LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Apr 15, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tracy Bennett
THEME: French Twists … each of today’s themed answers sounds like a common word or phrase, but the TWIST is that part of that phrase has been replaced with a FRENCH word:

27A. Testy lover? CROSS BEAU (sounds like “crossbow”)
29A. Musical work expressing resentment? BITTER SUITE (sounds like “bittersweet”)
39A. Napped fabric, without a doubt? EASILY SUEDE (sounds like “easily swayed”)
52A. Bridezilla’s fabric of choice? POWER TULLE (sounds like “power tool”)
72A. Measly computer storage? PETTY CACHE (sounds like “petty cash”)
85A. Surviving spouse’s irritation? WIDOW’S PIQUE (sounds like “widow’s peak”)
96A. The latest in foal fashions? ARABIAN CHIC (sounds like “Arabian sheik”)
98A. Beauty needing a lift? BLUE BELLE (sounds like “bluebell”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

20. Transportation network app UBER
Uber is a ridesharing service that was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. The service is somewhat controversial and has been described as an illegal taxicab operation. Central to Uber’s service is the company’s mobile app, which can use the client’s GPS location to help find the nearest available ride. Personally, I love the service and only have had good experiences …

21. So long, in Avignon ADIEU
Avignon is a city in the southeast of France. Avignon is sometimes called the “City of Popes” as it was home to seven popes during the Catholic schism from 1309 to 1423.

22. He had a way with words ROGET
Peter Mark Roget was an English lexicographer. Roget was an avid maker of lists, apparently using the routine of list-making to combat depression, a condition he endured for most of his life. He published his famous thesaurus in 1852, with revisions and expansions being made years later by his son, and then in turn by his grandson.

23. Hops drier OAST
An oast is a kiln used for drying hops as part of the brewing process. Such a structure might also be called an “oast house”.

24. ’30s Lorre role MOTO
The mysterious Mr. Moto is a Japanese secret agent who appears in six novels by American author, John P. Marquand. Mr. Moto was famously played by Peter Lorre in a series of eight films released in the 1930s.

The marvelous actor Peter Lorre was born in what is now modern-day Slovakia. Lorre’s real name was Laszlo Lowenstein. He started acting in Vienna when he was quite young, only 17 years old. When Hitler came to power, the Jewish Lowenstein headed to Paris and then London, eventually ending up in Hollywood. Lorre found himself typecast as the wicked foreigner in American movies, but I think he sneered and snarled his way to the bank.

25. 1959 Broadway family name TRAPP
Baron Georg Johannes von Trapp was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian Navy who achieved worldwide fame when his family became the inspiration for the musical “The Sound of Music”.

26. Multicolored marble AGATE
A playing marble made from agate is called just that, an agate. Steelies on the other hand, are made from solid steel.

32. Ikea offering SOFA
“Sofa” is a Turkish word meaning “bench”.

34. Key of Mozart’s 40th symphony G MINOR
Mozart’s “Symphony No. 40 in G minor” is often referred to as his “Great G minor symphony”. It is indeed “great”, and is one of Mozart’s best known works. His “Symphony No. 25 in G minor” is less-well known, and is referred to as Mozart’s “Little G minor symphony”.

36. ‘Mongst kin? TWIXT
The phrase “twixt kith and kin” is a quaint way of saying “between friends and family”.

38. Cops on base MPS
The Military Police (MPs) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

“To cop” was northern British dialect for “to seize, catch”. This verb evolved in the noun “copper”, describing a policeman, someone who catches criminals. “Copper” is often shortened to “cop”.

39. Napped fabric, without a doubt? EASILY SUEDE (sounds like “easily swayed”)
Suede is leather made from the underside of the skin, mainly from a lamb. As such it is very soft, although not as durable as leather made from the exterior skin. The soft leather was, and is still used for making gloves. Back in 1859 these gloves were called “gants de Suede” in France, or “gloves of Sweden”. So, the name “suede” comes from the French word for Sweden.

