LA Times Crossword 2 Jan 20, Thursday

Advertisement

Constructed by: Derek Bowman
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: In Stitches

Themed clues each end with “IN STITCHES”:

  • 50A See 17-, 25- and 38-Across : … IN STITCHES
  • 17A One who leaves garments 50-Across : SEAMSTRESS
  • 25A One who leaves audiences 50-Across : STAND-UP COMIC
  • 38A One who leaves patients 50-Across : BRAIN SURGEON

Bill’s time: 8m 55s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Common email attachments : PDFS

Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

10 Tablet with Siri : IPAD

Siri is a software application that works with Apple’s iOS operating system. “Siri” is an acronym standing for Speech Interpretation and Recognition Interface. Voice-over artist Susan Bennett revealed herself as the female American voice of Siri a few years ago. The British version of Siri is called Daniel, and the Australian version is called Karen. Also, “Siri” is a Norwegian name meaning “beautiful woman who leads you to victory”, and was the name the developer had chosen for his first child.

14 Singer between Melanie and Joan at Woodstock : ARLO

Arlo Guthrie is the son of Woody Guthrie. Both father and son are renowned for singing protest songs about social injustice. Arlo is most famous for his epic “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, a song that lasts a full 18m 34s. In the song Guthrie tells how, after being drafted, he was rejected for service in the Vietnam War based on his criminal record. He had only one incident on his public record, a Thanksgiving Day arrest for littering and being a public nuisance when he was 18-years-old.

“Melanie” is the stage name of singer-songwriter Melanie Safka. Her biggest hit recording is 1971’s “Brand New Key”. Melanie also wrote and recorded the megahit “What Have They Done to My Song Ma”, which is perhaps better known for the song’s cover versions. Two of Melanie’s children had a hit of their own whey they were just 6 and 7 years old. They recorded a version of “There’s No One Quite Like Grandma” that charted in Canada.

Joan Baez is an American folk singer and a prominent activist in the fields of non-violence, civil rights, human rights and environmental protection. Baez has dated some high-profile figures in her life including Bob Dylan, Steve Jobs (of Apple) and Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead.

19 www addresses : URLS

An Internet address (like NYXCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) is more correctly called a Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

In essence, the World Wide Web (WWW) is a vast collection of documents that is accessible using the Internet, with each document containing hyperlinks which point to other documents in the collection. So the “Web” is different from the Internet, although the terms are often used interchangeably. The Web is a collection of documents, and the Internet is a global network of computers on which the documents reside. The Web was effectively the invention of British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee. The key to Berner-Lee’s invention was bringing together two technologies that already existed: hypertext and the Internet. I, for one, am very grateful …

23 “Louisiana Real & Rustic” chef : EMERIL

Emeril Lagasse is an American chef who was born in Massachusetts. Lagasse first achieved celebrity as executive chef in Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. Now famous for his television shows, his cuisine still showcases New Orleans ingredients and influences. Lagasse started using his famous “Bam!” catchphrase in order to keep his crew awake during repeated tapings of his show.

24 Plot : CONNIVE

To connive is to conspire with, to cooperate in secret. The term comes from the Latin verb “connivere” meaning “to wink”, the idea being that connivers might give each other a sly wink.

31 Yoga surface : MAT

Believe it or not, goat yoga is a thing, a thing that has been around since 2016. It’s doing yoga on a farm with goats around you.

33 Formerly employed by The Company : EX-CIA

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is the successor to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) formed during WWII. The CIA was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947. The organization is often referred to familiarly as “the Company”.

35 Longship propeller : OAR

The Vikings were a Germanic people from northern Europe who were noted as great seafarers. Key to the success of the Vikings was the design of their famous “longships”. Made from wood, the longship was long and narrow with a shallow hull, It was also light, so that the crew would actually carry it small distances over land and around obstacles. Longships were designed to be propelled by both sail and oars.

36 Playwright Chekhov : ANTON

Anton Chekhov was a Russian writer of short stories and a playwright, as well as a physician. He wrote four classic plays that are often performed all around the world, namely “The Seagull”, “Uncle Vanya”, “Three Sisters” and “The Cherry Orchard”. All the time Chekhov was writing, he continued to practice medicine. He is quoted as saying “Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.”

37 Cold Stone buy : CONE

Cold Stone Creamery is a chain of ice cream parlors based in Scottsdale, Arizona. The chain takes its name from the frozen granite stone on which servers mix in “toppings” or other flavors of ice cream.

46 San Diego County racetrack : DEL MAR

Del Mar racetrack opened in Del Mar Fairgrounds in in 1937. On opening day, cofounder of the Del Mar Turf Club Bing Crosby was at the gate to welcome the track’s first patrons. Del Mar has attracted many Hollywood names over the years. Races run at Del Mar include the Bing Crosby Stakes, the Bob Hope Stakes, the Cecil B. DeMille Stakes, the Pat O’Brien Handicap, the Jimmy Durante Stakes, the Betty Grable Stakes, the Cary Grant Stakes and the Desi Arnaz Stakes.

