LA Times Crossword 11 Sep 20, Friday

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Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Clever Tmehe

Themed answers are common two-word phrases. In the second (5-letter) word, the 2nd and 4th letters have been swapped around:

  • 16A Yuletide decorations at a beach cottage? : CHRISTMAS CORAL (from “Christmas carol”)
  • 29A What many skyscrapers in Houston and Dallas represent? : CORPORATE TEXAS (from “corporate taxes”)
  • 35A Opera group sponsored by a ’70s-’80s sitcom family? : JEFFERSON DIVAS (from “Jefferson Davis”)
  • 53A Denim’s golden age? : DAYS OF OUR LEVIS (from “Days of our Lives”)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 8m 21s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8 Oregon Trail sights : WAGONS

A conestoga is a large covered wagon that was used in many of the wagon trains that crossed North America in the late 1700s and early 1800s. The name was taken from the Conestoga Valley near Lancaster, Pennsylvania where the design was developed. The conestoga wagon resembled a boat on wheels, and often the gaps between the planks were caulked so that it would float when crossing water.

The Oregon Trail was established by fur trappers and traders as early as 1811. The first migrant wagon train traveled the route in 1836, starting off in Independence, Missouri and going as far as Fort Hall, Idaho. In the coming years, the trail was extended for wagons as far as the Willamette Valley in Oregon.

14 Part of a score : MEASURE

Musical scores are divided into “measures”, although on the other side of the Atlantic the term “bar” is used instead of “measure”.

16 Yuletide decorations at a beach cottage? : CHRISTMAS CORAL (from “Christmas carol”)

Yule celebrations coincide with Christmas, and the words “Christmas” and “Yule” (often “Yuletide”) have become synonymous in much of the world. However, Yule was originally a pagan festival celebrated by Germanic peoples. The name “Yule” comes from the Old Norse word “jol” that was used to describe the festival.

The word “carol” came into English via the Old French word “carole”, which was a “dance in a ring”. When “carol” made it into English, about 1300 AD, the term was used to describe a dance as well as a joyful song. Around 1500 AD, carols that were sung came to be associated with Christmas.

18 Michigan, e.g. : LAKE

Of the five Great Lakes, Lake Michigan is the only one that is located totally within the US. The others are shared by the US and Canada.

19 Some summer arrivals : LEOS

Leo is the fifth astrological sign of the Zodiac. People born from July 23 to August 22 are Leos.

26 Furniture chain that also sells lingonberry preserves : IKEA

Every IKEA store features a restaurant that serves traditional Swedish food, including Swedish meatballs and lingonberry jam. Each store also has a Swedish Food Market where customers can purchase specialty foods from Sweden.

27 Tolkien’s Legolas, for one : ELF

English actor Orlando Bloom’s breakthrough on the big screen came when he was chosen to play Legolas, a Sindarin Elf, in “The Lord of the Rings” series of films.

28 First name of the first woman to win a Nobel Prize : MARIE

Marie Curie lived a life of firsts. She was the first female professor at the University of Paris, the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and indeed was the first person to win two Nobel prizes (in Physics in 1903, and in Chemistry in 1911). Most of Curie’s work was in the field of radioactivity, and was carried out in the days when the impact of excessive radiation on the human body was not understood. She died from aplastic anemia, caused by high exposure to radiation. To this day, Curie’s personal papers are kept preserved in lead-lined boxes as they are highly radioactive, even her personal cookbook.

33 Righteous Babe Records founder DiFranco : ANI

Ani DiFranco is a folk-rock singer and songwriter. DiFranco has also been labeled a “feminist icon”, and in 2006 won the “Woman of Courage Award” from National Organization for Women.

Singer Ani DiFranco founded her record company Righteous Records in 1990 in order to gain independence from the established record industry. She had to change the name to Righteous Babe Records as there already was a Righteous Record label, one that published gospel music.

35 Opera group sponsored by a ’70s-’80s sitcom family? : JEFFERSON DIVAS (from “Jefferson Davis”)

The very popular sitcom called “The Jeffersons” ran from 1975 until it came to an abrupt end in 1985. CBS cancelled the show without even allowing a series finale that “wrapped things up”. In fact, lead actor Sherman Hemsley learned of the show’s cancellation in the newspaper.

