LA Times Crossword 21 Oct 19, Monday

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Constructed by: Kevin Salat
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Mixed Signals

Themed answers each include the letter string “SIGNAL”, with the order MIXED up:

  • 62A Communication confusion … or what’s literally found in this puzzle’s three sets of circles : MIXED SIGNALS
  • 17A Vessel for Bond : MARTINI GLASS
  • 28A “… for the remainder of my days” : AS LONG AS I LIVE
  • 47A Places to get bronzed skin : TANNING SALONS

Bill’s time: 5m 36s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Thespian’s platform : STAGE

A thespian is an actor. The term derives from the name of the Greek poet of the 6th century, Thespis, who is known as the father of Greek tragedy.

6 English Derby site : EPSOM

The Surrey town of Epsom in England is most famous for its racecourse (Epsom Downs), at which is run the Epsom Derby every year, one of the three races that make up the English Triple Crown. We also come across “Epsom salts” from time to time. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate, originally prepared by boiling down mineral waters. Epsom was indeed a spa town at one time. The town is also home to Epsom College, an English “public school” (which actually means “private, and expensive”). One of Epsom’s “old boys” was the Hollywood actor Stewart Granger.

14 Handsome god : APOLLO

In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto, and the twin brother of the goddess Artemis. Among other things, Apollo was worshiped as a god of light and the sun, truth and prophecy, as well as healing and plague.

15 “Me too!” : DITTO!

The word “ditto” was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So, “ditto” is just another wonderful import from that lovely land …

17 Vessel for Bond : MARTINI GLASS

Why have a vodka martini shaken and not stirred (as does James Bond, 007)? For one thing, the shaken drink tends to be colder. And with more melted ice in the drink, it isn’t as strong. These are my personal observations. No need to write in …

19 Sigma follower : TAU

Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, and the letter which gave rise to our Roman “T”. Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

21 Clairvoyant : SEER

We’ve been using the term “clairvoyant” to describe a psychic since the nineteenth century. Prior to that, a clairvoyant was a clear-sighted person. The term comes from French, with “clair” meaning “clear” and “voyant” meaning “seeing”.

22 B-ball : HOOPS

Basketball is truly a North American sport. It was created in 1891 by Canadian James Naismith at the YMCA in Springfield, Massachusetts. His goal was to create something active and interesting for his students in the gym. The first “hoops” were actually peach baskets, with the bottoms of the baskets intact. When a player got the ball into the “net”, someone had to clamber up and get the ball back out again in order to continue the game!

27 Smoke for Sherlock : PIPE

According to author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, his character Sherlock Holmes was based on a Dr. Joseph Bell for whom Doyle worked in Edinburgh. That said, Bell actually wrote a letter to Doyle in which he said “you are yourself Sherlock Holmes and well you know it”.

38 2020 Super Bowl number : LIV

Super Bowl I was played in January 1967 between the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas City Chiefs. The Packers emerged victorious in a game with a score of 35-10. That game was officially known as the AFL-NFL Championship Game, as the name “Super Bowl” wasn’t applied until two seasons later. That “first” Super Bowl is now known as Super Bowl III and was played between the New York Jets and the Baltimore Colts. The Jets came out on top.

39 Lemony Snicket’s evil count : OLAF

Lemony Snicket is a pen name used by Daniel Handler, a novelist from San Francisco, California. Snicket also appears as the narrator of his books, including the best known of the works: “A Series of Unfortunate Events”. Count Olaf is the antagonist in “A Series of Unfortunate Events”.

40 Celestial shower component : METEOR

The two most famous meteor showers are the Perseids and Leonids. The Perseid meteor shower is most visible around August 12th each year, and the Leonid meteor shower is most notable around November 17th. The Perseids appear to emanate from the constellation Perseus, and the Leonids from the constellation Leo (hence the names “Perseids” and “Leonids”).

43 “The Greatest” boxer : ALI

One of Muhammad Ali’s famous most famous lines is “I am the greatest!” So famous is the line that in 1963, Ali released an album of spoken word that had the title “I Am the Greatest!”

44 Painter of café scenes : MANET

Édouard Manet was a French painter whose works are mainly classified as Realist. Manet was friends with Impressionists masters like Edgar Degas, Claude Monet and Pierre-Auguste Renoir and greatly influenced the Impressionist movement. The list of Manet’s marvelous paintings includes “Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe”, “Le Repose” and “A Bar at the Folies-Bergère”.