41. Camaro __-Z IROC
The IROC-Z is a model of Camaro, introduced in 1978. The IROC-Z takes its name from a famous stock car race, the International Race of Champions.

43. Southwestern hill LOMA
“Loma” is a Spanish word for “hill”.

47. Quaker abolitionist Lucretia MOTT
Lucretia Coffin Mott (what a name!) was an American Quaker, and an advocate for women’s rights. Mott has been called the first American “feminist”. Her first job was teaching in the Quaker school in which she was educated. There she learned that her salary was to be one third of that paid to the males with the same job (she married one of the male teachers!). That injustice initiated her interest in women’s rights.

52. Bridezilla’s fabric of choice? POWER TULLE (sounds like “power tool”)
Tulle is a lightweight net fabric often used in veils, wedding gowns and ballet tutus.

A bridezilla is a difficult and demanding bride, with the term first used in 1995 in “The Boston Globe”.

54. Like Catwoman, e.g. MASKED
Catwoman is a supervillain who is usually depicted as an adversary of Batman in comics. In the sixties television show “Batman”, Catwoman was first portrayed by actress Julie Newmar, but then the more memorable Eartha Kitt took over, with the marvelously “feline voice”. On the big screen, Catwoman has been played by Lee Meriwether in “Batman” (1966), by Michelle Pfeiffer in “Batman Returns” (1992), by Halle Berry in “Catwoman” (2004) and by Anne Hathaway in “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012).

58. Less fusty NEWER
Our word “fusty” means “musty, stale-smelling”. The term comes into English from French via the word “fusté” meaning “tasting of the cask”, which in turn comes from the Old French “fuist”, the word for a wine cask.

60. City once sought by Sir Walter Raleigh EL DORADO
The original El Dorado was a Muisca chief who was covered with gold dust in a tribal ritual and then dove into Lake Guatavita in present-day Colombia. Later, “El Dorado” was adopted as the name for a mythical “Lost City of Gold” that became a quest from many Spanish Conquistadors who explored the Americas.

Sir Walter Raleigh was an adventurer in the court of Queen Elizabeth I of England. He is famous for popularizing tobacco smoking Europe, and is remembered in the US by the state capitol of North Carolina, which is named after him. Raleigh is not very popular in my homeland of Ireland as he spent many years there after crushing a rebellion and being awarded thousands of acres by the crown. It was in Ireland that he was famously doused by a servant who saw smoke emanating from Raleigh as he enjoyed a pipe of tobacco.

64. Stimulating nut BETEL
The betel nut is something that is chewed, especially in parts of Asia. “Betel nut” is a bit of misnomer, as the nut in question is actually an Areca nut from the Areca palm. For chewing, the Areca nut is wrapped in betel leaves and the whole thing is called a “betel nut”.

69. Worrywart, at times PACER
The term “worrywart”, meaning one who dwells unnecessarily on troubles, comes from a cartoon strip. Worry Wart was a character introduced in 1956 in the strip “Out Our Way” that was drawn by American cartoonist J.R. Williams. The cartoon Worry Wart caused others to do the worrying, which is the opposite of the meaning we give the term today.

71. One-named Tejano singer SELENA
Singer Selena Quintanilla-Perez, known professionally simply as “Selena”, was murdered in 1995 by the president of her own fan club at the height of her career. In a 1997 biopic about Selena’s life, Jennifer Lopez played the title role.

Tejano is the Spanish word for “Texan”. Tejano music is strongly influenced by Cajun culture, because of the proximity of Texas to Louisiana. The other strong influence came with immigrants from the Poland and what is now the Czech Republic. These immigrants brought with them the waltz, polka … and the accordion.

72. Measly computer storage? PETTY CACHE (sounds like “petty cash”)
The word “petty”, meaning “small-minded”, comes from the French word for small, “petit”. When “petty” first came into English it wasn’t used disparagingly, and was used more literally giving us terms like “petty officer” and “petty cash”.

