animal : RAM
93 Vacation spot : ISLE
94 “Truly, the souls of men are full of __”: Shak. : DREAD
96 “We the Living” novelist : AYN RAND
100 Big drink of water : SWIG
104 Retail outlets : EMPORIA
108 Low wind : BREEZE
109 Like some receptions : CATERED
112 In a showily pretentious manner : ARTILY
113 Awesome suit fabric? : BOSS TWEED
115 Awesome predicament? : SWEET PICKLE
117 Tennis great Nastase : ILIE
118 Villain named Julius : DR NO
119 Points at the dinner table : TINES
120 Pepsi rival : COKE
121 Picnic staple : SLAW
122 Cereal grain : OATS
123 Mocking sarcasm : SNARK
124 Arab leader : EMIR

Down

1 Movie mogul Harry and sportscaster Linda : COHNS
2 Lift : HOIST
3 Checked out at the library : ON LOAN
4 Ease, as symptoms : PALLIATE
5 Ring org. : WBA
6 Scythe blade shapes : ARCS
7 Starbucks serving : LATTE
8 Bar word meaning “cup” in Danish : SKOAL
9 Sage and thyme : HERBS
10 Pro or con : SIDE
11 2000s Yankee nickname : A-ROD
12 Sign of something missing : GAP
13 Unkind look : SNEER
14 Whitish : ASHEN
15 Tailgate party recyclable : BEER CAN
16 Campaign poster word : RE-ELECT
17 Most pertinent : APTEST
22 Org. in Clancy novels : CIA
23 Wheel inventor : FERRIS
25 Govt. agency that aids entrepreneurs : SBA
28 “Get lost!” : BEAT IT!
31 Hosp. readout : ECG
33 Bolivian export : TIN
35 Units of resistance : OHMS
37 ’80s-’90s Compaq laptop model : LTE
38 Prepare sans oil, as a movie treat : AIR-POP
40 Israeli leaders? : ALEPHS
41 Betray : SELL OUT
42 Soldier, at times : SALUTER
44 Electronics whiz : TECHIE
45 “Mending Wall” poet : FROST
46 Wrinkle remover : IRON
47 Continues : GOES ON
48 Supplier of bills : ATM
50 Seductress : VAMP
53 Far from fragrant : FETID
57 It may be skipped : ROPE
58 Security rounds : PATROLS
59 Locks : TRESSES
61 Bellow title hero March : AUGIE
62 One looking for a switch, maybe : GROPER
63 Those, in Tijuana : ESAS
65 Coastal California scenic attraction : BIG SUR
67 Basenji and Borzoi : BREEDS
69 Flips : UPENDS
70 Katherine of “Suits” : HEIGL
71 Edible seaweed : NORI
74 1970 Kinks hit : LOLA
77 What’s more : AND
78 Like Miss Congeniality : NICEST
79 Writer Bagnold : ENID
83 Trouble : AIL
84 Prominent, after “on” : … THE MAP
85 “… but it’ll cost you” : AT A PRICE
86 __ tax : PAYROLL
87 “The Bourne Identity” malady : AMNESIA
89 Assist : AID
90 Test for M.A. seekers : GRE
92 Yeshiva leaders : RABBIS
95 One involved in a speculative “bubble” : DOT-COM
97 Fix, as a hem : RESEW
98 AIDS-fighting drug : AZT
99 Salon overhaul : NEW DO
101 Bridge positions : WESTS
102 Novelist Shaw : IRWIN
103 Actress Davis : GEENA
105 Kipling’s “__-Tikki-Tavi” : RIKKI
106 Less well : ILLER
107 Word of support : AYE
109 Small change : CENT
110 Bothers : ADOS
111 Critter on XING signs : DEER
114 Notable time : ERA
116 Word of reproof : TSK

10 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 20 Oct 19, Sunday”

  1. 37:41 and DNF: 10 fills in the center there, surrounding TIGHT FITTING that I just couldn’t make work. I had some of them individually, then changed them trying to make the others fit. This one got the better of me, but at least it wasn’t trickery/gadgetry.

  2. Count me totally out of this one. Never got anywhere with it. Don’t know why, but couldn’t get any traction with Larson today.

  3. Constructor gripe: 36 across, “Court game word: ALAI” – Jai Alai is played in a fronton, not a court. Fronton is SUCH a cool word…

  4. Since I muffed yesterday I figured I’d give the Sunday a try; took 51:34 with no errors or peeks. I kinda liked the theme and it helped a bit in getting some of the trickier areas. Crosses helped out where they didn’t.

  5. Lots of obscure synonyms in this one. Larson trying to be clever, I guess, but he wasn’t. As an example, “Israeli leaders?” Even with the question mark the clue is not compatible with the answer. IMO it should have been “Hebrew leaders.”

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