45 John of “Three’s Company” : RITTER

Actor John Ritter had acting in his blood, as he was the son of Tex Ritter, the country music singer and movie actor. John Ritter’s big break was playing Jack Tripper on the hit sitcom “Three’s Company”.

The tremendously successful US sitcom “Three’s Company” ran from 1977 to 1984. The show was actually a remake of an equally successful British sitcom called “Man About the House”. I must, I was a fan of both shows. The American show started its run with three roommates, played by Joyce DeWitt, Suzanne Somers and John Ritter. The trio lived in an apartment building owned by characters Stanley and Helen Roper. The Ropers were eventually replaced by landlord Ralph Furley, played by the marvelous Don Knotts.

61 Game with Draw Two cards : UNO

UNO is a card game that was developed in the early seventies and that has been sold by Mattel since 1992. UNO falls into the shedding family of card games, meaning that the goal is to get rid of all your cards while preventing opponents from doing the same.

65 Quito’s country, to the IOC : ECU

The full name of the capital city of Ecuador is San Francisco de Quito. Quito is the second highest administrative capital city in the world, after La Paz, Bolivia.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) uses its own set of three-letter abbreviations for country names, e.g. HUN (Hungary), ECU (Ecuador) and CRO (Croatia).

69 Tibetan priests : LAMAS

“Lama” is a Tibetan word meaning “chief” or “high priest”.

Down

2 Pamplona runners : TOROS

Pamplona, Spain is famous for its San Fermin festival held in July every year, the highlight of which is the Running of the Bulls. Every year, 200-300 people are injured in the bull run, and 15 people have been killed since 1910. If you get to Pamplona two days before the Running of the Bulls, you can see the animal-rights protest event known as the Running of the Nudes. The protesters are as naked as the bulls …

3 Utah ski resort : ALTA

Alta ski resort actually lies within the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area. The first ski lift in the resort was opened way back in 1939. Today, Alta is one of only three ski resorts in the country that prohibits snowboarding (along with Deer Valley, Utah and Mad River Glen, Vermont. The ski resort of Snowbird, located next to Alta, has been in operation since 1971.

8 “A __ Is Born” : STAR

“A Star Is Born” is a 1937 film starring Janet Gaynor as an upcoming Hollywood actress. “A Star Is Born” was remade three times, in 1954 with Judy Garland playing the lead, in 1976 with Barbra Streisand, and in 2018 with Lady Gaga.

9 Tense NBA periods : OTS

Overtime (OT)

10 Slam-dancing area : MOSH PIT

Moshing (also “slam dancing”) is the pushing and shoving that takes place in the audience at a concert (usually a punk or heavy metal concert). The area directly in front of the stage is known as the mosh pit. When a performer does a “stage dive”, it is into (or I suppose “onto”) the mosh pit. It doesn’t sound like fun to me. Injuries are commonplace in the mosh pit, and deaths are not unknown.

11 Tesla self-driving car system : AUTOPILOT

Tesla Motors was founded in 2003 as a manufacturer of electric vehicles based in Palo Alto, California. Tesla is noted for producing the first electric sports car, called the Tesla Roadster. The company followed the sports car with a luxury sedan, the Model S. The Model S was the world’s best selling plug-in electric vehicle of 2015. Tesla Motors shortened its name to Tesla in early 2017.

12 Fruity metaphor for a rumor mill : GRAPEVINE

There are competing stories about the etymology of the phrase “heard it through the grapevine”, meaning “heard it by means of gossip or rumor”. One is that it is a reference to the Grapevine Tavern in Greenwich Village in New York City. The Grapevine was a popular meeting place for Union officers and Confederate spies during the Civil War, and so was a great spot for picking up and spreading vital gossip.

26 2018 Best Actor Gary : OLDMAN

Gary Oldman is an English stage and screen actor. Like many English actors it seems, Oldman has played a lot of villains in Hollywood movies e.g. in “Air Force One” and “The Fifth Element”. My favorite Oldman performance is as Ludwig van Beethoven in “Immortal Beloved”. He also gave an outstanding, and Oscar-winning, portrayal of Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour”.