77. Latin 84-Across builder AVIS
“Avis” is the Latin word for a bird.

79. Brylcreem applications DABS
The original Brylcreem product was a pomade introduced in England in 1928. When it first appeared in a television advertisement it was touted with a jingle that started out:

Bryl-creem, a little dab’ll do ya,
Use more, only if you dare,
But watch out,
The gals will all pursue ya,–
They’ll love to put their fingers through your hair.

85. Surviving spouse’s irritation? WIDOW’S PIQUE (sounds like “widow’s peak”)
Our term “pique” meaning a “fit of ill feeling” is a French word meaning a “prick, sting, irritation”.

A widow’s peak is a distinct point in the hairline at the center of the forehead. The old belief was that the presence of such a feature in a woman was an omen of early widowhood.

87. Gal follower? PAL
A “gal pal” is a female friend.

88. __ curls BICEP
The biceps muscle is made up of two bundles of muscle, both of which terminate at the same point near the elbow. The heads of the bundles terminate at different points on the scapula or shoulder blade. “Biceps” is Latin for “two-headed”.

95. Queen of Kings SHEBA
The Queen of Sheba turns up in the Books of Kings in the Hebrew Bible.

Sheba is referenced in the Bible several times. The “Queen of Sheba” is mentioned as someone who traveled to Jerusalem to behold the fame of King Solomon. No one knows for sure where the kingdom of Sheba was located, although there is evidence that it was actually the ancient Semitic civilization of Saba. The Sabeans lived in what today is Yemen, on the Arabian Peninsula.

102. Cristiano Ronaldo’s longtime jersey number SEVEN
Cristiano Ronaldo is a professional soccer player from Portugal who is often referred to as the finest player in the world. Ronaldo spent five years playing in the UK with Manchester United, and has played in Spain with Real Madrid since 2009.

104. Olympic event involving runners LUGE
A luge is a small sled used by one or two people, on which one lies face up and feet first. The luge can be compared to the skeleton, a sled for only one person and on which the rider lies face down and goes down the hill head-first.

108. Swing and others ERAS
The swing era is also referred to as the big band era, and ran from 1935 to 1946.

109. City whose name differs by one letter from a nearby volcano ENNA
The city of Enna sits very high up in the hills of Sicily, overlooking the whole island below. Enna is the capital of the province that bears its name, which is the highest province in the whole of Italy.

110. Micronite filter cigarettes KENTS
“Readers Digest” published an exposé article in 1952 called “Cancer in the Carton”, creating a scare among cigarette smokers. In response, tobacco manufacturers introduced cigarettes with filters, creating the impression that this would mitigate the harmful effects of smoking. One of the new brands was Kent, which had a much-touted “Micronite filter”. However, in 1956 it was revealed that Kent cigarettes were made with carcinogenic blue asbestos in the filter, so there was a quick reformulation and a replacement with charcoal. The Kent brand is named after Herbert Kent, a former executive of the Lorillard Tobacco Company.

112. Hurston’s “Their Eyes __ Watching God” WERE
Zora Neale Hurston was an American author, most famous for her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God”. Like the author, the main character in the novel is an African American woman, a part played by Halle Berry in a television movie adaptation that first aired in 2005.

113. Pepper and Stubby: Abbr. SGTS
Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band was the alter-ego of the Beatles and was the title of a famous studio album released in 1967.

Sergeant Stubby was a bull terrier who was the official mascot of the US Army’s 102nd Infantry during WWI. Stubby served with the 26th (Yankee) Division in the trenches in Europe and really played an active role. Newspaper stories were run back in the US recounting tales of Stubby saving soldiers by warning of surprise attacks with mustard gas, and finding wounded soldiers. After returning home at the end of the war, Stubby lived the life of a celebrity. He met with Presidents Wilson, Coolidge and Harding. When he died in 1926, Stubby merited a half-page obituary in the “New York Times”.

Down
1. Allied voters BLOC
“Bloc” is the French word for “block”. We use the term in English for a voting alliance.

