LA Times Crossword 12 Jan 23, Thursday

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Constructed by: Amie Walker
Edited by: Patti Varol

Today’s Reveal Answer: Right on Red

The grid includes six 4-letter words (in circled letters). For each, we start at the top left, then turn RIGHT and RIGHT again to spell out a shade of RED:

  • 59A Legal turn at some intersections, and a turn in each set of circles in this puzzle : RIGHT ON RED

Those shades of RED are:

  • WINE
  • LAVA
  • RUBY
  • RUST
  • BEET
  • ROSE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 6m 59s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Easily vandalized site : WIKI

A wiki is a website on which users are allowed to create and edit content themselves. The term “wiki” comes from the name of the first such site, introduced in 1994 and called WikiWikiWeb. “Wiki” is a Hawaiian word for “quick”, and is used because comprehensive content is created very quickly, as there are so many collaborators contributing to the site.

14 City on the Chisholm Trail : ENID

The Chisholm Trail was used in the late 1800s by ranchers driving their cattle from Texas to the stockyards and railroad termini in Kansas. The trail was named for Jesse Chisholm, who operated trading posts along much of the route.

15 Grayish brown : TAUPE

Taupe is a dark, gray-brown color. The word “taupe” comes from the Latin name of the European Mole, which has skin with the same color.

16 Norwegian royal name : OLAV

Of the many kings of Norway named Olaf/Olav (and there have been five), Olaf II is perhaps the most celebrated, as he was canonized and made the patron saint of the country. Olaf II was king from 1015 to 1028 and was known as “Olaf the Big” (or “Olaf the Fat”) during his reign. Today he is more commonly referred to as “Olaf the Holy”. After Olaf died he was given the title of “Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae”, which is Latin for “Norway’s Eternal King”.

19 Brick that’s painful to step on : LEGO

Lego produces some wonderful specialized sets with which you can build models of celebrated structures, including:

  • The Statue of Liberty (2,882 pieces)
  • The Sydney Opera House (2,989 pieces)
  • The Eiffel Tower (3,428 pieces)
  • Tower Bridge (4,295 pieces)
  • The Taj Mahal (5,922 pieces)

23 Silky fabric : RAYON

Rayon is a little unusual in the textile industry in that it is not truly a synthetic fiber, but nor can it be called a natural fiber. Rayon is produced from naturally occurring cellulose that is dissolved and then reformed into fibers.

28 Chicago’s Northalsted and Manhattan’s Chelsea, for two : GAYBORHOODS

A gay village (also “gayborhood”) is a part of a city that is home to and frequented by a large number of LGBT people. Famous gay villages around the world are Soho in London, Chelsea in New York City, the Castro in San Francisco and Boystown in Chicago.

34 Feudal worker : SERF

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

36 “__ Haw” : HEE

The variety show “Hee Haw” aired on CBS from 1969-1971, and then had a 20-year run in syndication. The show was built around country music, although the format was inspired by “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh In”.

37 Host : EMCEE

The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism used for a Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

38 Whodunit heroes : SLEUTHS

The word “sleuth” came into English from Old Norse as far back as 1200 when it meant the “track or trail of a person”. In the mid-1800s, a sleuthhound described a keen investigator, a hound close on the trail of the suspect. Sleuthhound was shortened to “sleuth” and was used for a detective in general.

44 Mario __ : KART

“Mario Kart” is a go-kart racing video game series from Nintendo.

45 Leaves Thanksgiving dinner before pumpkin pie, maybe : EATS AND RUNS

The tradition of the US President “pardoning” a Thanksgiving turkey was only formalized in 1989, during the administration of President George H.W. Bush. The pardoned turkey is taken to a farm where it gets to live out its life. Prior to 1989, the tradition was more focused on the presentation of a turkey to the White House, and less on the fate of the bird. President Eisenhower was presented with a turkey in each year of his two terms, and he ate them both …

49 Once called : NEE

“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”. The term “née” is mainly used in English when referring to a married woman’s birth name, assuming that she has adopted her husband’s name, e.g. Michelle Obama née Robinson, Melania Trump née Knavs, and Jill Biden née Jacobs.

51 Bozo, in Canada : HOSER

The derogatory word “hoser”, meaning “foolish or uncultivated person”, is apparently attributed to Canadians. That said, I just read that the term is in fact rarely used north of the border.

57 Salmorejo, for one : SOUP

Salmorejo (sometimes “ardoria/ardorio”) is a soup from Andalusia in southern Spain that is served cold. The primary ingredients are tomato, bread, olive oil and garlic.