30 Legendary Garbo : GRETA

Famously, Greta Garbo lived a life of seclusion in New York City after she retired from the entertainment business. Commentators often associated her need for privacy with a line she uttered in the great 1932 movie “Grand Hotel”. Her character Grusinskaya the Russian ballerina said, “I want to be alone (…) I just want to be alone”.

31 Twelve 24-Acrosses : ANO
(24A Spanish “month” : MES)

In Spanish, there are 12 “meses” (months) in an “año” (year).

41 U.K. language : ENG

The terms “United Kingdom”, “Great Britain” and “England” can sometimes be confused. The official use of “United Kingdom” originated in 1707 with the Acts of Union that declared the countries of England and Scotland as “United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain”. The name changed again with the Acts of Union 1800 that created the “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland” (much to the chagrin of most of the Irish population). This was partially reversed in 1927 when the current name was introduced, the “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland”, in recognition of an independent Irish Free State in the south of the island of Ireland.

42 Dime’s 10: Abbr. : CTS

The term “dime”, used for a 10-cent coin, comes from the Old French word “disme” meaning “tenth part”.

46 Acumen : INSIGHT

“Acumen” is such a lovely word, I think, one meaning “keenness of judgment or insight”. “Acumen” is Latin for “point, sting”, the idea being that someone with acumen has mental sharpness.

49 Pull-up muscles, briefly : LATS

The muscles known as the “lats” are the latissimi dorsi, and are the broadest muscles in the back. “Latissimus” is the Latin for “broadest” and “dorsum” is Latin for “back”.

52 Yoga posture : ASANA

“Asana” is a Sanskrit word that translates literally as “sitting down”. The asanas are the poses that a practitioner of yoga assumes. The most famous is the lotus position, the cross-legged pose called “padmasana”.

54 Hardy’s “__ of the D’Urbervilles” : TESS

In Thomas Hardy’s novel “Tess of the d’Urbervilles”, the heroine and title character is Tess Durbeyfield. Her father is an uneducated peasant and when he hears that his name is a corruption of the noble name of “D’Urberville”, the news goes to his head.

58 March 15, notably : IDES

There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually “fixed” by law. “Kalendae” were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. “Nonae” were originally the days of the half moon. And “idus” (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

63 Wash. neighbor : IDA

Idaho borders six states, and one Canadian province:

  • Montana
  • Wyoming
  • Nevada
  • Utah
  • Washington
  • Oregon
  • British Columbia, Canada

64 Hoppy brew, for short : IPA

India pale ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Thespian’s platform : STAGE
6 English Derby site : EPSOM
11 Earlier : AGO
14 Handsome god : APOLLO
15 “Me too!” : DITTO!
16 Coffee hour vessel : URN
17 Vessel for Bond : MARTINI GLASS
19 Sigma follower : TAU
20 Golf tournament kickoff : PRO-AM
21 Clairvoyant : SEER
22 B-ball : HOOPS
24 Spanish “month” : MES
25 Money in the middle of a poker table : POT
27 Smoke for Sherlock : PIPE
28 “… for the remainder of my days” : AS LONG AS I LIVE
34 No-holds-__ : BARRED
37 “Like it __ … ” : OR NOT
38 2020 Super Bowl number : LIV
39 Lemony Snicket’s evil count : OLAF
40 Celestial shower component : METEOR
42 Ice cream holder : CONE
43 “The Greatest” boxer : ALI
44 Painter of café scenes : MANET
45 John of “Three’s Company” : RITTER
47 Places to get bronzed skin : TANNING SALONS
50 Adolescent : TEEN
51 Cuteness reactions : AWS
52 State-of-the-__ : ART
55 “Me too!” : SO DO I!
56 Give off : EMIT
59 Debate topic : ISSUE
61 Game with Draw Two cards : UNO
62 Communication confusion … or what’s literally found in this puzzle’s three sets of circles : MIXED SIGNALS
65 Quito’s country, to the IOC : ECU
66 “Time is money,” e.g. : ADAGE
67 Texting devices : PHONES
68 Filming site : SET
69 Tibetan priests : LAMAS
70 Engaged in battle : AT WAR