The term “diva” comes to us from Latin via Italian. “Diva” is the feminine form of “divus” meaning “divine one”. The word is used in Italy to mean “goddess” or “fine lady”, and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861, just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation, and retained the post for the life of the government.

43 Drops off : WANES

The verbs “to wax” and “to wane” come from Old English. To wax is to increase gradually in size, strength, intensity or number. To wane is to decrease gradually.

44 U.K. part : ENG

The terms “United Kingdom”, “Great Britain” and “England” can sometimes be confused. The official use of “United Kingdom” originated in 1707 with the Acts of Union that declared the countries of England and Scotland as “United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain”. The name changed again with the Acts of Union 1800 that created the “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland” (much to the chagrin of most of the Irish population). This was partially reversed in 1927 when the current name was introduced, the “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland”, in recognition of an independent Irish Free State in the south of the island of Ireland.

45 Target ball in a pool game : NINE

Eight-ball and nine-ball are arguably the most popular variants of pool played in North America. In eight-ball, one player sinks the striped balls and the other the solid balls. The first to sink all his or her balls and then the black 8-ball, without fouling, wins the game. In nine-ball, each player must hit the lowest numbered ball on the table first with the cue ball. The first player to sink the 9-ball wins. Sinking the nine ball can happen when first hitting the lowest bowl on the table, or possibly when balls numbered 1-8 have been sunk.

46 “The Martian” novelist Weir : ANDY

“The Martian” is an intriguing 2015 science fiction film starring Matt Damon as an astronaut who is accidentally stranded on Mars. The movie is based on a 2011 novel of the same name by Andy Weir. One thing that I liked about the film is that the science cited is fairly realistic. In fact, NASA collaborated with the filmmakers extensively from script development to principal casting.

47 Young newts : EFTS

Newts wouldn’t be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

49 Momoa who plays Aquaman : JASON

Jason Momoa is a model and actor who is perhaps best known for playing superhero Aquaman in several DC Comics films. He also played warrior leader Khal Drogo in the HBO TV series “Game of Thrones”. In 2017, Momoa married actress Lisa Bonet, who played Denise Huxtable on “The Cosby Show”.

52 Mountain cat : PUMA

The mountain lion is found in much of the Americas from the Yukon in Canada right down to the southern Andes in South America. Because the mountain lion is found over such a vast area, it has many different names applied by local peoples, such as “cougar” and “puma”. In fact, the mountain lion holds the Guinness record for the animal with the most number of different names, with over 40 in English alone.

53 Denim’s golden age? : DAYS OF OUR LEVIS (from “Days of our Lives”)

Levi Strauss was the founder of the first company in the world to manufacture blue jeans. Levi Strauss & Co. opened in 1853 in San Francisco. Strauss and his business partner were awarded a patent in 1873 for the use of copper rivets to strengthen points of strain on working pants.

NBC’s “Days of Our Lives” is the second-longest running soap opera on US television, second only to “General Hospital”. “Days …” has been aired since November 1965.

58 Codeine, e.g. : OPIATE

The name of the class of drugs called “opioids” comes from the word “opium”, which describes the dried latex obtained from the opium poppy. Natural drugs derived from opium are known as “opiates”. The broader term “opioids” covers both natural and synthetic drugs that behave in the same way as opiates, i.e. those drugs that bind to opioid receptors in the brain.

60 Gets a gander at : ESPIES

To take a gander is to take a long look. “Gander” is a term we’ve been using in this sense since the 1880s, coming from the idea that in taking a long look one might be craning one’s neck like a goose (or gander).

Down

1 Film buff’s network : TMC

The Movie Channel is owned by Showtime, which in turn is a subsidiary of CBS. The channel’s name is often abbreviated to “TMC”, although this is informal usage.

A buff or nut is someone who is extremely enthusiastic and knowledgeable about a subject. For example, one might be a movie buff, or perhaps a baseball nut.

4 World atlas spread : ASIA MAP

The famous Flemish geographer Gerardus Mercator published his first collection of maps in 1578. Mercator’s collection contained a frontispiece with an image of Atlas the Titan from Greek mythology holding up the world on his shoulders. That image gave us our term “atlas” that is used for a book of maps.