49 Point after deuce : AD IN

In tennis, if the score reaches deuce (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the advantage. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

52 He reveals the Wizard : TOTO

Towards the end of the movie “The Wizard of Oz”, Dorothy’s little dog Toto pulls back a green curtain to reveal the true identity of the Wizard.

54 Air filter acronym : HEPA

Air filters can be specified as “HEPA”, with the acronym standing for “high-efficiency particulate absorption”. To be given the name “HEPA”, the filter must remove 99.7% of particles with a size of 0.3 microns or larger.

Down

3 Raisin bran tidbit : FLAKE

The name of the cereal “Raisin Bran” is not trademark protected. The Skinner Manufacturing Company introduced Raisin Bran in 1926, and did have trademark protection until 1944. At that time, an appeals court ruled that “Raisin-BRAN” should not be considered a trademark as it is merely a description of the cereal’s ingredients.

4 Bath’s county : SOMERSET

Somerset is a county in the southwest of England. Somerset’s county town is Taunton, although the county’s most famous city is Bath.

Bath is a beautiful city in South West England of which I have very fond memories. Bath is an old Roman spa town, and the city’s name comes from the Roman baths that have been excavated and restored.

5 Number one Hun : ATTILA

In his day, Attila the Hun was the most feared enemy of the Roman Empire, until he died in 453 AD. Attila was the leader of the Hunnic Empire of central Europe and was famous for invading much of the continent. However, he never directly attacked Rome.

8 Ambulance destinations, briefly : ERS

Emergency room (ER)

9 “The Hunger Games” setting : DYSTOPIA

A dystopia is an imaginary community in which the residents live unhappily and in fear. “Dystopia” is the opposite of “utopia”. One example of such a society is that described by George Orwell in “Nineteen Eighty-Four”. A more contemporary example would be the setting for the novels “The Hunger Games”.

11 Orangey fruit : PERSIMMON

The persimmon is the edible fruit of several species of tree, and in botanical terms is actually a berry.

27 House Beautiful subject : DECOR

“House Decorating” is an interior decorating magazine that has been around for an awfully long time. It was first published in 1896.

29 Biblical descendant of Jacob : ISRAELITE

In the Torah, the Israelites are traced back to Jacob, the grandson of Abraham. Jacob’s twelve sons became the ancestors of the Twelve Tribes of Israel. Jacob’s sons were:

  • Reuben
  • Simeon
  • Levi
  • Judah
  • Dan
  • Naphtali
  • Gad
  • Asher
  • Issachar
  • Zebulun
  • Joseph
  • Benjamin

34 How café is often served : CON LECHE

In Spanish, one might have “café con leche” (coffee with milk).

36 “My Way” lyricist : ANKA

The song “My Way” has lyrics that were written by Paul Anka in 1969, but the tune itself was composed two years earlier by Claude François and Jacques Revaux. The song had been released with completely different lyrics in France as “Comme d’habitude” (“As Usual”). When Anka heard the song on television in Paris he sought out and obtained the rights to use it himself, for free. Supposedly, “Comme d’habitude” has been recorded in more languages, by more artists than any other song in the contemporary repertoire.

And now, the end is near
And so I face the final curtain
My friend, I’ll say it clear
I’ll state my case, of which I’m certain
I’ve lived a life that’s full
I traveled each and every highway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

43 Actor Milo : O’SHEA

Milo O’Shea was a great Irish character actor from Dublin who has appeared in everything from “Romeo and Juliet” to “The West Wing”. O’Shea passed away in 2013, in New York City.

44 Pedometer count : STEPS

A pedometer is an instrument worn by a runner or walker that measures the number of steps taken. The name of the device comes from “pes”, the Latin for “foot”.

47 Baking amts. : TSPS

Teaspoon (tsp.)

48 Greek vowels : ETAS

Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

51 Long of “Third Watch” : NIA

Nia Long is an American actress who is probably best known for playing Will Smith’s sometime girlfriend and fiancee Lisa Wilkes on the TV show “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air”.

“Third Watch” is a crime drama series about teams of police officers, firefighters and paramedics who work the same 3pm – 11pm shift in a New York precinct. “Third Watch” originally aired from 1999 to 2005.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Common email attachments : PDFS
5 Fired (up) : AMPED
10 Tablet with Siri : IPAD
14 Singer between Melanie and Joan at Woodstock : ARLO
15 Drag one’s feet : TARRY
16 Prepared-salad seller : DELI
17 One who leaves garments 50-Across : SEAMSTRESS
19 www addresses : URLS
20 Feel compassion for, with “on” : TAKE PITY …
21 Some are imperfect : TENSES
23 “Louisiana Real & Rustic” chef : EMERIL
24 Plot : CONNIVE
25 One who leaves audiences 50-Across : STAND-UP COMIC
28 “It’s all false!” : LIES!
30 Chilling : EERIE
31 Yoga surface : MAT
32 Kid around : JEST
33 Formerly employed by The Company : EX-CIA
34 Campsite bunks : COTS
35 Longship propeller : OAR
36 Playwright Chekhov : ANTON
37 Cold Stone buy : CONE
38 One who leaves patients 50-Across : BRAIN SURGEON
41 Approach stealthily, with “on” : SNEAK UP …
42 Can’t-miss : NO-LOSE
46 San Diego County racetrack : DEL MAR
47 Violent storms : TEMPESTS
49 Point after deuce : AD IN
50 See 17-, 25- and 38-Across : … IN STITCHES
52 He reveals the Wizard : TOTO
53 Bite like a puppy : NIP AT
54 Air filter acronym : HEPA
55 Several : A FEW
56 Full of hot air : GASSY
57 “Not so fast!” : EASY!