59 Legal turn at some intersections, and a turn in each set of circles in this puzzle : RIGHT ON RED

If you’re sitting behind a car that doesn’t make a right on red, it may just be a rental car driven by someone from Europe. Speaking as someone who learned to drive over there, I must admit I held up a few people at red lights when I first visited this country. That’s because in Europe we aren’t allowed to make any move past a red light, unless there is an accompanying green arrow. So, if you’re driving overseas, take care …

66 “O mio babbino __”: Puccini aria : CARO

“O mio babbino caro” is a really beautiful aria from Giacomo Puccini’s opera “Gianni Schicchi”.

67 Golfer’s pocketful : TEES

A tee is a small device on which, say, a golf ball is placed before striking it. The term “tee” comes from the Scottish “teaz”, which described little heaps of sand used to elevate a golf ball for the purpose of getting a clean hit with a club.

68 __ Nast : CONDE

Condé Nast is a mass media corporation that has a very large portfolio of publications, including “Vogue”, “GQ”, “House and Garden”, “Golf Digest”, “Wired”, “Vanity Fair” and “The New Yorker”.

69 “Their __ Were Watching God” : EYES

1937’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” is the best-known work penned by American author Zora Neale Hurston. The novel gained popularity in the late 1900s after a mediocre reception when first published. It is now associated with the Harlem Renaissance, and in 2005 was named as one of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Down

2 Cookbook writer Garten : INA

Ina Garten is an author as well as the host of a cooking show on the Food Network called “Barefoot Contessa”. She is a mentee of Martha Stewart, and indeed was touted as a potential “successor” to the TV celebrity when Stewart was incarcerated in 2004 after an insider trading scandal. Garten has no formal training as a chef, and indeed used to work as a nuclear policy analyst at the White House!

3 Persian snack? : KITTY TREAT

The Persian is that long-haired cat with a squashed muzzle. The breed takes its name from its place of origin, namely Persia (Iran).

4 State with a panhandle : IDAHO

The US state of Idaho has a panhandle that extends northwards between Washington and Montana, right up to the border with Canada. Across that border is the Canadian province of British Columbia. Most of Idaho is in the Mountain Time Zone, but Northern Idaho (the Panhandle) is in the Pacific Time Zone.

7 Connecticut WNBA team : SUN

The WNBA’s Connecticut Sun joined the league as an expansion team in 1999 as the Orlando Miracle. The Miracle moved to Uncasville, Connecticut in 2003, changing their name to the Sun. For several years, the Sun were the only WNBA franchise that didn’t share the local market with an NBA team. That distinction ended when the NBA’s Supersonics relocated, leaving the WNBA’s Storm as the only professional team based in Seattle.

8 Historic Harlem theater : APOLLO

The Apollo Theater in the Harlem district of Manhattan, New York opened in 1914 as Hurtig and Seamon’s New Burlesque Theater. The original facility was a whites-only venue. When it was opened to African Americans in 1934, the name was changed to “The Apollo”.

10 Hindu festival of colors : HOLI

Holi is a Hindu festival, one celebrated in spring, that is also known as the Festival of Colours.

11 Estadio cries : OLES

In Spain, one might hear a shout of “Olé!” in “un estadio” (a stadium).

12 Italian body of water : LAGO

In Italian, a “lago” (lake) is full of “acqua” (water).

13 HarperCollins romance imprint : AVON

Avon was a noted publisher of comic books and paperbacks. The company was founded in 1941 and focused on lowbrow literature designed for popular appeal, especially romance novels.

18 Viper tooth : FANG

The Viperidae are a family of venomous snakes commonly referred to as vipers.

24 Bedelia of kid-lit : AMELIA

The “Amelia Bedelia” series of children’s books was written by Peggy Parish until she passed away in 1988. Her nephew, Herman Parish took over and has been writing them since 1995. The Amelia character is based on a maid in Cameroon where Parish had lived during her formative years.

26 Purple yam : UBE

Ube is a species of yam that is purple in color. I’m a big fan of ube ice cream. Potato-flavored ice cream; what’s not to like?!

30 Trans-Siberian Railway city : OMSK

Omsk is a city in southwest Siberia. It is located over 1400 miles from Moscow and was chosen as the destination for many internal exiles in the mid-1900s. Perhaps the most famous of these exiles was the author Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

The Trans-Siberian Railway (TSR) connects Moscow to the Russian Far East. At almost 6,000 miles in length, it is the longest railway line in the world. Although it is still being expanded today, the bulk of the track was laid between 1891 and 1916 at the behest of Tsars Alexander III and Nicholas II. Branches of the TSR connect Russia to Mongolia, China and North Korea.