5 Walrus features : TUSKS

Walruses are large marine mammals with very prominent tusks. Their natural habitat is in and around the northern hemisphere’s Arctic Ocean.

6 Art Deco icon : ERTE

“Erté” was the pseudonym of French (Russian-born) artist and designer Romain de Tirtoff. “Erté” is the French pronunciation of his initials “R.T.” Erté’s diverse portfolio of work included costumes and sets for the “Ziegfeld Follies” of 1923, productions of the Parisian cabaret show “Folies Bergère”, as well as the 1925 epic movie “Ben-Hur”. Erté’s most famous work by far is an image titled “Symphony in Black”. It depicts a tall and slender woman dressed in black, holding a black dog on a leash.

Art Deco is a style of design and architecture of the 1920s that actually had its roots in Belgium and then spread throughout Europe before arriving in North America. Celebrated examples of Art Deco architecture are the magnificent Chrysler Building in New York City completed in 1930, and the GE Building that sits in the middle of New York City’s Rockefeller Center with the address of “30 Rock”.

7 __ sleep : REM

“REM” is an acronym standing for “rapid eye movement”. REM sleep takes up 20-25% of the sleeping hours and is the period associated with one’s most vivid dreams.

9 Cravat cousin : ASCOT

An ascot is a horrible-looking (I think!), wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

The cravat originated in Croatia and was an accessory used with a military uniform. Cravats were introduced to the fashion-conscious French by Croatian mercenaries enlisted into a regiment of the French army. The English placed a lot of emphasis on the knot used for the cravat, and in the period after the Battle of Waterloo the cravat came to be known as a “tie”. What we now call a tie in English is still called a “cravate” in French.

10 Most 1990s Prizms : GEOS

Geos were small vehicles manufactured by General Motors mainly in the nineties. They were designed to compete head-to-head with the small imports that were gaining market share at the time in the US. Some Geo models that you might remember are the Metro, the Prizm and the Storm. The cars were actually built as joint-ventures with Japanese manufacturers. The Prizm was a GM/Toyota project, the Metro was GM/Suzuki, and the Storm was GM/Isuzu.

12 River between two Great Lakes : NIAGARA

The mighty Niagara River flows from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, and forms part of the border between the US and Canada. The river is only about 35 miles long, so some describe it as a “strait”. It has a drop in elevation of 325 feet along its length, with 165 feet of that drop taking place at Niagara Falls.

13 First U.S. city to host the Olympic Games : ST LOUIS

The 1904 Olympic Games were held on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis. That made 1904 the first year that the Olympics were held outside of Europe, and the first time they were held in a mainly English-speaking country. The whole event actually lasted four and half months, with events spread over that period in order to accompany the schedule of the World’s Fair that was held in St. Louis the same year.

The list of US-hosted Olympic Games is:

  • Los Angeles, California (Summer 1932 & 1984)
  • Squaw Valley, California (Winter 1960)
  • Atlanta, Georgia (Summer 1996)
  • Saint Louis, Missouri (Summer 1904)
  • Lake Placid, New York (Winter 1932 & 1980)
  • Salt Lake City, Utah (Winter 2002)

22 Idiosyncrasy : TIC

The prefix “idio-” indicates something peculiar, as in “idiosyncrasy”, a peculiarity exhibited by an individual or a group.

23 Classic studio letters : RKO

The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO initialism then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

27 Fish-eating bird : ERNE

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also known as the white-tailed eagle or the sea eagle.

30 Stumblebums : OAFS

A stumblebum is a clumsy and incompetent person. The term “stumblebum” particularly applies to a second-rate prizefighter.

31 Jackets named for a British school : ETONS

An Eton jacket is usually black in color, cut square at the hips and has wide lapels. It is named for the design of jacket worn by the younger students at Eton College just outside London.

35 Mystery woman : JANE DOE

Though the English court system does not use the term today, “John Doe” first appeared as the “name of a person unknown” in England in 1659, along with the similar “Richard Roe”. An unknown female is referred to as “Jane Doe ”, and the equivalent to Richard Roe is Jane Roe (as in Roe v. Wade, for example). Variants of “John Doe” used outside of the courts are “Joe Blow” and “John Q. Public”.