2. 2013-’14 Katy Perry hit ROAR
Katy Perry is an American singer who grew up listening to and singing gospel music, as she was the daughter of two Christian pastors. In fact, her first musical release was a gospel album in 2001. She has branched out since then. Her first successful single was “Ur so Gay”, followed by “I Kissed A Girl”. She was married (only for a year) to the British comedian Russell Brand, until 2012.

7. Vegan Greek salad omission FETA
Feta is a Greek cheese made from sheep’s milk, or a mixture of sheep’s and goat’s milk. The cheese is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months before it is eaten.

8. Slangy slacks TROU
“Trou” is short for “trousers”.

The term “slacks” was introduced in the early 1800s with the the meaning “loose trousers”. Those early slacks were part of a military uniform.

9. Cloche carriers HATBOXES
A cloche hat is a woman’s hat that is in the shape of a bell. The design was introduced in 1908 by Caroline Reboux, and was at its height of popularity in the twenties and early thirties. The hat’s name comes from “cloche”, the French word for “bell”.

11. Rodeo catcher RIATA
“Reata” is the Spanish word for “lasso”. We tend to use the spelling “riata” in English, but sometimes can opt for the original Spanish word.

15. Rapscallion ROGUE
We might call a little imp a rapscallion, an evolution from “rascallion”, which in turn comes from “rascal”.

16. “There you go __”: Reagan AGAIN
There was just one televised debate between the candidates in the 1980 US presidential election. At one point in the exchange, President Carter was attacking then-Governor Reagan’s position on Medicare. Governor Reagan responded with the line “There you go again”, and in the process seemed to gain the upper hand in the exchange. The phrase was so effective that President Reagan used it in future exchanges during his presidency.

17. Davis of “Dead Ringer” BETTE
I must confess that I have a problem watching movies starring Bette Davis. I think I must have seen her play one of her more sinister roles when I was a kid and it gave me nightmares or something.

“Dead Ringer” is a 1964 film in which Bette Davis plays twin sisters. Davis also played twin sisters in the 1946 film “A Stolen Life”. Despite rumors to the contrary, “Dead Ringer” is not a remake of “A Stolen Life”.

18. “… a __ flying fearless and fleet”: Longfellow STEED
“Paul Revere’s Ride” is an 1860 poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Here are some lines from the work:

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.

28. Small one on a runway, briefly STOL
STOL is an abbreviation standing for “short take-off and landing”

36. Winter Olympics host before Vancouver TURIN
The 2006 Winter Olympics were held in Turin, in the Italian Alps. The Turin games were one of the most expensive Winter Games ever staged, and sadly much of that cost was a huge overrun. The event ended up costing almost twice what had been budgeted.

37. “Mad Men” creator Matthew WEINER
Matthew Weiner worked as a writer and producer on the HBO hit drama “The Sopranos” for several seasons. When “The Sopranos” ended its run, Weiner sold his idea for “Mad Men” to AMC, and has served as the show’s executive producer and head writer ever since.

41. Olympian Midori ITO
Midori Ito is a Japanese figure skater. Ito was the first woman to land a triple/triple jump and a triple axel in competition. In fact she landed her first triple jump in training when she was only 8 years old …

42. Investment firm T. __ Price ROWE
T. Rowe Price is an investment company based in Baltimore that was founded in 1937 by Thomas Rowe Price, Jr.

43. Victory emblem LAUREL
In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

45. “The Streets of San Francisco” co-star MALDEN
Karl Malden was the stage name of Serbian American actor Mladen George Sekulovich. Malden was born in Chicago, the son of a Serbian father and Czech mother. Malden liked to slip his real family name of “Sekulovich” into the movies and TV shows in which he appeared. For example, playing Omar Bradley in “Patton”, he address a soldier with “Hand me that helmet, Sekulovich”. Playing a prison warden in “Birdman of Alcatraz” he includes “Sekulovich” in a rollcall of inmates. And then in the seventies cop show “The Streets of San Francisco”, Malden’s character Mike Stone employed a legman named Sekulovich.