Down

1 Fifth tire : SPARE
2 Pamplona runners : TOROS
3 Utah ski resort : ALTA
4 Quick look : GLIMPSE
5 Ages and ages : EON
6 Beat by a bit : EDGE
7 Paperwork accumulation : PILE
8 “A __ Is Born” : STAR
9 Tense NBA periods : OTS
10 Slam-dancing area : MOSH PIT
11 Tesla self-driving car system : AUTOPILOT
12 Fruity metaphor for a rumor mill : GRAPEVINE
13 Burden : ONUS
14 Clock radio toggle : AM/PM
18 “No one __ blame” : IS TO
23 Crude in a tanker : OIL
26 2018 Best Actor Gary : OLDMAN
28 Dog’s bark : ARF!
29 What students take at lectures : NOTES
30 Legendary Garbo : GRETA
31 Twelve 24-Acrosses : ANO
32 Melancholy : SORROW
33 Of all time : EVER
34 Yacht or ferry : BOAT
35 Suddenly : ALL AT ONCE
36 Postponed, as a ball game : RAINED OUT
41 U.K. language : ENG
42 Dime’s 10: Abbr. : CTS
44 Barely enough : MINIMAL
46 Acumen : INSIGHT
48 Prefix with liberal : NEO-
49 Pull-up muscles, briefly : LATS
52 Yoga posture : ASANA
53 Measuring stick : RULER
54 Hardy’s “__ of the D’Urbervilles” : TESS
55 Takes to court : SUES
56 More than a quiz : EXAM
57 Prefix between kilo- and giga- : MEGA-
58 March 15, notably : IDES
60 Skiing surface : SNOW
63 Wash. neighbor : IDA
64 Hoppy brew, for short : IPA

13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 21 Oct 19, Monday”

  1. LAT: 6:55, no errors. Pretty difficult compared to Monday norm. Newsday: 4:57, no errors. CHE: 8:20, no errors. Pretty nice/smooth grid. New Yorker: 12:37, no errors. WSJ (the meta they had was pretty sophisticated, so I guess they’re having a time releasing the new puzzle with the solution?) and BEQ (wish I didn’t have to wait until mid morning for it, but it is what it is) will come sometime later.

  2. So I put am/fm instead of am/pm, which of course gave me froam. I never thought of pro am as a kickoff, but whatever.
    Then I put epson instead of epsom, which gave me nosh pit instead of mosh pit. Definitely the wrong answer for that! yikes.
    Not a typical Monday for me.

  3. Had to Google for PROAM. Even on a Monday, sports junk is not “in my wheelhouse.” Around that, I had bullS before TOROS, AMfM before AMPM (which should have been clued as an abbrev) . Only got LIV by crosses. If the world was like me, the only sport would be Scrabble. It took crosswords ages to include ETSY. I definitely have an attitude this AM. Have a nice day.
    Did I ever tell you all I hate sports?

  4. 8:31. A lot of missteps for a Monday puzzle. Back home again at least for a couple of weeks. It’s amazing how fast you get rusty from not doing these things for a few days, or maybe it’s just my difficulty with jet lag.

    My parents had a copy of MANET’s “A Bar at the Folies-Bergere” in our house when I was growing up. I never knew it was a copy of anything famous. I just saw it as something homey. That’s my expert art critic opinion.

    I wanted to like Gary OLDMAN’s rendition of Churchill in “Darkest Hour”, but he was so hard to understand that I got too frustrated to even finish watching the movie. Maybe he was too good at imitating Churchill? Dunno. Did anyone on this board make it through that movie? And here I thought I had mastered understanding English accents with all of my Monty Python experience.

    Best –

  5. No great shakes on time, but only 2 errors. Missed EPSOM (N) and MANET (O).
    A fun puzzle that took some digging, changing, spelling, etc.

  6. I did this Monday puzzle after a long hiatus. A few misspellings …. AMFM and I also didn’t know what Pro-AM meant.

    I decided to come here to see if any of the old friends were still here … Jane and Jeff and Daigle…. and others.

    Jeff, ….. about watching English movies on TV …
    I now use subtitles ( whereever possible – ) on all my movies, even if the movie is in english …
    …. and especially those made across the pond…
    Mr. Oldham’s acting was very good … but I keep thinking about the real Mr. Churchill …. there is no doubt his language skills and oratory was superb, but his leadership was so-so despite his long long service in politics. He was also lucky, for whats its worth.
    Just my humble opinion.

    Have a good week, all.

  7. Greetings y’all!!🦆

    VIDWAN!! So good to see you ~~ we’ve missed you in these parts!😁

    No errors. Jeff, I love that MANET painting. His faces were amazing.

    Be well~~🍷

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