37 “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” co-creator : FEY

“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” is a Netflix-made sitcom that was created by Tina Fey and Robert Carlock (the latter worked with Fey on “30 Rock”). The title character, played by Ellie Kemper, is a young woman adjusting to life in New York City after she was rescued from an underground bunker in Indiana where she had been held for 15 years. I tried a few episodes and found that it didn’t really hold my attention. But, I may give it another go one day, as I hear good things …

40 In relation to : VIS-A-VIS

We can use the French phrase “vis-à-vis” as a preposition meaning “compared with”. When used as an adverb or adjective, it means “face-to-face”, which is a more literal translation from French.

42 Six-yr.-term pol : SEN

The six-year terms enjoyed by US senators are staggered, so that every two years about one third of the 100 US Senate seats come up for reelection.

43 “1917” subject : WAR

“1917” is a 2019 Sam Mendes movie about two British soldiers carrying a message across no man’s land in northern France during WWI. Although historically inaccurate, the storyline was inspired by accounts of the war given to Mendes by his paternal grandfather. One remarkable feature of the film is that it was shot using long takes that were carefully edited to give the impression that it was filmed as just two continuous shots. Remarkable …

48 High pipes : FIFES

A fife is a small flute that is often used in military and marching bands. The name “fife” comes from the German “Pfeife” meaning “pipe”.

49 Child played by Meryl : JULIA

“Julie & Julia” is a wonderful 2009 Nora Ephron film that juxtaposes the lives of celebrity chef Julia Childs and home cook/blogger Julie Powell. Childs is played by Meryl Streep, and Powell by Amy Adams. Ephron’s screenplay is based on two nonfiction books: Child’s autobiography “My Life in France”, and Powell’s memoir “Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously”. Highly recommended …

51 Actor Morales : ESAI

Actor Esai Morales is best known in the world of film for the 1987 movie “La Bamba”, which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai). On the small screen, Morales plays Lt. Tony Rodriguez on “NYPD Blue” and Joseph Adama on “Caprica”.

52 Anticipated dance : PROM

A prom is a formal dance held upon graduation from high school (we call them “formals” over in Ireland). The term “prom” is short for “promenade”, the name given to a type of dance or ball.

55 A, in Oaxaca : UNA

Oaxaca (officially “Oaxaca de Juárez”) is the capital city of the Mexican state of Oaxaca, which is located in the south of the country.

56 Tahiti, to Gauguin : ILE

In French, one might go to an “île” (island) in the middle of “l’océan” (the ocean).

Tahiti is the most populous island in French Polynesia, which is located in the central Southern Pacific. Although Captain Cook landed in Tahiti in 1769, he wasn’t the first European to do so. However, Cook’s visit was the most significant in that it heralded a whole spate of European visitors, who brought with them prostitution, venereal disease and alcohol. Included among the subsequent visitors was the famous HMS Bounty under the charge of Captain Bligh.

Paul Gauguin was a French artist in the Post-Impressionist period. Gauguin was a great friend of Vincent van Gogh, and indeed was staying with him in Arles when van Gogh famously cut off his own ear. Equally famously, Gauguin “fled” to Tahiti in 1891 to escape the conventions of European life. He painted some of his most famous works on the island. After ten years living on Tahiti, Gauguin relocated to the Marquesas Islands, where he passed away in 1903.