46. Iris ring AREOLA
An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” comes from Latin, meaning “small open space”, and is a diminutive of the Latin word “area”, meaning “open space”.

53. “Ain’t Too Proud __”: Temptations hit TO BEG
The singing group known as the Temptations used to be known as the Elgins, and was formed in 1960 in Detroit. The group is still performing today, although only the second tenor, Otis Williams, was part of the original quintet. The Temptations were very much associated with their “sister group”, the Supremes.

54. Chatty flier MAGPIE
The bird known as a “jay” is sometimes called a “magpie”, although the terms are not completely interchangeable.

55. Pond protozoan AMOEBA
An ameba (or “amoeba” as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

56. Popular gundog SETTER
The setter breeds are hunting dogs. When the the dog encounters a prey, it freezes rather than gives chase. The distinctive crouch adopted is a called its “set”, giving the breed its name.

57. Fife player KNOTTS
Don Knotts was a comedic actor who played two major roles on television: Barney Fife on “The Andy Griffith Show” in the sixties, and Ralph Furley on “Three’s Company” in the seventies and eighties. Knotts appeared with child actor Ron Howard on “The Andy Griffith Show”, and in fact the two are sixth cousins.

59. That woman, in Brasilia ELA
Brasília is the capital of Brazil, and is located in the central-west of the country. A decision was made in 1956 to move the nation’s capital from Rio de Janeiro on the coast, to a more central location. So, Brasília was founded in 1960, and is now by far the fastest growing city in the country.

66. It precedes Oilers games O CANADA
Canada’s national anthem was commissioned in 1880 by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec, so the original words are in French. The first English translation was made in 1906. The current English lyrics have been revised a few times, but the French version remains the same as it did back in 1880.

The National Hockey League’s Edmonton Oilers are so called because they are located in Alberta, Canada … oil country.

68. CBS maritime drama NCIS
NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show “NCIS”, a spin-off drama from “JAG” in which the main “NCIS” characters were first introduced. The big star in “NCIS” is the actor Mark Harmon.

73. Post-FDR prez HST
The initial “S” in the middle of the name Harry S. Truman (HST) doesn’t stand for anything. The future-president was named “Harry” in honor of his mother’s brother Harrison “Harry” Young. The initial “S” was chosen in honor of young Harry’s two grandfathers: Anderson S-hipp Truman and S-olomon Young.

75. Texter’s afterthought intro BTW
By the way (BTW)

79. Hyperglycemia cause DIABETES
Diabetes is a group of disorders characterized by high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). Type 1 diabetes is caused by the body’s failure to make enough insulin, a hormone that promotes the absorption of glucose from the blood. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body’s cells fail to respond properly to insulin.

80. Apparatus co-invented by Cousteau AQUA-LUNG
Jacques-Yves Cousteau started off his career in the French Navy, aiming for a working life in aviation. Because of a car accident, Cousteau had to abandon his first career choice and instead went to sea. Famously, he co-invented the Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus (SCUBA), also called the aqua-lung.

81. Do diner work BUS
A busboy is a person who assists a waiter, mainly by clearing tables. The verb “to bus” arose in the early 1900s and is probably a reference to the wheeled cart that was used to carry dishes.

82. “… blind, but now I __” SEE
“Amazing Grace” is a very, very famous hymn, with words written by John Newton in 1779. The words have been set to a number of different melodies, but what we are used to hearing is that of a tune named “New Britain”.

Amazing grace! How sweet the sound
That saved a wretch like me.
I once was lost, but now am found,
Was blind but now I see.

86. Roman commoner PLEB
“Plebe” is a slang term for a freshman in the US military and naval academies. Plebe is probably short for “plebeian”, an adjective describing someone of the common class in Ancient Rome, one of the “plebs” (a singular collective noun). “Pleb” is a shortened version of plebeian, and is a term used outside of the military schools to mean “commoner”.