31 Juice brand with a wave in its logo : OCEAN SPRAY

The Ocean Spray brand is owned by a cooperative of growers in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, growers of cranberries and grapefruit.

33 Volleyball position : SETTER

In volleyball, each team can only touch the ball a maximum of three times before it returns to the other side of the net. The three contacts are often a “bump” (a preliminary pass) and a “set” (setting up the attacking shot) followed by a “spike” (a shot into the opposing court).

35 Faux __ : FURS

Faux fur is fake fur, with “faux” being the French word for false, fake.

39 Old autocrats : TSARS

The term “czar” (also “tsar”) is a Slavic word that was first used as a title by Simeon I of Bulgaria in 913 AD. “Czar” is derived from the word “caesar”, which was synonymous with “emperor” at that time. We tend to use the “czar” spelling, as opposed to “tsar”, when we describe a person today with great power or authority, e.g. “Drug Czar”.

43 “The A-Team” actor : MR T

“The A-Team” is an action television series that originally ran in the eighties. The A-Team was a group of ex-US special forces personnel who became mercenaries. Star of the show was Hollywood actor George Peppard (as “Hannibal” Smith), ably assisted by Mr. T (as “B.A.” Baracus) and Robert Vaughn (as Hunt Stockwell).

46 __ acid : NITRIC

Nitric acid has the formula HNO3. It is highly corrosive, and is also known by the Latin name “aqua fortis” meaning “strong water”.

47 Peanut butter-flavored Girl Scout cookie : DO-SI-DO

Depending on which bakery makes the particular variety of Girl Scout cookies, the name can vary. For example, Little Brownie Bakers makes Samoa cookies, while ABC Bakers uses the same recipe and calls the cookies Caramel deLites. The assumption is that these cookies have the exotic name “Samoa” because they contain the tropical ingredients of coconut and cocoa. The most popular variety of Girl Scout cookies sold are Thin Mints.

52 Cup fraction : OUNCE

There are six teaspoons (tsps.) in an ounce (oz.), and eight ounces (oz.) in a cup.

54 Drink similar to a Slurpee : ICEE

A slushie is a flavored frozen drink. The brand names Slurpee and ICEE are examples of the genre.

56 Codas : ENDS

In music, a coda is primarily a passage that brings a movement to a conclusion. “Coda” is Italian for “tail”.

57 Eyelid issue : STYE

A stye is a bacterial infection of the sebaceous glands at the base of the eyelashes, and is also known as a hordeolum.

60 “People Puzzler” channel : GSN

Game Show Network (GSN)

“People Puzzler” is a game show hosted by actress Leah Remini that is based on the crosswords published in “People” magazine. Those would be celebrity and pop-culture themed crosswords, a personal weakness of mine …

62 Sonnet preposition : ERE

A sonnet is a 14-line poem with a specific structure and rhyming scheme. A popular rhyming scheme for what is known as the Italian sonnet is ABBA, ABBA, CDECDE. Compare this with the Shakespearean sonnet which rhymes as ABAB, CDCD, EFEF, GG.

63 Novelist John __ Passos : DOS

John Dos Passos was an American novelist and artist who perhaps best known for his “USA” trilogy of novels:

  1. The 42nd Parallel (1930)
  2. 1919 (1932)
  3. The Big Money (1936)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Easily vandalized site : WIKI
5 “Such a bummer” : SO SAD
10 Spanish greeting : HOLA
14 City on the Chisholm Trail : ENID
15 Grayish brown : TAUPE
16 Norwegian royal name : OLAV
17 “Catch you on the flip side!” : TATA FOR NOW!
19 Brick that’s painful to step on : LEGO
20 Defrost : THAW
21 Go-between : LIAISON
23 Silky fabric : RAYON
25 Wears the crown : RULES
27 Qty. : AMT
28 Chicago’s Northalsted and Manhattan’s Chelsea, for two : GAYBORHOODS
34 Feudal worker : SERF
36 “__ Haw” : HEE
37 Host : EMCEE
38 Whodunit heroes : SLEUTHS
40 Examine in detail : DISSECT
42 Inventive types? : LIARS
43 Fellows : MEN
44 Mario __ : KART
45 Leaves Thanksgiving dinner before pumpkin pie, maybe : EATS AND RUNS
49 Once called : NEE
50 Hilarious folks : RIOTS
51 Bozo, in Canada : HOSER
53 Compendiums : DIGESTS
57 Salmorejo, for one : SOUP
58 Social sci. major : ECON
59 Legal turn at some intersections, and a turn in each set of circles in this puzzle : RIGHT ON RED
64 Give a little : BEND
65 Start of a take : I’D SAY …
66 “O mio babbino __”: Puccini aria : CARO
67 Golfer’s pocketful : TEES
68 __ Nast : CONDE
69 “Their __ Were Watching God” : EYES