57 Qantas hub, in itineraries : SYD

Australia’s Sydney Airport (SYD) is located just five miles south of the city center, and next to Botany Bay. There have been plans dating back to the 1940s to build a second airport on the outskirts of the city.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Staging area : THEATER
8 Oregon Trail sights : WAGONS
14 Part of a score : MEASURE
15 “No need to point” : I SEE IT
16 Yuletide decorations at a beach cottage? : CHRISTMAS CORAL (from “Christmas carol”)
18 Michigan, e.g. : LAKE
19 Some summer arrivals : LEOS
20 Bit of baby talk : GOO
22 Quick cuts : TRIMS
24 Snowball fight defense : FORT
25 Sing the praises of : LAUD
26 Furniture chain that also sells lingonberry preserves : IKEA
27 Tolkien’s Legolas, for one : ELF
28 First name of the first woman to win a Nobel Prize : MARIE
29 What many skyscrapers in Houston and Dallas represent? : CORPORATE TEXAS (from “corporate taxes”)
33 Righteous Babe Records founder DiFranco : ANI
34 Darken in summer : TAN
35 Opera group sponsored by a ’70s-’80s sitcom family? : JEFFERSON DIVAS (from “Jefferson Davis”)
43 Drops off : WANES
44 U.K. part : ENG
45 Target ball in a pool game : NINE
46 “The Martian” novelist Weir : ANDY
47 Young newts : EFTS
49 Momoa who plays Aquaman : JASON
50 DVR button : REC
51 Give off : EMIT
52 Mountain cat : PUMA
53 Denim’s golden age? : DAYS OF OUR LEVIS (from “Days of our Lives”)
58 Codeine, e.g. : OPIATE
59 How a leaf blower operates : NOISILY
60 Gets a gander at : ESPIES
61 Put together : AMASSED

Down

1 Film buff’s network : TMC
2 “That’s sorta funny” : HEH
3 Like a flashback time : EARLIER
4 World atlas spread : ASIA MAP
5 Walrus features : TUSKS
6 Art Deco icon : ERTE
7 __ sleep : REM
8 More prudent : WISER
9 Cravat cousin : ASCOT
10 Most 1990s Prizms : GEOS
11 Above, to a bard : O’ER
12 River between two Great Lakes : NIAGARA
13 First U.S. city to host the Olympic Games : ST LOUIS
17 Flying : ALOFT
21 Lines from an admirer : ODE
22 Idiosyncrasy : TIC
23 Classic studio letters : RKO
24 Distinctive style : FLAIR
25 Remiss : LAX
27 Fish-eating bird : ERNE
28 Fix : MEND
30 Stumblebums : OAFS
31 Jackets named for a British school : ETONS
32 Distinctive flavor : TANG
35 Mystery woman : JANE DOE
36 Market aisle border areas : END CAPS
37 “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” co-creator : FEY
38 Row : SET-TO
39 Completely disorganized : IN A MESS
40 In relation to : VIS-A-VIS
41 “Is that __?” : A NO
42 Six-yr.-term pol : SEN
43 “1917” subject : WAR
47 Overact : EMOTE
48 High pipes : FIFES
49 Child played by Meryl : JULIA
51 Actor Morales : ESAI
52 Anticipated dance : PROM
54 Shrill bark : YIP
55 A, in Oaxaca : UNA
56 Tahiti, to Gauguin : ILE
57 Qantas hub, in itineraries : SYD

22 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 11 Sep 20, Friday”

  1. 14:35, 2 errors because I don’t know how to spell noisily
    Bill – typo in the explanation for 45A: “…lowest *bowl* on the table…”

    1. @Mary …

      I think that many people would remember either Tina Fey or Andy Weir, which, in my view, says it’s not a Natick. It’s what I would call a “personal Natick” (except that I do remember Tina Fey). Others may (and probably will 😜) differ.

  2. Another good puzzle with a clever theme. Took me three-quarters of the puzzle to figure out the theme but it helped me get Days of Our Levis.

  3. Got stuck right of the bat. Did well on the rest of the puzzle. Could not get away from TCM for 1 down. Turner Classic Movies. That made that corner difficult for me. Clever theme, especially liked corporate Texas.
    Bob in Erie

  4. Well, it’s Friday, and if I didn’t have to Google yesterday, I surely do on Friday. Did thus, for JASON, JULIA SYD,
    END CAPS (someone please explain?)

    Did not actually know: ELF, FEY.
    Had “you” before All before A NO. Had REw before REC. Had “lynx” before PUMA

    1. The short shelves on the ends of grocery store aisles are called end caps.

      Today’s puzzle was a lot of fun, thanks Jeffrey Wechsler.

  5. No errors., got stuck on TCM then remembered maybe it’s TMC… Then got stuck on 43D.. Its WWI right? Then at same time got stuck on 41D.. Its ALL right? Then when things weren’t working and I put on game face, I filled in the crosses and voila , it’s WAR and A NO!! Ha!