Down

1 Tomato __ : PASTE
2 Fantasize : DREAM
3 Raisin bran tidbit : FLAKE
4 Bath’s county : SOMERSET
5 Number one Hun : ATTILA
6 Convenience store : MART
7 Salmon, to bears : PREY
8 Ambulance destinations, briefly : ERS
9 “The Hunger Games” setting : DYSTOPIA
10 “Search me” : I DUNNO
11 Orangey fruit : PERSIMMON
12 Make easier to bear : ALLEVIATE
13 Studies in detail : DISSECTS
18 Rods for roasting : SPITS
22 Suffix with persist : -ENCE
24 Smokehouse process : CURING
26 On deck : NEXT UP
27 House Beautiful subject : DECOR
28 Got word about : LEARNED OF
29 Biblical descendant of Jacob : ISRAELITE
32 Employment statistics : JOBS DATA
33 Not leaving to chance : ENSURING
34 How café is often served : CON LECHE
36 “My Way” lyricist : ANKA
37 Appropriate : CO-OPT
39 Grumpy response to “Are you awake?” : I AM NOW!
40 Bad blood : ENMITY
43 Actor Milo : O’SHEA
44 Pedometer count : STEPS
45 Long exam answer : ESSAY
47 Baking amts. : TSPS
48 Greek vowels : ETAS
51 Long of “Third Watch” : NIA

11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 2 Jan 20, Thursday”

  1. 6:06, which is fast for me on a Thursday. I wound up in the bottom early, which got me the theme revealer which was in turn a huge help for the other long theme answers. I need to start doing that as a deliberate tactic. My biggest misstep was tomato PUREE, but fortunately that immediately led to nonsense on the crossings so I got it backed out in short order.

    Back to work today for me, as I’m sure many of the rest of us!

  2. 21:49 no errors….I don’t care for puzzles that you need to fill in one clue via crosses to know what to look for in other clues but it all got stitched together in the end….PUN INTENDED

  3. 7:26. Got the theme almost immediately and filled the theme answers right away. Never heard of the term HEPA, but I think I’ll pay attention to it from now on.

    Best –

  4. Finished with a couple mistakes, but the word CON~LECHE was totally unknown to me. it’s A tough but enjoyable puzzle.

    Eddie

  5. @Glen – thank you for yesterday’s comment about how puzzles are distributed in the week.

    That being said, I found this one to be easy. No errors, no Googles. The only one I never heard of was Cold Stone. I can’t expect the assigners to consider age or sex in the distribution.

  6. 13:33, no errors. Again, very slow, plodding solve, and the puzzle wasn’t *that* hard. Shaking off the holiday rust, I guess…

  7. We got all but the H in HEPA; didn’t know the French coffee server and that would
    have solved it. I don’t think NO LOSE is real, but that is all it could have been. For only
    like the second time in recent memory, I caught on to the theme and it helped a lot. I
    found it pretty tough, but fun to try to solve. I will take 99.5% (letter based) any time
    on any day. Had done some poor jobs the few days before. Holiday brain lock. Also got
    the Jumble and the Wonderword puzzles, even though I didn’t understand the mystery
    word in Wonderword. There are still a few things that I don’t understand. Feeling good
    about puzzles today. Kudos to all you speedsters; I remain in awe and that is no lie, just
    because my fingers are moving.

  8. Zipped through this relatively quickly for me on a Thursday; took me 23 minutes with no errors. Got jammed up in the SW when I put in JOBStats and trey instead of …DATA and ADIN, but got it straightened out fairly quickly. Figured out two of the theme clues before the reveal which then made the third one easy.

    I was thinking ales before CONE became obvious. Reasonable…Cold Stone…since I’ve never seen it around here. Absolutely love crunchy persimmons, but sadly they’re just about gone for the year. Interesting that they’re a berry.

  9. Hello gang!!🦆

    I found this super easy for a Thursday– no errors, and I got the theme answers without needing the reveal answer. Got enough crosses to figure them out. 😊 Guess I got lucky here. My only issue was that I misspelled ENMITY!! I really always thought it was “emnity!” I wonder where else I’ve misspelled that in the last 62 years….😮 and seeing it spelled correctly, it STILL doesn’t look right to me…!!!
    Oh well– the rest was a breeze.

    Be well ~~🍺

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.