Down

1 Like fresh nail polish : WET
2 Cookbook writer Garten : INA
3 Persian snack? : KITTY TREAT
4 State with a panhandle : IDAHO
5 Stash away : STOW
6 Crew need : OAR
7 Connecticut WNBA team : SUN
8 Historic Harlem theater : APOLLO
9 Like grass in the morning, compared to other times of day : DEWIER
10 Hindu festival of colors : HOLI
11 Estadio cries : OLES
12 Italian body of water : LAGO
13 HarperCollins romance imprint : AVON
18 Viper tooth : FANG
22 Clambake leftovers : ASHES
23 Fight, colloquially : RASSLE
24 Bedelia of kid-lit : AMELIA
25 Some loaves : RYES
26 Purple yam : UBE
29 Spa sigh : AHH
30 Trans-Siberian Railway city : OMSK
31 Juice brand with a wave in its logo : OCEAN SPRAY
32 Official order : DECREE
33 Volleyball position : SETTER
35 Faux __ : FURS
39 Old autocrats : TSARS
40 Roman god : DEUS
41 Travel stop : INN
43 “The A-Team” actor : MR T
46 __ acid : NITRIC
47 Peanut butter-flavored Girl Scout cookie : DO-SI-DO
48 “Beat it!” : SHOO!
52 Cup fraction : OUNCE
53 Financial liability : DEBT
54 Drink similar to a Slurpee : ICEE
55 Vanished : GONE
56 Codas : ENDS
57 Eyelid issue : STYE
60 “People Puzzler” channel : GSN
61 “You __ one job!” : HAD
62 Sonnet preposition : ERE
63 Novelist John __ Passos : DOS

16 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 12 Jan 23, Thursday”

  1. No errors

    UBE ice cream? Never heard of the yam or the ice cream. Potato flavored to boot Bill?
    Yuck… ok, now I have to find some and check it out.

  2. No errors but had to look up the purple yam and the puzzle
    channel. Never heard of either term. But I guess that means
    I’ve learned something today.

  3. Ube is a wildly popular flavor (and color enhancer) in the Philippines. Check out the dessert Halo Halo online.

  4. Pretty tough for a Thursday, but I did it with no errors or look ups. Lotsa unknowns here but the crosses and getting the theme relatively early helped. Thanks for a good one (except, of course, for all the PPP’s–but what’s new?).

  5. I have now seen UBE several times in puzzles and each time (save the first) I have remembered … having seen it. So I posting this in hopes that typing UBE after UBE after UBE will finally fix the word in my aging brain cells.

    True story: A week or so ago, I woke up one morning with the name of a chemical compound floating in and out of focus. It took me half an hour to remember the whole thing: “Adenosine triphosphate”. And then I had to look it up to find out what it is. I have no idea how long it has been since I last encountered it in print, but I would think it has to have been years. So why am I having trouble remembering UBE?

    A troubling aspect of this is that adenosine triphosphate is a very important substance in the human body. Was my early-morning event the result of a dying brain cell’s last act? (The equivalent of someone dying of thirst and whispering, “Water, water?”) … 🤪😜😳.

    I must sample something flavored with UBE. UBE, UBE, UBE …

  6. 13:17 – no errors, lookups, or false starts.

    New: GAYBORHOOD, “Salmorejo,” “O mio babbino caro,” John DOS Passos.

    Pretty good theme, esp. that there are six occurrences of it.

    Haven’t ever had ube that I know of. Maybe I’ll one day know what the fuss is about.

  7. A bit tricky for a Thursday; took 19:41 with 1 dumb error. Didn’t read the 9D clue quite correctly and had DEWIEd, which made the cross GAYBOdHOODS (which is at least plausible). Outside of those, I remembered UBE – sorta – from a few days ago. Had to gently feel my way through DOSIDO, LIAISON (spelling), AMELIA, DEUS and change cITRIC.

    RIP Jeff Beck, a favorite

  8. 13D got me. I knew the correct answer for 16A was OLAF and not OLAV but I forgot to go back and double check the color. Dumb.

    1. That stumped me, too. I suppose the author meant “typical beginning of a reply to a question like: what is your take (opinion) on this problem”.

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