  6. @Anonymuss
    Responding to what you said yesterday, it’s a term you pick up when you hang around more construction-oriented groups among others (Rex Parker’s blog being a good example of many others). Basically when someone says a theme is “forced” or a theme element is “forced”, it means like what I said. I kinda stopped offering more general construction-oriented observations here since it was made clear it was unwelcome.

    But I’ll describe a couple of things from yesterday if it might help understanding. Yesterday’s LAT is “forced” mainly because the revealer clue really doesn’t draw the line that well to what’s happening in the grid (as commenters have said in other places, using the word “Shakespeare” would have helped it tremendously) and probably would draw a -* demerit from me if I were to critically review it.

    Yesterday’s WSJ is similarly forced, but a lot worse. “Significant others” really doesn’t communicate anything regarding the theme to me (even in hindsight), and the fact that I didn’t understand or see what was going on initially was a huge strike against it. I saw the intention from someone else’s writeup that “AL” was to be added to some of the other fill for the theme to work, but even knowing that I still don’t understand how I’m supposed to get there from “et. al”.

    Both are really good examples of poor communication within puzzles (as I’ve spoken about before), and notably not all puzzles exhibit these things.

  7. @Glenn …

    The phrase “et al.” is an abbreviation of “et alii” (or “et alia”), which is Latin for “and others”. So “et” is Latin for “and” and the clue for 17-Across (“9-Across et al.”) can be playfully interpreted as “the answer for 9-Across and al”, yielding “FORMAL” and the associated answer turns out to be “SENIOR PROM”.

    As I said yesterday, your definition of “forced” isn’t wrong, but it entails some highly subjective opinions, with which I may well disagree.

    And, as for yesterday’s LAT, the revealer pointed out the exact rows in which to look for “intermissions”. Adding a reference to Shakespeare would indeed have communicated more information about the theme and it would have been helpful, but I would also characterize it as a bit insulting, given that the names of the plays in question are so well known. (And yes, I will agree my opinion is also subjective … 😜.)

    (Of course, it was also said that yesterday’s theme was “STUPID”, which I would say is even more clearly subjective … 😜.)

    1. @Glenn …

      You said:

      “… the fact that I didn’t understand or see what was going on initially was a huge strike against it [the puzzle].”

      As the kids say these days: Srsly, dude?!?!

      I think this comment is hugely revealing of the difference between your expectations of a puzzle and mine.

  8. Hah before heh. AMC before TMC. Those got the NW corner looking a bit like a tanker carrying ink ran aground on the shoals of my puzzle. But after that mess got cleaned up the remainder of the puzzle came together without any excessive angst.

    The WSJ grid wasn’t too bad today. I definitely thought Wednesday and Thursday were more difficult.

    1. Today’s WSJ was definitely easier than Wednesday’s or Thursday’s. The metapuzzle was a different matter: It took me more than an hour to work through it (though I did get it, which doesn’t always happen, so I can’t complain … 🤪).

  9. No errors today but only after redoing several earlier mistakes.

    As AMC no longer really shows classic movies any more, it should no longer be considered for an answer to ‘Film buff’s network’ clues, leaving Turner Classic Movies & The Movie Channel as my ‘M’ & ‘C’ gotos.

    I would’ve really have loved it if the clue for 49D was ‘Child played by Meryl and Dan. (Akroyd) Watching Akroyd’s SNL skit as it aired live, I was amazed (and somewhat horrified) that they got that sketch past the censors.

  10. Nice fun Friday for me; took me 19:15 on-line with one error. I did a “check-grid” on the finished puzzle and had ENDwAP/REw. Never heard of an END CAP, but apparently it is a thing. Figured out the theme fairly early and it helped get the other three.

    Apparently JASON Momoa was recently seen cruising around the Bay Area on his Harley, according to an article I’d recently read. Hopefully he missed the Orange Hellscape before heading home.

    @Anon Mike – re “1917,” I wasn’t sure as well, but the notation indicated a novel or movie and, even though I didn’t see it, it was a movie about WWI.

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