90. Type of refractive surgery LASIK
LASIK surgery uses a laser to reshape the cornea of the eye to improve vision. The LASIK acronym stands for “laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis”.

91. Sherlock’s adversary Adler IRENE
The character Irene Adler only appeared in one of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In that story, “A Scandal in Bohemia”, Holmes expresses remarkable admiration for Adler as a woman and as a foe. As a result, derivative works in the Holmes genre often feature Adler as something of a romantic interest for Sherlock.

92. Connoisseur MAVEN
I’ve always loved the word “maven”, another word for an expert. Maven comes into English from the Yiddish “meyvn” meaning someone who appreciates and is a connoisseur.

93. His final blog post closes with “I’ll see you at the movies” EBERT
The film critic Roger Ebert wrote his final blog post at RogerEbert.com on April 2, 2013. In that post, Ebert announced that he was slowing down and handing over the writing of most of the film reviews to a team that he picked himself. He was taking what he called a “leave of presence”, necessitated by his failing health as he continued to fight cancer. Sadly, Roger Ebert passed away just two days later.

94. Courageous woman SHERO
A “shero” is a woman who is regarded as a hero.

97. Pacific salmon COHO
The Coho salmon is dark blue with silver along the side of its body, but only during the phase of its life while it is in the ocean. When spawning and heading up into a freshwater river, the Coho has bright red sides.

100. Forgoing time LENT
In Latin, the Christian season that is now called Lent was termed “quadragesima” (meaning “fortieth”), a reference to the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before beginning his public ministry. When the church began its move in the Middle Ages towards using the vernacular, the term “Lent” was introduced. “Lent” comes from “lenz”, the German word for “spring”.

101. Those women, in Bolivia ESAS
Bolivia is a landlocked country in South America, bordered by Brazil, Paraguay, Chile, Peru and Argentina. The land now occupied by Bolivia was originally part of the Inca Empire. The country declared independence from Spain in 1809, which led to 16 years of war. When the Republic was finally named, “Bolivia” was chosen in honor of the Venezuelan-born revolutionary leader, Simón Bolívar.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Show no humility BRAG
5. Golf club feature LOFT
9. Refers (back), as to a prior subject HARKS
14. Apprehends GRABS
19. Old wisdom LORE
20. Transportation network app UBER
21. So long, in Avignon ADIEU
22. He had a way with words ROGET
23. Hops drier OAST
24. ’30s Lorre role MOTO
25. 1959 Broadway family name TRAPP
26. Multicolored marble AGATE
27. Testy lover? CROSS BEAU (sounds like “crossbow”)
29. Musical work expressing resentment? BITTER SUITE (sounds like “bittersweet”)
31. Musical symbols NOTES
32. Ikea offering SOFA
33. Came to fruition RIPENED
34. Key of Mozart’s 40th symphony G MINOR
36. ‘Mongst kin? TWIXT
38. Cops on base MPS
39. Napped fabric, without a doubt? EASILY SUEDE (sounds like “easily swayed”)
41. Camaro __-Z IROC
43. Southwestern hill LOMA
47. Quaker abolitionist Lucretia MOTT
48. Eagles’ 84-Acrosses AERIES
49. Bustle TO-DO
50. Beyond the horizon AFAR
51. Wedding followers TRAINS
52. Bridezilla’s fabric of choice? POWER TULLE (sounds like “power tool”)
54. Like Catwoman, e.g. MASKED
58. Less fusty NEWER
60. City once sought by Sir Walter Raleigh EL DORADO
61. Revival chorus AMENS
62. Primed for a fight RILED
64. Stimulating nut BETEL
65. Act without restraint GO TO TOWN
69. Worrywart, at times PACER
71. One-named Tejano singer SELENA
72. Measly computer storage? PETTY CACHE (sounds like “petty cash”)
74. Sprain application ICE BAG
76. Doubting words I BET
77. Latin 84-Across builder AVIS
78. Irregular SPOTTY
79. Brylcreem applications DABS
83. “I’m all __” EARS
84. Chick’s starter home NEST
85. Surviving spouse’s irritation? WIDOW’S PIQUE (sounds like “widow’s peak”)
87. Gal follower? PAL
88. __ curls BICEP
89. Sentence component CLAUSE
90. Citrus refreshment LIMEADE
94. More than satisfy SATE
95. Queen of Kings SHEBA
96. The latest in foal fashions? ARABIAN CHIC (sounds like “Arabian sheik”)
98. Beauty needing a lift? BLUE BELLE (sounds like “bluebell”)
102. Cristiano Ronaldo’s longtime jersey number SEVEN
103. Doth proceed GOETH
104. Olympic event involving runners LUGE
105. Calendar col. TUES
106. Still INERT
107. Common fairy tale number THREE
108. Swing and others ERAS
109. City whose name differs by one letter from a nearby volcano ENNA
110. Micronite filter cigarettes KENTS
111. Monastery sights HOODS
112. Hurston’s “Their Eyes __ Watching God” WERE
113. Pepper and Stubby: Abbr. SGTS

Down
1. Allied voters BLOC
2. 2013-’14 Katy Perry hit ROAR
3. One with a burning passion ARSONIST
4. Wastes no time GETS ON IT
5. Place for cutting boards LUMBERYARD
6. Orchestral winds OBOES
7. Vegan Greek salad omission FETA
8. Slangy slacks TROU
9. Cloche carriers HATBOXES
10. Out of control, at sea ADRIFT
11. Rodeo catcher RIATA
12. Wouldn’t surrender KEPT
13. Big one on a runway SUPERMODEL
14. Apprehends GRASPS
15. Rapscallion ROGUE
16. “There you go __”: Reagan AGAIN
17. Davis of “Dead Ringer” BETTE
18. “… a __ flying fearless and fleet”: Longfellow STEED
28. Small one on a runway, briefly STOL
30. Chute mechanism RIPCORD
32. Glancing blow SIDESWIPE
34. Little shiner GEM
35. “Women hold up half the sky” proclaimer MAO
36. Winter Olympics host before Vancouver TURIN
37. “Mad Men” creator Matthew WEINER
40. Diver’s milieu SEA
41. Olympian Midori ITO
42. Investment firm T. __ Price ROWE
43. Victory emblem LAUREL
44. Recently OF LATE
45. “The Streets of San Francisco” co-star MALDEN
46. Iris ring AREOLA
51. Ready to snap TESTY
52. Steep cliff PRECIPICE
53. “Ain’t Too Proud __”: Temptations hit TO BEG
54. Chatty flier MAGPIE
55. Pond protozoan AMOEBA
56. Popular gundog SETTER
57. Fife player KNOTTS
59. That woman, in Brasilia ELA
63. Solve, in a way DECODE
66. It precedes Oilers games O CANADA
67. Kindred spirits are often on the same one WAVELENGTH
68. CBS maritime drama NCIS
70. Pave anew RETOP
71. Obeys a shooter SAYS CHEESE
73. Post-FDR prez HST
75. Texter’s afterthought intro BTW
78. Alternates SWITCHES
79. Hyperglycemia cause DIABETES
80. Apparatus co-invented by Cousteau AQUA-LUNG
81. Do diner work BUS
82. “… blind, but now I __” SEE
86. Roman commoner PLEB
87. Oils, e.g. PAINTS
88. Tempted BAITED
90. Type of refractive surgery LASIK
91. Sherlock’s adversary Adler IRENE
92. Connoisseur MAVEN
93. His final blog post closes with “I’ll see you at the movies” EBERT
94. Courageous woman SHERO
95. Sweets-lover’s craving SUGAR
97. Pacific salmon COHO
98. Erupted BLEW
99. Tempt LURE
100. Forgoing time LENT
101. Those women, in Bolivia ESAS

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